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judg

judg

judg Sentence Examples

  • 8), priests (Judg.

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  • Of the many Jewish bearers of this name, three are well known: (1) the grandson of Moses, who was priest at Dan (Judg.

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  • Apart from its share in the war against Sisera (Judg.

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  • This stands in striking contrast to other records of the partial successes of individual groups (Judg.

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  • The best historical narratives belong to Israel and Gilead; Judah scarcely appears, and in a relatively old poetical account of a great fight of the united tribes against a northern adversary lies outside the writer's horizon or interest (Judg.

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  • xxxiv., xxxviii.; Judg.

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  • A vaunting challenge to Joash (of Israel) gave rise to one of the two fables that are preserved in the Old Testament (Judg.

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  • Judg.

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  • Against the former is the fact that although certain groups are ultimately found in Judah (Judg.

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  • Hence it is noteworthy that the late editor of Judges has given the first place to Othniel, a Kenizzite, and therefore of Edomite affinity, though subsequently reckoned as a Judaean (Judg i.

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  • 2), Shaalbim, Har-heres and Aijalon (Judg.

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  • 1-9, Judg.

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  • Apparently it was here, too, that the Danites found a settlement (Judg.

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  • DELILAH, in the Bible, the heroine of Samson's last love-story and the cause of his downfall (Judg.

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  • For a while the ark seems to have been deposited here (Judg.

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  • 27), and it was a place for consulting the oracle (Judg.

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  • I; Judg.

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  • The city named Gilead (Judg.

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  • Baal-berith or El-berith of Shechem (Judg.

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  • 1-3), or by the tribes Judah and Simeon (Judg.

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  • Hence we find them taking part with Ammonites and Midianites (Judg.

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  • Twice Amalek seems to be mentioned as occupying central Palestine (Judg.

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  • According to the traditions, the original territory of the two tribes was the country lying immediately on the east of the Dead Sea, and of the lower half of the Jordan, having the Jabbok for its northern boundary; and of this tract the Ammonites laid claim to the northern portion between the Arnon and the Jabbok, out of which they had expelled the Zamzummim (Judg.

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  • The revelation of the name to Moses was made at a mountain sacred to Yahweh (the mountain of God) far to the south of Palestine, in a region where the forefathers of the Israelites had never roamed, and in the territory of other tribes; and long after the settlement in Canaan this region continued to be regarded as the abode of Yahweh (Judg.

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  • See also Judg.

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  • In early Israel it was considered natural to worship Yahweh by means of images (cp. the story of Gideon, Judg.

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  • 26, Judg.

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  • 19; Judg.

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  • perhaps Judg.

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  • 14 sqq.; Judg.

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  • 14; Judg.

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  • Northwards, Ephraim lost itself in Manasseh, even if it did not actually include it (Judg.

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  • Occasionally Israelites as well as aliens fall under the curse (Judg.

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  • 32 seq.; Judg.

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  • 90.5, of Soma) that it "cheers the heart of gods" (in the speech of the vine, Judg.

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  • Like the teraphim it was part of the common stock of Hebrew cult; it is borne (rather than worn) by persons acting in a priestly character (Samuel at Shiloh, priests of Nob, David), it is part of the worship of individuals (Gideon at Ophrah), and is found in a private shrine with a lay attendant (Micah; Judg.

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  • Here it must suffice to remark that the ark, too, was also an object for ascertaining the divine will (especially Judg.

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  • Again, in the story of Micah's shrine and the removal of the sacred objects and the Levite priest by the Danites, parallel narratives have been used: the graven and molten images of Judg.

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  • Finally, according to Judg.

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  • Finally, if there is no decisive evidence for the view that it was an image (Judg.

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  • your own eyes " is explained to refer to adultery, after the words of Samson " she is pleasing in my eyes " (Judg.

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  • 2 None of these passages belong to the very oldest thread of Pentateuchal story, and similarly Deborah is called prophetess only in the later account (Judg.

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  • 4), not in the song (Judg.

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  • But this list of forty names, corresponding to the years of wandering, is from a post-exilic source, and may be based merely upon a knowledge of caravan-routes; even if it be of older origin, it is of secondary value since it represents a tradition differing notably from that in the earlier narratives themselves, and these on inspection confirm Judg.

