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josiah

josiah

josiah Sentence Examples

  • 6-8)2 The Deuteronomic history of the monarchy actually ascribes to the Judaean king Josiah (621 B.C.) the suppression of the high-places, and states that the local priests were brought to Jerusalem and received support, but did not minister at the altar (2 Kings xxiii.

  • Josiah Royce in his lecture on The Conception of Immortality (1900) combines this argument of the soul's union with God with the argument of the incompleteness of man's life here: " Just because God is One, all our lives have various and unique places in the harmony of the divine life.

  • to Assyria, while the reformation in the reign of Josiah (621 B.C.) is conversely associated with the decay of Assyrian power after the death of Assur-bani-pal.

  • The closing years of the Judaean kingdom and the final destruction of the temple (586 B.C.) shattered the Messianic ideals cherished in the evening of Isaiah's lifetime and again in the opening years of the reign of Josiah.

  • xii.-xxvi.) is closely connected with the reformation in the reign of Josiah.

  • The book of Deuteronomy, in conjunction with the reformation of Josiah's reign (which synchronizes with the rapid decline of Assyria and the reviving prestige of Yahweh), appeared to mark the triumph of the great prophetic movement.

  • Sir Josiah Mason >>

  • Nevertheless, these places of cult remained some 300 years until almost the close of the monarchy, when their destruction is attributed to Josiah (§ 16).

  • Manasseh's son Amon fell in a court intrigue and " the people of the land," after avenging the murder, set up in his place the infant Josiah (637).

  • The assumption that the decay of Assyria awoke the national feeling of independence is perhaps justified by those events which made the greatest impression upon the compiler, and an account is given of Josiah's religious reforms, based upon a source apparently identical with that which described the work of Jehoash.

  • 5, 6), no social reform was possible; but now the young Josiah, the popular choice, was upon the throne.

  • The account of Josiah's work, like that of Hezekiah, is written by one of the Deuteronomic school: that is to say, the writer describes the promulgation of the teaching under which he lives.

  • Accordingly, in handling Josiah's successors the writer no longer refers to the high places.

  • But if Josiah carried out the reforms ascribed to him they were of no lasting effect.

  • On the other hand, the book of Deuteronomy has a characteristic social-religious side; its humanity, philanthropy and charity are the distinctive features of its laws, and Josiah's reputation (Jer.

  • - In Josiah's reign a new era was beginning in the history of the world.

  • Josiah at once interposed; it is uncertain whether, in spite of the power of Egypt, he had hopes of extending his kingdom, or whether the famous reformer was, like Manasseh, a vassal of Assyria.

  • The book of Kings gives the standpoint of a later Judaean writer, but Josiah's authority over a much larger area than Judah alone is suggested by xxiii.

  • 5 that Zedekiah would die in peace is not borne out by the history, nor does Josiah's fate agree with the promise in 2 Kings xxii.

  • Its ideals culminate in Josiah (§ 16, end), and there is a strong presumption that it is intended to impress upon the new era the lessons drawn from the past.

  • Whatever reforms Josiah actually accomplished, the restoration afforded the opportunity of bringing the Deuteronomic teaching into action; though it is more probable that Deuteronomy itself in the main is not much earlier than the second half of the 6th century B.C.'

  • Weighty reasons are brought also by conservative writers against the theory that Deuteronomy dates from or about the age of Josiah, and their objections to the " discovery " of a new law-roll apply equally to the " re-discovery " and promulgation of an old and authentic code.

  • The arguments of conservative writers involve concessions which, though often overlooked by their readers, are very detrimental to the position they endeavour to support, and the objections they bring against the theory of the introduction of new law-books (under a Josiah or an Ezra) apply with equal force to the promulgation of Mosaic teaching which had been admittedly ignored or forgotten.

  • As early as 1668, Sir Josiah Child, the millionaire governor of the East India company, pleaded for their naturalization on the score of their commercial utility.

  • The struggle was especially bitter during the administrations of the last three royal governors, Arthur Dobbs (1684-1765), William Tryon (1729-1788) and Josiah Martin (1737-1786).

  • In August 1771 Governor Tryon was succeeded by Governor Josiah Martin, who was soon engaged in spirited controversies with the assembly on questions pertaining to taxes, the southern boundary, and the attachment of property belonging to nonresidents.

  • William Tryon James Hasell, president of the council Josiah Martin.

  • JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS (1839-1903), American mathematical physicist, the fourth child and only son of Josiah Willard Gibbs (1790-1861), who was professor of sacred literature in Yale Divinity School from 1824 till his death, was born at New Haven on the 11th of February 1839.

  • Two years later, with that degree of moral courage which was one of his distinguishing characteristics, as it has been of his descendants, he, aided by Josiah Quincy, Jr., defended the British soldiers who were arrested after the "Boston Massacre," charged with causing the death of four persons, inhabitants of the colony.

  • Among the memorials to men of Massachusetts (a large part of them Bostonians) commemorated by monuments in the Common, the Public Garden, the grounds of the state house, the city hall, and other public places of the city, are statues of Charles Sumner, Josiah Quincy and John A.

  • Boston (2 vols., Boston, 1854; and later editions), and Old Landmarks and Historic Personages of Boston (Boston, 1873, and later editions); Josiah Quincy, A Municipal History of.

  • See the Life and Speeches of Thomas Corwin (Cincinnati, 1896), edited by Josiah Morrow; and an excellent character sketch, Thomas Corwin (Cincinnati, 1881), by A.

  • JOSIAH TATTNALL (1795-1871), American naval officer, was born.

