Johnson sentence example

johnson
  • He was a native of Berri, like herself, a stern but kindly taskmaster who treated her much as Dr Johnson treated Fanny Burney.
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  • While at home Hastings is said to have attached himself to literary society; and it may be inferred from his own letters that he now made the personal acquaintance of Samuel Johnson and Lord Mansfield.
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  • At the grammar school, founded in 1528, Dr Samuel Johnson was a master about 17 3 2, but found the work unbearable.
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  • The chief institutions for higher instruction are the university of Vermont and State Agricultural College (1800, 1865), a land-grant college at Burlington, Middlebury College (1800) at Middlebury, Norwich University (1819) at, Northfield, and the state normal schools at Randolph (1867), Johnson (1867) and Castleton (1868).
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  • It contains the panelling of a room from the house of Edmund Hector, which formerly stood in Old Square, Birmingham, where Dr Samuel Johnson was a frequent visitor.
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  • The rooms for students seemed very commodious, and Dr. Johnson said, the chapel was the neatest place of worship he had seen.
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  • Johnson supported Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War and was the only Southern senator who refused to join the confederacy.
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  • But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me.
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  • "What will the punishment be, Mr. Johnson?" asked a bold, bad boy.
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  • Young Mr. Johnson looked after him and wondered.
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  • As American diplomat Ralph Johnson Bunche aptly observed, "There are no warlike people, just warlike leaders."
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  • In a different way Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson" was interesting.
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  • But Johnson, and "The Plague" and everything else must wait a few minutes this afternoon, while I say, thank you, my dear Mrs. Hutton....
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  • Seward gradually regained his health, and remained in the cabinet of President Johnson until the expiration of his term in 1869.
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  • " Bird," when it passed from its earliest meaning of " nestlings," seems to have been applied to the smaller, and " fowl " to the larger species, a distinction which was retained by Johnson.
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  • He was essentially humane; and it is worthy of notice that he was in favour of the abolition of slavery, while humane men like his friend Lord Sheffield, Dr Johnson and Boswell were opposed to the antislavery movement.
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  • At the close of the war he was appointed by President Johnson secretary of Montana Territory, and there, in the absence of the territorial governor, he acted as governor from September 1866 until his death from accidental drowning in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana, on the 1st of July 1867.
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  • In 1865 President Johnson appointed as provisional governor William Lewis Sharkey (1797-1873), who had been chief justice of the state in 1832-1850, and a convention which assembled on the 14th of August recognized the "destruction" of slavery and declared the ordinance of secession null and void.
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  • In the " back country " extortionate fees, excessive taxes, and the oppressive manner of collecting them brought about a popular uprising, known as the Regulation, which centred in Orange and Anson counties, but was strong also in Brown, Edgecombe, Johnson, Granville and Halifax counties.
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  • But the assembly, the members of which were nearly the same as those of the congress, refused to interrupt the meeting of the congress, and in the next month the governor sought safety in flight, first to Fort Johnson on the Cape Fear below Wilmington and then to a man-of-war along the coast.
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  • His father, John Johnson (1770-1824), was a distinguished lawyer, who served in both houses of the Maryland General Assembly, as attorney-general of the state (1806-1811), as a judge of the court of appeals (1811-1821), and as a chancellor of his state (1821-1824).
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  • Taney; with Thomas Harris he reported the decisions of the court of appeals in Harris and Johnson's Reports (1820-1827); and in 1818 he was appointed chief commissioner of insolvent debtors.
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  • But he retained the political support of many who were opposed, like Senators Borah and Johnson, to any sort of international association.
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  • The earliest system adopted for the collection of petroleum appears to have consisted in Early skimming the oil from the surface of the water upon Methods which it had accumulated, and Professor Lesley states, that at Paint Creek, in Johnson county, Kentucky, a Mr George and others were in the habit of collecting oil from the sands, " by making shallow canals loo or 200 ft.
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  • In 1865 a provisional governor was appointed by President Andrew Johnson, and a new state government was organized.
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  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.
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  • Johnson, Democratic Republican Pierre Derbigny, Democratic Republican (died in office) .
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  • Municipal ownership has been further developed in Cleveland than in any other large city in the United States, chiefly because of the advocacy of Tom Loftin Johnson (born 1854), a street-railway owner, iron manufacturer, an ardent single-taxer, who was elected mayor of the city in 1901, 1903, 1905 and 1907.
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  • In this respect it reached its height in the second half of the 18th century, and is specially associated with Colley Cibber, Samuel Johnson, Cumberland the dramatist, David Garrick, Samuel Richardson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Beau Nash, Miss Chudleigh and Mrs Thrale.
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  • Democrat (died in office)1905-1909 John Albert Johnson Republican 1909Adolph Olson Eberhart Bibliography.
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  • His philological studies, to which the last fourteen years of his life were devoted, resulted in the compilation of "A Glossary of Provincial and Archaic Words," intended as a supplement to Dr Johnson's Dictionary, but never published except in part, which finally in 1831 passed into the hands of the English compilers of Webster's Dictionary, by whom it was utilized.
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  • Cicero's De Officiis abounds in the kind of question afterwards so warmly discussed by Dr Johnson and his friends.
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  • They decided each problem on its merits, looking more to the spirit than to the letter, and often showing a practical sagacity worthy of Johnson himself.
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  • His conversational powers rivalled those of Dr Johnson; and, if more of his sayings have not been chronicled for the benefit of posterity, the defect is due to the absence of a Boswell.
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  • After the war he allied himself with the radical wing of his party, was a member of the joint committee that outlined the congressional plan of reconstructing the late Confederate States, and laboured for the impeachment of President Johnson.
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  • In 1755 occurred the famous dispute with Johnson over the dedication to the English Dictionary.
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  • In 1747 Johnson sent Chesterfield, who was then secretary of state, a prospectus of his Dictionary, which was acknowledged by a subscription of X10.
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  • It was said that Johnson was kept waiting in the anteroom when he called while Cibber was admitted.
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  • Chesterfield's " respectable Hottentot," now identified with George, Lord Lyttelton, was long supposed, though on slender grounds, to be a portrait of Johnson.
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  • Samuel Johnson, who was not perhaps the best judge in the world, pronounced his manners to have been " exquisitely elegant "; yet as a courtier he was utterly worsted by Robert Walpole, whose manners were anything but refined, and even by Newcastle.
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  • He was sober enough (for his day and society) in eating and drinking generally; but drank coffee, as his contemporary, counterpart and enemy, Johnson, drank tea, in a hardened and inveterate manner.
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  • He appears to have had no great sense of natural beauty, in which point he resembled his generation (though one remarkable story is told of his being deeply affected by Alpine scenery); and, except in his passion for the stage, he does not seem to have cared much for any of the arts, Conversation and literature were, again as in Johnson's case, the sole gods of his idolatry.
