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justly

justly

justly Sentence Examples

  • It has been justly observed by many that this continuous cyclical movement entirely excludes the progress of humanity towards a better future.

  • He justly termed his father "the father of the Translators," but Samuel's own method surpassed his father's in lucidity and fidelity to the original.

  • When John Knox visited Calvin at Geneva one Sunday, it is said that he discovered him engaged in a game; and John Aylmer (1521-1594), though bishop of London, enjoyed a game of a Sunday afternoon, but used such language "as justly exposed his character to reproach."

  • The event showed that he judged the situation rightly - the religious scheme announced by him, though not accepted in all its details, became the dominant policy of the later time, and he has been justly called ' The stricter marriage law is formulated in Lev.

  • Gibbon justly calls Beli- sarius the Africanus of New Rome.

  • Macaulay terms, him, justly enough, "the father of modern Toryism, of Toryism modified to suit an order of things in which the House of Commons is the most powerful body in the state."

  • The law was ably and justly administered, and Irish trade was admitted to the same privileges as English, enjoying the same rights in foreign and colonial trade; and no attempt was made to subordinate the interests of the former to the latter, which was the policy adopted both before and after Cromwell's time, while the union of Irish and English interests was further recognized by the Irish representation at Westminster in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 16J9.

  • On the other hand, Cromwell could justly boast "there is not a nation in Europe but is very willing to ask a good understanding with you."

  • It cannot justly be said that the companies made large profits while neglecting to develop the services adequately, but it is true that they were not able commercially to comply with many of the demands made upon them by the public. Until speculation took place in anticipation of government purchase, the market prices of the telegraph securities were mostly below par.

  • This tyrant had made himself justly odious; and when he was hunted to death in 1259, the triumph was less for the Guelph cause than for humanity outraged by the iniquities of such a monster.

  • What is self-evident, Flint justly remarks, neither needs nor admits of argument.

  • The prospect over the town and its environs from Mount Eden is justly famous.

  • Progress Of Geographical Discovery Exploration and geographical discovery must have started from more than one centre, and to deal justly with the matter one ought to treat of these separately in the early ages before the whole civilized world was bound together by the bonds of modern intercommunication.

  • or more in vertical height may justly be called a mountain, while abrupt slopes of lesser height may be called hills.

  • Though probably not personally avaricious, he was justly accused of nepotism.

  • This was justly regarded by him as an important service to his country and one of the triumphs of his career, and he hoped to obtain further successes with the assistance of Germany, but the cordial relations between the cabinets of St Petersburg and Berlin did not subsist much longer.

  • Gibbon justly describes it as " a golden volume, not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author."

  • 'Tis Pity she's a Whore has been justly recognized as a tragedy of extraordinary power.

  • With the assistance of these two counsellors he held in check the lawless, turbulent nobles, and ruled justly, to the satisfaction of the people, for fourteen years.

  • Collisions, on the other hand, are preventable, and derailments nearly so, and the records of deaths and injuries in this class in successive years are therefore justly taken as an index to the efficiency with which the railways are managed.

  • " Ex ungue leonem " might have been justly said, for he attacked, and attacked successfully, the redoubtable Warburton.

  • The Talmud shows the influence of that law in many points, and may justly be compared to it as a monument of codification based on great principles.

  • He was the author of Institutiones Physiologicae (1787), and of a Handbuck der vergleichenden Anatomie (1804), both of which were very popular and went through many editions, but he is best known for his work in connexion with anthropology, of which science he has been justly called the founder.

  • He is thus justly considered the second founder of the Reformed Church in Scotland.

  • Another reform was the substitution for the corvee of a tax in money levied on the whole province, the construction of roads being handed over to contractors, by which means Turgot was able to leave his province with a good system of roads, while distributing more justly the expense of their construction.

  • His description of the different kinds of ploughs is interesting; and he justly recommends such as were drawn by two horses (some even by one horse) in preference to the weighty and clumsy machines which required four or more horses or oxen.

  • Some of the criticism of their works, necessary and useful as it has been, will probably be corrected later on by that breadth of view and sense of proportion which has enabled us to appreciate justly the achievements of lesser men in more remote times.

  • "If," to quote Dr Robertson, "by attempting to relate the various occurrences in the New World in a strict chronological order, the arrangement of events in his work had not been rendered so perplexed, disconnected and obscure that it is an unpleasant task to collect from different parts of his book and piece together the detached shreds of a story, he might justly have been ranked among the most eminent historians of his country."

  • It is still characterized by great splendour; of San indeed, the library of San Marco, built by Jacopo Sansovino in 1536, is justly considered the most sumptuous example of Renaissance architecture in the world.

  • The present library (antedated by several circulating, social and professional collections) may justly be said to have had its origin in the efforts of the Parisian, Alexandre Vattemare (1796-1864), from 1830 on, to foster international exchanges.

  • The scenery among them is justly celebrated, more especially in the neighbourhood of Haich`eng, Siu-yen and the Korean Gate.

  • Lavoisier may be justly regarded as the founder of modern or quantitative chemistry.

  • Hipparchus, the famous astronomer, on the other hand, (c. 150 B.C.) proved a somewhat captious critic. He justly objected to the arbitrary network of the map of Eratosthenes.

