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juris

juris Sentence Examples

  • The first of these, De uno et universi juris principio et fine uno, was subdivided into two parts; so like.

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  • In 1708 he published his De ratione studiorum, in 1710 De antiquissima Italorum sapientia, in 1720 De universi juris uno principio et fine uno, and in 1721 De constantia jurisprudentis.

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  • juris pub'.

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  • juris canon.

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  • Bruns, Fontes juris Romani, c. 3, No.

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  • Law; Ayliffe, Parergon juris ecclesiastici, p. 161; Godolphin, Abridgement of the Laws Ecclesiastical, p. 8).

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  • The Austrian bishops, however, maintain their tribunals for spiritual purposes, and insist that such things as divorced vinculo must be granted by their authority (Aichner, Compendium juris ecclesiastici, pp. 551-553).

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  • 197 et seq.; p. 403 et seq.; Tauber, Manuale juris canonici, Sabariae, 1904, p. 277).

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  • Ayliffe, Parergon juris ecclesiastici (1726); J.

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  • Gibson, Codex juris ecclesiastici (Oxford, 1761); D.

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  • Aichner, Compendium juris ecclesiast.

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  • Hackett, History of the Orthodox Church in Cyprus (1901); Tauber, Manuale juris canonici (1906); E.

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  • At this period he wrote two important works which, owing to the distracted state of public affairs, remained unpublished, Institutiones juris ecclesiastici and Praelectiones juris ecclesiastici.

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  • After studying law at the university of Budapest he graduated doctor juris.

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  • The diet, which met at Buda in hot haste, proclaimed the young king 2 dictator, 1 The Opus tripartitum juris consuetudinarii regni Hungariae was drawn up by Verbbczy at the instance of the diet in 1507.

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  • He studied at Erfurt and in Italy, where he took his degree of doctor utriusque juris at Ferrara and devoted himself more especially to the study of Greek.

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  • So far as regards criminal offences, the maxim as to ignorantia juris admits of no exception, even in the case of a foreigner temporarily in England, who is likely to be ignorant of English law.

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  • allgemeines historisches Lexikon (Leipzig, 1709 ff.); Historia Ecclesiastica Veteris Testamenti (4 vols., Halle, 1709); Elementa Philosophiae Practicae, Instrumentalis, et Theoreticae (3 vols., 1697); Selecta Juris Naturae et Gentium (Halle, 1704); Miscellanea Sacra (3 vols., Jena, 1727); and Isagoge Historico-Theologica ad Theologiam Universam, singulasque ejus pales (2 vols., 1727).

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  • The legal character of this transaction is summed up in a well-known passage in the Digest: - Interdictum de precariis merito introductum est, quia nulla eo nomine juris civilis actio esset, magis enim ad donationes et beneficii causam, quam ad negotii contracts spectat precarii conditio.

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  • juris Rom.

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  • Historical journalism was first represented by Electa juris publici (1709), philology by Neue acerra philologica (1715-1723), philosophy by the Ada philosophorum (1715-1727), medicine by Der patriotische Medikus (1725), music by Der musikalische Patriot (1725), and education by Die Matrone (1728).

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  • Thomas Aquinas was the first theologian to describe the Church as a divinely organized absolute monarchy, whose head concentrated in his person the entire authority of the Church, and was the source of all the ecclesiastical law (conditor juris), issuing the decrees of general councils in his own name, and claiming the right to revoke or modify the decrees of former councils - indeed, to make exceptions or to set aside altogether anything which did not rest upon the dictates of divine or natural law.

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  • "Suprematum illi tribuo qui non tantum domi subditos manu militari regit, sed et qui exercitum extra fines ducere et armis, foederibus, legationibus, ac caeteris juris gentium functionibus aliquid momenti ad rerum Europae generalium summam conferre potest" (Leibnitz, Opera, 4.333).

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  • Late in life, in 1518, he began the study of jurisprudence at the university of Basel, and in 1519 took the degree of doctor juris.

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  • His most important works were Introductio in controversies juris civilis recentioris (Jena, 1771) and Geschichte der in Deutschland geltenden Rechte (Jena, 1780).