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  • The Mitre in Fleet Street, so intimately associated with Dr Johnson, also existed at this time.
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  • Dr Johnson's Jacobite sympathies are well known, and on the death of Victor Emmanuel I., the ex-king of Sardinia, in 1824, Lord Liverpool wrote to Canning saying "there are those who think that the ex-king was the lawful king of Great Britain."
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  • Tin dissolves readily in strong hot hydrochloric acid as SnC12; aqueous sulphuric acid does not act on it appreciably in the cold; at 150° it attacks it more or less quickly, according to the strength of the acid, with evolution of sulphuretted hydrogen or, when the acid is stronger, of sulphurous acid gas and deposition of sulphur (Calvert and Johnson).
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  • Johnson in England Arc appear, in 1853, to have introduced the earliest practical form of furnace.
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  • On the inauguration of President Lincoln in 1861 he was appointed secretary of the navy, a position which he held until the close of President Andrew Johnson's administration in 1869.
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  • On the questions relating to political reconstruction and the policy of President Johnson, he supported his party, though opposed to its Radical leaders.
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  • He warmly advocated the insertion in the Reconstruction Acts of a provision ensuring the early termination of military government; and he opposed the impeachment of President Johnson, though he voted for conviction on the trial.
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  • In 1787, with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson (1727-1819), he was one of Connecticut's delegates to the constitutional convention at Philadelphia, in which his services were numerous and important.
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  • In 1865 he rejected the more radical views of his party as to the treatment to be accorded to the late Confederate states, opposed the immediate and unconditional enfranchisement of freedmen, and, though not accepting President Johnson's views in their entirety, he urged the people of Massachusetts to give the new president their support.
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  • In the following year he became involved in the deadly quarrel between President Johnson and Congress.
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  • To tie the president's hands Congress had passed the Tenure of Office Act, forbidding the president to remove any cabinet officer without the consent of the Senate; but in August 1867 President Johnson suspended Secretary Stanton and appointed Grant secretary of war ad interim until the pleasure of the Senate should be ascertained.
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  • President Johnson was much disgusted at the readiness with which Grant turned over the office to Stanton, and a bitter controversy ensued between Johnson and Grant.
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  • In May 1872 something was done towards alleviating the odious Reconstruction laws for dragooning the South, which had been passed by Congress in spite of the vetoes of President Johnson.
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  • Presi- the beginning of 1868, hoped to make him their can 1868y' didate in the election of that year; but the effect of the controversy with President Johnson was to bring Grant forward as the candidate of the Republican party.
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  • The Tory party and the established church were defended in the Critical Review (1756-1817), founded by Archibald Hamilton and supported by Smollett, Dr Johnson and Robertson.
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  • Johnson contributed to fifteen numbers of the Literary Magazine (1756-1758).
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  • Cave introduced the practice of giving engravings, maps and portraits, but his greatest success was the addition of Samuel Johnson to the regular staff.
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  • At a later period he was unjustly described as "a scurrilous party writer," which he certainly was not; but, on the other hand, Johnson spoke of his writing "so variously and so well," and put Robinson Crusoe among the only three books that readers wish longer.
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  • He was a strong opponent of the reconstruction measures of President Johnson, for whose conviction he voted (on most of the specific charges) in the impeachment trial.
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  • In October-November 1768, Sir William Johnson and representatives of Virginia and Pennsylvania met 3200 Indians of the Six Nations here and made a treaty with them, under which, for 10,460 in money and provisions, they surrendered to the crown their claims to what is now Kentucky and West Virginia and the western part of Pennsylvania.
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  • On the 2nd of August an advance party of Colonel Barry St Leger's forces coming from the west arrived before the fort, and the main body (altogether about 650 whites, including loyalists - the Royal Greens - under Sir John Johnson, and more than Boo Indians, some led by Joseph Brant) arrived soon afterwards.
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  • The inscription is by Dr Johnson.
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  • The new settlement prospered from the start, and a valuable trade was built up with the Indians, over whom Johnson exercised an immense influence.
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  • After the war Sir William retired to his estates, where, on the site of the present Johnstown, he built his residence, Johnson Hall, and lived in all the style of an English baron.
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  • In 1739 Johnson had married Catherine Wisenberg, by whom he had three children.
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  • His Son, SIR John Johnson (1742-1830), Who was knighted in 1765 and succeeded to the baronetcy on his father's death, took part in the French and Indian War and in the border warfare during the War of Independence, organizing a loyalist regiment known as the "Queen's Royal Greens," which he led at the battle of Oriskany and in the raids (1778 and 1780) on Cherry Valley and in the Mohawk Valley.
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  • Sir William's nephew, GUY Johnson (1740-1788), succeeded his uncle as superintendent of Indian affairs in 1774, and served in the French and Indian War and, on the British side, in the War of Independence.
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  • 3 Manuel Johnson, M.A., Radcliffe observer, Astronomical Observations made at the Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford, in the Year 1850, Introduction, p. iii.
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  • With Benjamin Harrison, John Dickinson, Thomas Johnson and John Jay he was appointed in November 1775 to a committee to carry on a secret correspondence with the friends of America " in Great Britain, Ireland and other parts of the world."
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  • On his father's return from Gibraltar, David, who had previously been educated at the grammar school of Lichfield, was, largely by the advice of Gilbert Walmley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court, sent with his brother George to the " academy " at Edial, just opened in June or July 1736 by Samuel Johnson, the senior by seven years of David, who was then nineteen.
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  • This seminary was, however, closed in about six months, and on the 2nd of March 1736/7 both Johnson and Garrick left Lichfield for London - Johnson, as he afterwards said, " with twopence halfpenny in his pocket," and Garrick " with three-halfpence in his."
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  • Johnson, whose chief asset was the MS. tragedy of Irene, was at first the host of his former pupil, who, however, before the end of the year took up his residence at Rochester with John Colson (afterwards Lucasian professor at Cambridge).
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  • In September 1747 it was opened with a strong company of actors, Johnson's prologue being spoken by Garrick, while the epilogue, written by him, was spoken by Mrs Woffington.
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  • Johnson, of whose various and often merely churlish remarks on Garrick and his doings many are scattered through the pages of Boswell, spoke warmly of the elegance and sprightliness of his friend's conversation, as well as of his liberality and kindness of heart; while to the great actor's art he paid the exquisite tribute of describing Garrick's sudden death as having " eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure."
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  • Gradually they resumed church-fellowship in Amsterdam, where they chose the learned Henry Ainsworth as teacher, in place of Greenwood, but elected no new pastor, as they expected Francis Johnson (1562-1618) soon to be released and to rejoin them.
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  • Johnson, a man autocratic by nature, and leaning to his old Presbyterian ideals on the point, held that the church had no power to control its elders, once elected, in their exercise of discipline, much less to depose them; while Ainsworth, true to Barrow and the " old way " as he claimed, sided with those who made the church itself supreme throughout.