  • In this work the British hydrographic office may justly claim the credit of having contributed the chief share.

  • Encouragement and help have been given by the local Archaeological Society, and by many individuals, notably Greeks justly proud of a city which is one of the glories of their national story.

  • By this Bede has justly earned the title of the Father of English History.

  • Such an idea is justly stigmatized by Mommsen as ridiculous, and reflecting a discredit as unfounded as it is unjust on the imperial police of the capital.

  • Romanes thought that the manner of stinging and paralysing their prey might be justly deemed the most remarkable instinct in the world.

  • The appointment was avowedly made in order that an acceptable British statesman, in whom public confidence was reposed, might go to South Africa to consider all the circumstances, and to formulate a policy which should combine the upholding of British interests with the attempt to deal justly with the Transvaal and Orange Free State governments.

  • He returned to the Cape in February 1899 fully assured of the support of Mr Chamberlain, though the government still clung to the hope that the moderate section of the Cape and Free State Dutch would induce Kruger to deal justly with the Uitlanders.

  • Justly to estimate the work done by Kallay, it is only necessary to point to the contrast between Bosnia in 1882 and Bosnia in 1903; for in 21 years the anarchy and ruin entailed by four centuries of misrule were transformed into a condition of prosperity unsurpassed in south-eastern Europe.

  • The improvement of the telescope was justly regarded as a sine qua non for the advancement of astronomical knowledge.

  • He is thus justly regarded as the inventor of the "method of variations" - a name supplied by Euler in 1766.

  • The peasants are described as intelligent, and the artizans are justly celebrated for their ingenuity and mechanical skill.

  • William Little of Craigmillar, and his brother Clement Little, advocate, along with James Lawson, the colleague and successor of John Knox, may justly be regarded as true founders.

  • James, the Lord's brother, who, partly because of his relationship to Christ, stood supreme in the church at Jerusalem, as also Timothy and Titus, who acted as temporary delegates of St Paul at Ephesus and in Crete, are justly considered to have been forerunners of the monarchical episcopate.

  • has outlived its day may be justly identified with obscurantism, but not so the systems of those who, by their intellectual force alone, once held all the minds of Europe in subjection.

  • It marks the dawn of a public spirit as represented by the gentry, who, alarmed at the national peril and justly suspicious of the ruling magnates, unhesitatingly placed their destinies in the hands of Hunyadi, the one honest man who by sheer merit had risen within the last ten years from the humble position of a country squire to a leading position in the state.

  • Rakoczy also did much for education and civilization generally, and their era has justly been called the golden era of Transylvania.

  • Voltaire's education, the Cirey residence may be justly said to be the first stage of his literary manhood.

  • It is desultory to a degree; it is a base libel on religion and history; it differs from its model Ariosto in being, not, as Ariosto is, a mixture of romance and burlesque, but a sometimes tedious tissue of burlesque pure and simple; and it is exposed to the objection - often and justly urged - that much of its fun depends simply on the fact that there were and are many people who believe enough in Christianity to make its jokes give pain to them and to make their disgust at such jokes piquant to others.

  • This is essentially the apocalyptic conception of history, and Ezekiel may be justly represented as in certain essential aspects its founder in Israel.

  • The Viennese women are justly celebrated for their beauty and elegance; and dressing as a fine art is cultivated here with almost as great success as in Paris.

  • As has been justly said, if Newton once suffered a cerebral attack without forfeiting our veneration for the Principia, Comte may have suffered in the same way, and still not have forfeited our respect for Positive Philosophy and Positive Polity.

  • FitzGerald very justly attributed the landscape character of Tennyson's genius to the impress left on his imagination by "old Lincolnshire, where there were not only such good seas, but also such fine hill and dale among the wolds."

  • Gladstone justly regarded the refusal to remit a duty as being in effect an act of taxation, and Budget th e refore as an infringement of the rights of the House of'1860.

  • But the fringe of coast-land from Trebizond westward is one of the most beautiful parts of Asia Minor and is justly extolled by Strabo for its wonderful productiveness.

  • Men of the calibre of KOyetsu KOrin, RitsuO, Kajikawa and Mitsutoshi must be rare in any age, and the epoch when they flourished is justly remembered with enthusiasm.

  • Such porcelains, however, lack the velvet-like softness and depth of tone so justly prized in the genuine monochrome, where the glaze itself contains the coloring matter, pte and glaze being tired simultaneously at the same high temperature.

  • The latter published, in 1870, the first Japanese work on railways, advocating the building of lines from Tokyo to KiOto and Osaka; the former, appointed superintendent of the lines, held that post for 30 years, and is justly spoken of as the father of Japanese railways.

  • Scott justly observed that Defoe's style "is the last which should be attempted by a writer of inferior genius; for though it be possible to disguise mediocrity by fine writing, it appears in all its naked inanity when it assumes the garb of simplicity."

  • His chronology is fantastic and incredible; William of Newburgh justly remarks that, if we accepted the events which Geoffrey relates, we should have to suppose that they had happened in another world.

  • Mariana's Historiae, though in many parts uncritical, is justly esteemed for its research, accuracy, sagacity and style.