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  • This partial civitas does not seem to have been entirely replaced, as in Italy, by the grant of full privileges to the communities possessing it, and the distinction survived for some time in the provinces between coloniae, municipia juris Romani, and municipia juris Latini.

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  • Authorities.-C. Bruns, Fontes juris romani, c. III., No.

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  • Compensation, in its most familiar sense, is however a nomen juris for the reparation or satisfaction made to the owners of property which is taken by the state or by local authorities or by the promoters of parliamentary undertakings, under statutory authority, for public purposes.

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  • On his return to Rome, about 1622, he took his degree as Doctor utriusque juris, and then became captain of infantry in the regiment of Colonna, which took part in the war in the Valtelline.

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  • Propaganda: De Martinis, Juris pontificii de Propaganda Fide, &c. (Rome, 1888, &c.); Collectanea S.

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  • Juris >>

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  • C. von Carmer (1721-1801) on the basis of the Project des Corporis Juris Fridericiani, completed in the year 1749-1751 by the eminent jurist Samuel von Cocceji (1679-1755).

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  • The Corpus Juris of Justinian continued to be, with naturally a few additions in the ordinances of succeeding emperors, the chief law-book of the Roman world till the time of the Macedonian dynasty when, towards the end of the 9th century, a new system was prepared and issued by those sovereigns, which we know as the Basilica.

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  • In the western provinces, which had been wholly severed from the empire before the publication of the Basilica, the law as settled by Justinian held its ground; but copies of the Corpus Juris were extremely rare, nor did the study of it revive until the end of the 1 ith century.

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  • From 1839 to 1845 Wolfgang studied law at Bonn, Jena, Heidelberg and Berlin, taking his degree of doctor juris at Heidelberg in 1845.

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  • His father, proud of his son's steady application and success, sent him the costly present of a Corpus Juris.

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  • IRNERIUS (Hirnerius, Hyrnerius, Iernerius, Gernerius, Guarnerius, Warnerius, Wernerius, Yrnerius), Italian jurist, sometimes referred to as "lucerna juris."

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  • He continued his studies at Berlin and Bonn, and, having graduated doctor juris, attended lectures at the Ecole de Droit in Paris.

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  • OBLIGATION, in law, a term derived from the Roman law, in which obligatio signified a tie of law (vinculum juris) whereby one person is bound to perform or forbear some act for another.

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  • In English law obligation is used in at least four senses - (1) any duty imposed by law; (2) the special duty created by a vinculum juris; (3) not the duty, but the evidence of the duty - that is to say, an instrument under seal, otherwise called a bond; (4) the operative part of a bond.

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  • A perfect obligation is one which is directly enforceable by legal proceedings; an imperfect or moral obligation (the naturalis obligatio of Roman law) is one in which the vinculum juris is in some respects incomplete, so that it cannot be directly enforced, though it is not entirely destitute of legal effect.

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  • Professor de Louter defines it as " une servitude du droit des gens (servitus juris gentium), et qui differe de la servitude du droit priv y en ce qu'elle ne constitue pas un droit reel (jus in re aliena) mais un droit entre deux personnes de droit international (subjecta juris gentium) " (Revue de droit international, 18 99, p. 33 0).

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  • He defined his problem as the quid juris or the question of the validity of knowledge, not its quid facti or the laws of the empirical genesis and evolution of intellection (to use Croom Robertson's phraseology).

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  • Pitra, Juris Ecclesiastici Graecorum Historia et Monumenta, i.

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  • This is the division adopted in all the official collections of the Corpus juris.

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  • This first official code was the basis of the second part of the Corpus juris canonici.

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  • It includes the constitutions subsequent to were included in the edition of Jean Chappuis in 150o; they passed into the later editions, and are considered as forming part of the Corpus juris canonici.

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  • Though we find in the 15th « century, for example, at the council of Basel the The Corpus juris expression corpus juris, obviously suggested by the Corpus juris civilis, not even the official edition of Gregory XIII.

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  • has as its title the words Corpus juris canonici, and we do not meet with this title till the Lyons edition of 1671.

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  • The history of the canonical collections forming the Corpus juris would not be complete without an account of the labours of which they were the object.

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  • councils of Lyons, and is arranged in books and titles, as above described; the last title, de regulis juris, contains no less than eighty-eight legal axioms, mostly borrowed from Roman law.