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  • 1-3 the Israelites (a generalizing amplification) captured Hormah, on the way to Beersheba, and subsequently the clan Caleb and the Kenites (the clan of Moses' father-in-law) are found in Judah (Judg.

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  • It is called el Muntar, "the watch tower," and is supposed to be the mountain "before (or facing) Hebron," to which Samson carried the gates of Gaza (Judg.

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  • The chief towns of ancient Phoenicia, as we know of them from the Amarna tablets (15th century B.C.) and from Egyptian, Assyrian and the Old Testament documents, were the following: Acco (now Acre or Akka, Judg.

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  • 5; Judg.

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  • 8; Judg.

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  • from each), frequently referred to in the Bible as the southern limit of Palestine ("Dan to Beersheba," Judg.

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  • Jotham's apologue, Judg.

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  • 8 sqq., and Samson's riddle, Judg.

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  • That there were harlots and adulteresses in Israel from an early time is shown by such passages as Judg.

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  • However, the Hebrews themselves have preserved, in the proverbial expression " from Dan to Beersheba " (Judg.

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  • These preserve old poetical literature (Judg.

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  • The author of the chapter cannot have had Joshua or his history in his eye at all, and the words "and it came to pass after the death of Joshua" in Judg.

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  • In Judg.

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  • From this point of view the parts of the book are by no means all of equal value; critical analysis shows that often parallel or distinct narratives have been fused together, and that, whilst the older stories gave more prominence to ordinary human motives and combinations, 1 This is confirmed by the circumstance that in Judg.

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  • 1-27, a late [Ephraimite] record inserted by a second Deuteronomic hand, and xxiii., D) appears both from their contents and from the fact that Judg.

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  • The general stand-point of the stories (esp. Judg.

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  • represents central Palestine separated by Canaanite cities from tribes to the south and north; it is the situation recognized in Judg.

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  • Asher is blamed for taking no part in the fight against Sisera (Judg.

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  • 17), and although it shares with Zebulun and Naphtali in Gideon's defeat of the Midianites (Judg.

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  • Lying as it did in the closest proximity to Phoenicians and Aramaeans, its population must have been exceptionally mixed, and the description of the occupation of Palestine in Judg.

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  • 28-32; Judg.

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  • 16, 22), and the modern Wadi el-Fikreh, in which the "Scorpion pass" was probably situated (Judg.

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  • Petra is usually identified with the biblical Sela, unless this latter is to be placed at the south end of the Dead Sea (Judg.

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  • In Husham, the third king, several scholars (Gratz, Klostermann, Marquart, &c.) have recognized the true adversary of Othniel (q.v.; Judg.

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  • The defeat of Midian in the land of Moab by his successor Hadad has been associated with the Midianite invasion in the time of Gideon (q.v.; Judg.

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  • 2; Judg.

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  • He was the favourite of his father and brothers (with which contrast the spirit of the stories in Judg.

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  • It is a curious feature that its noted slingers were said to be left-handed (Judg.

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  • n7,?, Judg.

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  • 29; Judg.

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  • Jethro was invited to accompany the people into the promised land, and later, we find his clan settling in the south of Judah (Judg.

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  • Further (c) the capture of Hebron and Debir is ascribed to Judah who gives them to Caleb (Judg.

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  • The only incident in its history recorded in the Bible (the spoliation by Samson, Judg.

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  • See, for example, Judg.

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  • 47, Judg.

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  • upon the story of Jephthah's daughter (Judg.

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  • On his way to Haran he stops at Bethel (formerly Luz, according to Judg.

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  • 19, Judg.

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  • It was otherwise known for an annual religious ceremony, the traditional origin of which is related in the story of Jephthah's vow and sacrifice (Judg.

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  • It was the scene of the coronation (a religious ceremony) of Abimelech (Judg.

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  • The prophetess Deborah dwelt under a palm-tree near Bethel (Judg.

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  • Bochim (" weeping") elsewhere receives its name when an angel appeared to the Israelites (Judg.

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  • 13; see Judg.

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  • We reach thus approximately the age when post-Deuteronomic editors were able to utilize such records as Judg.