  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.

  • In 1797 his wife died, and next year he married Catherine Allen, sister-in-law of Josiah and John Wedgwood, through whom he introduced Coleridge to the Morning Post.

  • JOSIAH (Heb.

  • Samaria thus lay within the grasp of Josiah, who may have entertained hopes of forming an independent power of his own.

  • The reign of Josiah is important for the biblical account of the great religious reforms which began in his eighteenth year, when he manifested interest in the repair of the Temple at Jerusalem.

  • Although the character of the reforms throws remarkable light upon the condition of religion in Judah in the time of Josiah, it is to be observed that the writings of the contemporary prophets (Jeremiah, Ezekiel) make it very questionable whether the narratives are thoroughly trustworthy for the history of the king's measures.

  • At the time of the reformation under Josiah, represented by Deuteronomy, the attempt was made to turn the family thank-offering of firstlings into a sacrificial rite performed by the priests in the Temple with the aid of the males of each household, who had to come up to Jerusalem but left the next morning to celebrate the Feast of Unleavened Bread in their homes.

  • On the latter tract a military post was established by Lieut.-Colonel Henry Leavenworth (1783-1834) in 1819, and in the following year the construction was begun of a fort at first named Fort St Anthony but renamed Fort Snelling in 1824 (two years after its completion) in honour of its builder and commander Colonel Josiah Snelling (1782-1829).

  • The date would fall between Josiah's reformation (621) and his death (609).

  • The most original statement is perhaps the view that the words of Isaiah were preserved orally by his disciples, and did not see the light (in a revised form) till a considerable time after the crystallization of the reforms of Josiah into laws.

  • In conjunction with Josiah Latimer Clark, with whom he entered into partnership in 1861, he invented improved methods of insulating submarine cables, and a paper on electrical standards read by them before the British Association in the same year led to the establishment of the British Association committee on that subject, whose work formed the foundations of the system still in use.

  • 11, where an allusion is seen by some to the mourning for King Josiah, slain in battle at Megiddo.

  • After the evacuation of Norfolk by the Confederates on the 9th of May Commodore Josiah Tattnall, then in command of the "Merrimac," being unable to take her up the James, sank her.

  • 1729), who called himself duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and who left two sons, Christian Ernest and Francis Josiah, who ruled the land together, the principle of primogeniture being introduced by the survivor of the two, Francis Josiah.

  • To promote the ends he had in view he suggested non-importation, instituted the Boston committees of correspondence, urged that a Continental Congress be called, sought out and introduced into public service such allies as John Hancock, Joseph Warren and Josiah Quincy, and wrote a vast number of articles for the newspapers, especially the Boston Gazette, over a multitude of signatures.

  • Josiah).

  • He was the tenth son of Josiah Franklin, and the eighth child and youngest son of ten children borne by Abiah Folger, his father's second wife.

  • "Yah[weh] raiseth up"), in the Bible, son of Josiah and king of Judah (2 Kings xxiii.

  • On the defeat of Josiah at Megiddo his younger brother Jehoahaz (or Shallum) was chosen by the Judaeans, but the Egyptian conquerer Necho summoned him to his headquarters at Riblah (south of Hamath on the Orontes) and removed him to Egypt, appointing in his stead Eliakim, whose name ("El[God] raiseth up") was changed to its better-known synonym, Jehoiakim.

  • Taylor, 10 Josiah Royce" and others.

  • In oratory, James Otis, Fisher Ames, Josiah Quincy, junr., Webster, Choate, Everett, Sumner, Winthrop and Wendell Phillips; and, in addition, in statesmanship, Samuel Adams, John Adams and John Quincy Adams. In fiction, Hawthorne and Mrs Stowe.

  • At the age of thirteen he accompanied his sister Emilia and her husband the Rev. Josiah Brewer (the parents of the distinguished judge of the Supreme Court, David J.

  • "JOSIAH ROYCE (1855-1916), American philosopher, was born at Grass Valley, Cal., Nov.

  • The defeat and death of the good king Josiah came through disobedience to the Divine will (2 Chron.

  • Thus, the reformation of Josiah has been thrust back from his eighteenth to his twelfth year (when he was nineteen years old) apparently because it was felt that so good a king would not:have tolerated the abuses of the land for so long a period,' but the result of this is to leave an interval of ten years between his conversion and the subsequent act of repentance (2 Chron.

  • and MANASSEH); the death of Josiah (2 Chron.

  • Here Josiah Wedgwood was born in 1730, his family having practised the manufacture in this locality for several generations, while he himself began work independently at the Ivy House pottery in 1759.

  • 2), subsequent history shows that the high-places, like the altars to heathen deities in Jerusalem itself, long remained undisturbed; it was the Deuteronomic reformation, ascribed to Josiah, which marked the great advance in the religion of Yahweh, and under its influence the history of the monarchy has been compiled.

  • A statue commemorates Josiah Wedgwood, born at Burslem in 1730; but other famous names in the pottery trade are more intimately connected with Stoke.

  • Thus Josiah Spode the second was born here in 1754, and had a great house at Penkhull, on the western outskirts of Stoke.

  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.

  • The Canaanite influence on the later organization of the Temple is clearly seen in the association of Temple prophets with the Temple priests under the control of the chief priest, which is often referred to by Jeremiah; even the viler ministers of sensual worship, the male and female prostitutes of the Phoenician temples, had found a place on Mt Zion and were only removed by Josiah's reformation.'

  • In the time of Josiah altar service and not the function of " teaching " has become the essential thing in priesthood (Deut.