  • The chronicle of Villehardouin is justly held to be the very best presentation we possess of the spirit of chivalry - not the designedly exalted and poetized chivalry of the romances, not the self-conscious and deliberate chivalry of the 14th century, but the unsophisticated mode of thinking and acting which brought about the crusades, stimulated the vast literary development of the 12th and 13th centuries, and sent knights-errant, principally though not wholly of French blood, to establish principalities and kingdoms throughout Europe and the nearer East.

  • The brief chapters of his work have been justly compared to the laisses or tirades of a chanson in what may be called the vignetting of the subject of each, in the absence of any attempt to run on the narrative, in the stock forms, and in the poetical rather than prosaic word-order of the sentences.

  • The alliance of Brandenburg and the Mainz electorate had already been secured, and Spain, justly fearing for the safety of her Flemish possessions, soon joined them.

  • This is the Mandragola, which may be justly called the ripest and most powerful play in the Italian language.

  • However, he received the news of the massacre of St Bartholomew (23rd of August 1572) with joy, and publicly celebrated the event, having been led to believe, according to his apologists, that France had been miraculously delivered, and that the Huguenots had suffered justly as traitors.

  • Meanwhile Major Thruston - a man justly loved by his soldiers, in whom he had complete confidence - hurried to the garrison at Luba's, near the Ripon Falls, relying on his personal influence to control the men, and risking his life in the heroic attempt.

  • He may justly claim the merit of having guided the awakened psychological interest of British thinkers of the second half of the 19th century into fruitful channels.

  • " Yet in spite of this harsh talk about princes, Luther relied upon them to forward the reforms in which he was interested, and he justly claimed that he had greatly increased their powers by reducing the authority of the pope and subjecting the clergy in all things to the civil government.

  • As a state she may justly be said to have been foremost in the struggle against slavery.'

  • The discovery of America is justly dated on the 12th (N.S.

  • On the west the only two rivers of importance are the Buller and the Grey, the former justly famous for the grandeur of its gorges.

  • To the above must be added an edition of Storch's Cours d'economie politique, which Say published in 1823 without Storch's authorization, with notes embodying a "critique amere et virulente," a proceeding which Storch justly resented.

  • They say, ` Come to us ye who are of clean hands and pure speech, ye who are unstained by crime, who have a good conscience towards God, who have done justly and lived uprightly.'

  • The system of regulation by central boards was severely .criticised for incompetence and even for corruption, and sometimes justly; but on the whole it was amply justified by the urgent necessities of the times and by its results.

  • It is in contrast to these that the Didache is justly felt to be genuinely primitive and of a piece with the Apostolic Fathers.

  • Such an act she must regard as failing in sincerity to the crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her constitutional right of dismissing that minister.

  • Unfortunately his indiscretion equalled his eloquence: one speech (1861) sent him to America to avoid a duel with the duke d'Aumale; another (1865), in which he justly but intemperately protested against the Mexican expedition, cost him all his official dignities.

  • Though Spener has been justly called "the father of Pietism," hardly any of the errors and none of the extravagances of the movement can be ascribed to him personally.

  • The goldsmith's work of Siam is justly celebrated.

  • Erasmus, though justly styled by Muretus (Varr.

  • The fundamental type of the Arabic sanctuary can be traced through all the Semitic lands, and so appears to be older than the Semitic dispersion; even the technical terms are mainly the same, so that we may justly assume that the more developed ritual and priesthoods of the settled Semites sprang from a state of things not very remote from what we find among the heathen Arabs.

  • Prague, the capital (677,000 inhabitants), is picturesquely situated on the Vltava and justly famous for its architectural beauty.

  • Two-thirds of the grandduchy consisted of old Russian lands inhabited by men who spoke the Ruthenian language and professed the Orthodox Greek religion, while in the north were the Lithuanians proper, semisavage and semi-catholic, justly proud of their heroic forefathers of the house of Gedymin, and very sensitive of the pretensions of Poland to the provinces of Volhynia and Podolia, the fruits of Lithuanian valour.

  • Karol Szajnocha's great monograph, justly described as "a pearl of historical literature," Jadwiga and Jagiello (4 vols., Lemberg, 1861), the result of twelve years of exhaustive study, is our best authority on the first union between Poland and Lithuania.

  • These beautiful elegies have been justly praised by Mickiewicz; they are enough to raise Kochanowski far above the level of a merely artificial poet.

  • He is justly considered one of the greatest of the modern poets of Poland.

  • In reality, they might justly be compared to the priests in so far as they were the mouthpieces of the congregation in public thanksgiving.

  • Thirdly, it can justly claim the honour of Plato's name, since it expressly goes back to him for its metaphysics, directly combating those of the Stoa.

  • It seems justly alleged against this system by Dr Thomas Brown that "the moral sentiments, the origin of which it ascribes to our secondary feelings of mere sympathy, are assumed as previously existing in the original emotions with which the secondary feelings are said to be in unison."

  • What may justly be said of Smith is that the deductive bent was not the predominant character of his mind, nor did his great excellence lie in the "dialectic skill" which Buckle ascribes to him.

  • Some have represented Smith's work as of so loose a texture and so defective in arrangement that it may be justly described as consisting of a series of monographs.