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  • 1), and Gaza (Judg.

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  • Little is known of his cult (Judg.

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  • 9; Judg.

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  • 22, Josh.xxiv.I 5, Judg.

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  • 14-20, Judg.

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  • The latter finds no place in the present history, although the local story of Jephthah's deliverance of Gilead (Judg.

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  • xi.) has been treated as the occasion of a general Ammonite oppression, which leads to an Israelite gathering, also at Mizpah (Judg.

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  • (cp. Judg.

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  • 63; Judg.

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  • The close interconnexion of Judg.

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  • xii.) belongs to the Deuteronomic and later account of Saul's rise, and closes the period of (a) the Israelite " judges " (see Judg.

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  • On the other hand, Judg.

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  • This finds support (a) in the internal evidence for the later addition of Judg.

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  • xvii.-xxi., and of certain portions of the opening chapters of I Samuel; (b) in the absence of any continuity in the intervening history; and (c) in the material relationship between portions of the highly composite Judg.

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  • 26, Abiathar bore the ark, and while some traditions traced its history to Shiloh, or even found it at Bethel (Judg.

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  • 15) compare the similar notices in Judg.

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  • On Judg.

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  • That Judg 11 thinks in terms of consecrated virginity is therefore improbable 22.

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  • The majority, in which Cardinal Manning pla t ed a very active part, took their stand on theological reasons o the strongest kind; they invoked the promises of Our Lord o St Peter: " Thou art Peter, and upon this rock will I build y Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against her " and again, " I have prayed for thee, Peter, that thy faith ail not; and do thou in thy turn confirm thy brethren "; they showed the popes, in the course of the ages, acting as the g ardians and judges of the faith, arousing or welcoming dogmati controversies and authoritatively settling them, exercising the supreme direction in the councils and sanctioning their decis ons; they explained that the few historical difficulties did not in olve any dogmatic defect in the teaching of the popes; they i sisted upon the necessity of a supreme tribunal giving judg ent in the name of the whole of the scattered Church; and finally, they considered that the definition had become opportu e for the very reason that under the pretext of its inopportuneness the doctrine itself was being attacked.

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  • It was the city of palm trees of the ancient record of the Israelite invasion preserved in part in Judg.

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  • 8), priests (Judg.

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  • Of the many Jewish bearers of this name, three are well known: (1) the grandson of Moses, who was priest at Dan (Judg.

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  • Apart from its share in the war against Sisera (Judg.

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  • This stands in striking contrast to other records of the partial successes of individual groups (Judg.

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    0
  • The best historical narratives belong to Israel and Gilead; Judah scarcely appears, and in a relatively old poetical account of a great fight of the united tribes against a northern adversary lies outside the writer's horizon or interest (Judg.

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  • xxxiv., xxxviii.; Judg.

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  • A vaunting challenge to Joash (of Israel) gave rise to one of the two fables that are preserved in the Old Testament (Judg.

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  • Against the former is the fact that although certain groups are ultimately found in Judah (Judg.

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  • Hence it is noteworthy that the late editor of Judges has given the first place to Othniel, a Kenizzite, and therefore of Edomite affinity, though subsequently reckoned as a Judaean (Judg i.

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  • 2), Shaalbim, Har-heres and Aijalon (Judg.

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  • 1-9, Judg.

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  • Apparently it was here, too, that the Danites found a settlement (Judg.

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  • and xxiii.) find their analogy in Caleb's overthrow of the sons of Anak (Judg.

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  • DELILAH, in the Bible, the heroine of Samson's last love-story and the cause of his downfall (Judg.

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  • For a while the ark seems to have been deposited here (Judg.

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  • 27), and it was a place for consulting the oracle (Judg.

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  • I; Judg.

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  • The city named Gilead (Judg.

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  • Baal-berith or El-berith of Shechem (Judg.

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  • 1-3), or by the tribes Judah and Simeon (Judg.

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  • Hence we find them taking part with Ammonites and Midianites (Judg.

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  • Twice Amalek seems to be mentioned as occupying central Palestine (Judg.

