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justiciar

justiciar

justiciar Sentence Examples

  • The members were called "justices," and in the king's absence the chief justiciar presided over the court.

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  • JUSTICIAR (med.

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  • Thus Ranulf Flambard, the minister of William II., who was probably the first to exercise the powers of a justiciar, is called justiciarius by Ordericus Vitalis.

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  • In his absence the administration was entrusted to a justiciar, a regent or lieutenant of the kingdom; and the convenience being once ascertained of having a minister who could in the whole kingdom represent the king, as the sheriff did in the shire, the justiciar became a permanent functionary."

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  • Hubert de Burgh was the last of the great justiciars; after his fall (1231) the justiciarship was not again committed to a great baron, and the chancellor soon took the position formerly occupied by the justiciar as second to the king in dignity, as well as in power and influence.

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  • Outside England the title justiciar was given under Henry II.

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  • In Scotland the title of justiciar was borne, under the earlier kings, by two high officials, one having his jurisdiction to the north, the other to the south of the Forth.

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  • Meanwhile in England, which was ruled by Peter des Roches as justiciar, the discontent had been increasing rather than diminishing, and its volume became much larger owing to an event of May 1214.

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  • From 1228 to 123 2 he held the high office of justiciar of Ireland.

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  • Round holds that the office of Justiciar was created by Henry I.'s charter, and as he was the chief authority in the city this somewhat takes off from the value of the privilege of appointing sheriffs.

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  • A small party of the citizens under Henry of Cornhill remained faithful to the chancellor Longchamp, but at a meeting held at St Paul's on the 8th of October, the barons welcomed the archbishop of Rouen as chief justiciar (he having produced the king's sign manual appointing a new commission), and they saluted John as regent.

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  • Stubbs, in his introduction to the"'Chronicle of Roger de Hoveden, writes: " This done, oaths were largely taken: John, the Justiciar and the Barons swore to maintain the Communa of London; the oath of fealty to Richard was then sworn, John taking it first, then the two archbishops, the bishops, the barons, and last the burghers with the express understanding that should the king die without issue they would receive John as his successor."

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  • The council, which met on the 5th of June 1245, was attended only by those prepared to support the pope's cause; and though Frederick condescended to be represented by his justiciar, Thaddeus of Suessa, the judgment was a foregone conclusion.

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  • During the first year of Henry's reign Hotspur further was appointed justiciar of North Wales and constable of the castles of Chester, Flint, Conway, Denbigh and Carnarvon.

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  • 1243), chief justiciar of England in the reign of John and Henry III., entered the royal service in the reign of Richard I.

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  • Both before and after the issue of the Great Charter Hubert adhered loyally to the king; he was rewarded, in June 1215, with the office of chief justiciar.

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  • As the saviour of the national cause the justiciar naturally assumed after the death of William Marshal (1219) the leadership of the English loyalists.

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  • Other opponents were weakened by the audacious stroke of 1223, when the justiciar suddenly announced the resumption of all the castles, sheriffdoms and other grants which had been made since the king's accession.

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  • In 1231 Henry lent an ear to those who asserted that the justiciar had secretly encouraged armed attacks upon the aliens to whom the pope had given English benefices.

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  • The blow fell suddenly, a few weeks after his appointment as justiciar of Ireland.

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  • 1219), and his successor, the justiciar Hubert de Burgh, asserted the royal prerogative against native barons and foreign mercenaries.

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  • Against the wishes of the justiciar he planned and carried out an expedition to the west of France (1230); when it failed he laid the blame upon his minister.

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  • Henry's legal and administrative reforms are illustrated by the Tractatus de legibus attributed to Ranulph Glanville, his chief justiciar (ed.

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  • Into the midst of this region of banditti Sigismund came as a sort of grand justiciar, a sworn enemy of every sort of disorder.

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  • An attack was made upon the English justiciar, Ormsby, who was holding his court at Scone.

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  • The justiciar himself escaped, but many of his followers were captured or slain.

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  • 1205), chief justiciar of England and archbishop of Canterbury, was a relative of Ranuif de Glanvill, the great justiciar of Henry II., and rose under the eye of his kinsman to an important position in the Curia Regis.

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  • Soon afterwards he was elected archbishop of Canterbury and made justiciar.

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  • To make it easier, the justiciar ordered the assessment to be made by a sworn jury in every hundred, and one may reasonably conjecture that these jurors were also elected.

