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keel

keel

keel Sentence Examples

  • This keel is much reduced in the New.

    31
    18
  • Sweden, and the northern mountains of Finland a continuation of Kjolen (the Keel) which separate Sweden from Norway, while the other great line of upheaval of the old continent, which runs N.W.

    19
    8
  • in breadth, and have a blunt keel and flat edges.

    19
    10
  • The most novel feature, and one the importance of which most ornithologists of the present day are fully prepared to admit, is the separation of the class A y es into two great divisions, which from one of the most obvious distinctions they present were called by its author Carinatae' and Ratitae, 2 according as the sternum possesses a keel (crista in the phraseology of many anatomists) or not.

    6
    6
  • A diagnosis covering all the Ratitae (struthio, rhea, casuarius, dromaeus, apteryx and the allied fossils dinornis and aepyornis) would be as follows - (i) terrestrial birds without keel to the sternum, absolutely flightless; (ii) quadrate bone with a single proximal articulating knob; (iii) coracoid and scapula fused together and forming an open angle; (iv) normally without a pygostyle; (v) with an incisura ischiadica; (vi) rhamphotheca compound; (vii) without apteria or bare spaces in the plumage; (viii) with a complete copulatory organ, moved by skeletal muscles.

    6
    7
  • A diagnosis covering all the Ratitae (struthio, rhea, casuarius, dromaeus, apteryx and the allied fossils dinornis and aepyornis) would be as follows - (i) terrestrial birds without keel to the sternum, absolutely flightless; (ii) quadrate bone with a single proximal articulating knob; (iii) coracoid and scapula fused together and forming an open angle; (iv) normally without a pygostyle; (v) with an incisura ischiadica; (vi) rhamphotheca compound; (vii) without apteria or bare spaces in the plumage; (viii) with a complete copulatory organ, moved by skeletal muscles.

    6
    7
  • configuration of the palate, precoracoid, pelvis, intestinal convolutions, copulatory organ, &c. Loss of the keel is co-ordinated with the power of using the forelimbs for locomotion; although a " Ratite " character, it is not sufficient to turn a Notornis, Cnemiornis or Stringops, not even a Phororhacos into a member of the Ratitae.

    6
    8
  • - lv.) found vestiges of a keel in a young rhea, and apteria in the embryonic ostrich, and she concluded that they were descendants of birds which originally possessed the power of flight.

    5
    2
  • - lv.) found vestiges of a keel in a young rhea, and apteria in the embryonic ostrich, and she concluded that they were descendants of birds which originally possessed the power of flight.

    5
    2
  • The keel is pushed back to the distal third of the sternum, whilst the original anterior margin of the keel is correspondingly elongated,and the furcula fused with the rostral portion.

    5
    7
  • Although loss of flight (correlated with more or less reduction of the wings and the sternal keel, and often compensated by stronger hind limbs) has occurred, and is still taking place in various groups of birds, it is quite impossible that a new Ratite can still come into existence, because the necessary primitive substratum, whence arose the true Ratitae, is no longer available.

    4
    4
  • that when the compass is placed in the binnacle the line joining the pivot and the lubber's point be parallel to the keel of the vessel.

    3
    2
  • The keel has been lost, and is being lost, at various epochs and by various groups of birds.

    3
    3
  • Society, 18 74, p. 594) to be "lost," whereas the clavicles, which in most birds unite to form that bone, are present, though they do not meet, while in like manner the bird has been declared (op. cit., 1867, p. 624, note) to furnish among the Carinatae " the only apparent exception to the presence of a keel" to the sternum.

    3
    3
  • Its leaves are five or six in number, are about a foot in length and an inch in breadth, and have a blunt keel and flat edges.

    3
    3
  • In conformity with these reductions the breastbone of the moas is devoid of any coracoidal facets; there is no trace of a keel, and the number of sternal ribs is reduced to three or even two pairs.

    2
    2
  • In Broom there is an explosive machanism; the pressure of the insect visitor on the keel of the corolla causes a sudden release of the stamens and the scattering of a cloud of pollen over its body.

    2
    2
  • Two days after this they sighted land to the right hand, and came to a cape, where they found the keel of a ship - perhaps a relic of some earlier, possibly Scandinavian explorer - and which they called therefore Kialames (Keelness; Cape Breton, or some adjacent point?); the long bleak sandy shores of this coast they called the Wonderstrands (on the east coast of Cape Breton Island?).