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  • A reconciliation was effected, however, by Colonel William Johnson (1715-1774), who had long been superintendent of Indian affairs.
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  • None of these was taken but on the 8th of September Major-General William Johnson, in command of the expedition against Crown Point, defeated a French and Indian force under Baron Dieskau in the battle of Lake George.
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  • As Johnson thought it unsafe to pursue the routed army his victory had no other effect than the erection here of the useless defences of Fort William Henry, but as it was the only success in a year of gloom parliament rewarded him with a grant of X 5000 and the title of a baronet.
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  • Sir William Johnson died in 1774, but under his influence and that of his son, Sir John Johnson, and his nephew Guy Johnson, the Mohawks and other Iroquois Indians had become firmly attached to the British side and threatened the western frontier.
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  • Severe English moralists like Johnson thought but ill of him, but the public generally was not unwilling to testify against French intolerance, and regarded his sentimentalism with favour.
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  • But between the time of Massillon and D'Aguesseau and the time of Lamennais and Joseph de Maistre the class of men of whom in England Berkeley, Butler and Johnson were representatives did not exist in France.
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  • These meters, of which one well-known form is that of Johnson and Phillips, have the disadvantage of being unsuited for the measurement of electric supply in those cases in which it is irregular or intermittent - as in a theatre or hotel.
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  • There are also many connexions with Dr Johnson, a frequent visitor here to his friend Dr Taylor, who occupied a house opposite the grammar school.
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  • Johnston withdrew; Johnson himself was killed at Shiloh, but an attempt was subsequently made by General Bragg to install this government at Frankfort.
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  • Johnson's successor, was actually " inaugurated," but naturally this state " government " immediately collapsed.
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  • He first appeared as an author by contributing two articles to the Edinburgh Review (an earlier journal than the present, which was commenced in 1755, but of which only two numbers were published),-one on Johnson's Dictionary and the other a letter to the editors on the state of literature in the different countries of Europe.
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  • 3 A story was told by Sir Walter Scott, and is also related in the Edinburgh Review, of an "unfortunate rencontre," arising out of the publication of the same letter, between Smith and Dr Johnson, during the visit of the latter to Glasgow.
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  • Smith seems not to have met Johnson in Scotland at all.
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  • It appears, however, from Boswell's Life, under date of 29th April 1778, that Johnson had on one occasion quarrelled with Smith at Strahan's house, apparently in London; it is clear that the "unlucky altercation" at Strahan's must have occurred in 1761 or 1763, and could have had nothing to do with the letter on Hume's death.
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  • Against such a destiny D'Israeli's mind strongly revolted; and he carried his poem, with a letter earnestly appealing for advice and assistance, to Samuel Johnson; but when he called again a week after to receive an answer, the packet was returned unopened - the great Doctor was on his.
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  • This cathedral contains the monuments of several illustrious persons, amongst which the most celebrated are those of Swift (dean of this cathedral), of Mrs Hester Johnson, immortalized under the name of "Stella"; of Archbishop Marsh; of the first earl of Cork; and of Duke Schomberg, who fell at the battle of the Boyne.
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  • The most important was that of President Johnson, whose conviction failed by one vote35 to 19.
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  • Jackson, however, as well as Tyler, Johnson and especially Cleveland, employed it pretty boldly.
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  • Andrew Johnson is the only president who has been impeached.
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  • In accord with President Andrew Johnson's plan for reorganizing the Southern States, a provisional governor, James Johnson, was appointed on the 17th of June 1865, and a state convention reformed the constitution to meet the new conditions, rescinding the ordinance of secession, abolishing slavery and formally repudiating the state debt incurred in the prosecution of the war.
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  • Here is the gravestone of the wife of Dr Johnson.
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  • Johnson began in politics to oppose the aristocratic element .and became the spokesman and champion of the poorer and labouring classes.
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  • In 1835-1837 and 1839-1841 Johnson was a Democratic member of the state House of Representatives, and in 1841-1843 of the state Senate; in both houses he uniformly upheld the cause of the " common people," and, in addition, opposed legislation for " internal improvements."
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  • Though his favourite leaders became Whigs, Johnson remained a Democrat, and in 1840 canvassed the state for Van Buren for president.
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  • In 1864, to secure the votes of the war Democrats and to please the border states that had remained in the Union, Johnson was nominated for vice-president on the ticket with Lincoln.
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  • Johnson took a prominent and undignified part in the congressional campaign of 1866, in which his policies were voted down by the North.
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  • President Johnson's leading political principles were a reverence of Andrew Jackson, unlimited confidence in the people, and an intense veneration for the constitution.
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  • Dunning's paper ' ` More Light on Andrew Johnson" (in the American Historical Review, April 1906), in which apparently conclusive evidence is presented to prove that Johnson's first inaugural, a notable state paper, was.
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  • In the bitter conflict between the large state party and the small state party he and his colleagues, Oliver Ellsworth and William Samuel Johnson, acted as peacemakers.
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  • In 1832 Buffalo obtained a city charter, and Dr Ebenezer Johnson (1786-1849) was chosen the first mayor.
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  • He voted for Johnson's conviction on his trial for impeachment, and for this was severely criticized, since, in the event of conviction, he would have become president; but Wade's whole course before and after the trial would seem to belie the charge that he was actuated by any such motive.
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  • In 1755 the precursor of the later Edinburgh Review was started, now chiefly remembered because in its pages Adam Smith criticized the dictionary of Dr Johnson, and because the contents of its two numbers were edited by Wedderburn.
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  • Johnson, R.N., showed from experiments in the iron steamship "Garry Owen" that the vessel acted on an external compass as a magnet.
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  • The genuineness of these so-called translations from the works of a 3rd-century bard was immediately challenged in England, and Dr Johnson, after some local investigation, asserted (Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, 1775) that Macpherson had only found fragments of ancient poems and stories, which he had woven into a romance of his own composition.
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  • Macpherson is said to have sent Johnson a challenge, to which Johnson replied that he was not to be deterred from detecting what he thought a cheat by the menaces of a ruffian.
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  • Perhaps our knowledge of Johnson's sentiments regarding the Scots in general, and of his expressions regarding Hume and Smith in particular, may lessen our surprise at this vehemence.
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  • The opposition to Johnson within the party greatly increased during his term, and the Democratic national convention of 1840 adopted the unprecedented course of refusing to nominate anyone for the vice-presidency.
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  • In the ensuing election Johnson received most of the Democratic electoral votes, but was defeated by the Whig candidate, John Tyler.
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  • At a house (now the Johnson Museum) in the Market Square, Lichfield, Samuel Johnson was born on the 18th of September 1709 and baptized on the same day at St Mary's, Lichfield.
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  • Old Michael Johnson was much better qualified to pore over books, and to talk about them, than to trade in them.