  • He also set up societies, in accordance with the recommendations in Josiah Wedgwood's little book on the subject; and these exercised a great influence on the religious life of the people.

  • 5) down to Josiah (2 Kings xiii.

  • Jeremiah's first public appearance as a prophet was in the 13th year of Josiah (Jer.

  • There is little noticeable in Hobbes' dating of the prophets, though he considers it " not apparent " whether Amos wrote, as well as composed, his prophecy, or whether Jeremiah and the other prophets of the time of Josiah and Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai and Zechariah, who lived in the captivity, edited the prophecies ascribed to them.

  • 5, 6, to the earlier part of Josiah's reign.

  • Nay more, the reception of the book of Deuteronomy by king and people in the eighteenth year of Josiah shows what a hold the prophetic teaching had on the popular conscience..

  • The immediate result of Josiah's reformation was the complete dissolution of anything that could be called a political party of prophetic ideas; the priests and the ordinary prophets were satisfied with what had been accomplished; the old abuses began again, but the nation had received a reformed constitution and there was nothing more to be said.

  • Even in that earliest part of his book which is mainly a recapitulation of his experiences and work in the reign of Josiah, his tone is one of absolute hopelessness as to the future of the nation.

  • From January 1846 to 1849, as the successor of Josiah Quincy, he was president of Harvard College.

  • Mesheck Weare John Langdon John Sullivan John Langdon John Sullivan Josiah Bartlett State Governors.

  • Josiah Bartlett.

  • Chester Bradley Jordan Nahum Josiah Bachelder John McLane .

  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the Marine Museum, the Public Library (founded in 1854 by Josiah Little and containing about 45,000 volumes), the old Tracy mansion (built in 1771 or 1772), which forms part of the Public Library building, the Anna Jacques and Homoeopathic hospitals, homes for aged women and men, a Home for Destitute Children, Old South Church, in which is the tomb of George Whitefield, and the Young Men's Christian Association building, which is a memorial to George Henry Corliss (1817-1888), the inventor, erected by his widow, a native of Newburyport.

  • Josiah Tattnall.

  • Two months later, on the 9th of May, the Confederates abandoned the navy yard and evacuated Norfolk and Portsmouth, and the "Virginia" was destroyed by her commander, Josiah Tattnall.

  • Prof. Josiah Royce has suggested for this supposed form of hallucination the term "pseudo-presentiment."

  • The general plan of the open-hearth process was certainly conceived by Josiah Marshall Heath in 1845, if not indeed by Reaumur in 1722, but for lack of a furnace in which a high enough temperature could be generated it could not be carried out until the development of the Siemens regenerative gas furnace about 1860.

  • His other writings include: Sonnets and Other Verses (1894); Lucifer, a Theological Tragedy (1899); Three Philosophical Poets (1910); Winds of Doctrine; Studies in Contemporary Opinion (1913); Philosophy (1916) and Character and Opinion in the United States; with Reminiscences of William James and Josiah Royce, and Academic Life in America (1920).

  • Josiah alone, faithful to the king of Assyria, opposed him with his feeble force at Megiddo and was easily overcome and slain.

  • ZEDEKIAH (Hebrew for "righteousness of Yah[weh]"), son of Josiah, and the last king of Judah (2 Kings xxiv.

  • JOSIAH WEDGWOOD (1730-1795), the most distinguished of English manufacturers of pottery, came of a family many members of which had been established as potters in Stafford - shire throughout the 17th century and had played a notable part in the development of the infant industry.

  • Josiah, born in 1730, was the youngest child of another Thomas Wedgwood, who owned a small but thriving pottery in Burslem.

  • Soon after the death of his father in 1739, Josiah, then scarcely ten years of age, was taken away from school and set to learn the art of " throwing " clay, i.e.

  • Although every European country was affected by this neo-classical revival it may be claimed that England absorbed it more com - pletely than any other country, for the brothers Adam (the - architects) and Josiah Wedgwood brought it into absolute correspondence with modern tastes and ideas.

  • For detailed accounts of his life see Eliza Metyeard, Life of Wedgwood (1865-1866); Jewitt, Life of Wedgwood (1865); Rathbone, Old Wedgwood (1893); Church, Josiah Wedgwood: Master-Potter (1894; new ed., 1903); Burton, History and Description of English Earthenware and Stoneware (1904); J.

  • Morse, John Quincy Adams (Boston, 1883; new edition, 1899); Josiah Quincy, Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams (Boston, 1858); C. F.

  • Judah (under Josiah) was overthrown at Megiddo, where about nine centuries previously the victory of Tethmoses (Thutmose) III.

  • especially Isaiah), the character of the reforms ascribed to Josiah (2 Kings xxiii.), the pictures drawn by Jeremiah and Ezekiel, and the latter's condemnation of the half-Hittite, half-Amorite capital, combine with the events of later history to prove that the religion of the national sanctuary must not be too narrowly estimated from the denunciations of more spiritual minds or from a priori views of the inevitable concomitants of either henotheism or monotheism or of a lofty ethical teaching.

  • Amid constant periods of apostasy Y P P Y two epoch-making events stand out: (a) the rediscovery of the Book of the Law (Deuteronomy is meant) in the time of Josiah (2 Kings xxii.) followed by a reform of sundry religious abuses dating from the foundation of the temple, and (b) the promulgation by Ezra of the Law of Yahweh, the law of Moses (Ezra.

  • In 1682 Sir Josiah Child at home and Sir John Child in India formed a combination, which recognized that in the struggle between the Mogul and the Mahrattas the English must meet force with force; and in 1687 Bombay supplanted Surat as the chief seat of the English in India.