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  • The laws are formulated in general terms, and the decisions in particular cases relegated to the sphere of juris prudence; and the canonists have definitely lost the function which fell to them in the 12th and 13th centuries: they receive the law on authority and no longer have to deduce it from the texts.

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  • This collection has been of some service, and appears as an appendix in many editions of the Corpus juris; the chief reason for its failure is that it has no official sanction.

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  • Immediately after the publication of the official edition of the Corpus juris, Gregory XIII.

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  • For the Greek Church: Pitra, Juris ecclesiae graecorum historia et monuments (Rome, 1864); the later history of the Greek law: Zachariae, Historiae juris graecorum delineatio (Heidelberg, 1839) Mortreuil, Histoire du droit byzantin (Paris, 1843-1846); the recent texts in the Conciliorum Collectio lacensis, vol.

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  • Papp-Szilagyi, Enchiridion juris eccl.

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  • Periodicals: Analecta juris pontificii, ed.

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  • But though one of the fontes juris Scotiae, canon law never was of itself authoritative in Scotland.

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  • Much of it, no doubt, was borrowed from the Corpus juris canonici and the English provincial canons.

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  • Of his other works, the more important are the Roman Chronology to the Time of Caesar (1858), a work written in conjunction with his brother August; his editions of the Monumentum Ancyranum and of the Digest in the Corpus juris civilis, and of the Chronica of Cassiodorus in Monumenta Germaniae historica, the Auctores antiquissimi section of which was under his supervision.

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  • By the canon law is meant, substantially, the contents of the Corpus juris canonici, which have been largely superseded or added to by, e.g.

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  • These furnish, with the canons of the councils, the chief source of the legislation of the church, and form the greater part of the Corpus Juris.

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  • This clerical side of the parish bounds-beating was one of the religious functions prohibited by the Injunctions of Queen Elizabeth; but it was then ordered that the perambulation should continue to be performed as a quasi-secular function, so that evidence of the boundaries of parishes, &c. might be preserved (Gibson, Codex juris Ecclesiastici Anglicani (1761) pp. 213-214).

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  • In 1708 he published his De ratione studiorum, in 1710 De antiquissima Italorum sapientia, in 1720 De universi juris uno principio et fine uno, and in 1721 De constantia jurisprudentis.

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  • The first of these, De uno et universi juris principio et fine uno, was subdivided into two parts; so like.

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  • Thus in the varied manifestations of law Vico was able to discover a single and enduring principle (De universi juris uno princ p peo et fine uno).

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  • juris pub'.

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  • juris canon.

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  • 27 annates and all the benefice reservations which did not appear in the Corpus Juris.

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  • Giobbio, I Concordati (Monza, 1900); idem, Lezioni di diplomazia ecclesiastica (Rome, 1899-1903); Cardinal Cavagnis, Institutiones juris publici ecclesiastici (Rome, 1906).

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  • Bruns, Fontes juris Romani, c. 3, No.

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  • Law; Ayliffe, Parergon juris ecclesiastici, p. 161; Godolphin, Abridgement of the Laws Ecclesiastical, p. 8).

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  • The Austrian bishops, however, maintain their tribunals for spiritual purposes, and insist that such things as divorced vinculo must be granted by their authority (Aichner, Compendium juris ecclesiastici, pp. 551-553).

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  • 197 et seq.; p. 403 et seq.; Tauber, Manuale juris canonici, Sabariae, 1904, p. 277).

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  • p. 205; Sanguineti, Juris ecc. inst., Rome, 18 9 0, pp. 393, 394).

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  • in the Corpus juris canonici (1879-1881); " Hostiensis " Super Decretum; W.

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  • Ayliffe, Parergon juris ecclesiastici (1726); J.

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  • Gibson, Codex juris ecclesiastici (Oxford, 1761); D.

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  • Sanguineti, Juris ecc. inst.

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  • Aichner, Compendium juris ecclesiast.

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  • Hackett, History of the Orthodox Church in Cyprus (1901); Tauber, Manuale juris canonici (1906); E.