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  • At Oxford Johnson resided barely over two years, possibly less.
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  • The time drew near at which Johnson would, in the ordinary course of things, have become a Bachelor of Arts; but he was at the end of his resources.
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  • At Lichfield, however, Johnson could find no way of earning a livelihood.
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  • While leading this vagrant and miserable life, Johnson fell in love.
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  • At length Johnson, in the twenty-eighth year of his age,, determined to seek his fortune in London as a literary adventurer.
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  • Never since literature became a calling in England had it been a less gainful calling than at the time when Johnson took up his residence in London.
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  • One of the publishers to whom Johnson applied for employment measured with a scornful eye that athletic though uncouth frame, and exclaimed, "You had better get a porter's knot and carry trunks."
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  • Some time appears to have elapsed before Johnson was able to form any literary connexion from which he could expect more than bread for the day which was passing over him.
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  • "Harry Hervey," said Johnson many years later, "was a vicious man; but he was very kind to me.
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  • At Hervey's table Johnson sometimes enjoyed feasts which were made more agreeable by contrast.
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  • Oxford, when Johnson resided there, was the most Jacobitical place in England; and Pembroke was one of the most Jacobitical colleges in Oxford.
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  • Even the ship-money Johnson would not pronounce to have been an unconstitutional impost.
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  • But Johnson long afterwards owned that, though he had saved appearances, he had taken care that the Whig dogs should not have the best of it; and, in fact, every passage which has lived, every passage which bears the marks of his higher faculties, is put into the mouth of some member of the opposition.
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  • A few weeks after Johnson had, entered on these obscure labours, he published a work which at once placed him high among the writers of his age.
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  • What Pope had done for Horace, Johnson aspired to do for Juvenal.
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  • Johnson's London appeared without his name in May 1738.
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  • The attempt failed, and Johnson remained a bookseller's hack.
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  • But the most remarkable of the persons with whom at this time Johnson consorted was Richard Savage, an earl's son, a shoemaker's apprentice, who had seen life in all its forms, who had feasted among blue ribands in St James's Square, and had lain with fifty pounds weight of irons on his legs in the condemned ward of Newgate.
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  • During some months Savage lived in the closest familiarity with Johnson; and then the friends parted, not without tears.
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  • Johnson remained in London to drudge for Cave.
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  • The Life of Savage was anonymous; but it was well known in literary circles that Johnson was the writer.
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  • Such was Johnson's reputation that, in 1747, several eminent booksellers combined to employ him in the arduous work of preparing a Dictionary of the English Language, in two folio volumes.
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  • He received Johnson's homage with the most winning affability, and requited it with a few guineas, bestowed doubtless in a very graceful manner, but was by no means desirous to see all his carpets blackened with the London mud, and his soups and wines thrown to right and left over the gowns of fine ladies and the waistcoats of fine gentlemen, by an absent, awkward scholar, who gave strange starts and uttered strange growls, who dressed like a scarecrow and ate like a cormorant.
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  • During some time Johnson continued to call on his patron, but, after being repeatedly told by the porter that his lordship was not at home, took the hint, and ceased to present himself at the inhospitable door.
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  • Johnson had flattered himself that he should have completed his Dictionary by the end of 1750; but it was not till 1755 that he at length gave his huge volumes to the world.
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  • Continued adversity had soured Johnson's temper.
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  • At length Johnson undertook the adventure in which so many aspirants had failed.
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  • But Johnson had had enough of the patronage of the great to last him all his life, and was not disposed to haunt any other door as he had haunted the door of Chesterfield.
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  • Mrs Johnson had been given over by the physicians.
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  • The writings of Johnson were warmly praised.
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  • But the just resentment of Johnson was not to be so appeased.
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  • Johnson's Dictionary was hailed with an enthusiasm such as no similar work has ever excited.
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  • Johnson was a wretched etymologist.
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  • The Dictionary, though it raised Johnson's fame, added nothing to his pecuniary means.
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  • In the spring of 1758 Johnson put forth the first of a series of essays, entitled the Idler.
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  • While Johnson was busied with his Idlers, his mother, who had accomplished her ninetieth year, died at Lichfield.
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  • Johnson has frequently blamed Shakespeare for neglecting the proprieties of time and place, and for ascribing to one age or nation the manners and opinions of another.
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  • Yet Shakespeare has not sinned in this way more grievously than Johnson.
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  • Johnson, not content with turning filthy savages, ignorant of their letters, and gorged with raw steaks cut from living cows, into philosophers as eloquent and enlightened as himself or his friend Burke, and into ladies as highly accomplished as Mrs Lennox or Mrs Sheridan, transferred the whole domestic system of England to Egypt.
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  • By such exertions as have been described Johnson supported himself till the year 1762.
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  • The head of the treasury was now Lord Bute, who was a Tory, and could have no objection to Johnson's Toryism.
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  • Bute wished to be thought a patron of men of letters; and Johnson was one of the most eminent and one of the most needy men of letters in Europe.
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  • This event produced a change in Johnson's whole way of life.
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  • Churchill, who, confident in his powers, drunk with popularity, and burning with party spirit, was looking for some man of established fame and Tory politics to insult, celebrated the Cock Lane ghost in three cantos, nicknamed Johnson Pomposo, asked where the book was which had been so long promised and so liberally paid for, and directly accused the great moralist of cheating.
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  • This publication saved Johnson's character for honesty, but added nothing to the fame of his abilities and learning.
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  • Johnson had, in his prospectus, told the world that he was peculiarly fitted for the task which he had undertaken, because he had, as a lexicographer, been under the necessity of taking a wider view of the English language than any of his predecessors.
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  • Raleigh and others, who recognize both sagacity and scholarship in Johnson's Preface and Notes.
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  • Johnson's wide grasp of the discourse and knowledge of human nature enable him in a hundred entangled passages to go straight to the dramatist's meaning.
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  • Johnson might easily in a few months have made himself well acquainted with every old play that was extant.
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  • In the interval between 1765 and 1775 Johnson published only two or three political tracts.
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  • To a man of Johnson's strong understanding and irritable temper, the silly egotism and adulation of Boswell must have been as teasing as the constant buzz of a fly.
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  • Johnson hated to be questioned; and Boswell was eternally catechizing him on all kinds of subjects, and sometimes propounded such questions as, "What would you do, sir, if you were locked up in a tower with a baby ?"
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  • Johnson was a water-drinker and Boswell was a winebibber, and indeed little better than an habitual sot.
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  • During those visits his chief business was to watch Johnson, to discover all Johnson's habits, to turn the conversation to subjects about which Johnson was likely to say something remarkable, and to fill quarto notebooks with minutes of what Johnson had said.
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  • Soon after the club began to exist, Johnson formed a connexion less important indeed to his fame, but much more important to his happiness, than his connexion with Boswell.