  • 10 and the shore batteries on the 4th of April, and Lieut.-Commander Egbert Thompson, commanding the "Pittsburgh," on the 7th; meanwhile the Federals under the direction of Colonel Josiah W.

  • FENTON JOHN ANTHONY HORT (1828-1892), English theologian, was born in Dublin on the 23rd of April 1828, the great-grandson of Josiah Hort, archbishop of Tuam in the 18th century.

  • Josiah "defiled" it as part of his reforming activity, and it became a place for the bestowal and destruction of refuse, and a synonym for Gehenna (Isa.

  • Professor Josiah Royce has pictured the social-moral process by which society finally impressed its " claims on wayward and blind individuals " who " sought wealth and not a social order," and so long as possible shirked all social obligations.

  • 5, 1) states that Jeremiah wrote an elegy on Josiah still extant in his day, he may be merely quoting a little too much of Chron.

  • 20; and, therefore, he must have connected the passage with Josiah, the last of the good kings.

  • Rather, the contrary; for he implies that The Qinoth contained not only Jeremiah's single dirge on Josiah, but also the elegies of " all the singing men and singing women," from the time of Josiah's death (608) down to his own day (3rd century).

  • The untimely fate of Josiah became a stock allusion in dirges.

  • for Jeremiah's dirge on Josiah, or that the book he calls The Qinoth was identical with our Qinoth.

  • That Mather's administration of the college was excellent is admitted even by his harsh critic, Josiah Quincy, in his History of Harvard University.'

  • Mather's worth has been under-estimated by Josiah Quincy, Justin Winsor and other historians out of sympathy with his ecclesiastical spirit, who represent him as only an ambitious narrow-minded schemer.

  • 18 93, 12, P. 433); and on the theoretical side, see papers by Josiah Willard Gibbs; R.

  • Josiah Hardy .

  • The criticism lavished on Cattley and Townsend's edition led to a new one (1846-1849) under the same editorship. A new text prepared by the Rev. Josiah Pratt was issued (1870) in the "Reformation Series" of the Church Historians of England, with a revised version of Townsend's Life and appendices giving copies of original documents.

  • Josiah Bartlett (1729-1795), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born here, and is commemorated by a statue (1888) by Karl Gerhardt.

  • He came forward as a prophet in the thirteenth year of Josiah (626 B.C.), still young but irresistibly impelled.

  • The death of the pious king Josiah at Megiddo in 608 B.C. dashed the high hopes of the "book-men," but meant no victory for Jeremiah.

  • Its only result for the majority was a falling back on the earlier popular cultus of the Baals, and on the heathen customs introduced, or reintroduced, by Josiah's grandfather, Manasseh.

  • The former is dated in the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, though Wellhausen suspects that the date is a mistake, and that the real occasion was the death of Josiah.

  • 19, 20, 22; reign of Josiah, strong personal element.

  • Josiah Parkes, engineer to the Royal Agricultural Society, advocated a greater distance apart for the drains, and, in order that the subterranean water might be reached, a depth of at least 4 ft.

  • 1) which makes the prophet a contemporary of King Josiah (c. 637), and this in turn appears to agree (a) with the internal conditions (i.

  • 4, 5, 12) which, it is held, are evidently earlier than Josiah's reforms (620); (b) with the denunciation of the royal household, but not of the (young) king himself (i.

  • The name of Baal (so LXX.; remnant implies a date after Josiah's reforms) and of the idolatrous priests will be cut off, together with them that worship the " host of heaven " (condemned later than 620 in Jer.

  • 1-4 do not compel a date before Josiah's reforms. The doom of Cush is still in the future in Ezek.

  • xxxii., for example, looks upon Edom and Sidon as dead), and while the continued revision of the book allows the presumption that the tradition ascribing its inception to the time of Josiah may be authentic, it is doubtful how much of the original nucleus can be safely recognized.

  • The disastrous defeats of General Josiah Harmar (1753-1813) in October 1790 on the Miami river in Ohio, and of Governor Arthur St Clair on the 4th of November 1791 near Fort Recovery, Ohio, were followed in 1792 by the appointment of General Anthony Wayne to the command of the frontier.

  • In the home of Josiah Quincy (1802-1882) in Wollaston Park is the Quincy Mansion School for Girls.

  • In the beginning of the 19th century de Wette startled the religious world by declaring that Deuteronomy, so far from being Mosaic, was not known till the time of Josiah.

  • The original Deuteronomy, D, read to King Josiah, cannot have been so large as our present book, for not only could it be read at a single sitting, but it could be easily read twice in one day.

  • But the impression made upon Josiah by what he heard was far too deep to have been produced by the legislative part alone.

  • The book read to Josiah must therefore have comprised most of what is found in Deut.

  • Hence this school of thought arose between the age of Isaiah and that of Jeremiah; but how long D itself may have been in existence before it was read in 622 to Josiah cannot be determined with certainty.

  • The more natural explanation is that it was written not in the early years of Josiah's reign, and with the cognizance of the temple priests then in office, but some time during the long reign of Manasseh, probably when his policy was most reactionary and when he favoured the worship of the "host of heaven" and set up altars to strange gods in Jerusalem itself.

  • 9 shows that even the zeal of Josiah could not carry out the instructions laid down in D xviii.

  • Josiah's acceptance of D made it the first canonical book of scripture.

  • These reforms made too heavy demands upon the people, as was proved by the reaction which set in at Josiah's death.