    2
    2
  • When Vancouver visited the islands in 1792, he left sheep and neat cattle, 3 protected by a ten years' taboo, and laid down the keel of a European ship for Kamehameha.

    2
    2
  • The same effect is well shown by the linguiform isotherms. In January, for example, the isotherm of 14°, after skirting the north coast of the Scandinavian peninsula, turns southward along the Keel, crossing the upper part of the district of the great northern lakes.

    2
    2
  • In conformity with these reductions the breastbone of the moas is devoid of any coracoidal facets; there is no trace of a keel, and the number of sternal ribs is reduced to three or even two pairs.

    2
    2
  • The keel, or carina sterni, is formed as a direct cartilaginous outgrowth of the body of the sternum, ossifying from a special centre.

    2
    3
  • The separation of the Ratitae from the other birds, and their seemingly fundamental differences, notably the absence of the keel and of the power of flight, induced certain authors to go so far as to derive the Ratitae from the Dinosaurian reptiles, whilst Archaeopteryx (q.v.) and the Carinatae were supposed to have sprung from some Pterosaurian or similar reptilian stock.

    2
    3
  • The scales are sometimes rounded behind, but generally rhombic in shape and more or less elongate; they may be quite smooth or provided with a longitudinal ridge or keel in the middle line.

    2
    3
  • Keel, Belmullet and Ballycastle are the headquarters of sea and coast fishing districts, and Ballina of a salmon-fishing district, and these fisheries are of some value to the poor inhabitants.

    2
    3
  • It is absent in the Ratitae, which from this feature have received their name, but considerable traces of a cartilaginous keel occur in the embryo of the ostrich, showing undeniably that the absence of a keel in the recent bird is not a primitive, fundamental feature.

    2
    4
  • Often it reaches the keel of the sternum, with subsequent syndesmosis or even synostosis, e.g.

    2
    5
  • in the cliffs of Minaun, near the village of Keel on the south.

    2
    6
  • It is the heaviest lifting fin keel in the world.

    1
    0
  • Previously to 793 there lay between Jutland and England a sea which no keel had traversed within the memory of man.

    1
    1
  • The large canoes in which they formerly made long voyages are no longer built, but various kinds of smaller canoes are made, from the commonest, which is simply a hollowed-out tree cut into form, to the finely shaped one built upon a keel, the joints of the various pieces being nicely fitted, and the whole stitched together with cord made from the husk of coconuts.

    1
    1
  • long, with a strong crista lateralis, which indicates a strongly developed great pectoral muscle and hence, by inference, the presence of a keel to the sternum.

    1
    1
  • The outer glumes are acute and glabrous, the flowering glumes lance-shaped, with a comb-like keel at the back, and the outer or lower one prolonged at the apex into a very long bristly awn.

    1
    1
  • - Flower of Pea (Pisum sativum), showing a papilionaceous corolla, with one petal superior (st) called the standard (vexillum), two inferior (car) called the keel (carina), and two lateral (a) called wings (alae).

    1
    1
  • 40), in which there are five petals: - one superior (posterior), st, placed next to the axis, usually larger than the rest, called the vexillum or standard; two lateral, a, the alae or wings; two inferior (anterior), partially or completely covered by the alae, and often united slightly by their lower margins, so as to form a single keel-like piece, car, called carin g, or keel, which embraces the essential organs.

    1
    1
  • This arises mostly from the angle formed by the keel with the body of the sternum, passes by a strong tendon through the foramen triosseum, and is inserted upon the upper tubercle of the humeral crest, which it rotates and abducts.

    1
    2
  • But it was now made to appear that the struthious birds in this respect resembled, not only the duck, but a great many other groups - waders, birds-of-prey, pigeons, passerines and perhaps all birds not gallinaceous - so that, according to Cuvier's view, the five points of ossification observed in the Gallinae, instead of exhibiting the normal process, exhibited one quite exceptional, and that in all other birds, so far as he had been enabled to investigate the matter, ossification of the sternum began at two points only, situated near the anterior upper margin of the side of the sternum, and gradually crept towards the keel, into which it presently extended; and, though he allowed the appearance of detached portions of calcareous matter at the base of the still cartilaginous keel in ducks at a certain age, he seemed to consider this an individual peculiarity.

    1
    2
  • The fowl possesses all five ossifications at birth, and for a long while the middle piece forming the keel is by far the largest.

    1
    2
  • Some of the usual characters employed for systematic purposes, for the making of convenient keys, are the following: The number of rows of scales across the body and in a longitudinal direction; shape and structure of scales, whether smooth or with a longitudinal keel; arrangement of the shields on the head; shape of the contracted pupil.

