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justice

justice

justice Sentence Examples

  • Just trying to explain them can't do them justice.

  • It was heart wrenching when sometimes our tip failed to bring about justice.

  • He pinched me for obstructing justice and a whole bunch of stuff.

  • Maybe it was poetic justice that her soul was doomed.

  • It's only a matter of time until justice is served.

  • Your picture doesn't do you justice.

  • Dean could not understand someone voluntarily subjecting themselves to the tedium of the molasses-process of justice.

  • According to Vico, law emanates from the conscience of mankind, in whom God has infused a sentiment of justice.

  • 31 a a formal protestatio, in which he not only denounced the failure of the Powers to do justice to.

  • He was given the right to dispense justice, to coin money and to appoint the bishops in Bavaria.

  • The building has been restored in modern times to serve as a court of justice and a prison.

  • He was successful in winning the support of many of the younger princes, and in establishing a new court of justice, the members of which were named by himself.

  • If they had appealed to the General Assembly they might have received justice, or possibly the separation might have been on a larger scale.

  • The cabinet is composed of eight ministers - the heads of the government departments of the interior, foreign affairs, finance, war, marine, justice, agriculture, and public works.

  • Each has its own judicial system, and enacts laws relating to the administration of justice, the distribution and imposition of taxes, and all matters affecting the province.

  • The administration of justice, he declared, had fallen to so low an ebb as to be practically non-existent.

  • The presidency of the council of state belongs ex officio to the minister of justice.

  • It is the seat of a justice of the peace, and is the electoral unit for the general council and the district council.

  • Justice.

  • They are composed of employers and workmen in equal numbers and are established by decree of the council of state, advised by the minister of justice.

  • For convenience the judge often sits at the royal courts of justice.

  • An article in the Spectator of the 17th of February 1883, by Lord Justice Bowen, gives perhaps the best idea of Smith's extraordinary personal qualities and influence.

  • The government is carried on by a ministry of five, with departments for the ducal house and foreign affairs, home affairs, justice, education and public worship and finance.

  • The central court of justice at Malines was abolished, but the Grand Council was reorganized :and made thoroughly representative.

  • He redressed many grievances, regulated the administration of justice, encouraged commerce, reformed the coinage, but as time went on he was compelled to demand larger subsidies and to take severer measures against heretical opinions.

  • The love of right reason is the supreme virtue, whence flow the cardinal virtues, diligence, obedience, justice and humility.

  • On the one hand, there was no law except that of force by which an offence could be attributed to the sovereign, the anointed king, the source of justice.

  • Large steps were made towards the union of the two kingdoms by the representation of Scotland in the parliament at Westminster; free trade between the two countries was established, the administration of justice greatly improved, vassalage and heritable jurisdictions abolished, and security and good order maintained by the council of nine appointed by the Protector.

  • A merchant named Cony refused to pay customs not imposed by parliament, his counsel declaring their levy by ordinance to be contrary to Magna Carta, and Chief Justice Rolle resigning in order to avoid giving judgment.

  • Yet Cromwell's monument is not altogether misplaced in such surroundings, for in him are found the true principles of piety, of justice, of liberty and of governance.

  • The twelve senior thegns of the hundred play a part, the nature of which is rather doubtful, in the development of the English system of justice.

  • It is therefore not a criterion which can do justice to the principles of Wagner's non-symphonic art, for its.

  • Mr Justice Stephen decided (Attorney-General v.

  • The possibility of reforming these contracts in some parts of the kingdom has been studied, in the hope of bringing them into closer harmony with the needs of rational cultivation and the exigencies of social justice.

  • Besides its legislative functions, the senate is the highest court of justice in the case of political offences or the impeachment of ministers.

  • The penal tribunals have jurisdiction in cases involving imprisonment up to ten years, or a fine exceeding 40, while the assize courts, with a jury, deal with offences involving imprisonment for life or over ten years, and have exclusive jurisdiction (except that the senate is on occasion a high court of justice) over all political offences.

  • With unbroken spirit, though the objects of his life were unattained, though Italy and Europe had been thrown into confusion, and the issue of the conflict was still doubtful, Gregory expired in 1085 with these words on his lips: I loved justice, I hated iniquity, therefore in banishment I die.

  • A new magistrate, the gonfalonier of justice, appears in some of the Guelph cities, with the special duty of keeping the insolence of the nobility in check.

  • Besides the premiership, Depretis assumed the portfolio of finance; Nicot~a, an ex-Garibaldian of somewhat tarnished reputation, but a man of energetic ~~t~ and conservative temperament, was placed at the ministry of the interior; public works were entrusted to Zanardelli, a Radical doctrinaire of considerable juridical attainments; General Mezzacapo and Signor Brin replaced General Ricotti Magnani and Admiral Saint-B on at the war office and ministry of marine; while to Mancini and Coppino, prominent members of the Left, were allotted the portfolios of justice and public instruction.