  • Indeed the country people would look on the destruction of the high places with their Asheras and Mazzebas as sacrilege and would consider Josiah's death in battle as a divine punishment for his sacrilegious deeds.

  • It is also recognized that J and E are non-prophetical and non-Deuteronomic, but it has not been proved that the present J and E are earlier than the prophets or the Deuteronomic reforms of Josiah (2 Kings xxii.

  • xi.; Letters of Lady Hesketh to John Johnson (1901); John Newton, by the Rev. Josiah Bull (1868); Cowper and Mary Unwin, by Caroline Gearey (1900); and A Concordance to the Poetic Works of William Cowper, by John Neave (1887).

  • On the completion of his arts course, he nominally studied divinity at Edinburgh until 1787; in1788-1789he spent rather more than a year as private tutor in a Virginian family, and from 1790 till the close of 1792 he held a similar appointment at Etruria in Staffordshire, with the family of Josiah Wedgwood, employing his spare time in experimental research and in preparing a translation of Buffon's Natural History of Birds, which was published in nine 8vo vols.

  • The main redaction of Judges and Kings was made under the influence of the ideas which characterize Deuteronomy, that is, after the reforms ascribed to Josiah (2 Kings xxiii.); but in Samuel the " Deuteronomistic " hand is much less prominent and the chronological system which runs through Judges and Kings occurs only sporadically.

  • Manasseh was succeeded by his son Amon, who after a brief reign of two years perished in a conspiracy, his place being taken by Amon's son (or brother) Josiah.

  • Josiah Wedgwood and Matthew Boulton were other prominent early industrialists.

  • His father, Clement Wedgwood, was the grandson of Josiah Wedgwood, the famous potter from Staffordshire.

  • Josiah is also suitably snotty and has gone to bed early as well.

  • tableware manufacturers in the world - Josiah Wedgwood and Royal Doulton.

  • Josiah supposedly got in the way and was killed at Megiddo leaving Judah now an Egyptian vassal.

  • 1, where the meaning of the date " thirtieth year " is obscure; it cannot refer to his age (which would be otherwise expressed in Hebrew), or to the reform of Josiah, 621 (which is not elsewhere employed as an epoch); possibly the reference is to the era of Nabopolassar (626 according to the Canon of Ptolemy), if chronological inexactness be supposed (34 or 33 years instead of 30), a supposition not at all improbable.

  • 6-8)2 The Deuteronomic history of the monarchy actually ascribes to the Judaean king Josiah (621 B.C.) the suppression of the high-places, and states that the local priests were brought to Jerusalem and received support, but did not minister at the altar (2 Kings xxiii.

  • xxix.) and Josiah (xxxv.) - contrast the history in the earlier books of Samuel and Kings - or when the still later book of Jubilees (xxxii.) places the rise of the Levitical priesthood in the patriarchal period.

  • These situations cannot be severed from what is known elsewhere of the Deuteronomic teaching, of the reform ascribed to Josiah, or of the principle inculcated by Ezekiel (see § r [b]).

  • Josiah Royce in his lecture on The Conception of Immortality (1900) combines this argument of the soul's union with God with the argument of the incompleteness of man's life here: " Just because God is One, all our lives have various and unique places in the harmony of the divine life.

  • to Assyria, while the reformation in the reign of Josiah (621 B.C.) is conversely associated with the decay of Assyrian power after the death of Assur-bani-pal.

  • The closing years of the Judaean kingdom and the final destruction of the temple (586 B.C.) shattered the Messianic ideals cherished in the evening of Isaiah's lifetime and again in the opening years of the reign of Josiah.

  • xii.-xxvi.) is closely connected with the reformation in the reign of Josiah.

  • The book of Deuteronomy, in conjunction with the reformation of Josiah's reign (which synchronizes with the rapid decline of Assyria and the reviving prestige of Yahweh), appeared to mark the triumph of the great prophetic movement.

  • Sir Josiah Mason >>

  • Nevertheless, these places of cult remained some 300 years until almost the close of the monarchy, when their destruction is attributed to Josiah (§ 16).

  • Manasseh's son Amon fell in a court intrigue and " the people of the land," after avenging the murder, set up in his place the infant Josiah (637).

  • The assumption that the decay of Assyria awoke the national feeling of independence is perhaps justified by those events which made the greatest impression upon the compiler, and an account is given of Josiah's religious reforms, based upon a source apparently identical with that which described the work of Jehoash.

  • 5, 6), no social reform was possible; but now the young Josiah, the popular choice, was upon the throne.

  • (See Deuteronomy; Josiah.) Some very interesting parallels have been cited from Egyptian and Assyrian records where religious texts, said to have been found in temples, or oracles from the distant past, have come to light at the very time when " the days were full."

  • The account of Josiah's work, like that of Hezekiah, is written by one of the Deuteronomic school: that is to say, the writer describes the promulgation of the teaching under which he lives.

  • Accordingly, in handling Josiah's successors the writer no longer refers to the high places.

  • But if Josiah carried out the reforms ascribed to him they were of no lasting effect.

  • Josiah himself is praised for his justice, but faithless Judah is insincere (Jer.

  • On the other hand, the book of Deuteronomy has a characteristic social-religious side; its humanity, philanthropy and charity are the distinctive features of its laws, and Josiah's reputation (Jer.

  • - In Josiah's reign a new era was beginning in the history of the world.

  • Josiah at once interposed; it is uncertain whether, in spite of the power of Egypt, he had hopes of extending his kingdom, or whether the famous reformer was, like Manasseh, a vassal of Assyria.

  • The book of Kings gives the standpoint of a later Judaean writer, but Josiah's authority over a much larger area than Judah alone is suggested by xxiii.