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  • In 1765 the Thrales became acquainted with Johnson, and the acquaintance ripened fast into friendship. They were astonished and delighted by the brilliancy of his conversation.
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  • Johnson soon had an apartment at the brewery in Southwark, and a still more pleasant apartment at the villa of his friends on Streatham Common.
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  • It would seem that a full half of Johnson's life during about sixteen years was passed under the roof of the Thrales.
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  • At the head of the establishment Johnson had placed an old lady named Williams, whose chief recommendations were her blindness and her poverty.
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  • An old quack doctor named Levett, who had a wide practice, but among the very poorest class, poured out Johnson's tea in the morning and completed this strange menagerie.
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  • The course of life which has been described was interrupted in Johnson's sixty-fourth year by an important event.
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  • At length, in August 1773, Johnson crossed the Highland line, and plunged courageously into what was then considered, by most Englishmen, as a dreary and perilous wilderness.
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  • But even in censure Johnson's tone is not unfriendly.
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  • One scribbler abused Johnson for being blear-eyed, another for being a pensioner; a third informed the world that one of the doctor's uncles had been convicted of felony in Scotland, and had found that there was in that country one tree capable of supportin the weight of an Englishman.
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  • The only effect of this threat was that Johnson reiterated the charge of forgery in the most contemptuous terms, and walked about, during some time, with a cudgel.
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  • Of other assailants Johnson took no notice whatever.
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  • But Johnson took no notice of the challenge.
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  • War was evidently impending; and the ministers seem to have thought that the eloquence of Johnson might with advantage be employed to inflame the nation against the opposition at home, and against the rebels beyond the Atlantic. He had already written two or three tracts in defence of the foreign and domestic policy of the government; and those tracts, though hardly worthy of him, were much superior to the crowd of pamphlets which lay on the counters of Almon and Stockdale.
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  • Johnson had failed, not because his mind was less vigorous than when he wrote Rasselas in the evenings of a week, but because he had foolishly chosen, or suffered others to choose for him, a subject such as he would at no time have been competent to treat.
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  • Happily, Johnson soon had an opportunity of proving most signally that his failure was not to be ascribed to intellectual decay.
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  • The Lives of the Poets are, on the whole, the best of Johnson's works.
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  • Savage's Life Johnson reprinted nearly as it had appeared in 1744.
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  • Since Johnson had been at ease in his circumstances he had written little and had talked much.
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  • Indeed Johnson, though he did not despise or affect to despise money, and though his strong sense and long experience ought to have qualified him to protect his own interests, seems to have been singularly unskilful and unlucky in his literary bargains.
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  • Johnson was now in his seventy-second year.
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  • Mrs Thrale herself confessed that without her husband's assistance she did not feel able to entertain Johnson as a constant inmate of her house.
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  • The secret of this attachment was soon discovered by Fanny Burney, but Johnson at most only suspected it.
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  • In September 1782 the place at Streatham was from motives of economy let to Lord Shelburne, and Mrs Thrale took a house at Brighton, whither Johnson accompanied her; they remained for six weeks on the old familiar footing.
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  • In March 1783 Boswell was glad to discover Johnson well looked after and staying with Mrs Thrale in Argyll Street, but in a bad state of health.
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  • Impatience of Johnson's criticisms and infirmities had been steadily growing with Mrs Thrale since 1774.
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  • Johnson was very ill in his lodgings during the summer, but he still corresponded affectionately with his "mistress" and received many favours from her.
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  • The whole dispute seems, to-day, entirely uncalled-for, but the marriage aroused some of Johnson's strongest prejudices.
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  • When at length the moment, dreaded through so many years, came close, the dark cloud passed away from Johnson's mind.
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  • - The splendid example of his style which Macaulay contributed in the article on Johnson to the 7th edition of this encyclopaedia has become classic, and has therefore been retained above with a few trifling modifications in those places in which his invincible love of the picturesque has drawn him demonstrably aside from the dull line of veracity.
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  • Macaulay, it must be noted, exaggerated persistently the poverty of Johnson's pedigree, the squalor of his early married life, the grotesqueness of his entourage in Fleet Street, the decline and fall from complete virtue of Mrs Thrale, the novelty and success of the Dictionary, the complete failure of the Shakespeare and the political tracts.
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  • Yet this contribution is far more mellow than the article contributed on Johnson twenty-five years before to the Edinburgh Review in correction of Croker.
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  • Johnson's prose is not extensively read.
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  • As in the case of all great men, Johnson has suffered a good deal at the hands of his imitators and admirers.
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  • But the tendency at the present day is undoubtedly to prize Johnson's personality and sayings more than any of his works.
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  • Johnson's "Club" ("The Club") still exists, and has contained ever since his time a large proportion of the public celebrities of its day.
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  • A "Johnson Club," which has included many Johnson scholars and has published papers, was founded in 1885.
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  • Statues both of Johnson and Boswell are in the market-place at Lichfield.
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  • This threatening attitude, in conjunction with alarming indications of a conspiracy to resist the draft, had the effect to thoroughly consolidate the war party, which had on the 8th of June unanimously renominated Lincoln, and had nominated Andrew Johnson of Tennessee for the vice-presidency.
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  • In London great meetings were held in Covent Garden theatre, at which William Johnson Fox was the chief orator, but Bright and Cobden were the leaders of the movement.
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  • Raleigh was the birthplace of President Andrew Johnson; the house in which he was born has been removed to Pullen Park.
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  • Boswell's Life of Johnson gives an account of the lexicographer's visit to Burnett at Monboddo, and is full of references to the natural contemporary view of a man who thought that the human race could be descended from monkeys.
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  • It is, as Dr Johnson justly described this work at the time of its appearance, a " Dictionary " of carefully sifted facts, which tells all that is wanted and all that is known, but without any laboured splendour of language or affected subtlety of conjecture.
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  • He was described by the most brilliant Eton tutor of his day, William Johnson Cory (author of Ionica), as a "portentously wise youth, not, however, deficient in fun."
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  • Remaining in the cabinet of President Andrew Johnson, Stanton exerted all his energies toward thwarting the policies of that executive, especially those related to the reconstruction of the Southern states.
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  • He was, as Froude says, impressed by the story of Johnson's " penance " at Uttoxeter, and desired to make a posthumous confession of his shortcomings in his relations to his wife.
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  • Froude in this and the later publications held that he was giving effect to Carlyle's wish to imitate Johnson's " penance."
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  • Johnson made a large number of tests for the Forest Department of the Board of Agriculture of the United States between 1891 and 1895.
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  • One general conclusion arrived at both by Bauschinger and Johnson was that the strength is much affected by the specific gravity of the timber.
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  • This work was carried out in a most thorough manner, and as many as 16,000 tests were made, the conditions of test being based upon those laid down by Johnson.