  • For some time all appeals to the king, to parliament, and to the courts of justice were unavailing; but on the 12th of February 1684 his application to Chief Justice Jeffreys was at last successful, and he was set at liberty on finding bail to the amount of X40,000, to appear in the House of Lords in the following session.

  • What the Three Sermons sought to find written small within - a law of inflexible justice or righteousness - part i.

  • We now come to an important series of articles which deal with abuses in the administration of justice.

  • Under his sons justice was equally, perhaps more, costly, while adequate protection was much harder to obtain.

  • This was intended to remove an old and serious evil, as the sheriffs had earned a very bad reputation by their methods of administering justice.

  • It checked temporarily the process of centralizing the administration of justice.

  • simply says, "To no one will we sell, to no one will we refuse or delay, right or justice."

  • In the event of this not being granted within forty days the matter is to be referred to the twenty-five, who are empowered to seize the lands and property of the king, or to obtain justice in any other way possible.

  • By declaring, as it does, what were the laws and customs of a past age wherein justice prevailed, it shows what was the ideal of good government formed by John's prelates and barons.

  • New provisions were introduced for the preservation of the peace - unlawful castles were to be destroyed - while others were directed towards making the administration of justice by the visiting justices less burdensome.

  • With approved conduct, however, he may be absolutely released after twenty to twenty-five years in the settlement; and throughout that time, though possessing no civil rights, a quasi-judicial procedure controls all punishments inflicted upon him, and he is as secure of obtaining justice as if free.

  • The synod may restore them if convinced of the justice of their cause (and not merely in cases of ajbia).

  • the larger district answering to the civil " diocese "), or before the royal see of Constantinople, who shall do justice upon it.

  • (k) In England the Constitutions of Clarendon added a provision for appeal to the king, " and if the archbishop shall have failed in doing justice recourse is to be had in the last resort (postremo) to our lord the king, that by his writ the controversy may be ended in the court of the archbishop; because there must be no further process without the assent of our lord the king."

  • He merely corrects slackness or lack of doing justice (Si archiepiscopus defecerit in justitia exhibenda) and by his writ (precepto) directs the controversy to be determined in the metropolitan's court.

  • The breaking of such a promissory oath was called " perjury " (as in classical Latin and in Shakespeare), contrary to modern usage which confines the word to false evidence before a court of justice.

  • c. 19) took away all appeals to Rome and gave a further appeal, "for lack of justice," from the several courts of the archbishops to the king in chancery.

  • Of modern buildings may be mentioned the University (1826), the Palais de Justice (1844), and the new theatre (1848), all designed by Roelandt, and the Institut des Sciences (1890) by A.

  • It did little more than arrange for the administration of justice by nominated jurats (scabini) under the count's bailli.

  • He was responsible for the Universities of Scotland Act of 1858, and in the same year he was elevated to the bench as lord justice clerk.

  • In 1867 he was made lord justice general of Scotland and lord president of the court of session, taking the title of Lord Glencorse.

  • This condition of mind can be obtained only by "living conformably to nature," that is to say, one's whole nature, and as a means to that man must cultivate the four chief virtues, each of which has its distinct sphere - wisdom, or the knowledge of good and evil; justice, or the giving to every man his due; fortitude, or the enduring of labour and pain; and temperance, or moderation in all things.

  • Together with Szilagyi, the Minister of Justice, Csaky was one of the most decided champions of obligatory civil marriage and of the rights of the Jews.

  • Its founder was a Norfolk lawyer, William Howard or Haward, who was summoned to parliament as a justice in 1295, being appointed a justice of the common pleas in 1297.

  • Of this we may perhaps roughly' distinguish a higher and a lower type, according as there is either complete confidence in the divine benevolence and justice, or a disposition to suppose a certain arbitrariness or at any rate conditionality to attach to the granting of requests.

  • Loubet's cabinet in 1892, and was minister of justice under M.

  • According to Moslem traditionists Mahomet declared that one of his descendants, the imam of God, who would fill the earth with equity and justice, would bear the name of al-mandi.

  • In1564-1566he accompanied the young king on an extended tour through France; and in 1566 he was instrumental in the promulgation of an important edict for the reform of abuses in the administration of justice.

  • They include his "Harangues" and "Remonstrances," the Epistles, the Memoire to Charles IX., a Traite de la reformation de la justice, and his will.

  • But Geoffrey hardly did justice to the Normans if he meant to imply that they were simple imitators of others.

  • The special character of Norman rule in Sicily was that all these various races flourished, each in its own fashion, each keeping its own creed, tongue and manners, under the protection of a common sovereign, who belonged to none of them, but who did impartial justice to all.

  • There are civil, commercial and criminal courts in Montevideo, a departmental court in each departmental capital, and a justice of the peace in each of 205 judicial districts into which the republic is divided, with sub-district courts under deputy judges in addition.

