Jutland sentence example

jutland
  • In Europe there is good reason to suppose that it includes Shetland; but it is on the north-western coast of the Continent, from Jutland to the extreme north of Norway, that the greatest number are reared.
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  • His noblest achievement in this respect is the codification of the Danish laws known as the Jydske Lov (Jutland Code), which he lived to see completed a few days before his death at Vordingborg on the 28th of March 1241.
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  • During the ensuing interregnum he powerfully contributed, at the head of the nobles of Funen and Jutland, to the election of Christian III.
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  • These include plane-table sections (Maalebordsblade), 1209 sheets on a scale of 1:20,000, with contours at intervals of 5 to io ft., published since 1830; Atlasblade of Jutland and of De Danske Der, on a scale of I :40,000, the former in 131 sheets, since 1870, the latter, on the same scale, in 94 sheets, since 1890, and still in progress, and a general staff map on a scale of 1: ioo,000, in 68 sheets, since 1890.
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  • On the 1st of August 1808 1 They subsequently escaped from Jutland, on British vessels, and reached Santander in October 1808.
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  • The through railway traffic of Hamburg is practically confined to that proceeding northwards - to Kiel and Jutland - and for the accommodation of such trains the central (terminus) station at Altona is the chief gathering point.
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  • In 811 Charlemagne founded a church here, perhaps on the site of a Saxon place of sacrifice, and this became a great centre for the evangelization of the north of Europe, missionaries from Hamburg introducing Christianity into Jutland and the Danish islands and even into Sweden and Norway.
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  • Narrowly escaping assassination, at a banquet a few days later, at the hands of his rival, King Sweyn III., he succeeded only with the utmost difficulty in escaping to Jutland, but on the 23rd of October utterly routed Sweyn at the great battle of Grathe Heath, near Viborg, Sweyn perishing in his flight from the field.
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  • (1) Beowulf, king of the Geatas (Jutland), whose story in its present form was probably brought from the continent by the Angles.
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  • The Danish army at once dispersed and the duchy of Bremen was recovered by the Swedes, who in the early autumn swarmed over Jutland and firmly established themselves in the duchies.
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  • Two railways run north to Aalborg, continuing the main East Jutland line from the south, and an eastward branch serves Grenaa and Aebeltoft on the coast.
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  • (1340), who for nine years had held Jutland and Funen and dominated the rest of Denmark, first opened Valdemar's way to the throne, and on midsummer day 1340 he was elected king at a Landsting held at Viborg, after consenting to espouse Helveg, the sister of his most important confederate, Valdemar, duke of Schleswig.
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  • Neither the time nor the place of Valdemar's birth is known, but he could not have been more than twenty when he became the nominal king of Denmark, though, as a matter of fact, his territory was limited to the northernmost county of Jutland.
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  • By this time, too, the whole of Jutland (except the province of Ribe) had fallen to him, county by county, as their respective holders were paid off.
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  • Both Absalon and Valdemar narrowly escaped assassination at the hands of their treacherous host on this occasion, but at length escaped to Jutland, whither Sweyn followed them, but was defeated and slain at the battle of Grathe Heath.
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  • If the Teutoni really came from the same quarter as the Cimbri, it is possible that their name may have been preserved in that of the district called until recently Thyland or Thythsyssel in the extreme north-west of Jutland.
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  • Yet throughout the bronze age it is possible to trace a fairly well-defined group of antiquities covering the basin of the Elbe, Mecklenburg, Holstein, Jutland, southern Sweden and the islands of the Belt, and archaeologists have conjectured with much probability that these antiquities represent the early civilization of the Teutonic peoples.
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  • Indeed, by this time it was probably known to most of the Teutonic peoples, for several of the inscriptions found in Jutland and the islands of the Belt can hardly be of later date.
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  • It has a station on the railway route between Copenhagen and Jutland and Schleswig-Holstein via Korsor.
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  • He had at his disposal from 19,000 to 25,000 men, and at first gained some successes; but on the 27th of August 1626 he was utterly routed by Tilly at Lutter-am-Barenberge, and in the summer of 1627 both Tilly and Wallenstein, ravaging and burning, occupied the duchies and the whole peninsula of Jutland.
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  • In January 1630 the rupture became final, and Christina retired to her estates in Jutland.
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  • In May the Swedish Riksrad decided upon war; on the 12th of December the Swedish marshal Lennart Torstensson, advancing from Bohemia, crossed the northern frontier of Denmark; by the end of January 1644 the whole peninsula of Jutland was in his possession.
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  • Torstensson, too, was unable to cross from Jutland to Fiinen for want of a fleet, and the Dutch auxiliary fleet which came to his assistance was defeated between the islands of Sylt and Rdnno on the west coast of Schleswig by the Danish admirals.