  • Smith was among the latter; Karl Knies and others justly remark on the masterly sketches of this kind which occur in the Wealth of Nations.

  • Its situation is justly admired.

  • It was probably in 1547 that du Bellay met Ronsard in an inn on the way to Poitiers, an event which may justly be regarded as the starting-point of the French school of Renaissance poetry.

  • It has been justly remarked of the Pauline view, that- " The union with the Lord Himself, to which those who partake of the Lord's Supper have, is compared with the union which those who partake of a sacrifice have with the deity to whom the altar is devoted - in the case of the Israelites with God, of the heathen with demons.

  • v.) has justly observed that "the history of political ideas begins with the assumption that kinship in blood is the sole possible ground of community in political functions," and that in early commonwealths "citizens considered all the groups in which they claimed membership to be founded on common lineage."

  • But in this he relied on Polybius, whom he might justly consider as having from his position at Rome far better means of gaining accurate information.

  • All The Tables Of This Kind Previously Published, Which Extend Beyond The Year 1900 Of The Christian Era, Are Erroneous, Not Excepting The Celebrated French Work, L'Art De Verifier Les Dates, So Justly Regarded As The Greatest Authority In Chronological Matters.

  • He is justly remembered as the most blameless of the popular heroes of the War of Independence.

  • His mother trained him in reading the Bible, of which he read through every chapter of every book year by year; and to this study he justly attributes his early command of language and his pure sense of style.

  • Of the special regard which Henry seemed to have conceived for him Latimer took advantage to pen the famous letter on the free circulation of the Bible, an address remarkable, not only for what Froude justly calls " its almost unexampled grandeur," but for its striking repudiation of the aid of temporal weapons to defend the faith, "for God," he says, "will not have it defended by man or man's power, but by His Word only, by which He hath evermore defended it, and that by a way far above man's power and reason."

  • As there is little, if any, difference of racial origin, character and physical type, among the inhabitants of this region, except in Andalusia, and, to a less extent, in Estremadura, the Castilian is justly regarded as the typical Spaniard.

  • From the year 1900 he retired into private life, devoting himself to the solution of socialistic problems. His countrymen justly ascribe to him the fame of having been the first to organize and lead a political party in Japan.

  • In 1764 he published his brief but justly celebrated treatise Dei Delitti e delle Pene (" On Crimes and Punishments").

  • Bishop Whipple of Minnesota was justly called the Apostle of the Indians, so far as the work of the American Episcopal Church was concerned.

  • He also published several courses of sermons on particular topics, and is the author of many well-known and justly admired hymns, e.g.

  • He was of that greatest human type: a man of the present, valuing justly the past and no dreamer.

  • DelbrUck, however, had resigned in 1876, justly foreseeing that a change of policy was imminent in which he could no longer co-operate with Bismarck.

  • The avowed cause of difference was commercial policy; they were the Free Tradei:s, but they also justly foresaw that the reaction would extend to other matters.

  • His career as Attorney-General was widely, and it was generally felt justly, criticized by the public at large and by competent legal authorities as being both arbitrary and inefficient.

  • Russia, justly offended, drew closer her ties with Prussia, where Bismarck was already hatching the plans which were to mature in 1866; and, if the attitude of Napoleon in the Polish question prevented any revival of the alliance of Tilsit, the goodwill of Russia was assured for France in the coming struggle with Austria in Italy.

  • ments made by later writers like Josephus, as to the visit of Alexander to Jerusalem or the privileges conferred upon the Jews in the new Macedonian realms are justly suspected of being fiction.

  • Ali was angered by the refusal to surrender Parga and justly suspicious of the ambitions which this refusal implied; he could not feel himself secure with the Ionian Islands and the Dalmatian coast in the hands of a power whose plans in the East were notorious, and he was glad enough to avail himself of Napoleon's reverses in 1812 to help to rid himself of so dangerous a neighbor.

  • By their cowardice, incapacity, fished, egotism and treachery during the crisis of the struggle, the Danish aristocracy had justly forfeited the respect of every other class of the community, and emerged from the war hopelessly discredited.

  • He skilfully contends that Christians who worship the self-existent God cannot justly be called less religious than those who worship subordinate deities, and concludes by vindicating the Godhead of Christ.

  • It is, as Dr Johnson justly described this work at the time of its appearance, a " Dictionary " of carefully sifted facts, which tells all that is wanted and all that is known, but without any laboured splendour of language or affected subtlety of conjecture.

  • From the analogy of the higher plants observers have justly argued that when they have seen and marked the characters of the reproductive organs they have found the plant at the stage when it exhibits its most noteworthy features, and they have named and classified the species in accordance with these observations.

  • Livy's words, " inhumana crudelitas, perfidia plus quam Punica," might, it is to be feared, have been applied as justly to the vikings as to any people of western 1 Steenstrup (Normannerne, i.

  • As a presbyter, he won high reputation by his preaching at Antioch, more especially by his homilies on The Statues, a course of sermons delivered when the citizens were justly alarmed at the prospect of severe measures being taken against them by the emperor Theodosius, whose statues had been demolished in a riot.

