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kano

kano

kano Sentence Examples

  • Besides the Shari, the only important stream entering Lake Chad is the Waube or Yo (otherwise the Komadugu Yobe), which rises near Kano, and flowing eastward enters the lake on its western side 40 m.

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  • KANO, one of the most important provinces of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • The sub-province of Katagum was incorporated with Kano in 1905, and is included within this area.

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  • Kano was one of the original seven Hausa states.

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  • But the annals of Kano distinctly record the introduction and describe the development of Mahommedanism at an early period of local history.

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  • The capital is the city of Kano, situated in 12° N.

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  • Other towns, like Zaria, may do as much trade, but Kano is pre-eminent as a manufacturing centre.

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  • Leather goods of all kinds are also manufactured, and from Kano come most of the "morocco leather" goods on the European markets.

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  • This last class trades with the other three and despatches caravans to Illorin and other places, where the Kano goods, the "potash" and other merchandise are exchanged for kolas and European goods.

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  • In Kano itself is a great market for livestock: camels, horses, oxen, asses and goats being on sale.

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  • Besides Hausa, who represent the indigenous population, there are large colonies of Kanuri (from Bornu) and Nupians in Kano.

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  • About a mile and a half east of Kano is Nassarawa, formerly the emir's suburban residence, but since 1902 the British Residency and barracks.

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  • The city of Kano appears on the map of the Arab geographer, Idrisi, A.D.

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  • 1145, and the hill of Dala is mentioned in the earliest records as the original site of Kano.

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  • Barth, however, concluded that the present town does not date earlier than the second half of the 1 6th century, and that before the rise of the Fula power (c. 1800) scarcely any great Arab merchant ever visited Kano.

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  • Kano submitted to the Fula without much resistance, and under them in the first half of the 19th century flourished greatly.

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  • Barth's descriptions of the wealth and importance of the city attracted great attention in Europe, and Kano was subsequently visited by several travellers, missionaries, and students of Hausa, but none was permitted to live permanently in the city.

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  • In the closing years of the century, Kano became the centre of resistance to British influence, and the emir, Alieu, was the most inveterate of Fula slave raiders.

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  • The emir is not allowed to maintain a standing army, and the city of Kano is the headquarters of the British garrison.

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  • The province of Kano is generally fertile.

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  • Kano district proper contains 170 walled towns and about 450 villages.

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  • It is not even certain whether he was of Chinese or Japanese birth; he is, however, believed by some authorities to have been the teacher of three great artistsShubun, Sesshtt and Kano Masanobuwho became the leaders of three schools: Shubun, that of the pure Chinese art of the Sung and Yuan dynasties (10th and 13th centuries); Sesshu, that of a modified school bearing his name; and Masanobu, of the great Kano school, which has reached to the present day.

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  • ShObun was an artist of little less power, but he followed more closely his exemplars, the Chinese masters of the 12th and 13th centuries; while Kano Masanob (1424-1520), trained in the love of Chinese art, departed little from the canons he had learned from Josetsu or Oguri SOtan.

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  • Ogata Kerin (1653-1716) is claimed by both the Tosa and Kano schools, but his work bears more resemblance to that of an erratic offshoot of the Kano line named Sotatsu than to the typical work of the academies.

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  • Later there came abundant aid to the cause of popular art, partly from pupils of the Kano aiid Tosa schools, but mainly from the artisan class.

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  • Throughout the whole of this period, embracing about a hundred years, there still continued to work, altogether apart from the men who were making the success of popular art, a large number of able painters of the Kano, Tosa and Chinese schools, who multiplied pictures that had every merit except that of originality.

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  • If the disciples of this school could shake off the Sesshu tradition of strong outlines and adopt the Kano Motonobu revelation of modelling by mass only, their work would stand on a high place.

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  • The founder of the first great line of tsuba and menuki artists was Got YjO (1440-1512), a friend of the painter Kano Motonobu, whose designs he adopted.

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  • He was the eldest son of an artist, named Ogato SOken, and studied the styles of the KanO and Tosa schools successively.

