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juba

juba

juba Sentence Examples

  • At the end of the war, Caesar bestowed upon Bocchus part of the territory of Massinissa, Juba's ally, which was recovered after Caesar's murder by Massinissa's son Arabion.

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  • Cleopatra's daughter by Antony (Cleopatra Selene) was married in 25 to Juba II.

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  • to the mouth of the Juba.

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  • from British East Africa by the Juba.

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  • from the coast, and further inland is Dolo at the confluence of the Daua and Ganale to form the Juba.

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  • from the Indian Ocean, to the Juba.

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  • Of the three headstreams, the Web, the Ganale and the Daua, the Ganale (or Ganana) is the central river and the true upper course of the Juba.

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  • Below the Daua the river, now known as the Juba, receives no tributary of importance.

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  • On the west a series of small lakes and backwaters receives water from the Juba during the rains.

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  • The date of Juba's death is by no means certain; it has been put between A.D.

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  • Juba's tomb, the so-called Tombeau de la Chretienne (see Algeria), is 71 m.

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  • that part which had been called Africa Nova before it was given to Juba.

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  • Juba's attention was distracted by a counter invasion of his territories by Bocchus the younger and Sittius; but, finding that his lieutenant Sabura was able to defend his interests, he rejoined the Pompeians with a large force, and shared the defeat at Thapsus.

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  • No one of the dependent dynasts found himself more imminently threatened by this peril than Juba king of Numidia.

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  • During the African war they invaded Numidia and conquered Cirta, the capital of the kingdom of Juba, who was thus obliged to abandon the idea of joining Metellus Scipio against Caesar.

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  • At the end of the war, Caesar bestowed upon Bocchus part of the territory of Massinissa, Juba's ally, which was recovered after Caesar's murder by Massinissa's son Arabion.

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  • Cleopatra's daughter by Antony (Cleopatra Selene) was married in 25 to Juba II.

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  • to the mouth of the Juba.

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  • The country between the Tana and Juba rivers now forms part of British East Africa, and in this article is not included in Somaliland.

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  • The incline is uniformly to the south-east, and apart from the few coast streams that reach the Gulf of Aden during the rains, all the running waters are collected in three rivers - the Nogal in the north, the Webi Shebeli in the centre, and the Juba (q.v.) I See also Abyssinia.

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  • But so slight is the precipitation that the Juba alone has a permanent discharge seawards.

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  • parallel with the coast, and then disappearing in a swampy depression (the Bali marshes) before reaching the Juba estuary.'

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  • There are wart hogs, baboons (maned and maneless varieties), a tree monkey, jumping shrews, two kinds of squirrel, a small hare, rock rabbits 2 It is probable that a divergent branch leaves the Shebeli some distance above the swamps and that at high water an overflow into the Juba occurs (see Geog.

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  • The Rahanwin, with numerous but little-known sub-groups, including, however, the powerful and warlike Abgals, Barawas, Gobrons, Tuni, Jidus and Kalallas, occupy in part the region between the Webi-Shebeli and Juba, but chiefly the territory extending from the Juba to the Tana, where they have long been in contact, mostly hostile, with the Wa-Pokomo and other Bantu peoples of the British East Africa Protectorate.

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  • In 1892 Captain Vittorio Bottego and a companion left Berbera and made their way past Imi to the upper Juba, which Bottego explored to its source, both travellers finally making their way via Lugh to the east coast.

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  • In1902-1903a survey of the Galla-Somali borderlands between Lake Rudolf and the upper Juba was executed by Captain P. Maud of the British army.

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  • Italian Somaliland Italian Somaliland extends on the coast from Bandar Ziyada, a point on the Gulf of Aden intersected by 49° E., eastward to Cape Guardafui, and thence southward to the mouth of the river Juba in o° 15' S.

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  • from British East Africa by the Juba.

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  • Yub (Jub) is a small town at the mouth of the Juba river.

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  • In the interior is Lugh, a populous city on the left bank of the Juba, about 240 m.

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  • from the coast, and further inland is Dolo at the confluence of the Daua and Ganale to form the Juba.

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  • But the most fertile district is the valley of the lower Juba, where for over 100 m.

