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keble

keble

keble Sentence Examples

  • Newman's secession in 1845 placed Manning in a position of greater responsibility, as one of the High Church leaders, along with Pusey and Keble and Marriott; but it was with Gladstone and James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) that he was at this time most closely associated.

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  • With Dean Church he may be said to have restored the waning influence of the Tractarian school, and he succeeded in popularizing the opinions which, in the hands of Pusey and Keble, had appealed to thinkers and scholars.

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  • To the last he maintained the narrow standpoint of Pusey and Keble, in defiance of all the developments of modern thought and modern scholarship; and his latter years were embittered by the consciousness that the younger generation of the disciples of his school were beginning to make friends of the Mammon of scientific unrighteousness.

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  • In 1835 he obtained a scholarship at University College; and in 1836 he gained the Newdigate prize for a poem on "The Knights of St John," which elicited special praise from Keble.

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  • Wordsworth's tomb, and also that of Coleridge, are in the churchyard of the ancient church of St Oswald, which contains a memorial to Wordsworth with an inscription by John Keble.

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  • These volumes revealed the author as the most gifted of the immediate disciples of Wordsworth, with a warmer colouring and more pronounced ecclesiastical sympathies than the master, and strong affinities to Tennyson, Keble and Monckton Milnes.

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  • Meanwhile his interests were not wholly confined to law: for some time (1840-1843) he wrote for The Times and the British Critic; he made a plunge into patristic learning, from which he soon recoiled; he was much interested in the controversies which distracted the Church on the subject of Tract 90; in the treatment of the Episcopal Church in Canada by the Canadian government and the Colonial Office; in the establishment by the crown, in conjunction with the king of Prussia, of the Jerusalem bishopric; and in the contest for the professorship of poetry at Oxford on Keble's retirement.

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  • He was at Oxford during the early years of the movement known as Puseyism, and was powerfully influenced by association with Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • Keble wrote in his defence, and was present at his trial at Edinburgh.

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  • 26 1858, and educated at Marlborough College and Keble College, Oxford.

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  • JOHN KEBLE (1792-1866), English poet and divine, the author of the Christian Year, was born on St Mark's Day (April 25), 1792, at Fairford, Gloucestershire.

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  • He was the second child of the Rev. John Keble and his wife Sarah Maule.

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  • Descended from a family which had attained some legal eminence in the time of the Commonwealth, John Keble, the father of the poet, was vicar of Coln St Aldwyn, but lived at Fairford, about 3 m.

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  • After his election to the Oriel fellowship Keble gained the University prizes, both for the English essay and also for the Latin essay.

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  • Oriel College was, at the time when Keble became a fellow, the centre of all the finest ability in Oxford.

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  • Copleston, Davison, Whately, were among the fellows who elected Keble; Arnold, Pusey, Newman, were soon after added to the society.

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  • In 1815 Keble was ordained deacon, and priest in 1816.

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  • Keble had purposed in his own mind to keep them beside him, correcting and improving them, as long as he lived, and to leave them to be published only "when he was fairly out of the way."

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  • Towards the close of 1831 Keble was elected to fill the chair of the poetry professorship in Oxford, as successor to his friend and admirer, Dean Milman.

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  • Cardinal Newman writes, "On Sunday July 14, 1833, Mr Keble preached the assize sermon in the University pulpit.

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  • Against the spirit which would treat the church as the mere creature of the state Keble had long chafed inwardly, and now he made his outward protest, asserting the claim of the church to a heavenly origin and a divine prerogative.

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  • About the same time, and partly stimulated by Keble's sermon, some leading spirits in Oxford and elsewhere began a concerted and systematic course of action to revive High Church principles and the ancient patristic theology, and by these means both to defend the church against the assaults of its enemies, and also to raise to a higher tone the standard of Christian life in England.

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  • If Keble is to be reckoned, as Newman would have it, as the primary author of the movement, it was from Pusey that it received one of its best known names, and in Newman that it soon found its genuine leader.

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  • To the tracts Keble made only four contributions: - No.

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  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.

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  • Keble came forward at the time, desirous to share the responsibility and the blame, if there was any; for he had seen the tract before it was published, and approved it.

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  • The same year in which burst this ecclesiastical storm saw the close of Keble's tenure of the professorship of poetry, and thenceforward he was seen hut rarely in Oxford.

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  • No other public event ever affected Keble so deeply as the secession of Newman to the Church of Rome in 1845.

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  • In all the ecclesiastical contests of the twenty years which followed 1845, Keble took a part, not loud or obtrusive, but firm and resolute, in maintaining those High Anglican principles with which his life had been identified.

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  • In the late autumn of the latter year, Keble left Hursley for the sake of his wife's health, and sought the milder climate of Bournemouth.

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  • Keble also published A Metrical Version of the Psalter (1839), Lyra Innocentium (1846), and a volume of poems was published posthumously.