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  • By it private war was declared unlawful, except in cases where justice could not be obtained; a chief justiciar was appointed for the Empire; all tolls and mints erected since the death of Henry VI.

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  • The military importance of Athlone dates from the erection of the castle and of a bridge over the river by John de Grey, bishop of Norwich and justiciar of Ireland, in 1210.

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  • When Richard left England (Dec. 1189), he put the tower of London in his hands and chose him to share with Hugh de Puiset, the great bishop of Durham, the office of chief justiciar.

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  • He traces his descent from the justiciar of the Norman kings.

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  • The justiciar continued to be the chief officer of state, next to the king, until the fall of Hubert de Burgh (in the reign of King John), described by Stubbs as the last of the great justiciars.

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  • Henceforward, according to Stubbs, the office may be said to have survived only in the judicial functions, which were merely part of the official character of the chief justiciar.

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  • The chancellor took the place of the justiciar in council, the treasurer in the exchequer, while the two offshoots from the curia regis, the common pleas and the exchequer, received chiefs of their own.

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  • The king's bench represented the original stock of the curia regis, and its chief justice the great justiciar.

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  • The justiciar may, therefore, be said to have become from a political a purely judicial officer.

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  • at Pembroke in 1171, and was appointed the royal justiciar of all South Wales.

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  • The years of his minority were marked by an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by Walter Comyn, earl of Menteith, the other by Alan Durward, the justiciar.

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  • Robert De Beaumont (1104-1168), justiciar of England, married a granddaughter of Ralph Guader, earl of Norfolk, and receiving his father's English fiefs in 1118 became earl of Leicester.

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  • He and his brother, Waleran, were the chief advisers of Stephen, and helped this king to seize the bishops of Salisbury and Lincoln in '139; later, however, Robert made his peace with Henry II., and became chief justiciar of England.

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  • It is to Henry, aided by his great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, that England owed the institution of the machinery of government by which it was to be ruled during the Constftu- earlier middle ages.

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  • Around the sovereign was his Curia Regis or body of councillors, of whom the most important were the justiciar, the chancellor and the treasurer, though the feudal officers, the constable and marshal, were also to be found there.

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  • It sat, or certain members of it sat, under the presidency of the king or the justiciar, as the supreme court of justice of the realm.

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  • The justiciar, chancellor and treasurer sat with certain other members of the council as the court of exchequer, not only to receive and audit the accounts of the royal revenue, but to give legal decisions on all questions connected with finance.

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  • At Winchester he was acknowledged as king by the bishop, his own brother Henry of Blois, and by the great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, and the archbishop, William of Corbeil.

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  • He handed over the exchequer to Nigel, bishop of Ely, the nephew of the old justiciar Roger of Salisbury, and the heir of his traditions.

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  • When Becket was visited by the justiciar who came to rehearse the judgment, he started to his feet, refused to listen to a word, declared his repudiation of all lay courts and left the hall.

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  • The exile, who had taken refuge in a French abbey, placed the justiciar and six other of the kings chief councillors under the ban of the Church, and intimated that he should add Henry himself to the list unless he showed speedy signs of repentance (April 1166).

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  • The justiciar, Richard de Lucy, routed the army of the earl of Leicester at Fornham in Snifolk, the castles of the rebel earls were subdued one after another, and William of Scotland was surprised and captured by a force of northern loyalists while he was besieging Alnwick (1173-1174).

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  • For this reason he was almost constantly abroad, leaving the administration of the one loyal section of his realm to his great justiciar.

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  • disappointed, to find that he could gather few supporters; the justiciar and the bureaucrats of the Curia Regis would give him no assistance; they worked on honestly in the name of the absent king.

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  • But no one rose to aid him, and his garrisons were soon being besieged by, loyal levies, headed by the justiciar and, byHubertWalter,the newly elected archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • He left behind Archbishop Hubert Walter as justiciar, a faithful if a somewhat high-handed minister.

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  • Probably his long immunity was due in the main to the capacity of his strong-handed justiciar Geoffrey Fitz-Peter; the king hated him bitterly, but generally took his advice.

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  • The old justiciar Geoffrey Fitz-Peter, now on his death-bed, had also refused to pronounce sentence on the defaulters.

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  • After his decease the conduct of the government passed into the hands of the justiciar Hubert de Burgh, and the papal legate Pandulf, to whom the marshal had specially recommended the young king.