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  • In 1908 a royal decree placed that part of the country between the Juba and the sultanate of Obbia under a civil governor.

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  • from the Indian Ocean, to the Juba.

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  • JUBA, or JUB, a river of East Africa, exceeding moo m.

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  • Of the three headstreams, the Web, the Ganale and the Daua, the Ganale (or Ganana) is the central river and the true upper course of the Juba.

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  • Below the Daua the river, now known as the Juba, receives no tributary of importance.

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  • On the west a series of small lakes and backwaters receives water from the Juba during the rains.

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  • the Juba enters the sea across a dangerous bar, which has only one fathom of water at high tide.

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  • rapids occur, the Juba is navigable by shallow-draught steamers, having a general depth of from 4 to 12 ft., though shallower in places.

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  • Below the mountainous region of the headstreams the Juba and its tributaries flow through a country generally arid away from the banks of the streams. The soil is sandy, covered either with thorn-scrub or rank grass, which in the rainy season affords herbage for the herds of cattle, sheep and camels owned by the Boran Gallas and the Somali who inhabit the district.

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  • above the mouth of the Juba, a road runs S.W.

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  • The lower Juba was ascended in 1865 in a steamer by Baron Karl von der Decken, who was murdered by Somali at Bardera, but the river system remained otherwise almost unknown until after 1890.

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  • Dundas of the British navy, while in1892-1893its headstreams were explored by the Italian officers, Captains Vittorio, Bottego and Grixoni, the former of whom disproved the supposed connexion of the Omo (see Rudolf, Lake) with the Juba system.

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  • In 31 B.C. Octavius gave up Numidia, or Africa Nova, to King Juba II.

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  • Five years later Augustus gave Mauretania and some Gaetulian districts to Juba, and received in exchange Numidia, which thus reverted to direct Roman control.

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  • Apart from the province of Constantine, Algeria is less rich in Roman remains than Tunisia; mention must, however, be made of the excavations of Victor Waille at Cherchel, where were found fine statues in the Greek style of the time of King Juba II.; of P. Gavault at Tigzirt (Rusuccuru), and finally of those of Stephane Gsell at Tipasa (basilica of St Salsa) and throughout the district of Setif and at Khamissa (Thuburticum Numidarum).

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  • The Guanches, now extinct as a distinct people, appear, from the study of skulls and bones discovered, to have resembled the Cro-Magnon race of the Quaternary age, and no real doubt is now entertained that they were an offshoot of the great race of Berbers which from the dawn of history has occupied northern Africa from Egypt to the Atlantic. Pliny the Elder, deriving his knowledge from the accounts of Juba, king of Mauretania, states that when visited by the Carthaginians under Hanno the archipelago was found by them to be uninhabited, but that they saw ruins of great buildings.

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  • Dicuil's reading was wide; he quotes from, or refers to, thirty Greek and Latin writers, including the classical Homer, Hecataeus, Herodotus, Thucydides, Virgil, Pliny and King Juba, the sub-classical Solinus, the patristic St Isidore and Orosius, and his contemporary the Irish poet Sedulius;-in particular, he professes to utilize the alleged surveys of the Roman world executed by order of Julius Caesar, Augustus and Theodosius (whether Theodosius the Great or Theodosius II.

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  • His Paraplus (or description of the coasts of India) probably formed part of the work, and, incorporated by Juba II.

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  • JUBA II., son of the above.

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  • Juba seems to have reigned in considerable prosperity, though in A.D.

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  • The date of Juba's death is by no means certain; it has been put between A.D.

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  • Juba, according to Pliny, who constantly refers to him, is mainly memorable for his writings.

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  • For the denarii of Juba II.

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  • Juba River >>

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  • The Kubr-er-Rumia - best known by its French name, Tombeau de la Chretienne, tradition making it the burial-place of the beautiful and unfortunate daughter of Count Julian - is near Kolea, and is known to be the tomb of the Mauretanian king Juba II.

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  • The latest event mentioned in his work is the death of Juba, king of Mauretania, which took place in A.D.

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  • Juba II.