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  • Perhaps his edition of the Leges Visigothorum (1579) was his most valuable contribution to historical science; in the same line he edited the Capitula of Charlemagne, Louis the Pious, and Charles the Bald in 1588, and he also assisted his brother Francois in preparing an edition of the Corpus juris canonici (1687).

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  • Roman law owes much to Hadrian, who instructed Salvius Julianus to draw up an edictum perpetuum, to a great extent the basis of Justinian's Corpus juris (see M.

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  • Walter, Corpus juris germanici antiqui (Berlin, 1824); Monumenta Germaniae historica, Leges.

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  • At this period he wrote two important works which, owing to the distracted state of public affairs, remained unpublished, Institutiones juris ecclesiastici and Praelectiones juris ecclesiastici.

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  • In the Corpus juris canonici the Decretum (pt.

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  • After studying law at the university of Budapest he graduated doctor juris.

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  • The diet, which met at Buda in hot haste, proclaimed the young king 2 dictator, 1 The Opus tripartitum juris consuetudinarii regni Hungariae was drawn up by Verbbczy at the instance of the diet in 1507.

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  • He studied at Erfurt and in Italy, where he took his degree of doctor utriusque juris at Ferrara and devoted himself more especially to the study of Greek.

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  • A well-known legal maxim runs: ignorantia juris non excusat ("ignorance of the law does not excuse").

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  • So far as regards criminal offences, the maxim as to ignorantia juris admits of no exception, even in the case of a foreigner temporarily in England, who is likely to be ignorant of English law.

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  • allgemeines historisches Lexikon (Leipzig, 1709 ff.); Historia Ecclesiastica Veteris Testamenti (4 vols., Halle, 1709); Elementa Philosophiae Practicae, Instrumentalis, et Theoreticae (3 vols., 1697); Selecta Juris Naturae et Gentium (Halle, 1704); Miscellanea Sacra (3 vols., Jena, 1727); and Isagoge Historico-Theologica ad Theologiam Universam, singulasque ejus pales (2 vols., 1727).

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  • The legal character of this transaction is summed up in a well-known passage in the Digest: - Interdictum de precariis merito introductum est, quia nulla eo nomine juris civilis actio esset, magis enim ad donationes et beneficii causam, quam ad negotii contracts spectat precarii conditio.

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  • juris Rom.

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  • Historical journalism was first represented by Electa juris publici (1709), philology by Neue acerra philologica (1715-1723), philosophy by the Ada philosophorum (1715-1727), medicine by Der patriotische Medikus (1725), music by Der musikalische Patriot (1725), and education by Die Matrone (1728).

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  • According to the medieval canon law, based on the decretals, and codified in the 13th century in the Corpus juris canonici, by which the earlier powers of metropolitans had been greatly curtailed, the powers of the archbishop consisted in the right (i) to confirm and consecrate suffragan bishops; (2) to summon and preside over provincial synods; (3) to superintend the suffragans and visit their dioceses, as well as to censure and punish bishops in the interests of discipline, the right of deprivation, however, being reserved to the pope; (4) to act as a court of appeal from the diocesan courts; (5) to exercise the jus devolutionis, i.e.

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  • Among his noteworthy achievements are the reform of the calendar on the 24th of February 1582 (see Calendar); the improved edition of the Corpus juris canonici, 1582; the splendid Gregorian Chapel in St Peter's; the fountains of the Piazza Navona; the Quirinal Palace; and many other public works.

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  • (See Canon Law and Decretals, False.) As every fully equipped university had its faculty of canon law in which the Corpus juris canonici was studied, Rashdall is hardly guilty of exaggeration when he says: " By means of the happy thought of the Bolognese monk the popes were enabled to convert the new-born universities - the offspring of that intellectual new birth of Europe which might have been so formidable an enemy to the papal pretensions - into so many engines for the propagation of Ultramontane ideas."

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  • Thomas Aquinas was the first theologian to describe the Church as a divinely organized absolute monarchy, whose head concentrated in his person the entire authority of the Church, and was the source of all the ecclesiastical law (conditor juris), issuing the decrees of general councils in his own name, and claiming the right to revoke or modify the decrees of former councils - indeed, to make exceptions or to set aside altogether anything which did not rest upon the dictates of divine or natural law.

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  • (2) Basilica, a compilation from the different parts of the Justinian Corpus Juris, subsequently the text-book for the study of law.