    1
    2
  • The keel, however, is undoubtedly there, as remarked by Blanchard (Ann.

    1
    2
  • At the head-waters of the Tornea, Finland penetrates as a narrow strip into the heart of the highlands of Kjolen (the Keel), where the Haldefjall (Lappish, Halditjokko) reaches 4115 ft.

    1
    2
  • The backbone of the Scandinavian peninsula is a range, or series of masses, of mountains (in Swedish Kolen, 1 the keel) extending through nearly the whole length of the peninsula towards the western side.

    1
    2
  • The mountains of the Keel are not so high as wholly to destroy this effect over Sweden, and the maritime influence of the Baltic system has also to be considered.

    1
    7
  • Without sternal keel.

    0
    0
  • Division Odontolcae.-Marine, flightless, without sternal keel.

    0
    0
  • This is a very disappointing performance, since the author observes that, notwithstanding his new classification of birds is based on a study of the form of the sternal apparatus, yet, because that lies wholly within the body, he is compelled to have recourse to such outward characters as are afforded by the 1 From carin g, a keel.

    0
    0
  • the keel.

    0
    0
  • 3 Some unkind fate has hitherto hindered 2 Thus he cites the cases of Machetes pugnax and Scolopax rusticola among the " Limicoles," and Larus cataractes among the " Larides," as differing from their nearest allies by the possession of only one " notch " on either side of the keel.

    0
    0
  • The sternum has no keel, and ossifies from lateral and paired centres only; the axes of the scapula and cora.coid have the same general direction; certain of the cranial bones have characters very unlike those possessed by the next order - the vomer, for example, being broad posteriorly and generally intervening between the basisphenoidal rostrum and the palatals and pterygoids; the barbs of the feathers are disconnected; there is no syrinx or inferior larynx; and the diaphragm is better developed than in other birds.'

    0
    0
  • They also decrease the specific gravity, so that the grain is more readily carried by the wind, especially when, as in Briza, the glume has a large surface compared with the size of the grain, or when, as in H olcus, empty glumes also take part; in Canary grass (Phalaris) the large empty glumes bear a membranous wing on the keel.

    0
    0
  • These boats are either plain dug-outs, with or without outriggers, or regularly built by planks tightly laced and well caulked to an excavated keel.

    0
    0
  • 3, A part of the carina or keel.

    0
    0
  • 5, The remaining part of the keel.

    0
    0
  • The world was on an even keel now.

    0
    0
  • Here GeoSwath has the advantage as it is able to collect bathymetry below the keel of a vessel whilst it is alongside.

    0
    0
  • bilge keel yacht is more suited to this approach than a fin keeled yacht.

    0
    0
  • bilge keel version of the Senior was produced for that very reason.

    0
    0
  • carbon fiber reinforcement on gunwales and keel.

    0
    0
  • The Ferriby boats may be considered to be extended dugouts with the dugout base flattened out to a broad keel board.

    0
    0
  • fin keel in the world.

    0
    0
  • garboard (strake)of strakes on either side of the keel, are called garboard strakes.

    0
    0
  • My deepened keel Eventide, 4 " extra, draws 1 m. I would go for roller reefing genoa every time.

    0
    0
  • Surveyor says keel has been made deeper, weather helm problems!

    0
    0
  • The JST's, Patron, HRH The Duke of York laid the keel in June 1996.

    0
    0
  • Just to get back on an even keel, you know.

    0
    0
  • The main keel was different too, a deeper, heavier keel was used on the bilge keeler.

    0
    0
  • For Med cruising the large diesel is a bonus but the long keel does make handling under power in small harbors a bit nerve-wracking.

    0
    0
  • keel plank.

    0
    0
  • keel bolts.

    0
    0
  • keel boats try here.

    0
    0
  • keel plate was laid at Chatham on December 1st 1900 by Mrs Atkinson.

    0
    0
  • keel box.

    0
    0
  • keel men of the Tyne very concerned with the Welfare of their fellow workers thus they built a hospital in Newcastle.

    0
    0
  • keel over just with two draws.

    0
    0
  • On 10 December 1798, the ship's keel was laid.

    0
    0
  • keel of the boat to which one of 4 aluminum fins can be fitted.

    0
    0
  • keel of the ship.

    0
    0
  • I could use the lead to make half round bars which could be fasted to the cast iron keel.