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  • Juba's tomb, the so-called Tombeau de la Chretienne (see Algeria), is 71 m.

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  • In the geographical books Varro is supplemented by the topographical commentaries of Agrippa which were completed by the emperor Augustus; for his zoology he relies largely on Aristotle and on Juba, the scholarly Mauretanian king, studiorum claritate memorabilior quam regno (v.

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  • Juba is also his principal guide in botany.

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  • He married Glaphyra, the widow of his brother Alexander, though his wife and her second husband, Juba, king of Mauretania, were alive.

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  • In 25 B.C., after their deaths, Augustus gave the two kingdoms to Juba II.

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  • of Numidia (see under Juba), with the river Ampsaga as the eastern frontier (Plin.

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  • Juba and his son Ptolemaeus after him reigned till A.D.

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  • Caesariensis to the east of that river, the latter taking its name from the city Caesarea (formerly Iol), which Juba had thus named and adopted as his capital.

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  • It retained its independence till the time of Augustus, who in 25 B.C. bestowed the sovereignty of the previously existing kingdom upon Juba II., king of Numidia, at the same time uniting it with the western portion of Numidia, from the Mulucha to the Ampsaga, which received the name of Mauretania Caesariensis, while the province that had previously constituted the kingdom, or Mauretania proper, came to be known as Mauretania Tingitana (see Mauretania).

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  • The Romans learned of their existence through Juba, king of Mauretania, whose account of an expedition to the islands, made about 40 B.C., was preserved by the elder Pliny.

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  • The rest is carried off, almost due north by the Khor Baraka, which occasionally reaches the Red Sea south of Suakin; by the Hawash, which runs out in the saline lacustrine district near the head of Tajura Bay; by the Webi Shebeli (WabiShebeyli) and Juba, which flow S.E.

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  • The chief rivers of Somaliland, the Webi Shebeli and the Juba, have their rise on the south-eastern slopes of the Abyssinian escarpment, and the greater part of their course is through territory belonging to Abyssinia.

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  • Juba (Kings) >>

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  • After the death of Jugurtha as a captive at Rome in 106, the western part of his dominions was added to those of Bocchus, king of Mauretania, while the remainder (excluding perhaps the territory towards Cyrene) continued to be governed by native princes until the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, in which Juba I., then king of Numidia, who had espoused the cause of the Pompeians, was defeated by Caesar, and put an end to his own life (46 B.C.).

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  • Numidia, in the more restricted sense which it had now acquired, became for a short time a Roman province under the title of Africa Nova, but in the settlement of affairs after the battle of Actium it was restored to Juba II.

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  • (son of Juba I.), who had acquired the favour of Augustus.

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  • Soon afterwards, in 25 B.C., Juba was transferred to the throne of Mauretania, including the whole western portion of the ancient Numidian monarchy as far as the river Ampsaga, while the eastern part was added to the province of Africa, i.e.

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  • that part which had been called Africa Nova before it was given to Juba.

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  • The Rovuma, Rufiji, Tana, Juba and Webi Shebeli principally drain the outer slopes of the East African highlands, the last named losing itself in the sands in close proximity to the sea.

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  • An expedition was sent (1875) to the Juba River with that object, but it was withdrawn at the request of the British government, as it infringed the rights of the sultan of Zanzibar.

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  • a The Juba was quite unsuitable as a means of communication between the Indian Ocean and the Nile.

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  • The proposal made to Ismail by Gordon was to send an expedition to Mombasa and thence up the Tana River, but for some unexplained reason, or perhaps by mistake, the expedition was ordered to the Juba (see Col.

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  • JUBA I.

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  • In 49 Juba inflicted on the Caesarean army a crushing defeat, in which Curio was slain (Vell.

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  • Juba's attention was distracted by a counter invasion of his territories by Bocchus the younger and Sittius; but, finding that his lieutenant Sabura was able to defend his interests, he rejoined the Pompeians with a large force, and shared the defeat at Thapsus.

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  • At length, in despair, Juba killed Petreius, and sought the aid of a slave in despatching himself (46).

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  • Juba was a thorough savage; brave, treacherous, insolent and cruel.

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  • Juba II >>

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