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joinville

joinville

joinville Sentence Examples

  • At the entrance, between Cape Joinville or Santa Clara on the N.

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  • He was a missionary to the Indians when the prince de Joinville, son of Louis Philippe, met him, and after some conversation asked him to sign a document abdicating his rights in favour of Louis Philippe, in return for which he, the dauphin (alias Eleazar Williams), was to receive the private inheritance which was his.

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  • This insulting behaviour, and the language of the letter with which Andrew reappeared, marked the mission a failure: King Louis, says Joinville, "se repenti fort."

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  • (Paris, 18 39), pp. 261, 26 5, 2 79, 2 9 6, 3 10, 353, 3 6 3, 37 0; Joinville, ed.

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  • As king of Jerusalem Frederick was now able 1 Joinville, ch.

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  • He started in 1248 with a gallant company, which contained his three brothers and the sieur de Joinville, his biographer; and after wintering in Cyprus he directed his army in the spring of 1249 against Egypt.

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  • Already in 1267 St Louis had taken the cross a second time, moved by the news of Bibars' conquests; and though the French baronage, including even Joinville himself, refused to follow the lead of their king, Prince Edward of England imitated his example.

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  • For the Crusades of St Louis the chief authorities are Joinville's life of his master (whom he accompanied to Egypt on the Seventh Crusade), and de Nangis' Gesta Ludovici regis.

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  • Francis, prince of Joinville; Louis Philippe Albert, count of Paris; and the traveller Prince Henry of Orleans.

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  • JOINVILLE, the name of a French noble family of Champagne, which traced its descent from Etienne de Vaux, who lived at the beginning of the 1 ith century.

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  • 1184), sire de Joinville, who accompanied Henry the Liberal, count of Champagne, to the Holy Land in 1147, received from him the office of seneschal, and this office became hereditary in the house of Joinville.

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  • In 1203 Geoffroi V., sire de Joinville, died while on a crusade, leaving no children.

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  • 1374), sire de Joinville, the grandson of Jean, became count of Vaudemont, through his mother, Marguerite de Vaudemont.

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  • 1415), to whom she brought the lands of Joinville.

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  • In 1552, Joinville was made into a principality for the house of Lorraine.

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  • Mlle de Montpensier, the heiress of Mlle de Guise, bequeathed the principality of Joinville to Philip, duke of Orleans (1693).

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  • The title of prince de Joinville (q.v.) was given later to the third son of King Louis Philippe.

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  • Two branches of the house of Joinville have settled in other countries: one in England, descended from Geoffroi de Joinville, sire de Vaucouleurs, and brother of the historian, who served under Henry III.

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  • and Edward I.; the other, descended from Geoffroi de Joinville, sire de Briquenay, and son of Jean, settled in the kingdom of Naples.

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  • Simonnet, Essai sur l'histoire et la ge'nealogie des seigneurs de Joinville (1875); H.

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  • Delaborde, Jean de Joinville et les seigneurs de Joinville (1894).

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  • Francois Ferdinand Philippe Louis Joinville >>

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  • And this is substantially the story repeated by other European writers of the end of the 13th century, such as Ricold of Montecroce and the sieur de Joinville, as well as by one Asiatic, the famous Christian writer, Gregory Abulfaraj.

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  • While Francois, prince de Joinville, was bombarding Tangier and Mogador, Bugeaud gained the victory of the Isly (August 1844).

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  • Both his chronicles, however, became very popular and found several continuators, Jean de Joinville being among those who made use of the Chronicon.

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  • The brilliant side comes out most clearly in Joinville, the Chronique de Du Guesclin, and the Histoire de Bayart; the darker side appears in the earlier chronicles of the crusades, and is especially emphasized by preachers and moralists like Jacques de Vitry, Etienne de Bourbon, Nicole Bozon and John Gower.

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  • The other children were Louise, consort of Leopold I., king of the Belgians; Marie, who married Prince Alexander of Wurttemberg and died in 1839; Louis Charles, duc de Nemours; Clementine, married to the duke of Coburg-Kohary; Francois Ferdinand, prince de Joinville; Henri Eugene, duc d'Aumale; Antoine Philippe, duc de Montpensier, who married the Infanta, younger sister of Queen Isabella of Spain.