  • In the canon of Pope Gelasius (494) George is mentioned in a list of those " whose names are justly reverenced among men, but whose acts are known only to God," a statement which implies that legends had already grown up around his name.

  • As a moralist and a guide to the conduct of life - an aspect of Goethe's work which Carlyle, viewing him through the coloured glasses of Fichtean idealism, emphasized and interpreted not always justly - Goethe was a powerful force on German life in years of political and intellectual depression.

  • Gradually they extended their powers, aided by the jealousy between the royal houses, which made it almost impossible for the two kings to co-operate heartily, and from the 5th to the 3rd century they exercised a growing despotism which Plato justly calls a tyrannis (Laws, 692).

  • The judgment of Severus himself is no doubt that which he puts in the mouth of his interlocutor Posthumianus: "I am astonished that one and the same man could have so far differed from himself that in the approved portion of his works he has no equal since the apostles, while in that portion for which he is justly blamed it is proved that no man has committed more unseemly errors."

  • The ward into which she penetrated was like a den of wild beasts; it was filled with women unsexed, fighting, swearing, dancing, gaming, yelling and justly deserved its name of "hell above ground."

  • To any one acquainted, even to a slight extent, with the elements of Cartesian geometry of three dimensions, a glance at the extremely suggestive constituents of this expression shows how justly Hamilton was entitled to say: " When the conception ...

  • 5 The same year the breach between the royal sisters was made final by the dismissal of Marlborough, justly suspected of Jacobite intrigues, from all his appointments.

  • His restless energy was that of a Charles XII., to whom in this respect he has justly been compared, while, unlike the king of Sweden, he was as careful and vigilant as the most methodical strategist.

  • He claims justly that the conditions were very difficult, but he made a big effort.

  • The criticism of the Old English epic has therefore for nearly a century been justly regarded as indispensable to the investigation of Germanic antiquities.

  • He declared that Hus had been justly executed and stated in a letter addressed on the 12th of August 1415 to Lacek, lord of Kravdfthe only literary document of Jerome that has been preserved - that "the dead man (Hus) had written many false and harmful things."

  • His New Theory of the Earth (1696), although destitute of sound scientific foundation, obtained the praise of both Newton and Locke, the latter of whom justly classed the author among those who, if not adding much to our knowledge, "at least bring some new things to our thoughts."

  • It is, moreover, more exactly adequate to the actual situation, for the Principe has a divine spark of patriotism yet lingering in the cinders of its frigid science, an idealistic enthusiasm surviving in its moral aberrations; whereas a great Italian critic of this decade has justly described the Ricordi as "Italian corruption codified and elevated to a rule of life."

  • The army, at the end of the war, was justly dissatisfied with its treatment.

  • The Moderate period is justly regarded as in some respects the most brilliant in the history of the church.

  • The Paradoxes (Characters of a believing Christian in paradoxes, and seeming contradictions), which was often and justly suspected, has been conclusively proved by Grosart to be the work of another author.

  • It can scarcely be denied that the Roman Catholic clergy have always owed much of their influence to their celibacy, and that in many cases this influence has been most justly earned by the celibate's devotion to an unworldly ideal.

  • The consequence of this careful breeding is, that the women of Guayaquil are considered (and justly) the finest along the whole Pacific coast.

  • Doubts were long entertained whether the Dihong could be justly regarded as the continuation of the Tsangpo, but these were practically set at rest by the voyage of F.

  • Knox does not seem to have known beforehand of Rizzio's "slaughter," which had been intended to be a semi-judicial act; but soon after it he records that "that vile knave Davie was justly punished, for abusing of the commonwealth, and for other villainy which we list not to express."

  • But, admitting all that may be justly urged against the extreme attitude of some of the missionaries, no unprejudiced man will deny that their work on the whole has been a good one.

  • "The father of Russian diplomacy," as he has justly been called, was remarkable throughout his career for infinite tact and insight, and a wonderfully correct appreciation of men and events.

  • Timid by nature, aware of his impending doom, and ax times justly dissatisfied with himself, he tries all means of reconciling himself to the idea of suicide.

  • Albuquerque was almost the only Portuguese statesman who strove to deal justly with both Hindus and Mahommedans, to respect native customs, and to establish friendly relations with the great powers of the East.

  • Zanella was a broad-minded and patriotic ecclesiastic, and his character is justly held in equal honour with his poetry, which, if hardly to be termed powerful, wears a stamp of peculiar elegance and finish, and asserts a place of its own in modern Italian literature.

  • Pitt in office, looking back on the commencement of his public life, might have used the plea "A good deal has happened since then," at least as justly as some others have done.

  • The city is excellently drained, well-paved, well-lighted and furnished with an abundant supply of filtered water, while the cellar dwellings have given place to light and airy tenements, and Berlin justly claims to rank among the cleanest and healthiest capitals in Europe.

  • He cannot be justly blamed for having been born to rule a despotic monarchy, without even the capacity which would have qualified him to manage a small estate.

  • He is justly regarded as one of the greatest of mathematicians.

  • He justly claims that such a law connected and explained a vast number of independent facts.

  • Among the obligations which he enumerated as necessarily and justly resting on his legatee was the duty of respecting the arrangements by which he had provided for the establishment of the Domaine de la couronne and the Domaine prive de l'etat.