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  • "The exactness of the descriptions of Palestine, which Keble had never visited, have been noted, and verified on the spot," by Dean Stanley.

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  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

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  • Keble's life was written by his life-long friend Mr Justice J.

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  • Works published in Keble's lifetime: Christian Year (1827); Psalter (1839); Praelectiones Academicae (1844); Lyra Innocentium (1846); Sermons Academical (1848); Argument against Repeal of Marriage Law, and Sequel (1857); Eucharistical Adoration (1857); Life of Bishop Wilson (1863); Sermons Occasional and Parochial (1867).

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  • In 1826 he was chosen fellow of Oriel and was ordained, among his friends and colleagues being Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • degree with first-class honours in both classics and mathematics in 1813, he next year obtained the chancellor's prize for a Latin essay, and shortly afterwards was elected to a fellowship in his college, Keble, Newman and Arnold being among his contemporaries.

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  • H., afterwards Cardinal, Newman was the chief, but who numbered among their leaders Hurrell Froude, the brother of the historian, and Keble, the author of the Christian Yearendeavoured to prove that the doctrines of the Church of England were identical with those of the primitive Catholic Church, and that every Catholic doctrine might be held by those who were within its pale.

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  • The vigorous practical life of the modern school of High Church Anglicanism, initiated by John Keble, W.

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  • Newman and John Keble.

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  • The year following Newman supported and secured the election of Hawkins as provost of Oriel in preference to Keble, a choice which he later defended or apologized for as having in effect produced the Oxford Movement with all its consequences.

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  • He was at home again in Oxford on the 9th of July, and on the 14th Keble preached at St Mary's an assize sermon on "National Apostasy," which Newman afterwards regarded as the inauguration of the Oxford Movement.

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  • In the words of Dean Church, it was "Keble who inspired, Froude who gave the impetus and Newman who took up the work"; but the first organization of it was due to H.

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  • Keble must have been concerned at the cost as reflected in the ensuing correspondence.

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  • In our very latest work, " Marge " has mapped the whole Keble triangle.

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  • As a hymn-writer he has had few equals in England; it can scarcely be said that even Keble, though possessed of much rarer poetic gifts, surpassed him in his own sphere (see Hymns).

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  • Newman's secession in 1845 placed Manning in a position of greater responsibility, as one of the High Church leaders, along with Pusey and Keble and Marriott; but it was with Gladstone and James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) that he was at this time most closely associated.

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  • With Dean Church he may be said to have restored the waning influence of the Tractarian school, and he succeeded in popularizing the opinions which, in the hands of Pusey and Keble, had appealed to thinkers and scholars.

    0
    0
  • To the last he maintained the narrow standpoint of Pusey and Keble, in defiance of all the developments of modern thought and modern scholarship; and his latter years were embittered by the consciousness that the younger generation of the disciples of his school were beginning to make friends of the Mammon of scientific unrighteousness.

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  • "The Church Porch," "The Agony," "Sin," "Sunday," "Virtue," "Man," "The British Church," "The Quip," "The Collar," "The Pulley," "The Flower," "Aaron" and "The Elixir" are among the best known of these poems. Herbert and Keble are the poets of Anglican theology.

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  • In 1835 he obtained a scholarship at University College; and in 1836 he gained the Newdigate prize for a poem on "The Knights of St John," which elicited special praise from Keble.

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  • Wordsworth's tomb, and also that of Coleridge, are in the churchyard of the ancient church of St Oswald, which contains a memorial to Wordsworth with an inscription by John Keble.

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  • These volumes revealed the author as the most gifted of the immediate disciples of Wordsworth, with a warmer colouring and more pronounced ecclesiastical sympathies than the master, and strong affinities to Tennyson, Keble and Monckton Milnes.

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    0
  • Meanwhile his interests were not wholly confined to law: for some time (1840-1843) he wrote for The Times and the British Critic; he made a plunge into patristic learning, from which he soon recoiled; he was much interested in the controversies which distracted the Church on the subject of Tract 90; in the treatment of the Episcopal Church in Canada by the Canadian government and the Colonial Office; in the establishment by the crown, in conjunction with the king of Prussia, of the Jerusalem bishopric; and in the contest for the professorship of poetry at Oxford on Keble's retirement.

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  • He was at Oxford during the early years of the movement known as Puseyism, and was powerfully influenced by association with Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • Keble wrote in his defence, and was present at his trial at Edinburgh.

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  • 26 1858, and educated at Marlborough College and Keble College, Oxford.

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  • JOHN KEBLE (1792-1866), English poet and divine, the author of the Christian Year, was born on St Mark's Day (April 25), 1792, at Fairford, Gloucestershire.

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  • He was the second child of the Rev. John Keble and his wife Sarah Maule.