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  • The most troublesome of them was Falkes de Breaut, the most famous of King Johns foreign condottieri, whose minions held Bedford castle against the justiciar and the whole shire levy of eastern England for nearly two months in 1224.

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  • The moment that he had got rid of the honest and capable old justiciar Hubert de Burgh, who had pacified the country during his minority, and set the machinery of government once more in regular order, Henry gave himself over to fostering horde after horde of foreign favorites.

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  • Simon., fought most gallantly, and was left dead on the field along with his eldest son Henry, his justiciar HughDespenser, and the flower of his party.

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  • All posts of dignity and emolument were kept for their personal adherents, and a new and formidable dignity was conferred on Mortimer himself, when he was made both justiciar of the principality of Wales, and also earl of March, in which lay both his own broad lands and the estates of Despenser and Arundel, which he had shamelessly appropriated.

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  • He was accused of stirring up rebellion among the Welsh, and the justiciar proceeded against him.

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  • In 1176 he was appointed justiciar and seneschal of Normandy, and was given full control of all the royal business in the duchy.

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    0
  • A general peace (Landfrieden), which became the basis of all such peaces in the future, was sworn to; a new office, that of imperial justiciar, was created, and a permanent judicial record was first instituted.

    0
    0
  • Hither he summoned a general council, which met in June 1245; but although Frederick sent his justiciar, Thaddeus of Suessa, to represent him, and expressed his willingness to treat, sentence of excommunication and deposition was pronounced against him.

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  • Gerald's cousin, the Lord Rhys, had been appointed the king's justiciar in South Wales.

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  • In England Rufus began to display uncontrolled tyranny along with his chief justiciar, the despised Ranulf Flambard.

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  • The members were called "justices," and in the king's absence the chief justiciar presided over the court.

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  • The latter dying soon afterwards (January 1514) in Wigtownshire, where he had gone as justiciar, and his son having been killed at Flodden, the succession fell to Gavin's nephew Archibald (6th earl).

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  • JUSTICIAR (med.

    0
    0
  • Thus Ranulf Flambard, the minister of William II., who was probably the first to exercise the powers of a justiciar, is called justiciarius by Ordericus Vitalis.

    0
    0
  • In his absence the administration was entrusted to a justiciar, a regent or lieutenant of the kingdom; and the convenience being once ascertained of having a minister who could in the whole kingdom represent the king, as the sheriff did in the shire, the justiciar became a permanent functionary."

    0
    0
  • Hubert de Burgh was the last of the great justiciars; after his fall (1231) the justiciarship was not again committed to a great baron, and the chancellor soon took the position formerly occupied by the justiciar as second to the king in dignity, as well as in power and influence.

    0
    0
  • and his successor, in place of the justiciar - who had presided over all causes vice regis- separate heads were established in the three branches into which the curia regis as a judicial body had been divided: justices of common pleas, justices of the king's bench and barons of the exchequer.

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  • Outside England the title justiciar was given under Henry II.

    0
    0
  • In Scotland the title of justiciar was borne, under the earlier kings, by two high officials, one having his jurisdiction to the north, the other to the south of the Forth.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile in England, which was ruled by Peter des Roches as justiciar, the discontent had been increasing rather than diminishing, and its volume became much larger owing to an event of May 1214.

    0
    0
  • From 1228 to 123 2 he held the high office of justiciar of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Round holds that the office of Justiciar was created by Henry I.'s charter, and as he was the chief authority in the city this somewhat takes off from the value of the privilege of appointing sheriffs.

    0
    0
  • A small party of the citizens under Henry of Cornhill remained faithful to the chancellor Longchamp, but at a meeting held at St Paul's on the 8th of October, the barons welcomed the archbishop of Rouen as chief justiciar (he having produced the king's sign manual appointing a new commission), and they saluted John as regent.

    0
    0
  • Stubbs, in his introduction to the"'Chronicle of Roger de Hoveden, writes: " This done, oaths were largely taken: John, the Justiciar and the Barons swore to maintain the Communa of London; the oath of fealty to Richard was then sworn, John taking it first, then the two archbishops, the bishops, the barons, and last the burghers with the express understanding that should the king die without issue they would receive John as his successor."

    0
    0
  • The council, which met on the 5th of June 1245, was attended only by those prepared to support the pope's cause; and though Frederick condescended to be represented by his justiciar, Thaddeus of Suessa, the judgment was a foregone conclusion.