  • 5 that Zedekiah would die in peace is not borne out by the history, nor does Josiah's fate agree with the promise in 2 Kings xxii.

  • The greater prevalence of heathen elements in Jerusalem, as detailed in the reforms of Josiah or in the writings of the prophets (cf.

  • Its ideals culminate in Josiah (§ 16, end), and there is a strong presumption that it is intended to impress upon the new era the lessons drawn from the past.

  • Whatever reforms Josiah actually accomplished, the restoration afforded the opportunity of bringing the Deuteronomic teaching into action; though it is more probable that Deuteronomy itself in the main is not much earlier than the second half of the 6th century B.C.'

  • Weighty reasons are brought also by conservative writers against the theory that Deuteronomy dates from or about the age of Josiah, and their objections to the " discovery " of a new law-roll apply equally to the " re-discovery " and promulgation of an old and authentic code.

  • They identify with Deuteronomy the law-roll which explains the noteworthy reforms of Josiah (§ 16); but since it is naturally admitted that religious conditions had become quite inconsistent with Mosaism, the conservative view implies that the " long-lost " Deuteronomy must have differed profoundly from any known Mosaic writings to which earlier pious kings and prophets had presumably adhered.

  • viii.), clearly contained much of which the people were ignorant, and conservative writers, who oppose the theory that a new Law was then introduced, emphasize (a) the previous existence of legislation (to prove that Ezra's book was not entirely a novelty), and (b) the gross wickedness in Judah (as illustrated by the prophets) from the time of Josiah to the strenuous efforts of the reformers on behalf of the most fundamental principles of the national religion.

  • The arguments of conservative writers involve concessions which, though often overlooked by their readers, are very detrimental to the position they endeavour to support, and the objections they bring against the theory of the introduction of new law-books (under a Josiah or an Ezra) apply with equal force to the promulgation of Mosaic teaching which had been admittedly ignored or forgotten.

  • As early as 1668, Sir Josiah Child, the millionaire governor of the East India company, pleaded for their naturalization on the score of their commercial utility.

  • The struggle was especially bitter during the administrations of the last three royal governors, Arthur Dobbs (1684-1765), William Tryon (1729-1788) and Josiah Martin (1737-1786).

  • In August 1771 Governor Tryon was succeeded by Governor Josiah Martin, who was soon engaged in spirited controversies with the assembly on questions pertaining to taxes, the southern boundary, and the attachment of property belonging to nonresidents.

  • William Tryon James Hasell, president of the council Josiah Martin.

  • JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS (1839-1903), American mathematical physicist, the fourth child and only son of Josiah Willard Gibbs (1790-1861), who was professor of sacred literature in Yale Divinity School from 1824 till his death, was born at New Haven on the 11th of February 1839.

  • Two years later, with that degree of moral courage which was one of his distinguishing characteristics, as it has been of his descendants, he, aided by Josiah Quincy, Jr., defended the British soldiers who were arrested after the "Boston Massacre," charged with causing the death of four persons, inhabitants of the colony.

  • Two campaigns, the first under General Josiah Harmar (1753-1813) in 17 9 0, and the second under General St Clair in 17 9 1, failed on account of bad management and ignorance of Indian methods of warfare, and in 1793 General Anthony Wayne was sent out in command of a large force of regulars and volunteers.

  • Among the memorials to men of Massachusetts (a large part of them Bostonians) commemorated by monuments in the Common, the Public Garden, the grounds of the state house, the city hall, and other public places of the city, are statues of Charles Sumner, Josiah Quincy and John A.

  • Boston (2 vols., Boston, 1854; and later editions), and Old Landmarks and Historic Personages of Boston (Boston, 1873, and later editions); Josiah Quincy, A Municipal History of.

  • Solomon built a high-place for her at Jerusalem which lasted until the days of King Josiah (i Kings xi.

  • See the Life and Speeches of Thomas Corwin (Cincinnati, 1896), edited by Josiah Morrow; and an excellent character sketch, Thomas Corwin (Cincinnati, 1881), by A.

  • JOSIAH TATTNALL (1795-1871), American naval officer, was born.

  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.

  • In 1797 his wife died, and next year he married Catherine Allen, sister-in-law of Josiah and John Wedgwood, through whom he introduced Coleridge to the Morning Post.

  • JOSIAH (Heb.

  • Samaria thus lay within the grasp of Josiah, who may have entertained hopes of forming an independent power of his own.

  • The reign of Josiah is important for the biblical account of the great religious reforms which began in his eighteenth year, when he manifested interest in the repair of the Temple at Jerusalem.

  • Although the character of the reforms throws remarkable light upon the condition of religion in Judah in the time of Josiah, it is to be observed that the writings of the contemporary prophets (Jeremiah, Ezekiel) make it very questionable whether the narratives are thoroughly trustworthy for the history of the king's measures.

  • At the time of the reformation under Josiah, represented by Deuteronomy, the attempt was made to turn the family thank-offering of firstlings into a sacrificial rite performed by the priests in the Temple with the aid of the males of each household, who had to come up to Jerusalem but left the next morning to celebrate the Feast of Unleavened Bread in their homes.

  • On the latter tract a military post was established by Lieut.-Colonel Henry Leavenworth (1783-1834) in 1819, and in the following year the construction was begun of a fort at first named Fort St Anthony but renamed Fort Snelling in 1824 (two years after its completion) in honour of its builder and commander Colonel Josiah Snelling (1782-1829).

  • The date would fall between Josiah's reformation (621) and his death (609).