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  • He was detained for twelve months in the island fortress of Kalb, on the east coast of Jutland, but contrived to escape to Lubeck in September 1519.
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  • No doubt the pre-eminence of the north, and especially of Denmark, at this period, was due to the amber trade, causing southern influence to penetrate up the basin of the Elbe to Jutland.
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  • About the same time the Roman fleet voyaged along the northern coast apparently as far as the north of Jutland, and received the nominal submission of several tribes in that region, including the Cimbri and the Charudes.
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  • The Saxons had been slowly reconquering the lost ground, and now Henry, advancing with his victorious army into Jutland, forced Gorm, the Danish king, to become his vassal and regained the land between the Eider and the Schlei.
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  • The Skagerrack bounds Jutland to the north and north-west.
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  • It is uniformly low, the highest elevation in the whole country, the Himmelbjerg near Aarhus in eastern Jutland, being little more than 500 ft.
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  • The landscape of the islands and the south-eastern part of Jutland is rich in beech-woods, corn-fields and meadows, and even the minute islets are green and fertile.
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  • In the western and northern districts of Jutland this condition gives place to a wide expanse of moorland, covered with heather, and ending towards the sea in low whitish-grey cliffs.
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  • The coasts are generally low and sandy; the whole western shore of Jutland is a succession of sand ridges and shallow lagoons, very dangerous to shipping.
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  • The coast is nowhere, however, very high, except at one or two points in Jutland, and at the eastern extremity of Moen, where limestone cliffs occur.
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  • Continental Denmark is confined wholly to Jutland, the geographical description of which is given under that heading.
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  • Fiinen, geologically a part of southern Jutland, has similar characteristics, a smiling landscape of fertile meadows, the typical beech-forests clothing the low hills and the presence of numerous erratic blocks, are the superficial signs of likeness.
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  • This boulder sand forms almost everywhere the highest hills, and besides, in the central part of Jutland, a wide expanse of heath and moorland apparently level, but really sloping gently towards the west.
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  • The upheaval of the country, a movement common to a large part of the Scandinavian peninsula, still continues, though slowly, north-east of a line drawn in a south-easterly direction from Nissumfjord on the west coast of Jutland, across the island of Fyen, a little south of the town of Nyborg.
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  • The islands have, upon the whole, a somewhat warmer climate than Jutland.
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  • It is highest on the west coast of Jutland;.
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  • No conifer grows in Denmark except under careful cultivation, which, however, is largely practised in Jutland.
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  • The larger quadrupeds are all extinct; even the red deer, formerly so abundant that in a single hunt in Jutland in 1593 no less than 1600 head of deer were killed, is now only to be met with in preserves.
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  • Jutland showed an average of only 109 inhabitants per square mile, whilst on the islands, which had a total population of 1,385,537, the average stood at 272.95, owing, on the one hand, to the fact that large tracts in the interior of Jutland are almost uninhabited, and on the other to the fact that the capital of the country, with its proportionately large population, is situated on the island of Zealand.
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  • It was stronger on the islands, where the rural population increased by 5.3% only in eleven years, whereas in Jutland the increase of the rural population between 1890 and 1901 amounted to 12.0%.
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  • The main lines in Jutland run (a) along the eastern side north from Fredericia by Horsens, Aarhus, Randers, Aalborg and HjOrring, to Frederikshavn, and (b) along the western side from Esbjerg by Skjerne and Vemb, and thence across the peninsula by Viborg to Langaa on the eastern line.
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  • Besides the numerous steam-ferries which connect island and island, and Jutland with the islands, and the Gjedser-Warnemiinde route, a favourite passenger line from Germany is that between Kiel and KorsOr, while most of the German Baltic ports have direct connexion with Copenhagen.
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  • Allusion has been made already to the efforts to plant the extensive heaths in Jutland with pine-trees.
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  • On the islands and in the more fertile part of Jutland the average is about 10 Td.
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  • Jutland was acquired by Dan, the eponymous ancestor of the Danes.
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  • In his time it is said that the land was divided into four kingdoms - Skaane, Zealand, Fyen and Jutland.
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  • The Danes, the southernmost branch of the Scandinavian family, referred to by Alfred (c. 890) as occupying Jutland, the islands and Scania, were, in 777, strong enough to defy the Frank empire by harbouring its fugitives.
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  • Previously to 793 there lay between Jutland and England a sea which no keel had traversed within the memory of man.
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  • Eastern Denmark was in the hands of one magnate; another magnate held Jutland and Fiinen in pawn; the dukes of Schleswig were practically independent of the Danish crown; the Scandian provinces had (1332) surrendered themselves to Sweden.