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  • In 1861 he and his brother accompanied their uncle, the prince de Joinville, to the United States.

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  • the name given to any meeting for discussion or debate (parlor, to speak), a sense in which it was still used by Joinville, but from the latter half of the 13th century employed in France in a special sense to designate the sessions of the royal court (curia regis).

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  • JOINVILLE, JEAN, SIRE DE (1224-1319), was the second great writer of history in Old French, and in a manner occupies the interval between Villehardouin and Froissart.

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  • Joinville's first appearance at the king's court was in 1241, on the occasion of the knighting of Louis IX.'s younger brother Alphonse.

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  • Jeanne was by this time dead, and Joinville presented his book to her son Louis the Quarreller.

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  • Great as was his age, Joinville had not ceased to be actively loyal, and in 1315 he complied with the royal summons to bear arms against the Flemings.

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  • He was at Joinville again in 1317, and on the IIth of July 1319 he died at the age of ninety-five, leaving his possessions and his position as seneschal of Champagne to his second son Anseim.

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  • Besides his Histoire de Saint Louis and his Credo or "Confession of Faith" written much earlier, a considerable number, relatively speaking, of letters and business documents concerning the fief of Joinville and so forth are extant.

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  • These have an importance which we shall consider further on; but Joinville owes his place in general estimation only to his history of his crusading experiences and of the subsequent fate of St Louis.

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  • Of the famous French history books of the middle ages Joinville's bears the most vivid impress of the personal character istics of its composer.

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  • No one perhaps ever took less trouble to make himself out a hero than Joinville.

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  • He is constantly admitting that on such and such an occasion he was terribly afraid; he confesses without the least shame that, when one of his followers suggested defiance of the Saracens and voluntary death, he (Joinville) paid not the least attention to him; nor does he attempt to gloss in any way his refusal to accompany St Louis on his unlucky second crusade, or his invincible conviction that it was better to be in mortal sin than to have the leprosy, or his decided preference for wine as little watered as might be, or any other weakness.

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  • It would, however, be a mistake to imagine that Joinville's book is exclusively or even mainly a chronicle of small beer.

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  • Joinville is a better warrior than Louis, but, while the former frankly prays for his own safety, the latter only thinks of his army's when they have escaped from the hands of the aliens.

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  • One of the king's knights boasts that ten thousand pieces have been "forcontes" (counted short) to the Saracens; and it is with the utmost trouble that Joinville and the rest can persuade the king that this is a joke, and that the Saracens are much more likely to;lave got the advantage.

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  • He warns Joinville against wine-bibbing, against bad language, against all manner of foibles small and great; and the pupil acknowledges that this physician at any rate had healed himself in these respects.

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  • But Louis was not of the 20th century but of the 13th, and after his kind he certainly deserved Joinville's admiration.

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  • But it is easy to understand the half-despairing adoration with which a shrewd and somewhat prosaic person like Joinville must have regarded this flower of chivalry born out of due time.

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  • He has had his reward, for assuredly the portrait of St Louis, from the early collection of anecdotes to the last hearsay sketch of the woeful end at Tunis, with the famous enseignement which is still the best summary of the theoretical duties of a Christian king in medieval times, is such as to take away all charge of vulgarity or mere commerage from Joinville, a charge to which otherwise he might perhaps have been exposed.

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  • According to its own account it is divided into three parts - the first dealing generally with the character and conduct of the hero; the second with his acts and deeds in Egypt, Palestine, &c., as Joinville knew them; the third with his subsequent life and death.

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  • After ransom Acre was the chief scene of Louis's stay in the East, and here Joinville lived in some state, and saw not a few interesting things, hearing besides much gossip as to the inferior affairs of Asia from ambassadors, merchants and others.

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  • At last they journeyed back again to France, not without considerable experiences of the perils of the deep, which Joinville tells with a good deal of spirit.