  • The most original statement is perhaps the view that the words of Isaiah were preserved orally by his disciples, and did not see the light (in a revised form) till a considerable time after the crystallization of the reforms of Josiah into laws.

  • According to Jerome and all the older Christian interpreters, the mourning for something that occurred at a place called Hadadrimmon (Maximianopolis) in the valley of Megiddo is meant, the event alluded to being generally held to be the death of Josiah (or, as in the Targum, the death of Ahab at the hands of Hadadrimmon); but more recently the opinion has been gaining ground that Hadadrimmon is merely another name for Adonis or Tammuz, the allusion being to the mournings by which the Adonis festivals were usually accompanied (Hitzig on Zech.

  • In conjunction with Josiah Latimer Clark, with whom he entered into partnership in 1861, he invented improved methods of insulating submarine cables, and a paper on electrical standards read by them before the British Association in the same year led to the establishment of the British Association committee on that subject, whose work formed the foundations of the system still in use.

  • 11, where an allusion is seen by some to the mourning for King Josiah, slain in battle at Megiddo.

  • After the evacuation of Norfolk by the Confederates on the 9th of May Commodore Josiah Tattnall, then in command of the "Merrimac," being unable to take her up the James, sank her.

  • 1729), who called himself duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and who left two sons, Christian Ernest and Francis Josiah, who ruled the land together, the principle of primogeniture being introduced by the survivor of the two, Francis Josiah.

  • Other quarterly reviews worth mentioning are the Eclectic Review (1805-1868), edited down to 1834 by Josiah Conder (1789-1855) and supported by the Dissenters; the British Review (1811-1825; the Christian Remembrancer (1819-1868); the Retrospective Review (1820-1826, 1828, 1853-1854), for old books; the Foreign Quarterly Review (1827-1846), afterwards incorporated with the Westminster; the Foreign Review (1828-1829); the Dublin Review (1836), a Roman Catholic organ; the Foreign and Colonial Quarterly Review (1843-1847); the Prospective Review (1845-1855), given up to theology and literature, previously the Christian Teacher (1835-1844); the North British Review (1844-1871); the British Quarterly Review (1845), successor to the British and Foreign Review (1835-1844); the New Quarterly Review (1852-1861), the Scottish Review (1853-1862), published at Glasgow; the Wesleyan London Quarterly Review (1853-); the National Review (1855-1864); the Diplomatic Review (1855-1881); the Irish Quarterly Review (1851-1859), brought out in Dublin; the Home and Foreign Review (1862-1864); the Fine Arts Quarterly Review (1863-1865); the New Quarterly Magazine (1873-1880); the Catholic Union Review (1863-1874); the Anglican Church Quarterly Review (1875); Mind (1876), dealing with mental philosophy; the Modern Review (1880-1884); the Scottish Review (1882); the Asiatic Quarterly Review (1886; since 1891 the Imperial and Asiatic Quarterly Review); and the Jewish Quarterly Review.

  • To promote the ends he had in view he suggested non-importation, instituted the Boston committees of correspondence, urged that a Continental Congress be called, sought out and introduced into public service such allies as John Hancock, Joseph Warren and Josiah Quincy, and wrote a vast number of articles for the newspapers, especially the Boston Gazette, over a multitude of signatures.

  • He was the tenth son of Josiah Franklin, and the eighth child and youngest son of ten children borne by Abiah Folger, his father's second wife.

  • "Yah[weh] raiseth up"), in the Bible, son of Josiah and king of Judah (2 Kings xxiii.

  • On the defeat of Josiah at Megiddo his younger brother Jehoahaz (or Shallum) was chosen by the Judaeans, but the Egyptian conquerer Necho summoned him to his headquarters at Riblah (south of Hamath on the Orontes) and removed him to Egypt, appointing in his stead Eliakim, whose name ("El[God] raiseth up") was changed to its better-known synonym, Jehoiakim.

  • Taylor, 10 Josiah Royce" and others.

  • In oratory, James Otis, Fisher Ames, Josiah Quincy, junr., Webster, Choate, Everett, Sumner, Winthrop and Wendell Phillips; and, in addition, in statesmanship, Samuel Adams, John Adams and John Quincy Adams. In fiction, Hawthorne and Mrs Stowe.

  • At the age of thirteen he accompanied his sister Emilia and her husband the Rev. Josiah Brewer (the parents of the distinguished judge of the Supreme Court, David J.

  • "JOSIAH ROYCE (1855-1916), American philosopher, was born at Grass Valley, Cal., Nov.

  • The defeat and death of the good king Josiah came through disobedience to the Divine will (2 Chron.

  • Thus, the reformation of Josiah has been thrust back from his eighteenth to his twelfth year (when he was nineteen years old) apparently because it was felt that so good a king would not:have tolerated the abuses of the land for so long a period,' but the result of this is to leave an interval of ten years between his conversion and the subsequent act of repentance (2 Chron.

  • and MANASSEH); the death of Josiah (2 Chron.

  • Here Josiah Wedgwood was born in 1730, his family having practised the manufacture in this locality for several generations, while he himself began work independently at the Ivy House pottery in 1759.

  • 2), subsequent history shows that the high-places, like the altars to heathen deities in Jerusalem itself, long remained undisturbed; it was the Deuteronomic reformation, ascribed to Josiah, which marked the great advance in the religion of Yahweh, and under its influence the history of the monarchy has been compiled.

  • A statue commemorates Josiah Wedgwood, born at Burslem in 1730; but other famous names in the pottery trade are more intimately connected with Stoke.