    0
    0
  • During the first year of Henry's reign Hotspur further was appointed justiciar of North Wales and constable of the castles of Chester, Flint, Conway, Denbigh and Carnarvon.

    0
    0
  • 1243), chief justiciar of England in the reign of John and Henry III., entered the royal service in the reign of Richard I.

    0
    0
  • Both before and after the issue of the Great Charter Hubert adhered loyally to the king; he was rewarded, in June 1215, with the office of chief justiciar.

    0
    0
  • As the saviour of the national cause the justiciar naturally assumed after the death of William Marshal (1219) the leadership of the English loyalists.

    0
    0
  • Other opponents were weakened by the audacious stroke of 1223, when the justiciar suddenly announced the resumption of all the castles, sheriffdoms and other grants which had been made since the king's accession.

    0
    0
  • In 1231 Henry lent an ear to those who asserted that the justiciar had secretly encouraged armed attacks upon the aliens to whom the pope had given English benefices.

    0
    0
  • The blow fell suddenly, a few weeks after his appointment as justiciar of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • 1219), and his successor, the justiciar Hubert de Burgh, asserted the royal prerogative against native barons and foreign mercenaries.

    0
    0
  • Against the wishes of the justiciar he planned and carried out an expedition to the west of France (1230); when it failed he laid the blame upon his minister.

    0
    0
  • Henry's legal and administrative reforms are illustrated by the Tractatus de legibus attributed to Ranulph Glanville, his chief justiciar (ed.

    0
    0
  • Into the midst of this region of banditti Sigismund came as a sort of grand justiciar, a sworn enemy of every sort of disorder.

    0
    0
  • An attack was made upon the English justiciar, Ormsby, who was holding his court at Scone.

    0
    0
  • The justiciar himself escaped, but many of his followers were captured or slain.

    0
    0
  • 1205), chief justiciar of England and archbishop of Canterbury, was a relative of Ranuif de Glanvill, the great justiciar of Henry II., and rose under the eye of his kinsman to an important position in the Curia Regis.

    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards he was elected archbishop of Canterbury and made justiciar.

    0
    0
  • To make it easier, the justiciar ordered the assessment to be made by a sworn jury in every hundred, and one may reasonably conjecture that these jurors were also elected.

    0
    0
  • By it private war was declared unlawful, except in cases where justice could not be obtained; a chief justiciar was appointed for the Empire; all tolls and mints erected since the death of Henry VI.

    0
    0
  • The military importance of Athlone dates from the erection of the castle and of a bridge over the river by John de Grey, bishop of Norwich and justiciar of Ireland, in 1210.

    0
    0
  • When Richard left England (Dec. 1189), he put the tower of London in his hands and chose him to share with Hugh de Puiset, the great bishop of Durham, the office of chief justiciar.

    0
    0
  • He traces his descent from the justiciar of the Norman kings.

    0
    0
  • The justiciar continued to be the chief officer of state, next to the king, until the fall of Hubert de Burgh (in the reign of King John), described by Stubbs as the last of the great justiciars.

    0
    0
  • Henceforward, according to Stubbs, the office may be said to have survived only in the judicial functions, which were merely part of the official character of the chief justiciar.

    0
    0
  • The chancellor took the place of the justiciar in council, the treasurer in the exchequer, while the two offshoots from the curia regis, the common pleas and the exchequer, received chiefs of their own.

    0
    0
  • The king's bench represented the original stock of the curia regis, and its chief justice the great justiciar.

    0
    0
  • The justiciar may, therefore, be said to have become from a political a purely judicial officer.

    0
    0
  • at Pembroke in 1171, and was appointed the royal justiciar of all South Wales.

    0
    0
  • The years of his minority were marked by an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by Walter Comyn, earl of Menteith, the other by Alan Durward, the justiciar.

    0
    0
  • 1274), justiciar of Galloway, who was a nephew of the constable of Scotland, Alexander Comyn, earl of Buchan (d.

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    0
  • Robert De Beaumont (1104-1168), justiciar of England, married a granddaughter of Ralph Guader, earl of Norfolk, and receiving his father's English fiefs in 1118 became earl of Leicester.

    0
    0
  • He and his brother, Waleran, were the chief advisers of Stephen, and helped this king to seize the bishops of Salisbury and Lincoln in '139; later, however, Robert made his peace with Henry II., and became chief justiciar of England.