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  • "Suprematum illi tribuo qui non tantum domi subditos manu militari regit, sed et qui exercitum extra fines ducere et armis, foederibus, legationibus, ac caeteris juris gentium functionibus aliquid momenti ad rerum Europae generalium summam conferre potest" (Leibnitz, Opera, 4.333).

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  • Late in life, in 1518, he began the study of jurisprudence at the university of Basel, and in 1519 took the degree of doctor juris.

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  • His most important works were Introductio in controversies juris civilis recentioris (Jena, 1771) and Geschichte der in Deutschland geltenden Rechte (Jena, 1780).

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  • He then explains how he verified the canon, and so found that there were no essential errors in it, although there were a few inaccuracies near the beginning of the quadrant, and he proceeds, " Haec to obiter scire volui, ut quibus to methodis incesseris, quas non dubito et plurimas et ingeniosissimas tibi in promptu esse, eas publici juris fieri, mihi saltem (puto et caeteris) scires fore gratissimum; eoque percepto, tua promissa folio 57, in debitum cecidisse intelligeres."

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  • This partial civitas does not seem to have been entirely replaced, as in Italy, by the grant of full privileges to the communities possessing it, and the distinction survived for some time in the provinces between coloniae, municipia juris Romani, and municipia juris Latini.

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  • Authorities.-C. Bruns, Fontes juris romani, c. III., No.

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  • Compensation, in its most familiar sense, is however a nomen juris for the reparation or satisfaction made to the owners of property which is taken by the state or by local authorities or by the promoters of parliamentary undertakings, under statutory authority, for public purposes.

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  • On his return to Rome, about 1622, he took his degree as Doctor utriusque juris, and then became captain of infantry in the regiment of Colonna, which took part in the war in the Valtelline.

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  • He insisted on the imperative duty of bishops and clergy to reside in their benefices, publishing at Venice (1547) his discourse to the council De necessaria residentia personali, which he treated as juris divini.

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  • Gregory did good service, moreover, by his reform of the calendar which bears his name, by his emended edition of the Corpus juris canonici and by the creation of nunciatures.

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  • Propaganda: De Martinis, Juris pontificii de Propaganda Fide, &c. (Rome, 1888, &c.); Collectanea S.

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  • Goldast, Gollectio constitutionum imperialium (1613; new and enlarged edition, 1673); the Capitulationes imperatorum et regum Romana-Germanorum (Strassburg, 1851) of Johann Limngus, and the Corpus juris Germanici antiqui (Berlin, 1824) of F.

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  • C. von Carmer (1721-1801) on the basis of the Project des Corporis Juris Fridericiani, completed in the year 1749-1751 by the eminent jurist Samuel von Cocceji (1679-1755).

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  • Before entering on this, however, he wisely took the preliminary step of settling the more important of the legal questions as to which the older jurists had been divided in opinion, and which had therefore remained sources of difficulty, a difficulty aggra 1 See, for an account of the instructions given to the commission, the constitution Haec quae, prefixed to the revised Codex in the Corpus juris civilis.

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  • They may be found printed in any edition of the Corpus juris civilis.

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  • This Corpus juris, which bears and immortalizes Justinian's name, consists of the four books described above: (1) The authorized collection of imperial ordinances (Codex constitutionum); (2) the authorized collection of extracts from the great jurists (Digesta or Pandectae); (3) the elementary handbook (Institutiones); (4) the unauthorized collection of constitutions subsequent to the Codex (Novellae).

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  • The Corpus Juris of Justinian continued to be, with naturally a few additions in the ordinances of succeeding emperors, the chief law-book of the Roman world till the time of the Macedonian dynasty when, towards the end of the 9th century, a new system was prepared and issued by those sovereigns, which we know as the Basilica.

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  • In the western provinces, which had been wholly severed from the empire before the publication of the Basilica, the law as settled by Justinian held its ground; but copies of the Corpus Juris were extremely rare, nor did the study of it revive until the end of the 1 ith century.

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  • The best edition is that of Friedberg (Corpus juris canonici, Leipzig, 1879).

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  • His most important work was the Corpus juris civilis, originally published at Geneva in 1583, which went through some twenty editions, the most valuable of them being that printed by the Elzevirs at Amsterdam in 1633 and the Leipzig edition of 1740.