  • their hydrographical conditions proves that neither of the the two lakes, Victoria (13,400 ft.) or Chakmaktin (13,020 ft.), can justly be regarded as sources, both of them being derived from the same mighty system of glacial snowfields on the summit of the Nicolas range.

  • The Dissertation on the Nature of True Virtue, posthumously published, is justly regarded as one of the most original works on ethics of the 18th century, and is the more remarkable as reproducing, with no essential modification, ideas on the subject written in the author's youth in the notes on the Mind.

  • It is justly considered the first as well as the oldest of the zoological stations of the world, and the chief universities pay £ioo a year for tables to which they send students.

  • His execution took place on the 3rd of May 1606, Garnet acknowledging himself justly condemned for his concealment of the plot, but maintaining to the last that he had never approved it.

  • By his T inatal (written between October 1854 and April 1855) he laid the foundations for the chronology of Icelandic history, in a series of conclusions that have not been displaced (save by his own additions and corrections), and that justly earned the praise of Jacob Grimm.

  • " The Kaffirs " in the opinion of Lord Glenelg, " had an ample justification for war; they had to resent, and endeavoured justly, though impotently, to avenge a series of encroachments " (despatch of the 26th of December 1835).

  • It brought in the enormous sum of £1,000,312,950 from no fewer than 5,289,000 subscribers; and Mr. Law justly hailed it both as an expression of the will of the people to win the war and also as evidence of the financial ability of the country to see it to a successful conclusion.

  • His idyllic masterpiece is the sustained transcript of winter scenery and home-life, Snow-Bound, which has had no equal except Longfellow's " Evangeline " in American favour, but, in fact," nothing of its class since " The Cottar's Saturday Night " can justly be compared with it.

  • Dr Edleston, in his preface to Newton's correspondence with Cotes, justly remarks: " If Flamsteed the Astronomer-Royal had cordially co-operated with him in the humble capacity of an observer in the way that Newton pointed out and requested of him.

  • Every king was obliged, on his inauguration, to swear that he would govern justly and according to law, to which he remained always subject.

  • Ptolemy had many brilliant mistresses, and his court, magnificent and dissolute, intellectual and artificial, has been justly compared with the Versailles of Louis XIV.

  • They had been repulsed, and terians and the victory was justly ascribed to the English con- Indepen tingent.

  • It included, as was natural enough in a warm admirer of Montesquieu, a fragment on law, of which he justly said that it ought to be the leading science in every well-ordered commonwealth.

  • The Appeal was justly accepted as a satisfactory performance for the purpose with which it was written.

  • Wollaston's theory of moral evil as consisting in the practical contradiction of a true proposition, closely resembles the most paradoxical part of Clarke's doctrine, and was not likely to approve itself to the strong common sense of Butler; but his statement of happiness or pleasure as a " justly desirable " end at which every rational being " ought " to aim corresponds exactly to Butler's conception of self-love as a naturally governing impulse; while' the " moral arithmetic " with which he compares pleasures and pains, and endeavours to make the notion of happiness quantitatively precise, is an anticipation of Benthamism.

  • The object of this sympathetic resentment, impelling us to punish, is what we call injustice; and thus the remarkable stringency of the obligation to act justly is explained, since the recognition of any action as unjust involves the admission that it may be forcibly obstructed or punished.

  • that " moral principles are justly to be regarded as the laws of the Deity "; but this he never proves.

  • What has not been adequately realized is that the metaphysical basis of his system of ethics - the argument, for example, contained in the introduction to the Prolegomena - is unfairly treated if divorced from his treatment of morals as a whole, and that it can be justly estimated only if interpreted as much as the conclusion as the starting-point of moral theory.

  • If Thucydides is justly accounted the first political historian, Ari may be fitly styled the first of scientific historians.

  • And, although it could not be justly said that the Servians of the 10th century produced a really great work from the literary point of view, they certainly made progress and produced some remarkable poetry.

  • 2 It can be justly charged against Calvin in this matter that he took the initiative in bringing on the trial of Servetus, that as his accuser he prosecuted the suit against him with undue severity, and that he approved the sentence which condemned Servetus to death.

  • From him, however, not only has punishment overtaken us, but a pestilence instilled from him resides in us, to which punishment is justly due.

  • The Lives, especially those of Copernicus, Tycho and Peiresc, have been justly admired.

  • Apart from the Kajkavci dialect, the whole body of SerboCroatian literature up to the 19th century may justly be regarded as the common heritage of Serbs and Croats.

  • Anselm's speculations did not receive, in the middle ages, the respect and attention justly their due.

  • General Gallieni, whose firm and vigorous administration, and desire to treat the Malagasy justly and kindly, made him liked by the people, retired in 1905, and was succeeded in that office by M.

  • His name is nevertheless justly associated with that vast extension of the bounds of the visible universe which has rendered modern astronomy the most sublime of sciences, and his telescopic observations are a standing monument to his sagacity and acumen.

  • At the end of his life he sacrificed his favorite at the instigation of his second wife, an act which, it is said, justly embittered his last days.