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  • The Ghadamsi merchants have been known for centuries as keen and adventurous traders, and their agents are to be found in the more important places of the western and central Sudan, such as Kano, Katsena, Kanem, Bornu, Timbuktu, as well as at Ghat and Tripoli.

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  • The caravans from Kano were also frequently pillaged by the Tuareg, so that the prosperity of the town declined.

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  • Later on, the opening of rapid means of transport from Kano and other cities to the Gulf of Guinea also affected Ghadames, which, however, maintains a considerable trade.

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  • Of these cities the most important is Kano, the great emporium of trade for the central Sudan, where Tuareg and Arab from the north meet merchants from the Niger, Lake Chad and the far southern regions.

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  • of Kano is Sokoto, on a tributary of the Niger of the same name.

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  • of Kano; Zaria (q.v.), pop.

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  • of Kano; Katsena (q.v.), 84 m.

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  • of Kano; Hadeija, near the N.

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  • railway from Baro on the Niger via Bida and Zaria to Kano - a distance of about 400 m.

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  • Good roads connect some of the great Hausa cities, and Kano and Kuka are starting-points for caravans across the Sahara to the Mediterranean.

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  • There are also old established caravan routes from Kano to Ashanti and neighbouring countries.

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  • There is telegraphic communication between Brass and Bonny and Europe by submarine cable, and land lines from Calabar to Lagos and from Lagos to Jebba, Lokoja, Zungeru, Kano, &c., a connexion being also effected with the telegraph system of French West Africa.

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  • Tin ore of excellent quality is found in the province of Bauchi, alkali salts are abundant in Kano province, iron ore and red and yellow ochres are found in Kontagora and other provinces, kaolin (china clay) and limestone in the west central regions.

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  • In Northern Nigeria up to the moment of the British occupation the foreign trade was chiefly in the hands of Tripoli Arabs whose caravans crossed the desert at great risk and expense, and carried to the markets of Kuka and Kano tea, sugar and other European goods, taking away the skins and feathers which constituted the principal articles of export to the Mediterranean coast.

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  • The centre of the cloth manufacture is Kano.

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  • If the Hausa history, which exists in written form, be correct, the manufacture of this cloth has been carried on in Kano since the 9th century.

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  • Kano and the district around it clothes half the population of the Sudan.

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  • The murderer fled northwards through Zaria to Kano, which was still an independent Mahommedan state.

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  • The emir of Zaria was found to be in treasonable correspondence with the emir of Kano.

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  • The important Mahommedan states of Sokoto, Gando, Kano and Katsena remained independent.

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  • Katsena was the centre of local learning, while Kano was at once the commercial and the military centre of power.

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  • Every attempt was made to settle the question at issue by conciliatory methods, but these having failed, a campaign against Kano and Sokoto was entered upon in January 1903.

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  • The capital of Kano, a walled and fortified town of great extent and formidable strength, fell to a British assault in February of 1903.

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  • Katsena and Gando followed the example set to them by Kano and Sokoto.

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  • For administrative purposes the territories were at first divided into seventeen provinces: Sokoto, Gando, Kano, Katsena, Bornu East, Bornu West, Zaria, Bauchi, Borgu, Kontagora, Nassarawa, Muri, Yola, Bassa, Kabba, Illorin, Nupe.

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  • Of these Sokoto and Gando, Kano and Katsena, Bornu East and Bornu West have been carried a step further in organization and now form three double provinces, each under the charge of a first-class resident.

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  • In August of that year the British government, on administrative, strategic and commercial grounds, came to a decision to build a railway which should place the important cities of Zaria and Kano in direct communication with the perennially navigable waters of the Lower Niger.

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  • At the same time the decision was taken to continue the Lagos railway till it effected a junction with the Kano line near Zungeru, the Niger being bridged at Jebba.

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  • Originally herdsmen in the western and central Sudan, they extended their sway east of the Niger, under the leadership of Othman Dan Fodio, during the early years of the 19th century, and having subdued the Hausa states, founded the empire of Sokoto with the vassal emirates of Kano, Gando, Nupe, Adamawa, &c.