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  • Returning to England in September 1592, he joined the Separatist Church in London, in which he declined to take office, though after the arrest of the ministers, Francis Johnson and John Greenwood, he seems to have been the regular preacher.
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  • Clearly the word Mass had ceased to be a colourless term generally applicable to the eucharistic service; it was, in fact, not only proscribed officially, but in the common language of English people it passed entirely out of use except in the sense in which it is defined in Johnson's Dictionary, i.e.
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  • From 1863 to 1869 he was a representative in Congress, taking an influential part in debate, and acting as one of the managers of President Johnson's impeachment.
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  • The organization of Arkansas being now acceptable to Congress, a bill admitting it to the Union was passed over President Johnson's veto, and on the 22nd of June 1868 the admission was consummated.
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  • 4 For derivations of the word see Latham's Johnson's Dictionary.
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  • The irrigable area of Wyoming is estimated at about 6,200,000 acres, lying chiefly in Bighorn, Sheridan and Johnson counties in the N.W.
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  • There are large irrigated areas in Johnson and Sheridan counties.
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  • He was not permitted to take a seat, but his presence in Washington hastened action, and on the 25th of July 1868 the act of Congress establishing a Territory with the present boundaries was approved by President Andrew Johnson.
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  • In parts of the state it became impossible to get a jury composed of these small squatters to convict anybody for stealing or killing cattle, and so bad did this become that, in 1892, certain cattlemen formed a small army of mounted men and invaded the central part of the state with the avowed intention of killing all the men generally considered to be stock thieves, an episode known as the Johnson County Raid.
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  • Typhon: a Burlesque Poem (1704); Aesop Dress'd, or a Collection of Fables writ in Familiar Verse (1704); The Planter's Charity (1704); The Virgin Unmasked (1709, 1724, 1731, 1742), a work in which the coarser side of his nature is prominent; Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions (1711, 1715, 1730) admired by Johnson (Mandeville here protests against merely speculative therapeutics, and advances fanciful theories of his own about animal spirits in connexion with "stomachic ferment": he shows a knowledge of Locke's methods, and an admiration for Sydenham); Free Thoughts on Religion (1720); A Conference about Whoring (1725); An Enquiry into the Causes of the Frequent Executions at Tyburn (1725); The Origin of Honour and the Usefulness of Christianity in War (1732).
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  • Later, in the Reconstruction period, he commanded the Fifth Military District (Louisiana and Texas) at New Orleans, where his administration of the conquered states was most stormy, his differences with President Johnson culminating in his recall in September 1867.
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  • An English abridgment of Le Grand's edition by Dr Johnson was published in 1735 (reprinted 1789).
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  • The commissioners - Thomas Johnson (1732-1819) and Daniel Carroll (1756-1829) of Maryland and Dr David Stuart of Virginia - gave the city its name; Major L'Enfant drew its plan, and Andrew Ellicott laid it out.
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  • In the city, on the 23rd and 24th of May 1865, President Andrew Johnson reviewed the returning soldiers of the Union Army.
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  • Pierpont set up in Richmond a government, based upon the Lincoln plan and supported by President Johnson, which continued till the 2nd of March 1867, when the famous reconstruction order converting the state into Military District No.
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  • In 1867 the Republican party had prepared for the admission of Colorado as a state, but the enabling act was vetoed by President Johnson, and statehood was not gained until 1876.
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  • He took an active part in the attempt to impeach President Johnson.
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  • The classical version of their achievements is that of Richard Johnson (1 573 - c. 1659), Famous Historie of the Seaven Champions of Christendom (3 parts, 1596, 1608, 1610: many editions).
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  • He led an expedition following Sherman into the Carolinas and fought two successful actions with Bragg at Kinston, N.C. He was governor of Ohio in 1866-1867, and as such advocated the colonization of the freedmen in a restricted area, and sympathized with President Johnson's programme of Reconstruction and worked for a compromise between Johnson and his opponents, although he finally deserted Johnson.
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  • Many of the most remarkable among the younger men of that period resorted to Highgate as to the shrine of an oracle, and although one or two disparaging judgments, such as that of Carlyle, have been recorded, there can be no doubt that since Samuel Johnson there had been no such power in England.
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  • A second edition of the Herbal was published in 1636 by Thomas Johnson, with a different illustration from that given in the first edition, and one which in some respects, as in showing the true nature of the tuber, is superior to the first.
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  • Previous to this (in 1629) Parkinson, the friend and associate of Johnson, had published his Paradisus, in which (p. 517) he gives an indifferent figure of the potato under the name of Papas seu Battatas Virginianorum, and adds details as to the method of cooking the tubers which seem to indicate that they were still luxuries.
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  • The third satire, imitated by Samuel Johnson in his London, presents such a picture as Rome may have offered to the satirist at any time in the 1st century of our era; but it was under the worst emperors, Nero and Domitian, that the arts of flatterers and foreign adventurers were most successful, and that such scenes of violence as that described at 2 77 seq.
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  • The industry seems to have had its origin among a colony of Perthshire families, including many glove-makers, who were settled in this region by Sir William Johnson about 1760.
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  • The best-known specimen of Pitt's eloquence, his reply to the sneers of Horatio Walpole at his youth and declamatory manner,which has found a place in somanyhandbooks of elocution, is evidently, in form at least, the work, not of Pitt, but of Dr Johnson, who furnished the report to the Gentleman's Magazine.
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  • Probably Pitt did say something of the kind attributed to him, though even this is by no means certain in view of Johnson's repentant admission that he had often invented not merely the form, but the substance of entire debates.
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  • Dr Johnson is reported to have said that "Walpole was a minister given by the king to the people, but Pitt was a minister given by the people to the king," and the remark correctly indicates Chatham's distinctive place among English statesmen.
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  • Johnson, Anthony,Solving Stonehenge: The New Key to an Ancient Enigma.
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  • He was not, however, entirely in accord with the more radical members of his own party, and this difference was exemplified in his opposition to the impeachment of President Johnson and subsequently in his voting for Johnson's acquittal.
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  • Pope bequeathed him the copyright and the editorship of his works, and contributed even more to his advancement by introducing him to Murray, afterwards Lord Mansfield, who obtained for him in 1746 the preachership of Lincoln's Inn, and to Ralph Allen, who, says Johnson, "gave him his niece and his estate, and, by consequence, a bishopric."
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  • In the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson he was one of the seven Republicans who voted to acquit, and he afterwards returned to the Democratic party.
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  • In Congress he was conspicuous as a Radical Republican in Reconstruction legislation, and was one of the managers selected by the House to conduct the impeachment, before the Senate, of President Johnson, opening the case and taking the most prominent part in it on his side; he exercised a marked influence over President Grant and was regarded as his spokesman in the House, and he was one of the foremost advocates of the payment in "greenbacks" of the government bonds.