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  • According to the traditions, the original territory of the two tribes was the country lying immediately on the east of the Dead Sea, and of the lower half of the Jordan, having the Jabbok for its northern boundary; and of this tract the Ammonites laid claim to the northern portion between the Arnon and the Jabbok, out of which they had expelled the Zamzummim (Judg.

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  • The revelation of the name to Moses was made at a mountain sacred to Yahweh (the mountain of God) far to the south of Palestine, in a region where the forefathers of the Israelites had never roamed, and in the territory of other tribes; and long after the settlement in Canaan this region continued to be regarded as the abode of Yahweh (Judg.

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  • See also Judg.

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  • In early Israel it was considered natural to worship Yahweh by means of images (cp. the story of Gideon, Judg.

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  • 26, Judg.

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  • 19; Judg.

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  • perhaps Judg.

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  • 14 sqq.; Judg.

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  • 14; Judg.

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  • Northwards, Ephraim lost itself in Manasseh, even if it did not actually include it (Judg.

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  • Occasionally Israelites as well as aliens fall under the curse (Judg.

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  • 32 seq.; Judg.

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  • 90.5, of Soma) that it "cheers the heart of gods" (in the speech of the vine, Judg.

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    0
  • Like the teraphim it was part of the common stock of Hebrew cult; it is borne (rather than worn) by persons acting in a priestly character (Samuel at Shiloh, priests of Nob, David), it is part of the worship of individuals (Gideon at Ophrah), and is found in a private shrine with a lay attendant (Micah; Judg.

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  • Here it must suffice to remark that the ark, too, was also an object for ascertaining the divine will (especially Judg.

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    0
  • Again, in the story of Micah's shrine and the removal of the sacred objects and the Levite priest by the Danites, parallel narratives have been used: the graven and molten images of Judg.

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  • Finally, according to Judg.

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  • Finally, if there is no decisive evidence for the view that it was an image (Judg.

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  • your own eyes " is explained to refer to adultery, after the words of Samson " she is pleasing in my eyes " (Judg.

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  • 2 None of these passages belong to the very oldest thread of Pentateuchal story, and similarly Deborah is called prophetess only in the later account (Judg.

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  • 4), not in the song (Judg.

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  • But this list of forty names, corresponding to the years of wandering, is from a post-exilic source, and may be based merely upon a knowledge of caravan-routes; even if it be of older origin, it is of secondary value since it represents a tradition differing notably from that in the earlier narratives themselves, and these on inspection confirm Judg.

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  • 1-3 the Israelites (a generalizing amplification) captured Hormah, on the way to Beersheba, and subsequently the clan Caleb and the Kenites (the clan of Moses' father-in-law) are found in Judah (Judg.

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    0
  • It is called el Muntar, "the watch tower," and is supposed to be the mountain "before (or facing) Hebron," to which Samson carried the gates of Gaza (Judg.

    0
    0
  • The chief towns of ancient Phoenicia, as we know of them from the Amarna tablets (15th century B.C.) and from Egyptian, Assyrian and the Old Testament documents, were the following: Acco (now Acre or Akka, Judg.

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  • 5; Judg.

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  • 8; Judg.

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  • from each), frequently referred to in the Bible as the southern limit of Palestine ("Dan to Beersheba," Judg.

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  • Jotham's apologue, Judg.

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  • 8 sqq., and Samson's riddle, Judg.

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  • That there were harlots and adulteresses in Israel from an early time is shown by such passages as Judg.

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    0
  • However, the Hebrews themselves have preserved, in the proverbial expression " from Dan to Beersheba " (Judg.

    0
    0
  • These preserve old poetical literature (Judg.

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    0
  • The author of the chapter cannot have had Joshua or his history in his eye at all, and the words "and it came to pass after the death of Joshua" in Judg.

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    0
  • In Judg.

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    0
  • From this point of view the parts of the book are by no means all of equal value; critical analysis shows that often parallel or distinct narratives have been fused together, and that, whilst the older stories gave more prominence to ordinary human motives and combinations, 1 This is confirmed by the circumstance that in Judg.

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    0
  • 1-27, a late [Ephraimite] record inserted by a second Deuteronomic hand, and xxiii., D) appears both from their contents and from the fact that Judg.

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  • The general stand-point of the stories (esp. Judg.