    0
    0
  • Most models also have many accessories available from teak decks to camper tops, steel keel guards, tables and trim tabs.

    0
    0
  • limber holes on either side of the keel.

    0
    0
  • The rudder pintle is mounted on a bronze bracket which extends 6in (152mm) along the keel to give extra strength.

    0
    0
  • Figure 2 A corroded rudder bearing The potential problem area is the lower bearing, above the keel plank.

    0
    0
  • protrudevessels can range from substantially intact relatively modern craft, to only the keel and ribs just protruding from the mud.

    0
    0
  • With her fin keel, wheel steering and sloop rig she is an easy boat to sail.

    0
    0
  • The Elan 40 benefits from the 'Performance Pack ' with a taller mast, rod rigging and a deeper fin keel.

    0
    0
  • The rear keel rollers are mounted directly onto the trailer's rear cross member.

    0
    0
  • About 60m behind the keel at the stern end, the ship is completely severed in half.

    0
    0
  • The bottom row of strakes on either side of the keel, are called garboard strakes on either side of the keel, are called garboard strakes.

    0
    0
  • The bottom row of strakes on either side of the keel, are called garboard strakes.

    0
    0
  • A brown super soft teddy with a hand tied bow - made by keel toys.

    0
    0
  • waterline projection at the stern of the Thera ships is not a projecting keel or ram what is it?

    0
    0
  • This consists of passing a sail, attached to cords, and charged with oakum, wool, and other materials, under the vessel's keel, in such a manner that the suction of the leak may draw the canvas into the aperture, and thus partially stop the vent.

    0
    0
  • The keel, or carina sterni, is formed as a direct cartilaginous outgrowth of the body of the sternum, ossifying from a special centre.

    0
    0
  • This keel is much reduced in the New.

    0
    0
  • It is absent in the Ratitae, which from this feature have received their name, but considerable traces of a cartilaginous keel occur in the embryo of the ostrich, showing undeniably that the absence of a keel in the recent bird is not a primitive, fundamental feature.

    0
    0
  • The keel has been lost, and is being lost, at various epochs and by various groups of birds.

    0
    0
  • Often it reaches the keel of the sternum, with subsequent syndesmosis or even synostosis, e.g.

    0
    0
  • This arises mostly from the angle formed by the keel with the body of the sternum, passes by a strong tendon through the foramen triosseum, and is inserted upon the upper tubercle of the humeral crest, which it rotates and abducts.

    0
    0
  • The keel is pushed back to the distal third of the sternum, whilst the original anterior margin of the keel is correspondingly elongated,and the furcula fused with the rostral portion.

    0
    0
  • Without sternal keel.

    0
    0
  • Division Odontolcae.-Marine, flightless, without sternal keel.

    0
    0
  • configuration of the palate, precoracoid, pelvis, intestinal convolutions, copulatory organ, &c. Loss of the keel is co-ordinated with the power of using the forelimbs for locomotion; although a " Ratite " character, it is not sufficient to turn a Notornis, Cnemiornis or Stringops, not even a Phororhacos into a member of the Ratitae.

    0
    0
  • Sweden, and the northern mountains of Finland a continuation of Kjolen (the Keel) which separate Sweden from Norway, while the other great line of upheaval of the old continent, which runs N.W.

    0
    0
  • In the following year .another set of hints - of a kind so different that probably no one then living would have thought it possible that they should ever be brought in correlation with those of Nitzsch - are contained in a memoir on Fishes contributed to the tenth volume of the Annales du Museum d'histoire naturelle of Paris by Etienne Geoffroy St-Hilaire in 1807.1 Here we have it stated as a general truth (p. too) that young birds have the ' sternum formed of five separate pieces - one in the middle, being its keel, and two " annexes " on each side to which the ribs are .articulated - all, however, finally uniting to form the single " breast-bone."

    0
    0
  • The most novel feature, and one the importance of which most ornithologists of the present day are fully prepared to admit, is the separation of the class A y es into two great divisions, which from one of the most obvious distinctions they present were called by its author Carinatae' and Ratitae, 2 according as the sternum possesses a keel (crista in the phraseology of many anatomists) or not.

    0
    0
  • This is a very disappointing performance, since the author observes that, notwithstanding his new classification of birds is based on a study of the form of the sternal apparatus, yet, because that lies wholly within the body, he is compelled to have recourse to such outward characters as are afforded by the 1 From carin g, a keel.