  • Thus Mehring is justly claimed as the originator of comb-foundation, though the value of his invention was less eagerly taken advantage of even in Germany than its merits deserved.

  • After Washington's death the Federalist leadership was divided (and disputed) between John Adams, who had the prestige of a varied and great career, and greater strength than any other Federalist with the people, and Hamilton, who controlled practically all the leaders of lesser rank, including much the greater part of the most distinguished men of the country, so that it has been very justly said that " the roll of his followers is enough of itself to establish his position in American history " (Lodge).

  • is more justly measured than Madison's (in 1831): " That he possessed intellectual powers of the first order, and the moral qualities of integrity and honour in a captivating degree, has been awarded him by a suffrage now universal.

  • The name Fraticelli may more justly be applied to the most exalted fraction of Franciscanism.

  • The Iraqi forces continue to exercise their legitimate right to self-defense and the Iraqi government justly points the finger at the aggressor.

  • Paul actually used an adverb which means " rightly, justly, properly.

  • The inn is justly popular with locals and visitors alike for its hospitality, well-kept ales and great food.

  • This heavy armament soon became justly feared by enemies on all fronts during WWII.

  • He is justly celebrated at Stratford as a comic actor; she is generally identified with more mature roles than that of Juliet.

  • The " fire and thief proof safes " made by them have justly attained a wide celebrity.

  • Some quite remarkable works may have appeared, had he lived a further 10 years, giving him the recognition he so justly deserved.

  • The Cotswolds and Lakes are, of course, justly famed.

  • Yell, the Gateway to the North Isles, and justly famous for otters, is the second largest island in Shetland.

  • Jones was justly awarded a best supporting actress Oscar for her performance as the double murderess Velma Kelly.

  • Among the royal palaces of Europe, Windsor Castle justly lays claim to the first place.

  • Firmly established as a breed in Lincolnshire by the 1750s, it can justly claim parentage of every improved Longwool type in the world.

  • In very poetical terms it means " governing rightly and doing justly " .

  • I think College Street is a charming little street of which Gloucester may be justly proud.

  • punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve.

  • The focal point of this family-run hotel is the atmospheric restaurant the regional cooking is justly renowned locally, with delicious truffle specialities.

  • As well as the justly renowned attractions of the city center, the campus itself offers plenty in the way of diversion.

  • Justly reproved, I commend any business which encourages the appreciation of Britain's waterways deserves support, not carping.

  • He was justly revered in the Palais, but out on the street no one had a kind word to say about him.

  • royal palaces of Europe, Windsor Castle justly lays claim to the first place.

  • It has been justly observed by many that this continuous cyclical movement entirely excludes the progress of humanity towards a better future.

  • He formed a league with the primate Prazmowski and other traitors to dethrone the king; when (1670) the plot was discovered and participation in it repudiated by Louis XIV., the traitors sought the help of the elector of Brandenburg against their own justly indignant countrymen.

  • He justly termed his father "the father of the Translators," but Samuel's own method surpassed his father's in lucidity and fidelity to the original.

  • Hitherto, by his own showing, the private life of the young tsar had been unspeakably abominable, but his sensitive conscience (he was naturally religious) induced him, in 1550, to summon a Zemsky Sobor or national assembly, the first of its kind, to which he made a curious public confession of the sins of his youth, and at the same time promised that the realm of Russia (for whose dilapidation he blamed the boyar regents) should henceforth be governed justly and mercifully.

  • When John Knox visited Calvin at Geneva one Sunday, it is said that he discovered him engaged in a game; and John Aylmer (1521-1594), though bishop of London, enjoyed a game of a Sunday afternoon, but used such language "as justly exposed his character to reproach."

  • The event showed that he judged the situation rightly - the religious scheme announced by him, though not accepted in all its details, became the dominant policy of the later time, and he has been justly called ' The stricter marriage law is formulated in Lev.

  • Gibbon justly calls Beli- sarius the Africanus of New Rome.

  • Macaulay terms, him, justly enough, "the father of modern Toryism, of Toryism modified to suit an order of things in which the House of Commons is the most powerful body in the state."

  • The law was ably and justly administered, and Irish trade was admitted to the same privileges as English, enjoying the same rights in foreign and colonial trade; and no attempt was made to subordinate the interests of the former to the latter, which was the policy adopted both before and after Cromwell's time, while the union of Irish and English interests was further recognized by the Irish representation at Westminster in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 16J9.

  • On the other hand, Cromwell could justly boast "there is not a nation in Europe but is very willing to ask a good understanding with you."

  • It cannot justly be said that the companies made large profits while neglecting to develop the services adequately, but it is true that they were not able commercially to comply with many of the demands made upon them by the public. Until speculation took place in anticipation of government purchase, the market prices of the telegraph securities were mostly below par.

  • This tyrant had made himself justly odious; and when he was hunted to death in 1259, the triumph was less for the Guelph cause than for humanity outraged by the iniquities of such a monster.

  • What is self-evident, Flint justly remarks, neither needs nor admits of argument.

  • The prospect over the town and its environs from Mount Eden is justly famous.

  • Progress Of Geographical Discovery Exploration and geographical discovery must have started from more than one centre, and to deal justly with the matter one ought to treat of these separately in the early ages before the whole civilized world was bound together by the bonds of modern intercommunication.