  • Thus Josiah Spode the second was born here in 1754, and had a great house at Penkhull, on the western outskirts of Stoke.

  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.

  • The steps which prepared the way for the post-exile hierarchy, the destruction of the northern sanctuaries and priesthoods by the Assyrians, the polemic of the spiritual prophets against the corruptions of popular worship, which issued in the reformation of Josiah, the suppression of the provincial shrines of Judah and the transference of their ministers to Jerusalem, the successful resistance of the sons See I Sam.

  • The Canaanite influence on the later organization of the Temple is clearly seen in the association of Temple prophets with the Temple priests under the control of the chief priest, which is often referred to by Jeremiah; even the viler ministers of sensual worship, the male and female prostitutes of the Phoenician temples, had found a place on Mt Zion and were only removed by Josiah's reformation.'

  • In the time of Josiah altar service and not the function of " teaching " has become the essential thing in priesthood (Deut.

  • He also set up societies, in accordance with the recommendations in Josiah Wedgwood's little book on the subject; and these exercised a great influence on the religious life of the people.

  • 5) down to Josiah (2 Kings xiii.

  • In the 7th century B.C., during the reign of either Manasseh or Josiah, the narrative of " JE " was enlarged by the addition of the discourses of Deuteronomy.

  • Jeremiah's first public appearance as a prophet was in the 13th year of Josiah (Jer.

  • There is little noticeable in Hobbes' dating of the prophets, though he considers it " not apparent " whether Amos wrote, as well as composed, his prophecy, or whether Jeremiah and the other prophets of the time of Josiah and Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai and Zechariah, who lived in the captivity, edited the prophecies ascribed to them.

  • 5, 6, to the earlier part of Josiah's reign.

  • Nay more, the reception of the book of Deuteronomy by king and people in the eighteenth year of Josiah shows what a hold the prophetic teaching had on the popular conscience..

  • The immediate result of Josiah's reformation was the complete dissolution of anything that could be called a political party of prophetic ideas; the priests and the ordinary prophets were satisfied with what had been accomplished; the old abuses began again, but the nation had received a reformed constitution and there was nothing more to be said.

  • Even in that earliest part of his book which is mainly a recapitulation of his experiences and work in the reign of Josiah, his tone is one of absolute hopelessness as to the future of the nation.

  • From January 1846 to 1849, as the successor of Josiah Quincy, he was president of Harvard College.

  • Mesheck Weare John Langdon John Sullivan John Langdon John Sullivan Josiah Bartlett State Governors.

  • Josiah Bartlett.

  • Chester Bradley Jordan Nahum Josiah Bachelder John McLane .

  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the Marine Museum, the Public Library (founded in 1854 by Josiah Little and containing about 45,000 volumes), the old Tracy mansion (built in 1771 or 1772), which forms part of the Public Library building, the Anna Jacques and Homoeopathic hospitals, homes for aged women and men, a Home for Destitute Children, Old South Church, in which is the tomb of George Whitefield, and the Young Men's Christian Association building, which is a memorial to George Henry Corliss (1817-1888), the inventor, erected by his widow, a native of Newburyport.

  • Josiah Tattnall.

  • Josiah Royce (b.

  • Two months later, on the 9th of May, the Confederates abandoned the navy yard and evacuated Norfolk and Portsmouth, and the "Virginia" was destroyed by her commander, Josiah Tattnall.

  • Prof. Josiah Royce has suggested for this supposed form of hallucination the term "pseudo-presentiment."

  • The general plan of the open-hearth process was certainly conceived by Josiah Marshall Heath in 1845, if not indeed by Reaumur in 1722, but for lack of a furnace in which a high enough temperature could be generated it could not be carried out until the development of the Siemens regenerative gas furnace about 1860.

  • His other writings include: Sonnets and Other Verses (1894); Lucifer, a Theological Tragedy (1899); Three Philosophical Poets (1910); Winds of Doctrine; Studies in Contemporary Opinion (1913); Philosophy (1916) and Character and Opinion in the United States; with Reminiscences of William James and Josiah Royce, and Academic Life in America (1920).

  • Josiah alone, faithful to the king of Assyria, opposed him with his feeble force at Megiddo and was easily overcome and slain.

  • ZEDEKIAH (Hebrew for "righteousness of Yah[weh]"), son of Josiah, and the last king of Judah (2 Kings xxiv.

  • JOSIAH WEDGWOOD (1730-1795), the most distinguished of English manufacturers of pottery, came of a family many members of which had been established as potters in Stafford - shire throughout the 17th century and had played a notable part in the development of the infant industry.

  • Josiah, born in 1730, was the youngest child of another Thomas Wedgwood, who owned a small but thriving pottery in Burslem.

  • Soon after the death of his father in 1739, Josiah, then scarcely ten years of age, was taken away from school and set to learn the art of " throwing " clay, i.e.

  • Although every European country was affected by this neo-classical revival it may be claimed that England absorbed it more com - pletely than any other country, for the brothers Adam (the - architects) and Josiah Wedgwood brought it into absolute correspondence with modern tastes and ideas.

  • For detailed accounts of his life see Eliza Metyeard, Life of Wedgwood (1865-1866); Jewitt, Life of Wedgwood (1865); Rathbone, Old Wedgwood (1893); Church, Josiah Wedgwood: Master-Potter (1894; new ed., 1903); Burton, History and Description of English Earthenware and Stoneware (1904); J.

  • Morse, John Quincy Adams (Boston, 1883; new edition, 1899); Josiah Quincy, Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams (Boston, 1858); C. F.

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