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  • Some anecdotes of the king's "justice," his favourite and distinguishing attribute during the sixteen years which intervened between the two crusades, are given; then comes the story of Joinville's own refusal to join the second expedition, a refusal which bluntly alleged the harm done by the king's men who stayed at home to the vassals of those who went abroad as the reason of Joinville's resolution to remain behind.

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  • There is no reason for supposing that Joinville indulged in various editions, such as those which have given Kervyn de Lettenhove and Simeon Luce so much trouble, and which make so vast a difference between the first and the last redaction of the chronicler of the Hundred Years' War.

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  • But, whereas there is no great difficulty (though much labour) in ascertaining the original and all subsequent texts of Froissart, the original text of Joinville was until recently unknown, and even now may be said to be in the state of a conjectural restoration.

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  • Now we have a catalogue of Louis le Hutin's library, and, strange to say, Joinville does not figure in it.

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  • Three years later a 14th-century copy was found at Brussels, and this is the standard manuscript authority for the text of Joinville.

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  • The modern science of critical editing, however, which applies to medieval texts the principles long recognized in editing the classics, has discovered in the 16th-century manuscript, and still more in the original miscellaneous works of Joinville, the letters, deeds, &c., already alluded to, the materials for what we have already called a conjectural restoration, which is not without its interest, though perhaps it is possible for that interest to be exaggerated.

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  • For merely general readers Buchon's or Michaud's editions of Joinville will amply suffice.

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  • Didot's Etudes sur Joinville (1870) and H.

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  • Delaborde's Jean de Joinville (1894).

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  • A number of prosperous German colonies - the largest and best known of which are Blumenau, Dona Francisca, Joinville, Itajahy, Brusque, Dom Pedro and Sao Bento - are devoted chiefly to agriculture.

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  • The capital of the state is Florianopolis also called Santa Catharina and Desterro, and its other towns are Blumenau, Lages (9356), Laguna (7282), Joinville (13,996), Itajahy (8875), Brusque (8094), Sao Jose (11,820), opposite Florianopolis, Tubarao (5495) and Sao Francisco (5583), a good port in the northern part of the state in direct communication with a majority of the German colonies.

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  • In the meantime Philip II., being rid of Don John of Austria, whose ambition he dreaded, was to crush the Protestants of England and the Netherlands; and the double result of the compact at Joinville was to allow French politics to be controlled by Spain, and to transform the wars of religion into a purely political quarrel.

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  • By a stroke of the pen he suppressed Protestantism, while Pope Sixtus V., who had at first been unfavourable to the treaty of Joinville as a purely political act, though he eventually yielded to the solicitations of the League, excommunicated the two Bourbons, Henry and Cond.

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  • In the vicinity are the villages of Joinville and Montpensier, which owe their origin to military camps established by Marshal Valee in 1838; and on the road to Medea are the tombs of the marabout Mahommed-el-Kebir, who died in 1580, and his two sons.

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  • At the entrance, between Cape Joinville or Santa Clara on the N.

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  • He was a missionary to the Indians when the prince de Joinville, son of Louis Philippe, met him, and after some conversation asked him to sign a document abdicating his rights in favour of Louis Philippe, in return for which he, the dauphin (alias Eleazar Williams), was to receive the private inheritance which was his.

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  • This insulting behaviour, and the language of the letter with which Andrew reappeared, marked the mission a failure: King Louis, says Joinville, "se repenti fort."

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  • (Paris, 18 39), pp. 261, 26 5, 2 79, 2 9 6, 3 10, 353, 3 6 3, 37 0; Joinville, ed.

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  • As king of Jerusalem Frederick was now able 1 Joinville, ch.

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  • He started in 1248 with a gallant company, which contained his three brothers and the sieur de Joinville, his biographer; and after wintering in Cyprus he directed his army in the spring of 1249 against Egypt.

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  • Already in 1267 St Louis had taken the cross a second time, moved by the news of Bibars' conquests; and though the French baronage, including even Joinville himself, refused to follow the lead of their king, Prince Edward of England imitated his example.

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  • For the Crusades of St Louis the chief authorities are Joinville's life of his master (whom he accompanied to Egypt on the Seventh Crusade), and de Nangis' Gesta Ludovici regis.