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  • In Jutland, too, after the repression, in 1441, of a peasant rising, something very like serfdom was introduced.
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  • (1838-1839) were also remarkable for the revival of political life, provincial consultative assemblies being established for Jutland, the Islands, Schleswig and Holstein, by the ordinance of the 28th of May 1831.
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  • After a struggling youth of great poverty, he published, in 1807-1809, a translation of Ossian; in 181 4 a volume of lyrical poems; and in 1817 he attracted considerable attention by his descriptive poem of The Tour in Jutland.
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  • His real genius, however, did not lie in the direction of verse; and his first signal success was with a story, A Village Sexton's Diary, in 1824, which was rapidly followed by other tales, descriptive of village life in Jutland, for the next twelve years.
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  • An interesting example of the great timber-chambered barrow is that at Jelling in Jutland, known as the barrow of Thyre Danebod, queen of King Gorm the Old, who died about the middle of the 10th century.
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  • It has railway communication with the east and north of Jutland, and with Germany.
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  • Jutland; exports pork and meat, butter, eggs, fish, cattle and sheep, skins, lard and agricultural seeds, and has regular communication with Harwich and Grimsby in England.
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  • The situation is typical of the north of Jutland.
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  • In the eastern region the viking leaders seem to have been closely connected with one of the Danish royal families, the kings of Jutland.
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  • In the west is the port of Kallundborg, with regular communication by steamer with Aarhus in Jutland.
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  • The northern portion only is Danish, and bears the name Jutland.
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  • The peninsula is almost at its narrowest (36 m.) at the frontier, but Jutland has an extreme breadth of 110 m.
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  • Jutland embraces nine amter (counties), namely, HjOrring, Thisted, Aalborg, Ringkjobing, Viborg, Randers, Aarhus, Vejle and Ribe.
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  • From the south-east the chain of islands forming insular Denmark extends towards Sweden, the strait between Jutland and Fiinen having the name of the Little Belt.
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  • The German portion of the peninsula is generally similar to that of western Jutland, the main difference lying in the occurrence of islands (the North Frisian) off the west coast in place of sand-bars and lagoons.
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  • Erratic blocks are of frequent occurrence in south Jutland.
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  • (For geology, and the general consideration of Jutland in connexion with the whole kingdom, see Denmark.) Although in ancient times well wooded, the greater portion of the interior of Jutland consisted for centuries of barren driftsand, which grew nothing but heather; but since 1866, chiefly through the instrumentality of the patriotic Heath association, assisted by annual contributions from the state, a very large proportion of this region has been more or less reclaimed for cultivation.
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  • Jutland is well served by railways.
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  • Several early writers agree in saying that the Cimbri occupied a peninsula, and in the map of Ptolemy Jutland appears as the Cimbric Chersonese.
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  • In ancient geography the Chersonesus Thracica, Chersonesus Taurica or Scythica, and Chersonesus Cimbrica correspond to the peninsulas of the Dardanelles, the Crimea and Jutland; and the Golden Chersonese is usually identified with the peninsula of Malacca.
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  • Finally Jutland rose against him, renounced its allegiance and offered the Danish crown to Duke Frederick of Holstein (January loth, 1523).
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  • In consequence of his professed attachment to the doctrines of Luther he was first imprisoned in the dungeons of Antvorskov and thence transferred, in the spring of 1525, to the Grey Friars' cloister at Viborg in Jutland, where he preached from his prison to the people assembled outside, till his prior, whom he won over to his views, permitted him to use the pulpit of the priory church.
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  • It is on the Eastern railway of Jutland.
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  • Hjorring is on the northern railway of Jutland, which here turns eastward to the Cattegat part of Frederikshavn (23 m.), a harbour of refuge.
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  • The "North Sea" water, of 34 to 35 pro male salinity, does not appear at the surface in the Skagerrak, except as a strip along part of the coast of Jutland, but it is always found as an undercurrent overlying the oceanic water.
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  • But these people may themselves have come from Jutland.
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  • He took part in the battle of Jutland and as can be seen from the photo was a ships carpenter & diver.
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  • In the north, Denmark occupies the small peninsula of Jutland.
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  • A new development now straddles the Jutland Street basin.
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  • Our biking vacation in Denmark is in the most western region of Jutland.
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  • On the death of King Eric Lam in 1147 Valdemar came forward as one of the three pretenders to the Danish crown, Jutland falling to his portion (compact of Roskilde, 9th of August 1157).
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  • Ecco shoes exhibit a heavy foreign influence mainly because the company began 40years ago, not in America, but in a tiny Denmark town in southern Jutland called Bredebro.
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