  • or more in vertical height may justly be called a mountain, while abrupt slopes of lesser height may be called hills.

  • Though probably not personally avaricious, he was justly accused of nepotism.

  • This was justly regarded by him as an important service to his country and one of the triumphs of his career, and he hoped to obtain further successes with the assistance of Germany, but the cordial relations between the cabinets of St Petersburg and Berlin did not subsist much longer.

  • Gibbon justly describes it as " a golden volume, not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author."

  • 21 the reader, seems original; in the dialogue, on the other hand, a justly famous passage in Act i.

  • 'Tis Pity she's a Whore has been justly recognized as a tragedy of extraordinary power.

  • Leroy-Beaulieu justly observes, a fundamental change in the conception of the Russian state, which, by placing the administration of justice outside the sphere of the executive power, ceased to be a despotism.

  • With the assistance of these two counsellors he held in check the lawless, turbulent nobles, and ruled justly, to the satisfaction of the people, for fourteen years.

  • The serfs were liberated entirely from the arbitrary rule of the landowners and became proprietors of the communal land; the old tribunals which could be justly described as " dens of iniquity and incompetence," were replaced by civil and criminal lawcourts of the French type, in which justice was dispensed by trained jurists according to codified legislation, and from which the traditional bribery and corruption were rigidly excluded; and the administration of local affairs - roads, schools, hospitals, &c. - was entrusted to provincial and district councils freely elected by all classes of the population.

  • Collisions, on the other hand, are preventable, and derailments nearly so, and the records of deaths and injuries in this class in successive years are therefore justly taken as an index to the efficiency with which the railways are managed.

  • " Ex ungue leonem " might have been justly said, for he attacked, and attacked successfully, the redoubtable Warburton.

  • While Burke and Fox and so many great statesmen proclaimed the consequences of the collision with America, Gibbon saw nothing but colonies in rebellion, and a paternal government justly incensed.

  • xxxv.), when the Judaean fields could produce a Micah or a Zephaniah, and when Israel no doubt had men who inherited the spirit of a Hosea, the nature of the underlying conditions can be more justly appreciated.

  • The Talmud shows the influence of that law in many points, and may justly be compared to it as a monument of codification based on great principles.

  • He was the author of Institutiones Physiologicae (1787), and of a Handbuck der vergleichenden Anatomie (1804), both of which were very popular and went through many editions, but he is best known for his work in connexion with anthropology, of which science he has been justly called the founder.

  • He is thus justly considered the second founder of the Reformed Church in Scotland.

  • Another reform was the substitution for the corvee of a tax in money levied on the whole province, the construction of roads being handed over to contractors, by which means Turgot was able to leave his province with a good system of roads, while distributing more justly the expense of their construction.

  • His description of the different kinds of ploughs is interesting; and he justly recommends such as were drawn by two horses (some even by one horse) in preference to the weighty and clumsy machines which required four or more horses or oxen.

  • Some of the criticism of their works, necessary and useful as it has been, will probably be corrected later on by that breadth of view and sense of proportion which has enabled us to appreciate justly the achievements of lesser men in more remote times.

  • "If," to quote Dr Robertson, "by attempting to relate the various occurrences in the New World in a strict chronological order, the arrangement of events in his work had not been rendered so perplexed, disconnected and obscure that it is an unpleasant task to collect from different parts of his book and piece together the detached shreds of a story, he might justly have been ranked among the most eminent historians of his country."

  • In 1806 Fischer de Waldheim, in his Tableaux syn- optiques de zoognosie (p. 181), quoting Nieremberg, extended his figure of speech, and, while justly deprecating the notion that the series of forms belonging to any particular group of creatures - the Mammalia was that whence he took his instance - could be placed in a straight line, imagined the various genera to be arrayed in a series of contiguous circles around Man as a centre.

  • The two most striking buildings in Venice, St Mark's and the Doge's Palace, at once give us an example of the two earlier styles, the Byzantine and the Gothic, at least in their general design, though both are so capricious in development and in decoration that they may more justly be con sidered as unique specimens rather than as typical examples of their respective styles.

  • It is still characterized by great splendour; of San indeed, the library of San Marco, built by Jacopo Sansovino in 1536, is justly considered the most sumptuous example of Renaissance architecture in the world.

  • The present library (antedated by several circulating, social and professional collections) may justly be said to have had its origin in the efforts of the Parisian, Alexandre Vattemare (1796-1864), from 1830 on, to foster international exchanges.

  • The scenery among them is justly celebrated, more especially in the neighbourhood of Haich`eng, Siu-yen and the Korean Gate.

  • Lavoisier may be justly regarded as the founder of modern or quantitative chemistry.

  • Hipparchus, the famous astronomer, on the other hand, (c. 150 B.C.) proved a somewhat captious critic. He justly objected to the arbitrary network of the map of Eratosthenes.

  • In this work the British hydrographic office may justly claim the credit of having contributed the chief share.

  • Encouragement and help have been given by the local Archaeological Society, and by many individuals, notably Greeks justly proud of a city which is one of the glories of their national story.

  • By this Bede has justly earned the title of the Father of English History.

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