    0
    0
  • But it was now made to appear that the struthious birds in this respect resembled, not only the duck, but a great many other groups - waders, birds-of-prey, pigeons, passerines and perhaps all birds not gallinaceous - so that, according to Cuvier's view, the five points of ossification observed in the Gallinae, instead of exhibiting the normal process, exhibited one quite exceptional, and that in all other birds, so far as he had been enabled to investigate the matter, ossification of the sternum began at two points only, situated near the anterior upper margin of the side of the sternum, and gradually crept towards the keel, into which it presently extended; and, though he allowed the appearance of detached portions of calcareous matter at the base of the still cartilaginous keel in ducks at a certain age, he seemed to consider this an individual peculiarity.

    0
    0
  • The fowl possesses all five ossifications at birth, and for a long while the middle piece forming the keel is by far the largest.

    0
    0
  • the keel.

    0
    0
  • 3 Some unkind fate has hitherto hindered 2 Thus he cites the cases of Machetes pugnax and Scolopax rusticola among the " Limicoles," and Larus cataractes among the " Larides," as differing from their nearest allies by the possession of only one " notch " on either side of the keel.

    0
    0
  • The sternum has no keel, and ossifies from lateral and paired centres only; the axes of the scapula and cora.coid have the same general direction; certain of the cranial bones have characters very unlike those possessed by the next order - the vomer, for example, being broad posteriorly and generally intervening between the basisphenoidal rostrum and the palatals and pterygoids; the barbs of the feathers are disconnected; there is no syrinx or inferior larynx; and the diaphragm is better developed than in other birds.'

    0
    0
  • The separation of the Ratitae from the other birds, and their seemingly fundamental differences, notably the absence of the keel and of the power of flight, induced certain authors to go so far as to derive the Ratitae from the Dinosaurian reptiles, whilst Archaeopteryx (q.v.) and the Carinatae were supposed to have sprung from some Pterosaurian or similar reptilian stock.

    0
    0
  • Although loss of flight (correlated with more or less reduction of the wings and the sternal keel, and often compensated by stronger hind limbs) has occurred, and is still taking place in various groups of birds, it is quite impossible that a new Ratite can still come into existence, because the necessary primitive substratum, whence arose the true Ratitae, is no longer available.

    0
    0
  • in the cliffs of Minaun, near the village of Keel on the south.

    0
    0
  • in breadth, and have a blunt keel and flat edges.

    0
    0
  • The scales are sometimes rounded behind, but generally rhombic in shape and more or less elongate; they may be quite smooth or provided with a longitudinal ridge or keel in the middle line.

    0
    0
  • Some of the usual characters employed for systematic purposes, for the making of convenient keys, are the following: The number of rows of scales across the body and in a longitudinal direction; shape and structure of scales, whether smooth or with a longitudinal keel; arrangement of the shields on the head; shape of the contracted pupil.

    0
    0
  • In Broom there is an explosive machanism; the pressure of the insect visitor on the keel of the corolla causes a sudden release of the stamens and the scattering of a cloud of pollen over its body.

    0
    0
  • Two days after this they sighted land to the right hand, and came to a cape, where they found the keel of a ship - perhaps a relic of some earlier, possibly Scandinavian explorer - and which they called therefore Kialames (Keelness; Cape Breton, or some adjacent point?); the long bleak sandy shores of this coast they called the Wonderstrands (on the east coast of Cape Breton Island?).

    0
    0
  • Keel, Belmullet and Ballycastle are the headquarters of sea and coast fishing districts, and Ballina of a salmon-fishing district, and these fisheries are of some value to the poor inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • When Vancouver visited the islands in 1792, he left sheep and neat cattle, 3 protected by a ten years' taboo, and laid down the keel of a European ship for Kamehameha.

    0
    0
  • Society, 18 74, p. 594) to be "lost," whereas the clavicles, which in most birds unite to form that bone, are present, though they do not meet, while in like manner the bird has been declared (op. cit., 1867, p. 624, note) to furnish among the Carinatae " the only apparent exception to the presence of a keel" to the sternum.

    0
    0
  • The keel, however, is undoubtedly there, as remarked by Blanchard (Ann.

    0
    0
  • that when the compass is placed in the binnacle the line joining the pivot and the lubber's point be parallel to the keel of the vessel.

    0
    0
  • Previously to 793 there lay between Jutland and England a sea which no keel had traversed within the memory of man.