  • The administration of justice in Uruguay has long been of bad repute.

  • But his good fortune did not last, and he attributes the calamities that came upon him to the ill will which his bold maintenance of justice had caused, and to his opposition to every oppressive measure.

  • Aeacus ruled over his people with such justice and impartiality that after his death he was made judge of the lower world together with Minos and Rhadamanthus.

  • Justice is administered from a written civil and criminal code.

  • The justice of Gerson's protest was borne out by events.

  • He came of a good family; his father was in the commission of the peace and his mother was a sister of Sir John Popham, successively attorney-general and lord chief justice.

  • The ministries are as follows: (1) of the Imperial Court, to which the administration of the apanages, the chapter of the imperial orders, the imperial palaces and theatres, and the Academy of Fine Arts are subordinated; (2) Foreign Affairs; (3) War and Marine; (4) Finance; (5) Commerce and Industry (created in 1905); (6) Interior (including police, health, censorship and press, posts and telegraphs, foreign religions, statistics); (7) Agriculture; (8) Ways and Communications; (9) Justice; (10) Public Instruction.

  • But by laws promulgated in 1888 and 1889 the rights of police and manorial justice were transferred from the landlords to officials of the central government.

  • The acting justice sits normally alone to hear causes in his canton of the peace (uchastok), but, at the request of both parties to a suit, he may call in an honorary justice as assessor or substitute.

  • As a court of justice its main drawback is that it is wholly unable to cope with the vast mass of documents representing appeals from all parts of the empire.

  • Their interest for the laity lies ' An ukaz of 1879 gave the governors the right to report secretly on the qualifications of candidates for the office of justice of the peace.

  • The justice administered in them was patriarchal and rough, but not ineffective.

  • Finnish diet ought to refer to the imperial legislature not only all military matters - as the tsar demanded (Rescript of October 14) - but the question of the use of the Russian language in the grand-duchy, the principles of the Finnish administration, police, justice, education, formation of business companies and of associations, public meetings, the press, the customs tariff, the monetary system, means of communication, and the pilot and lighthouse system.

  • As a young man Henry had been chivalrous and adventurous, and in politics anxious for good government and justice.

  • A conference between the three powers was thereupon held at Berlin, and a treaty was executed by those powers and by Samoa, on the 14th of June 1889, by virtue of which the independence and autonomy of the islands were guaranteed, Malietoa was restored as king, and the three powers constituted themselves practically a protectorate over Samoa, and provided a chief justice and a president of the municipality of Apia, to be appointed by them, to aid in carrying out the provisions of the treaty.

  • The government was administered under this treaty, but with considerable friction, until the end of 1898, when, upon the death of Malietoa, two rival candidates for the throne again appeared, and the chief justice selected by the three powers decided against the claims of Mataafa, and in favour of a boy, Malietoa Tanu, a relative of the deceased Malietoa.

  • He becomes the interpreter and vindicator of divine justice, the vocal exponent of a nation's conscience.

  • But let judgment roll down like waters and justice like a perennial brook."

  • In Isaiah both aspects - divine universal sovereignty and justice, taught by Amos, and divine loving-kindness to Israel and God's claims on His people's allegiance, taught by Hosea - are fully expressed.

  • The discovery of Anne's misdeeds coincided in an extraordinary manner with Henry's disappointment in not obtaining by her a male heir, while the king's despotic power and the universal unpopularity of Anne both tended to hinder the administration of pure justice.

  • Among the people she had always been intensely disliked; the love of justice, and the fear of trade losses imminent upon a breach with Charles V., combined to render her unpopular.

  • He complains especially of his tutors, and in one case with abundant reason; but, by his own confession, they might have recriminated with justice, for he indulged in gay society, and kept late hours.

  • He compressed into a single chapter the domestic history and policy of the emperors from the son of Heraclius to Isaac Angelus; and did no justice to the remarkable ability and the indefatigable industry shown in the service of the state by most of the sovereigns from Leo III.

  • The judicial department consists of a supreme court with a chief justice and two associate justices, chosen for six years, and district courts, with judges chosen for four years.

  • For each township there is a justice of the peace, chosen biennially by its voters.

  • From 1 794 until his death he declined in succession the following offices: United States senator (1794), secretary of state in Washington's cabinet (1795), chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1795), governor of Virginia (1796), to which office he had been elected by the Assembly, and envoy to France (1799).

  • But, in France at least, these critics were the first to render justice to his learning, his talents and his disinterestedness.

  • Carlisle, 1819, where Mr Justice Best remarks, "In the age of toleration, when that statute passed, neither churchmen nor sectarians wished to protect in their infidelity those who disbelieved the Holy Scriptures").

  • On that occasion the court reaffirmed the dictum of Chief Justice Hale, that Christianity is part of the laws of England.

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