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  • The emir fled, without fighting, to Kano.

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  • by the provinces of Kano, Katagum and Bornu; E.

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  • 8 6 word's OLOcPavros avaKropl ei 7 Kano 'ni' vas (Anth.

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  • The head waters of the Kaduna are not far from Kano.

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  • Below the mouth of the Kaduna, on the right bank of the Niger, is Baro, the starting-point of a railway to Kano.

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  • On the break up of the Songhoi empire the north-eastern part of Hausaland became more or less subject to Bornu, whose sultans in the 17th century claimed to rule over Katsena and Kano.

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  • In a few years the Fula had subdued most of the Hausa states, some, like Kano, yielding easily in order to preserve their trade, others, like Katsena, offering a stubborn resistance.

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  • Slave-raiding was practised on a scale which devastated and almost depopulated vast regions and greatly hampered the commercial activity of the large cities, of which Zaria and Kano were the most important.

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  • The northern states declined to fulfil the conditions of the treaties negotiated with the Niger Company or to submit to the abolition of the slave trade, and in 1902 Sokoto and Kano openly defied the British power.

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  • Kano was taken in February 1903, and Sokoto after some resistance made formal submission on the 22nd of March following.

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  • Like the emir of Kano the new emir of Sokoto worked most loyally with the British administration.

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  • The emir of Gando, treated on the same terms as the emirs of Kano and Sokoto, proved less loyal to his oath of allegiance and had to be deposed.

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  • Formal Dinner Our final night in Kano was recognized by a formal dinner, which seemed to be a major event in the town.

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  • Koizumi was to European judo what Kano was to world judo.

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  • The Kano region is the most agriculturally productive part of the country, with increased yields of sorghum, millet, cowpeas and groundnuts.

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  • Besides the Shari, the only important stream entering Lake Chad is the Waube or Yo (otherwise the Komadugu Yobe), which rises near Kano, and flowing eastward enters the lake on its western side 40 m.

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  • KANO, one of the most important provinces of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • It includes the ancient emirates of Kano, Katsena, Daura and Kazaure, and covers an area of about 31,000 sq.

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  • The sub-province of Katagum was incorporated with Kano in 1905, and is included within this area.

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  • Kano was one of the original seven Hausa states.

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  • But the annals of Kano distinctly record the introduction and describe the development of Mahommedanism at an early period of local history.

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  • The capital is the city of Kano, situated in 12° N.

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  • Other towns, like Zaria, may do as much trade, but Kano is pre-eminent as a manufacturing centre.

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  • Leather goods of all kinds are also manufactured, and from Kano come most of the "morocco leather" goods on the European markets.

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  • This last class trades with the other three and despatches caravans to Illorin and other places, where the Kano goods, the "potash" and other merchandise are exchanged for kolas and European goods.

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  • In Kano itself is a great market for livestock: camels, horses, oxen, asses and goats being on sale.

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  • Besides Hausa, who represent the indigenous population, there are large colonies of Kanuri (from Bornu) and Nupians in Kano.

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  • About a mile and a half east of Kano is Nassarawa, formerly the emir's suburban residence, but since 1902 the British Residency and barracks.

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  • The city of Kano appears on the map of the Arab geographer, Idrisi, A.D.

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  • 1145, and the hill of Dala is mentioned in the earliest records as the original site of Kano.

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  • Barth, however, concluded that the present town does not date earlier than the second half of the 1 6th century, and that before the rise of the Fula power (c. 1800) scarcely any great Arab merchant ever visited Kano.

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  • Kano submitted to the Fula without much resistance, and under them in the first half of the 19th century flourished greatly.

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  • Barth's descriptions of the wealth and importance of the city attracted great attention in Europe, and Kano was subsequently visited by several travellers, missionaries, and students of Hausa, but none was permitted to live permanently in the city.

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  • In the closing years of the century, Kano became the centre of resistance to British influence, and the emir, Alieu, was the most inveterate of Fula slave raiders.