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  • Francis, prince of Joinville; Louis Philippe Albert, count of Paris; and the traveller Prince Henry of Orleans.

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  • JOINVILLE, the name of a French noble family of Champagne, which traced its descent from Etienne de Vaux, who lived at the beginning of the 1 ith century.

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  • 1184), sire de Joinville, who accompanied Henry the Liberal, count of Champagne, to the Holy Land in 1147, received from him the office of seneschal, and this office became hereditary in the house of Joinville.

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  • In 1203 Geoffroi V., sire de Joinville, died while on a crusade, leaving no children.

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  • 1374), sire de Joinville, the grandson of Jean, became count of Vaudemont, through his mother, Marguerite de Vaudemont.

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  • His daughter, Marguerite de Joinville, married in 1393 Ferry of Lorraine (d.

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  • 1415), to whom she brought the lands of Joinville.

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  • In 1552, Joinville was made into a principality for the house of Lorraine.

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  • Mlle de Montpensier, the heiress of Mlle de Guise, bequeathed the principality of Joinville to Philip, duke of Orleans (1693).

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  • The title of prince de Joinville (q.v.) was given later to the third son of King Louis Philippe.

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  • Two branches of the house of Joinville have settled in other countries: one in England, descended from Geoffroi de Joinville, sire de Vaucouleurs, and brother of the historian, who served under Henry III.

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  • and Edward I.; the other, descended from Geoffroi de Joinville, sire de Briquenay, and son of Jean, settled in the kingdom of Naples.

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  • Simonnet, Essai sur l'histoire et la ge'nealogie des seigneurs de Joinville (1875); H.

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  • Delaborde, Jean de Joinville et les seigneurs de Joinville (1894).

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  • Francois Ferdinand Philippe Louis Joinville >>

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  • And this is substantially the story repeated by other European writers of the end of the 13th century, such as Ricold of Montecroce and the sieur de Joinville, as well as by one Asiatic, the famous Christian writer, Gregory Abulfaraj.

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  • Besides the works of Joinville and William of Nangis, see Elie Berger, "Histoire de Blanche de Castille, reine de France," in Bibliotheque des ecoles francaises d'Athenes et de Rome, vol.

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  • While Francois, prince de Joinville, was bombarding Tangier and Mogador, Bugeaud gained the victory of the Isly (August 1844).

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  • Both his chronicles, however, became very popular and found several continuators, Jean de Joinville being among those who made use of the Chronicon.

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  • He edited Jean de Joinville's Histoire de St Louis, roi de France (Paris, 1668), and his other works which may be mentioned are Traite historique du chef de St Jean Baptiste (Paris, 1666); Lettre du Sieur N., conseiller du roi (Paris, 1682); Cyrilli, Philoxeni, aliorumque veterum glossaria, and Memoire sur le projet d'un nouveau recueil des historiens de France, avec le plan general de ce recueil, which has been inserted by Jacques Lelong in his Bibliotheque historique de la France (Paris, 1768-1778).

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  • 2 Du Cange, Dissertation sur Joinville, xxi.; Sainte Palaye, Memoires, i.

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  • The brilliant side comes out most clearly in Joinville, the Chronique de Du Guesclin, and the Histoire de Bayart; the darker side appears in the earlier chronicles of the crusades, and is especially emphasized by preachers and moralists like Jacques de Vitry, Etienne de Bourbon, Nicole Bozon and John Gower.

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  • The other children were Louise, consort of Leopold I., king of the Belgians; Marie, who married Prince Alexander of Wurttemberg and died in 1839; Louis Charles, duc de Nemours; Clementine, married to the duke of Coburg-Kohary; Francois Ferdinand, prince de Joinville; Henri Eugene, duc d'Aumale; Antoine Philippe, duc de Montpensier, who married the Infanta, younger sister of Queen Isabella of Spain.

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  • In 1861 he and his brother accompanied their uncle, the prince de Joinville, to the United States.

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  • the name given to any meeting for discussion or debate (parlor, to speak), a sense in which it was still used by Joinville, but from the latter half of the 13th century employed in France in a special sense to designate the sessions of the royal court (curia regis).