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    0
  • represents central Palestine separated by Canaanite cities from tribes to the south and north; it is the situation recognized in Judg.

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    0
  • Asher is blamed for taking no part in the fight against Sisera (Judg.

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    0
  • 17), and although it shares with Zebulun and Naphtali in Gideon's defeat of the Midianites (Judg.

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    0
  • Lying as it did in the closest proximity to Phoenicians and Aramaeans, its population must have been exceptionally mixed, and the description of the occupation of Palestine in Judg.

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  • 28-32; Judg.

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    0
  • 16, 22), and the modern Wadi el-Fikreh, in which the "Scorpion pass" was probably situated (Judg.

    0
    0
  • Petra is usually identified with the biblical Sela, unless this latter is to be placed at the south end of the Dead Sea (Judg.

    0
    0
  • In Husham, the third king, several scholars (Gratz, Klostermann, Marquart, &c.) have recognized the true adversary of Othniel (q.v.; Judg.

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    0
  • The defeat of Midian in the land of Moab by his successor Hadad has been associated with the Midianite invasion in the time of Gideon (q.v.; Judg.

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    0
  • 2; Judg.

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    0
  • He was the favourite of his father and brothers (with which contrast the spirit of the stories in Judg.

    0
    0
  • It is a curious feature that its noted slingers were said to be left-handed (Judg.

    0
    0
  • n7,?, Judg.

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    0
  • 29; Judg.

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    0
  • Jethro was invited to accompany the people into the promised land, and later, we find his clan settling in the south of Judah (Judg.

    0
    0
  • Further (c) the capture of Hebron and Debir is ascribed to Judah who gives them to Caleb (Judg.

    0
    0
  • The only incident in its history recorded in the Bible (the spoliation by Samson, Judg.

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    0
  • See, for example, Judg.

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  • 47, Judg.

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  • upon the story of Jephthah's daughter (Judg.

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    0
  • On his way to Haran he stops at Bethel (formerly Luz, according to Judg.

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    0
  • 19, Judg.

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    0
  • It was otherwise known for an annual religious ceremony, the traditional origin of which is related in the story of Jephthah's vow and sacrifice (Judg.

    0
    0
  • It was the scene of the coronation (a religious ceremony) of Abimelech (Judg.

    0
    0
  • The prophetess Deborah dwelt under a palm-tree near Bethel (Judg.

    0
    0
  • Bochim (" weeping") elsewhere receives its name when an angel appeared to the Israelites (Judg.

    0
    0
  • 13; see Judg.

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    0
  • We reach thus approximately the age when post-Deuteronomic editors were able to utilize such records as Judg.

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    0
  • 1), and Gaza (Judg.

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  • Little is known of his cult (Judg.

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    0
  • 9; Judg.

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  • 22, Josh.xxiv.I 5, Judg.

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    0
  • 14-20, Judg.

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    0
  • The latter finds no place in the present history, although the local story of Jephthah's deliverance of Gilead (Judg.

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    0
  • xi.) has been treated as the occasion of a general Ammonite oppression, which leads to an Israelite gathering, also at Mizpah (Judg.

    0
    0
  • (cp. Judg.

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    0
  • 63; Judg.

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    0
  • The close interconnexion of Judg.

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  • xii.) belongs to the Deuteronomic and later account of Saul's rise, and closes the period of (a) the Israelite " judges " (see Judg.

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  • Although the pre-monarchical age is viewed as one of kinglike " judges," the chiefs are rather local heroes (so Ehud, Gideon, Jephthah), and the boisterous giant Samson (Judg.

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  • On the other hand, Judg.

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  • This finds support (a) in the internal evidence for the later addition of Judg.

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  • xvii.-xxi., and of certain portions of the opening chapters of I Samuel; (b) in the absence of any continuity in the intervening history; and (c) in the material relationship between portions of the highly composite Judg.

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    0
  • 26, Abiathar bore the ark, and while some traditions traced its history to Shiloh, or even found it at Bethel (Judg.

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  • 15) compare the similar notices in Judg.

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  • On Judg.

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  • That Judg 11 thinks in terms of consecrated virginity is therefore improbable 22.

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