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  • The emir is not allowed to maintain a standing army, and the city of Kano is the headquarters of the British garrison.

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  • The province of Kano is generally fertile.

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  • Kano district proper contains 170 walled towns and about 450 villages.

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  • It is not even certain whether he was of Chinese or Japanese birth; he is, however, believed by some authorities to have been the teacher of three great artistsShubun, Sesshtt and Kano Masanobuwho became the leaders of three schools: Shubun, that of the pure Chinese art of the Sung and Yuan dynasties (10th and 13th centuries); Sesshu, that of a modified school bearing his name; and Masanobu, of the great Kano school, which has reached to the present day.

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  • ShObun was an artist of little less power, but he followed more closely his exemplars, the Chinese masters of the 12th and 13th centuries; while Kano Masanob (1424-1520), trained in the love of Chinese art, departed little from the canons he had learned from Josetsu or Oguri SOtan.

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  • Kano Motonobu (1477-1559) was one of the greatest Japanese painters, an eclectic of genius, who excelled in every style and every branch of his art.

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  • Ogata Kerin (1653-1716) is claimed by both the Tosa and Kano schools, but his work bears more resemblance to that of an erratic offshoot of the Kano line named Sotatsu than to the typical work of the academies.

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  • Later there came abundant aid to the cause of popular art, partly from pupils of the Kano aiid Tosa schools, but mainly from the artisan class.

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  • Throughout the whole of this period, embracing about a hundred years, there still continued to work, altogether apart from the men who were making the success of popular art, a large number of able painters of the Kano, Tosa and Chinese schools, who multiplied pictures that had every merit except that of originality.

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  • If the disciples of this school could shake off the Sesshu tradition of strong outlines and adopt the Kano Motonobu revelation of modelling by mass only, their work would stand on a high place.

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  • The founder of the first great line of tsuba and menuki artists was Got YjO (1440-1512), a friend of the painter Kano Motonobu, whose designs he adopted.

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  • He was the eldest son of an artist, named Ogato SOken, and studied the styles of the KanO and Tosa schools successively.

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  • The Ghadamsi merchants have been known for centuries as keen and adventurous traders, and their agents are to be found in the more important places of the western and central Sudan, such as Kano, Katsena, Kanem, Bornu, Timbuktu, as well as at Ghat and Tripoli.

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  • The caravans from Kano were also frequently pillaged by the Tuareg, so that the prosperity of the town declined.

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  • Later on, the opening of rapid means of transport from Kano and other cities to the Gulf of Guinea also affected Ghadames, which, however, maintains a considerable trade.

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  • Of these cities the most important is Kano, the great emporium of trade for the central Sudan, where Tuareg and Arab from the north meet merchants from the Niger, Lake Chad and the far southern regions.

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  • of Kano is Sokoto, on a tributary of the Niger of the same name.

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  • of Kano; Zaria (q.v.), pop.

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  • of Kano; Katsena (q.v.), 84 m.

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  • of Kano; Hadeija, near the N.

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  • railway from Baro on the Niger via Bida and Zaria to Kano - a distance of about 400 m.

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  • Good roads connect some of the great Hausa cities, and Kano and Kuka are starting-points for caravans across the Sahara to the Mediterranean.

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  • There are also old established caravan routes from Kano to Ashanti and neighbouring countries.

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  • There is telegraphic communication between Brass and Bonny and Europe by submarine cable, and land lines from Calabar to Lagos and from Lagos to Jebba, Lokoja, Zungeru, Kano, &c., a connexion being also effected with the telegraph system of French West Africa.

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  • Tin ore of excellent quality is found in the province of Bauchi, alkali salts are abundant in Kano province, iron ore and red and yellow ochres are found in Kontagora and other provinces, kaolin (china clay) and limestone in the west central regions.

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  • In Northern Nigeria up to the moment of the British occupation the foreign trade was chiefly in the hands of Tripoli Arabs whose caravans crossed the desert at great risk and expense, and carried to the markets of Kuka and Kano tea, sugar and other European goods, taking away the skins and feathers which constituted the principal articles of export to the Mediterranean coast.