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  • From 1839 to 1845 Wolfgang studied law at Bonn, Jena, Heidelberg and Berlin, taking his degree of doctor juris at Heidelberg in 1845.

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  • His father, proud of his son's steady application and success, sent him the costly present of a Corpus Juris.

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  • The first to publish a general collection of treaties was Leibnitz, whose Codex juris gentium, containing documents from 1097 to 5497, " ea quae sola inter liberos populos legum sunt loco " appeared in 1693, and was followed in 1700 by the Mantissa.

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  • Wenck's Corpus juris gentium recentissimi (3 vols.

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  • IRNERIUS (Hirnerius, Hyrnerius, Iernerius, Gernerius, Guarnerius, Warnerius, Wernerius, Yrnerius), Italian jurist, sometimes referred to as "lucerna juris."

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  • He continued his studies at Berlin and Bonn, and, having graduated doctor juris, attended lectures at the Ecole de Droit in Paris.

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  • OBLIGATION, in law, a term derived from the Roman law, in which obligatio signified a tie of law (vinculum juris) whereby one person is bound to perform or forbear some act for another.

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  • In English law obligation is used in at least four senses - (1) any duty imposed by law; (2) the special duty created by a vinculum juris; (3) not the duty, but the evidence of the duty - that is to say, an instrument under seal, otherwise called a bond; (4) the operative part of a bond.

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  • A perfect obligation is one which is directly enforceable by legal proceedings; an imperfect or moral obligation (the naturalis obligatio of Roman law) is one in which the vinculum juris is in some respects incomplete, so that it cannot be directly enforced, though it is not entirely destitute of legal effect.

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  • Schlyter (1795-1888) as Corpus juris Sveo-Gotorum antiqui (4 vols., 1827-1869).

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  • The authorities upon the common law in South Africa are: the Dutch commentators upon the civil law, the statute law of Holland, the decisions of the Dutch courts, and, failing these, the corpus juris civilis itself.

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  • persons not sui juris detained by those not entitled to their guardianship or lunatics, or persons kidnapped, habeas corpus ad subjiciendum seems not to have been the ordinary common law remedy.

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  • Professor de Louter defines it as " une servitude du droit des gens (servitus juris gentium), et qui differe de la servitude du droit priv y en ce qu'elle ne constitue pas un droit reel (jus in re aliena) mais un droit entre deux personnes de droit international (subjecta juris gentium) " (Revue de droit international, 18 99, p. 33 0).

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  • He defined his problem as the quid juris or the question of the validity of knowledge, not its quid facti or the laws of the empirical genesis and evolution of intellection (to use Croom Robertson's phraseology).

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  • Pitra, Juris Ecclesiastici Graecorum Historia et Monumenta, i.

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  • As to the expression jus canonicum, it implies the systematic codification of ecclesiastical legislation, and had no existence previous to the labours which resulted in the Corpus juris canonici.

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  • With regard to the texts now in force, the name of jus antiquum, ancient law, has been given to the laws previous to the Corpus' juris canonici; the legislation of this Corpus has been called jus novum, new law; and finally, the name of recent law, jus novissimum, has been given to the law established by the council of Trent aid subsequent papal constitutions.

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  • The Decretum of Gratian and the Corpus Juris Canonici.

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  • On the other hand, the Decretum actually enjoys a certain public authority which is unique; for centuries it has been the text on which has been founded the instruction in canon law in all the universities; it has been glossed and commented on by the most illustrious canonists; it has become, without being a body of laws, the first part of the Corpus juris canonici, and as such it has been cited, corrected and edited by the popes.

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  • This is why we find in them hardly any documents earlier than the time of Gratian, and also why canonists have 1 See Laurin, Introductio in corpus juris canonici, c. vii.

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  • This is the division adopted in all the official collections of the Corpus juris.

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  • This first official code was the basis of the second part of the Corpus juris canonici.

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  • It includes the constitutions subsequent to were included in the edition of Jean Chappuis in 150o; they passed into the later editions, and are considered as forming part of the Corpus juris canonici.