    0
    0
  • The large canoes in which they formerly made long voyages are no longer built, but various kinds of smaller canoes are made, from the commonest, which is simply a hollowed-out tree cut into form, to the finely shaped one built upon a keel, the joints of the various pieces being nicely fitted, and the whole stitched together with cord made from the husk of coconuts.

    0
    0
  • long, with a strong crista lateralis, which indicates a strongly developed great pectoral muscle and hence, by inference, the presence of a keel to the sternum.

    0
    0
  • Its leaves are five or six in number, are about a foot in length and an inch in breadth, and have a blunt keel and flat edges.

    0
    0
  • At the head-waters of the Tornea, Finland penetrates as a narrow strip into the heart of the highlands of Kjolen (the Keel), where the Haldefjall (Lappish, Halditjokko) reaches 4115 ft.

    0
    0
  • The backbone of the Scandinavian peninsula is a range, or series of masses, of mountains (in Swedish Kolen, 1 the keel) extending through nearly the whole length of the peninsula towards the western side.

    0
    0
  • The mountains of the Keel are not so high as wholly to destroy this effect over Sweden, and the maritime influence of the Baltic system has also to be considered.

    0
    0
  • The same effect is well shown by the linguiform isotherms. In January, for example, the isotherm of 14°, after skirting the north coast of the Scandinavian peninsula, turns southward along the Keel, crossing the upper part of the district of the great northern lakes.

    0
    0
  • The genus Struthio forms the type of the group of Ratite birds, characterized chiefly by large size, breast-bone without a keel, strong running legs, rudimentary wings and simple feathers (see Bird).

    0
    0
  • They also decrease the specific gravity, so that the grain is more readily carried by the wind, especially when, as in Briza, the glume has a large surface compared with the size of the grain, or when, as in H olcus, empty glumes also take part; in Canary grass (Phalaris) the large empty glumes bear a membranous wing on the keel.

    0
    0
  • The latter is a thin flat scale bearing a median ridge or keel (e.g.

    0
    0
  • The outer glumes are acute and glabrous, the flowering glumes lance-shaped, with a comb-like keel at the back, and the outer or lower one prolonged at the apex into a very long bristly awn.

    0
    0
  • These boats are either plain dug-outs, with or without outriggers, or regularly built by planks tightly laced and well caulked to an excavated keel.

    0
    0
  • - Flower of Pea (Pisum sativum), showing a papilionaceous corolla, with one petal superior (st) called the standard (vexillum), two inferior (car) called the keel (carina), and two lateral (a) called wings (alae).

    0
    0
  • 3, A part of the carina or keel.

    0
    0
  • 5, The remaining part of the keel.

    0
    0
  • 40), in which there are five petals: - one superior (posterior), st, placed next to the axis, usually larger than the rest, called the vexillum or standard; two lateral, a, the alae or wings; two inferior (anterior), partially or completely covered by the alae, and often united slightly by their lower margins, so as to form a single keel-like piece, car, called carin g, or keel, which embraces the essential organs.

    0
    0
  • With her fin keel, wheel steering and sloop rig she is an easy boat to sail.

    0
    0
  • The Elan 40 benefits from the 'Performance Pack ' with a taller mast, rod rigging and a deeper fin keel.

    0
    0
  • The rear keel rollers are mounted directly onto the trailer 's rear cross member.

    0
    0
  • About 60m behind the keel at the stern end, the ship is completely severed in half.

    0
    0
  • My last view of Royal Oak was of her keel, silhouetted against the dark skyline.

    0
    0
  • A brown super soft teddy with a hand tied bow - made by keel toys.

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  • If the waterline projection at the stern of the Thera ships is not a projecting keel or ram what is it?

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  • A boat with a keel that sits low in the water can smoothly sail through some bodies of water but will quickly run aground in others.

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  • Of course, it's just a theory, but if you want to put your cat on an even keel, consider having her spayed.

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  • All of this activity adds up to a lot of mental stimulation for our feline friends- something every cat needs to remain on an even keel.

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  • The falls are deep violet-purple, with a beardless bright yellow keel, from which are purplish branchings, whilst the standards are pale self-lilac with creamy anthers.

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  • In this case, it is nice to see where you're at in the song in case you're ready to keel over.

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  • In these situations, the body needs a sudden jolt of sugar to get back on the right keel, meaning the sugar poses no danger, hence no insulin response and no accompanying crash an hour later.

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  • A high fiber snack will take longer to digest and keep your blood sugar levels on an even keel to prevent overeating later.

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  • It is pronounced: "Esk keel ee ah un cahmiseraht duh police pray de eecee?"

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