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  • The centre of the cloth manufacture is Kano.

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  • If the Hausa history, which exists in written form, be correct, the manufacture of this cloth has been carried on in Kano since the 9th century.

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  • Kano and the district around it clothes half the population of the Sudan.

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  • The murderer fled northwards through Zaria to Kano, which was still an independent Mahommedan state.

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  • The emir of Zaria was found to be in treasonable correspondence with the emir of Kano.

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  • The important Mahommedan states of Sokoto, Gando, Kano and Katsena remained independent.

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  • Katsena was the centre of local learning, while Kano was at once the commercial and the military centre of power.

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  • Every attempt was made to settle the question at issue by conciliatory methods, but these having failed, a campaign against Kano and Sokoto was entered upon in January 1903.

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  • The capital of Kano, a walled and fortified town of great extent and formidable strength, fell to a British assault in February of 1903.

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  • Katsena and Gando followed the example set to them by Kano and Sokoto.

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  • For administrative purposes the territories were at first divided into seventeen provinces: Sokoto, Gando, Kano, Katsena, Bornu East, Bornu West, Zaria, Bauchi, Borgu, Kontagora, Nassarawa, Muri, Yola, Bassa, Kabba, Illorin, Nupe.

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  • Of these Sokoto and Gando, Kano and Katsena, Bornu East and Bornu West have been carried a step further in organization and now form three double provinces, each under the charge of a first-class resident.

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  • In August of that year the British government, on administrative, strategic and commercial grounds, came to a decision to build a railway which should place the important cities of Zaria and Kano in direct communication with the perennially navigable waters of the Lower Niger.

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  • At the same time the decision was taken to continue the Lagos railway till it effected a junction with the Kano line near Zungeru, the Niger being bridged at Jebba.

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  • Originally herdsmen in the western and central Sudan, they extended their sway east of the Niger, under the leadership of Othman Dan Fodio, during the early years of the 19th century, and having subdued the Hausa states, founded the empire of Sokoto with the vassal emirates of Kano, Gando, Nupe, Adamawa, &c.

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  • The emir fled, without fighting, to Kano.

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  • by the provinces of Kano, Katagum and Bornu; E.

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  • 8 6 word's OLOcPavros avaKropl ei 7 Kano 'ni' vas (Anth.

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  • The head waters of the Kaduna are not far from Kano.

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  • Below the mouth of the Kaduna, on the right bank of the Niger, is Baro, the starting-point of a railway to Kano.

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  • It includes the sultanate of Sokoto and its dependent emirates of Kano, Bida, Zaria, &c., and the ancient sultanate of Bornu, which, with Adamawa, is partly within the German colony of Cameroon (see Nigeria and Cameroon).

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  • On the break up of the Songhoi empire the north-eastern part of Hausaland became more or less subject to Bornu, whose sultans in the 17th century claimed to rule over Katsena and Kano.

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  • In a few years the Fula had subdued most of the Hausa states, some, like Kano, yielding easily in order to preserve their trade, others, like Katsena, offering a stubborn resistance.

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  • Slave-raiding was practised on a scale which devastated and almost depopulated vast regions and greatly hampered the commercial activity of the large cities, of which Zaria and Kano were the most important.

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  • The northern states declined to fulfil the conditions of the treaties negotiated with the Niger Company or to submit to the abolition of the slave trade, and in 1902 Sokoto and Kano openly defied the British power.

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  • Kano was taken in February 1903, and Sokoto after some resistance made formal submission on the 22nd of March following.

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  • Like the emir of Kano the new emir of Sokoto worked most loyally with the British administration.

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  • The emir of Gando, treated on the same terms as the emirs of Kano and Sokoto, proved less loyal to his oath of allegiance and had to be deposed.

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  • A mercenary and a thief, Kano is the object of Sonya Blade's quest.

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  • A member of the Secret Forces unit and leader of the Outworld Investigation Agency, Lieutenant Sonya Blade is the mortal enemy of Kano (he killed her former partner and twin brother Daniel).

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