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  • He was twice married: in 1787 to Jane Mercer, daughter of Colonel William Mercer of Aldie; and in 1808 to Hester Maria Thrale, who is spoken of as "Queenie" in Boswell's Life of Johnson and Mme.
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  • The speculations as to primitive man connected with these stories diverted the British public, headed by Dr Johnson, who said that Monboddo was " as jealous of his tail as a squirrel."
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  • In November 1768, at a general council of the Six Nations with Sir William Johnson and representatives of Pennsylvania and Virginia, held at Fort Stanwix, on the site of the present Rome, New York (q.v.), at which was signed a treaty establishing the boundary line between the English possessions and the territory claimed by the Six Nations, the Indians sold for $io,000 to Thomas Penn (1702-1775) and Richard Penn (1706-1771), respectively, the second and third sons of William Penn - the founder of Pennsylvania - by his second wife, the remaining land in the province of Pennsylvania to which they claimed title, namely the tract lying south of the west branch of the Susquehanna river and of a straight line from the north-west corner of what is now Cambria county to the present Kittanning (in Armstrong county), and all of the territory east of the Allegheny river below Kittanning and south of the Ohio river.
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  • Richard Savage, the poet, claimed identity with Lady Macclesfield's son by Lord Rivers, but though his story was accepted by Dr Johnson and was very generally believed, the evidence in its support is faulty in several respects.
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  • To the odd terminology of Donne's poetic philosophy Dryden gave the name of "metaphysics," and Johnson, borrowing the suggestion, invented the title of the "metaphysical school" to describe, not Donne only, but all the amorous and philosophical poets who succeeded him, and who employed a similarly fantastic language, and who affected odd figurative inversions.
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  • Its gateway, erected in 1504, and remaining in St John's Square, served various purposes after the suppression of the monasteries, being, for example, the birthplace of the Gentleman's Magazine in 1731, and the scene of Dr Johnson's work in connexion with that journal.
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  • An Early English crypt remains beneath the neighbouring parish church of St John, where the notorious deception of the "Cock Lane Ghost," in which Johnson took great interest, was exposed.
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  • It was at Moor Park, near Farnham, the residence to which Temple had retired to cultivate apricots after the rapid decline of his influence during the critical period of Charles II.'s reign (1679-1681), that Swift's acquaintance with Esther Johnson, the "Stella" of the famous Journal, was begun.
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  • Esther, daughter of a merchant named Edward Johnson, a dependant, and legatee to a small amount, of Sir William Temple's (born in March 1680), whose acquaintance he had made at Moor Park in 1689, and whom he has immortalized as "Stella," came over with her companion Rebecca Dingley, a poor relative of the Temple family, and was soon permanently domiciled in his neighbourhood.
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  • We have already mentioned his invitation of Esther Johnson and Mrs Dingley to Ireland.
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  • It was accepted by the early biographers, Deane Swift, Orrery, Delany and Sheridan; also by Johnson, Scott, Dr Garnett, Craik, Dr Bernard and others.
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  • His influence, which grew during the 18th century in spite of the depreciation of Dr Johnson, has shared in the eclipse of the Queen Anne wits which began about the time of Jeffrey.
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  • Dr Johnson's Life is marred by manifest prejudice.
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  • Like a genial Dr. Johnson in conversation, he made easy captives of British statesmen on his visits to London.
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  • After the Civil War he vigorously opposed the Congressional plan of reconstructing the late Confederate states, and himself drafted the message of President Johnson, vetoing the Reconstruction Act of the 2nd of March 1867.
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  • He resented the initiative in Reconstruction taken by Lincoln, and later by Johnson, as an encroachment upon the powers of Congress.
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  • In the impeachment proceedings against Johnson, Sumner was one of the president's most implacable assailants.
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  • Political writing is at its best from Halifax to Cobbett, and its three greatest names are perhaps Swift, Junius and Burke, though Steele, Defoe, Bolingbroke and Dr Johnson are not far behind, while Cannings contributions to the A4nti-Jacobin and Gillrays caricatures require mention.
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  • Non invideo equidem, miror magis, was Johnson's good-natured remark, when he was taken over his friend's fine house and pleasant gardens.
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  • Johnson was of a very different type.
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  • We may say, if we please, that Johnson had the far truer and loftier dignity of the two; but we have to take such men as Burke with the defects that belong to their qualities.
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  • He was one of the commanding figures at the club at the Turk's Head, with Reynolds and Garrick, Goldsmith and Johnson.
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  • And everybody knows Johnson's vivid account of him: "Burke, Sir, is such a man that if you met him for the first time in the street, where you were stopped by a drove of oxen, and you and he stepped aside to take shelter but for five minutes, he'd talk to you in such a manner that when you parted you would say, ` This is an extraordinary man.'" They all grieved that public business should draw to party what was meant for mankind.
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  • His banter is nearly always ungainly, his wit blunt, as Johnson said, and often unseasonable.
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  • Throughout the war he allied himself with the most radical of the Republican faction in opposition to President Lincoln's policy, and subsequently became one of the bitterest opponents of President Johnson's plan of reconstruction.
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  • He was chief counsel for President Johnson during the impeachment trial, and from July 1868 until March 1869 he was attorney-general of the United States.
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  • In 1868 he was one of the managers in the impeachment of President Johnson.
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  • Dr Johnson received part of his education in this town (1726-1727).
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  • A correspondence took place between him and Burns, who considered his "Tullochgorum" "the best Scotch song Scotland ever saw," and procured his collaboration for Johnson's Musical Museum.
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  • After the Civil War Blair became a supporter of President Johnson's reconstruction policy, and eventually rejoined the Democratic party.
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  • Towards the middle of the 18th century Leipzig was the seat of the most influential body of literary men in Germany, over whom Johann Christoph Gottsched, like his contemporary, Samuel Johnson, in England, exercised a kind of literary dictatorship. Then, if ever, Leipzig deserved the epithet of a "Paris in miniature" (Klein Paris) assigned to it by Goethe in his Faust.
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  • On Fort Johnson, on James Island in Charleston harbour, he raised what is said to have been the first American battle-flag - blue, with a white crescent in the dexter corner, inscribed with the word "Liberty"; the flag was devised by him in September 1775.
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  • In 1790, a year before the Homer was published, commenced his friendship with his cousin John Johnson, known to all biographers of the poet as " Johnny of Norfolk."
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  • Johnson also aspired to be a poet, and visited his cousin armed with a manuscript.
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  • In the following year a removal took place into Norfolk under - the loving care of John Johnson.
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  • Johnson took Cowper and Mary Unwin to North Tuddenham, thence to Mundesley, then to Dunham Lodge, near Swaffham, and finally in October 1796 they moved to East Dereham.
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  • The Private Correspondence, edited by John Johnson, appeared in 2 volumes in 1824 and again in 1835.