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  • JOINVILLE, JEAN, SIRE DE (1224-1319), was the second great writer of history in Old French, and in a manner occupies the interval between Villehardouin and Froissart.

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  • Joinville was the head of a noble family of the province of Champagne (see Joinville, above).

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  • Joinville's first appearance at the king's court was in 1241, on the occasion of the knighting of Louis IX.'s younger brother Alphonse.

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  • Jeanne was by this time dead, and Joinville presented his book to her son Louis the Quarreller.

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  • Great as was his age, Joinville had not ceased to be actively loyal, and in 1315 he complied with the royal summons to bear arms against the Flemings.

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  • He was at Joinville again in 1317, and on the IIth of July 1319 he died at the age of ninety-five, leaving his possessions and his position as seneschal of Champagne to his second son Anseim.

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  • Besides his Histoire de Saint Louis and his Credo or "Confession of Faith" written much earlier, a considerable number, relatively speaking, of letters and business documents concerning the fief of Joinville and so forth are extant.

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  • These have an importance which we shall consider further on; but Joinville owes his place in general estimation only to his history of his crusading experiences and of the subsequent fate of St Louis.

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  • Of the famous French history books of the middle ages Joinville's bears the most vivid impress of the personal character istics of its composer.

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  • No one perhaps ever took less trouble to make himself out a hero than Joinville.

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  • He is constantly admitting that on such and such an occasion he was terribly afraid; he confesses without the least shame that, when one of his followers suggested defiance of the Saracens and voluntary death, he (Joinville) paid not the least attention to him; nor does he attempt to gloss in any way his refusal to accompany St Louis on his unlucky second crusade, or his invincible conviction that it was better to be in mortal sin than to have the leprosy, or his decided preference for wine as little watered as might be, or any other weakness.

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  • Every now and then indeed a striking circumstance, strikingly told, occurs in Joinville, such as the famous incident of the woman who carried in one hand a chafing dish of fire, in the other a phial of water, that she might burn heaven and quench hell, lest in future any man should serve God merely for hope of the one or fear of the other.

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  • It would, however, be a mistake to imagine that Joinville's book is exclusively or even mainly a chronicle of small beer.

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  • To St Louis Joinville is a nobler Boswell; and heroworshipper, hero, and heroic ideal all have something of the sublime about them.

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  • Joinville is a better warrior than Louis, but, while the former frankly prays for his own safety, the latter only thinks of his army's when they have escaped from the hands of the aliens.

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  • One of the king's knights boasts that ten thousand pieces have been "forcontes" (counted short) to the Saracens; and it is with the utmost trouble that Joinville and the rest can persuade the king that this is a joke, and that the Saracens are much more likely to;lave got the advantage.

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  • He warns Joinville against wine-bibbing, against bad language, against all manner of foibles small and great; and the pupil acknowledges that this physician at any rate had healed himself in these respects.

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  • But Louis was not of the 20th century but of the 13th, and after his kind he certainly deserved Joinville's admiration.

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  • But it is easy to understand the half-despairing adoration with which a shrewd and somewhat prosaic person like Joinville must have regarded this flower of chivalry born out of due time.

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  • He has had his reward, for assuredly the portrait of St Louis, from the early collection of anecdotes to the last hearsay sketch of the woeful end at Tunis, with the famous enseignement which is still the best summary of the theoretical duties of a Christian king in medieval times, is such as to take away all charge of vulgarity or mere commerage from Joinville, a charge to which otherwise he might perhaps have been exposed.

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  • According to its own account it is divided into three parts - the first dealing generally with the character and conduct of the hero; the second with his acts and deeds in Egypt, Palestine, &c., as Joinville knew them; the third with his subsequent life and death.

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  • The second part enters upon the history of the crusade itself, and tells how Joinville pledged all his land save so much as would bring in a thousand livres a year, and started with a brave retinue of nine knights (two of whom besides himself wore bannerets), and shared a ship with the sire d'Aspremont, leaving Joinville without raising his eyes,"pour ce que le cuer ne me attendrisist du biau chastel que je lessoie et de mes deux enfans"; how they could not get out of sight of a high mountainous island (Lampedusa or Pantellaria) till they had made a procession round the masts in honour of the Virgin; how they reached first Cyprus and then Egypt; how they took Damietta, and then entangled themselves in the Delta.