    0
    0
  • It is to Henry, aided by his great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, that England owed the institution of the machinery of government by which it was to be ruled during the Constftu- earlier middle ages.

    0
    0
  • Around the sovereign was his Curia Regis or body of councillors, of whom the most important were the justiciar, the chancellor and the treasurer, though the feudal officers, the constable and marshal, were also to be found there.

    0
    0
  • It sat, or certain members of it sat, under the presidency of the king or the justiciar, as the supreme court of justice of the realm.

    0
    0
  • The justiciar, chancellor and treasurer sat with certain other members of the council as the court of exchequer, not only to receive and audit the accounts of the royal revenue, but to give legal decisions on all questions connected with finance.

    0
    0
  • At Winchester he was acknowledged as king by the bishop, his own brother Henry of Blois, and by the great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, and the archbishop, William of Corbeil.

    0
    0
  • He handed over the exchequer to Nigel, bishop of Ely, the nephew of the old justiciar Roger of Salisbury, and the heir of his traditions.

    0
    0
  • When Becket was visited by the justiciar who came to rehearse the judgment, he started to his feet, refused to listen to a word, declared his repudiation of all lay courts and left the hall.

    0
    0
  • The exile, who had taken refuge in a French abbey, placed the justiciar and six other of the kings chief councillors under the ban of the Church, and intimated that he should add Henry himself to the list unless he showed speedy signs of repentance (April 1166).

    0
    0
  • The justiciar, Richard de Lucy, routed the army of the earl of Leicester at Fornham in Snifolk, the castles of the rebel earls were subdued one after another, and William of Scotland was surprised and captured by a force of northern loyalists while he was besieging Alnwick (1173-1174).

    0
    0
  • For this reason he was almost constantly abroad, leaving the administration of the one loyal section of his realm to his great justiciar.

    0
    0
  • disappointed, to find that he could gather few supporters; the justiciar and the bureaucrats of the Curia Regis would give him no assistance; they worked on honestly in the name of the absent king.

    0
    0
  • But no one rose to aid him, and his garrisons were soon being besieged by, loyal levies, headed by the justiciar and, byHubertWalter,the newly elected archbishop of Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • He left behind Archbishop Hubert Walter as justiciar, a faithful if a somewhat high-handed minister.

    0
    0
  • Probably his long immunity was due in the main to the capacity of his strong-handed justiciar Geoffrey Fitz-Peter; the king hated him bitterly, but generally took his advice.

    0
    0
  • The old justiciar Geoffrey Fitz-Peter, now on his death-bed, had also refused to pronounce sentence on the defaulters.

    0
    0
  • After his decease the conduct of the government passed into the hands of the justiciar Hubert de Burgh, and the papal legate Pandulf, to whom the marshal had specially recommended the young king.

    0
    0
  • The most troublesome of them was Falkes de Breaut, the most famous of King Johns foreign condottieri, whose minions held Bedford castle against the justiciar and the whole shire levy of eastern England for nearly two months in 1224.

    0
    0
  • The moment that he had got rid of the honest and capable old justiciar Hubert de Burgh, who had pacified the country during his minority, and set the machinery of government once more in regular order, Henry gave himself over to fostering horde after horde of foreign favorites.

    0
    0
  • Simon., fought most gallantly, and was left dead on the field along with his eldest son Henry, his justiciar HughDespenser, and the flower of his party.

    0
    0
  • All posts of dignity and emolument were kept for their personal adherents, and a new and formidable dignity was conferred on Mortimer himself, when he was made both justiciar of the principality of Wales, and also earl of March, in which lay both his own broad lands and the estates of Despenser and Arundel, which he had shamelessly appropriated.

    0
    0
  • He was accused of stirring up rebellion among the Welsh, and the justiciar proceeded against him.

    0
    0
  • In 1176 he was appointed justiciar and seneschal of Normandy, and was given full control of all the royal business in the duchy.

    0
    0
  • A general peace (Landfrieden), which became the basis of all such peaces in the future, was sworn to; a new office, that of imperial justiciar, was created, and a permanent judicial record was first instituted.

    0
    0
  • Hither he summoned a general council, which met in June 1245; but although Frederick sent his justiciar, Thaddeus of Suessa, to represent him, and expressed his willingness to treat, sentence of excommunication and deposition was pronounced against him.

    0
    0
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