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  • In the market-place here Dr Johnson stood hatless in the rain doing voluntary penance for disobedience to his father.
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  • As the expenses of Territorial government were partly borne by the United States, statehood was voted against in 1860, and again (virtually) in 1864 after Congress had passed an Enabling Act; but in 1866 a constitution framed by the legislature was declared carried by the people by a majority of loo votes in 7776, and Nebraska was admitted as a state (in spite of President Johnson's veto) in 1867, after her legislature had accepted a fundamental condition imposed by Congress removing the limitation of the suffrage to whites by the new constitution.
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  • He published, when only seventeen, a pamphlet On the War in North America, and in 1761 went to London and started a periodical work, entitled The Universal Museum, which was dropped by the advice of Samuel Johnson.
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  • Andrew Johnson, then a United States senator from Tennessee, refused to resign his seat, and was supported by a large element in East Tennessee.
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  • Schofield at Franklin, and on the 15th-16th of December was utterly defeated by Thomas at Nashville, the Federals thus securing virtually undisputed control of the state.1 After the occupation of the state by the Federal armies in 1862 Andrew Johnson was appointed military governor by the president (confirmed March 3, 1862), and held the office until inaugurated vice-president on the 4th of March 1865.
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  • 5 Andrew Johnson, the governor, was inaugurated as VicePresident, March 4, 1865, thereby vacating the office.
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  • I am extremely grateful to you, Minister Johnson, for your strong words of support for them.
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  • The College is delighted that Graham Johnson, one of the world's leading accompanists, is the inaugural visiting artist.
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  • She was also, through her famous friend Dr. Johnson to gain admittance to the London literary set.
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  • The company led by its Managing Director, Roger Johnson, has a highly ambitious agenda of growth over the next decade.
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  • The likes of Oliver Goldsmith, Tom Paine, Samuel Johnson and that little cockney bloke off Eastenders have all quaffed ale here.
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  • Mr Johnson's friend and employer, Jack Sheridan, was doused with gasoline and set alight on February 3, 1975.
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  • The story involves palpable anachronisms as Johnson's only visit to Glasgow was before Hume's death.
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  • Palace's Andy Johnson was hurt by a tackle - which did not appease Dowie.
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  • Both Boswell and Hawkins had dipped into Johnson's diaries without his permission; no doubt each felt somewhat ashamed of such sneaky behavior.
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  • Amy Johnson, the pioneering aviator, will be celebrated on a Royal Mail stamp issued on 29 April.
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  • Johnson also indicated part of my back to the quot Jonathan baker.
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  • Notice the wrought iron railing which was constructed by Phil Johnson, a Scottish artist blacksmith.
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  • Kent are to open talks with Somerset pace bowler Richard Johnson about a possible move to the St Lawrence.
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  • Councilor Johnson commented that, in addition to such a condition, she would wish to see standard conditions imposed to prevent noise breakout.
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  • The sacred 260 day calendar of early Mesoamerican civilisations Bob Johnson seeks an explanation for the Mayan calendar.
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  • A video of Johnson has been aired showing her nervously answering questions from her Iraqi captors.
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  • From colorful rugs to greetings cards, Johnson Crafts have the kit that is right for you.
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  • Johnson and I got six cartload of hay this afternoon.
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  • For Johnson the pattern of adult catechesis is the most integrated approach to keeping together outreach, discipleship, worship and ministry.
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  • Mr Johnson introduced this application and invited comments from callers.
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  • On 1st May, 1865, President Andrew Johnson ordered the formation of a nine-man military commission to try the conspirators.
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  • Mind you, at least Johnson scored a cracker against Luton, it wasn't presented to him on a plate.
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  • Vince Johnson said the investigator was suffering delusions of grandeur.
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  • Private Johnson had not only desecrated the statue of their Goddess, he had also desecrated the woman who played the Goddess.
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  • The story of the award of Johnson's honorary doctorate in March 1775 is told in Boswell's Life of Johnson.
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  • But not everyone in Air Force R&D was so enamored of Johnson or Lockheed.
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  • Johnson published a fine facsimile of the volume in 1936.
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  • I was uneasy to think myself too fastidious, whilst I fancied Dr. Johnson quite satisfied.
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  • Johnson and Johnson has a new floss that is good called ' Reach ' .
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  • Dr. Johnson was also involved in the successful flotation of CAT on the London Stock Exchange.
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  • They cleared the thickly forested land, built log dwellings, made merry with Highland games at Johnson Hall gatherings with the friendly Mohawks.
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  • Kids quot says are similar to wood Johnson foundation.
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  • Damon Johnson: It was my decision to become the frontman after searching for the better part of 2 years for a singer.
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  • In particular, I wish to bring to your notice the outstanding gallantry of Donald Johnson, Stoker First Class.
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  • Ann Johnson - Ann trained as a professional hairdresser and had her own business for 13 years.
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  • Johnson did see the hangman on the 15th December 1925.
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  • The greater intricacy of pop culture, Johnson concludes, might even have a neurological cause and effect.
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  • He was a proud Highlander and he didn't take the jibes of Johnson very well, " he said.
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  • Last year a high court judge, Mr Justice Johnson, ruled that her marriage was void because of a 1970 ruling.
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  • Unlike most modern lexicographers, Johnson introduced humor or prejudice into many of his definitions.
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  • Directors: Tim Burton, Mike Johnson CORPSE BRIDE marries gorgeous eye-popping visuals with a twisted and often macabre sense of humor.
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  • In fact Boswell himself skilfully manipulates the scene to place Johnson, and not the King, at its center.
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  • Tim Johnson has decided that it is time to let someone else assume this mantel.
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  • Johnson sent a messenger to inform Wild of what had happened.
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  • Most people completely misunderstand what Dr. Johnson said on patriotism.
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  • Under Findlay's direction Prior cut his teeth on W.E. Johnson's classic text Logic and studied the 18 th century British moralists.
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  • Unfortunately, the land within Johnson's Field itself has been recently, regularly mown resulting in much of the interest there being lost.
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  • The British author BS Johnson embarked on a quest for absolute literary naturalism which ended in his suicide.
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  • American clarinetist Jean Johnson enjoys a varied musical career that includes orchestral, chamber, and solo performances.
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  • Oscar nominated Ron Moody, Special Guest Conductor Laurie Johnson.
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  • As Johnson says of the Swedish monarch: " He left the name at which the world grew pale.
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  • Marshall had uncovered a paper trail that was leading him closer and closer to Johnson himself.
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  • Mrs Thrale could never understand the partiality which all her acquaintances felt for him and indeed Johnson seems to have irritated him at times.
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  • The defeat of Johnson by a 'Great White Hope ' became a burning passion.
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  • Patrick Johnson shows include are million dollars after.
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  • Anyway if we seemed peculiar to Howard Johnson's that afternoon, the feeling was mutual.
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