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    0
  • Descended from a family which had attained some legal eminence in the time of the Commonwealth, John Keble, the father of the poet, was vicar of Coln St Aldwyn, but lived at Fairford, about 3 m.

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    0
  • After his election to the Oriel fellowship Keble gained the University prizes, both for the English essay and also for the Latin essay.

    0
    0
  • Oriel College was, at the time when Keble became a fellow, the centre of all the finest ability in Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Copleston, Davison, Whately, were among the fellows who elected Keble; Arnold, Pusey, Newman, were soon after added to the society.

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    0
  • In 1815 Keble was ordained deacon, and priest in 1816.

    0
    0
  • Keble had purposed in his own mind to keep them beside him, correcting and improving them, as long as he lived, and to leave them to be published only "when he was fairly out of the way."

    0
    0
  • Towards the close of 1831 Keble was elected to fill the chair of the poetry professorship in Oxford, as successor to his friend and admirer, Dean Milman.

    0
    0
  • Cardinal Newman writes, "On Sunday July 14, 1833, Mr Keble preached the assize sermon in the University pulpit.

    0
    0
  • Against the spirit which would treat the church as the mere creature of the state Keble had long chafed inwardly, and now he made his outward protest, asserting the claim of the church to a heavenly origin and a divine prerogative.

    0
    0
  • About the same time, and partly stimulated by Keble's sermon, some leading spirits in Oxford and elsewhere began a concerted and systematic course of action to revive High Church principles and the ancient patristic theology, and by these means both to defend the church against the assaults of its enemies, and also to raise to a higher tone the standard of Christian life in England.

    0
    0
  • If Keble is to be reckoned, as Newman would have it, as the primary author of the movement, it was from Pusey that it received one of its best known names, and in Newman that it soon found its genuine leader.

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    0
  • To the tracts Keble made only four contributions: - No.

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  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.

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    0
  • Keble came forward at the time, desirous to share the responsibility and the blame, if there was any; for he had seen the tract before it was published, and approved it.

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    0
  • The same year in which burst this ecclesiastical storm saw the close of Keble's tenure of the professorship of poetry, and thenceforward he was seen hut rarely in Oxford.

    0
    0
  • No other public event ever affected Keble so deeply as the secession of Newman to the Church of Rome in 1845.

    0
    0
  • In all the ecclesiastical contests of the twenty years which followed 1845, Keble took a part, not loud or obtrusive, but firm and resolute, in maintaining those High Anglican principles with which his life had been identified.

    0
    0
  • In the late autumn of the latter year, Keble left Hursley for the sake of his wife's health, and sought the milder climate of Bournemouth.

    0
    0
  • Keble also published A Metrical Version of the Psalter (1839), Lyra Innocentium (1846), and a volume of poems was published posthumously.

    0
    0
  • "The exactness of the descriptions of Palestine, which Keble had never visited, have been noted, and verified on the spot," by Dean Stanley.

    0
    0
  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

    0
    0
  • Keble's life was written by his life-long friend Mr Justice J.

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    0
  • Works published in Keble's lifetime: Christian Year (1827); Psalter (1839); Praelectiones Academicae (1844); Lyra Innocentium (1846); Sermons Academical (1848); Argument against Repeal of Marriage Law, and Sequel (1857); Eucharistical Adoration (1857); Life of Bishop Wilson (1863); Sermons Occasional and Parochial (1867).

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  • In 1826 he was chosen fellow of Oriel and was ordained, among his friends and colleagues being Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • degree with first-class honours in both classics and mathematics in 1813, he next year obtained the chancellor's prize for a Latin essay, and shortly afterwards was elected to a fellowship in his college, Keble, Newman and Arnold being among his contemporaries.

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    0
  • H., afterwards Cardinal, Newman was the chief, but who numbered among their leaders Hurrell Froude, the brother of the historian, and Keble, the author of the Christian Yearendeavoured to prove that the doctrines of the Church of England were identical with those of the primitive Catholic Church, and that every Catholic doctrine might be held by those who were within its pale.

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  • The vigorous practical life of the modern school of High Church Anglicanism, initiated by John Keble, W.

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  • Newman and John Keble.

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  • The year following Newman supported and secured the election of Hawkins as provost of Oriel in preference to Keble, a choice which he later defended or apologized for as having in effect produced the Oxford Movement with all its consequences.

    0
    0
  • He was at home again in Oxford on the 9th of July, and on the 14th Keble preached at St Mary's an assize sermon on "National Apostasy," which Newman afterwards regarded as the inauguration of the Oxford Movement.

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    0
  • In the words of Dean Church, it was "Keble who inspired, Froude who gave the impetus and Newman who took up the work"; but the first organization of it was due to H.

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  • Shortly thereafter, we met up with Tony Robinson, a Keble alumnus who did yeoman work in setting up the dinner.

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