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  • After ransom Acre was the chief scene of Louis's stay in the East, and here Joinville lived in some state, and saw not a few interesting things, hearing besides much gossip as to the inferior affairs of Asia from ambassadors, merchants and others.

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    0
  • At last they journeyed back again to France, not without considerable experiences of the perils of the deep, which Joinville tells with a good deal of spirit.

    0
    0
  • Some anecdotes of the king's "justice," his favourite and distinguishing attribute during the sixteen years which intervened between the two crusades, are given; then comes the story of Joinville's own refusal to join the second expedition, a refusal which bluntly alleged the harm done by the king's men who stayed at home to the vassals of those who went abroad as the reason of Joinville's resolution to remain behind.

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    0
  • There is no reason for supposing that Joinville indulged in various editions, such as those which have given Kervyn de Lettenhove and Simeon Luce so much trouble, and which make so vast a difference between the first and the last redaction of the chronicler of the Hundred Years' War.

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    0
  • But, whereas there is no great difficulty (though much labour) in ascertaining the original and all subsequent texts of Froissart, the original text of Joinville was until recently unknown, and even now may be said to be in the state of a conjectural restoration.

    0
    0
  • Now we have a catalogue of Louis le Hutin's library, and, strange to say, Joinville does not figure in it.

    0
    0
  • Three years later a 14th-century copy was found at Brussels, and this is the standard manuscript authority for the text of Joinville.

    0
    0
  • The modern science of critical editing, however, which applies to medieval texts the principles long recognized in editing the classics, has discovered in the 16th-century manuscript, and still more in the original miscellaneous works of Joinville, the letters, deeds, &c., already alluded to, the materials for what we have already called a conjectural restoration, which is not without its interest, though perhaps it is possible for that interest to be exaggerated.

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    0
  • For merely general readers Buchon's or Michaud's editions of Joinville will amply suffice.

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    0
  • Didot's Etudes sur Joinville (1870) and H.

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    0
  • Delaborde's Jean de Joinville (1894).

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    0
  • A number of prosperous German colonies - the largest and best known of which are Blumenau, Dona Francisca, Joinville, Itajahy, Brusque, Dom Pedro and Sao Bento - are devoted chiefly to agriculture.

    0
    0
  • The capital of the state is Florianopolis also called Santa Catharina and Desterro, and its other towns are Blumenau, Lages (9356), Laguna (7282), Joinville (13,996), Itajahy (8875), Brusque (8094), Sao Jose (11,820), opposite Florianopolis, Tubarao (5495) and Sao Francisco (5583), a good port in the northern part of the state in direct communication with a majority of the German colonies.

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  • A definite agreement was made between them at Joinville (December 31, 1584), the religious and popular pretext being the danger of leaving the kingdom to the king of Navarre, and the ostensible end to secure the succession to a Catholic prince, the old Cardinal de Bourbon, an ambitious and violent man of mean intelligence; while the secret aim was to secure the crown for the Guises, - who had already attempted to fabricate for themselves a genealogy tracing their descent from Charlemagne.

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  • In the meantime Philip II., being rid of Don John of Austria, whose ambition he dreaded, was to crush the Protestants of England and the Netherlands; and the double result of the compact at Joinville was to allow French politics to be controlled by Spain, and to transform the wars of religion into a purely political quarrel.

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    0
  • By a stroke of the pen he suppressed Protestantism, while Pope Sixtus V., who had at first been unfavourable to the treaty of Joinville as a purely political act, though he eventually yielded to the solicitations of the League, excommunicated the two Bourbons, Henry and Cond.

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  • In the vicinity are the villages of Joinville and Montpensier, which owe their origin to military camps established by Marshal Valee in 1838; and on the road to Medea are the tombs of the marabout Mahommed-el-Kebir, who died in 1580, and his two sons.

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