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  • Thus was closed, as the canonists say, the Corpus juris canonici; but this expression, which is familiar to us nowadays, is only a bibliographical term.

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  • Though we find in the 15th « century, for example, at the council of Basel the The Corpus juris expression corpus juris, obviously suggested by the Corpus juris civilis, not even the official edition of Gregory XIII.

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  • has as its title the words Corpus juris canonici, and we do not meet with this title till the Lyons edition of 1671.

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  • The history of the canonical collections forming the Corpus juris would not be complete without an account of the labours of which they were the object.

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  • 1271), commonly called (cardinalis) Hostiensis, whose Summa Hostiensis or Summa aurea is a work of the very highest order; Wilhelmus Durantis or Durandus, Joannes Andreae, Nicolas de Tudeschis (abbas siculus), &c. The 15th century produced few original treatises; but after the council of Trent the Corpus juris was again commented on by distinguished canonists, e.g.

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  • councils of Lyons, and is arranged in books and titles, as above described; the last title, de regulis juris, contains no less than eighty-eight legal axioms, mostly borrowed from Roman law.

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  • It has in no way undermined the official status of the Corpus juris; but it has completed the legislation of the latter in many important respects, and in some cases reformed it.

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  • The laws are formulated in general terms, and the decisions in particular cases relegated to the sphere of juris prudence; and the canonists have definitely lost the function which fell to them in the 12th and 13th centuries: they receive the law on authority and no longer have to deduce it from the texts.

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  • If we now consider the laws in themselves, we shall find that the dispersed condition of the legislative documents has not been modified since the closure of the Corpus juris; on the contrary, the enormous number of pontifical constitutions, and of decrees emanating from the Roman Congregations, has greatly aggravated the situation; moreover, the attempts which have been made to resume the interrupted process of codification have entirely failed.

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  • Mill's saying: " All ages of English history have given one 1 The history of this commission and the rules which it followed for editing the Decretum, will he found in Laurin, Introductio in corpus juris canonici, p. 63, or in the Prolegomena to Friedberg's edition of the Decretum.

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  • This collection has been of some service, and appears as an appendix in many editions of the Corpus juris; the chief reason for its failure is that it has no official sanction.

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  • Immediately after the publication of the official edition of the Corpus juris, Gregory XIII.

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  • Laurin, Introductio in Corpus juris canonici (Freiburg, 1889); Tardif, Histoire des sources du droit canonique (Paris, 1887).

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  • For the Greek Church: Pitra, Juris ecclesiae graecorum historia et monuments (Rome, 1864); the later history of the Greek law: Zachariae, Historiae juris graecorum delineatio (Heidelberg, 1839) Mortreuil, Histoire du droit byzantin (Paris, 1843-1846); the recent texts in the Conciliorum Collectio lacensis, vol.

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  • Papp-Szilagyi, Enchiridion juris eccl.

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  • Periodicals: Analecta juris pontificii, ed.

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  • But though one of the fontes juris Scotiae, canon law never was of itself authoritative in Scotland.

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  • Much of it, no doubt, was borrowed from the Corpus juris canonici and the English provincial canons.

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  • Of his other works, the more important are the Roman Chronology to the Time of Caesar (1858), a work written in conjunction with his brother August; his editions of the Monumentum Ancyranum and of the Digest in the Corpus juris civilis, and of the Chronica of Cassiodorus in Monumenta Germaniae historica, the Auctores antiquissimi section of which was under his supervision.

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  • By the canon law is meant, substantially, the contents of the Corpus juris canonici, which have been largely superseded or added to by, e.g.

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  • These furnish, with the canons of the councils, the chief source of the legislation of the church, and form the greater part of the Corpus Juris.

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  • This clerical side of the parish bounds-beating was one of the religious functions prohibited by the Injunctions of Queen Elizabeth; but it was then ordered that the perambulation should continue to be performed as a quasi-secular function, so that evidence of the boundaries of parishes, &c. might be preserved (Gibson, Codex juris Ecclesiastici Anglicani (1761) pp. 213-214).

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  • A law degree is known as a Juris Doctor or Doctor of Jurisprudence.

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  • The degree of juris doctor (J.D.) is offered by the USD School of Law.

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  • Juris Canon.

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  • Sanguineti, Juris ecc. inst.

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