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john

john

john Sentence Examples

  • As for Luke the Fluke, he sounds like John Luke Grasso to a tee and a prime suspect for killing my friend's sister.

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  • "I know John Donne," she said sharply.

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  • Once this became known, the question was submitted for arbitration to the king of the Netherlands, who ruled the St. John River to be the border.

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  • John and an older brother Dominic owned a bunch of different places.

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  • To Mr. John Greenleaf Whittier.

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  • TO MR. JOHN P. SPAULDING South Boston, May 11th, 1892.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ Tuscumbia, Alabama, Dec. 19, 1892.

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  • As for Martha's father, Patsy's comments as recorded on one statement she grudgingly gave the authorities listed him as "some john I did for a couple of bucks drug money."

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  • Her visit to the World's Fair she described in a letter to Mr. John P. Spaulding, which was published in St. Nicholas, and is much like the following letter.

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  • I was in a cold sweat as I drove toward town knowing John Luke Grasso was in the area!

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  • In 1888 John shot and killed a man in one of his clubs, 'The 220.'

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  • That wasn't John Vanoli.

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  • John died later that same year.

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  • Mr. John P. Spaulding, of Boston, died in February, 1896.

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  • The next two letters were written just after the death of Mr. John P. Spaulding.

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  • TO MISS CAROLINE DERBY New York, March 2nd, 1896. ...We miss dear King John sadly.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ Brewster, Mass.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 12 Newbury Street, Boston, February 3, 1899. ...I had an exceedingly interesting experience last Monday.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 138 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Feb. 3, 1900. ...My studies are more interesting than ever.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 14 Coolidge Ave., Cambridge, Nov. 26, 1900. ...--has already communicated with you in regard to her and my plan of establishing an institution for deaf and blind children.

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  • Poor John Field!--I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it--thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country--to catch perch with shiners.

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  • The driver's name is John – he's the father, and the mother's name is Marie.

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  • Bordeaux, this is Casey Fritz, Hank Royce, and John Davis.

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  • The problem is they'll know what I did sooner or later and when I resurface, they'll be on me like John Dillinger at the movie.

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  • The guy's name is John Luke Grasso.

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  • I waited to hear John Luke Grasso, and steeled myself to pretend I didn't recognize the name.

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  • It wasn't John Luke Russo!

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  • Our boy John Luke Grasso drives a motor home!

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  • Does the name John Luke Grasso ring any bells?

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  • I see no reason not to mention my suspicion about John Luke Grasso and his connection to Willard.

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  • John Luke Grasso, his name was so much bile on my tongue I gagged to keep it down.

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  • "John Luke Grasso is responsible," I stated firmly.

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  • There was no brief respite, no few days of safety; John Luke Grasso was here in our back yard!

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  • I hoped to god my wife was smarter than John Luke Grasso.

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  • John Luke Grasso is our man.

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  • The John Wayne look-alike with the big belly was in charge and held up his hand for attention.

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  • "Cindy's in the john," Mrs. Riley said nervously.

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  • If you're looking for John Doe, I think you're in luck.

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  • Baratto was in the john, but as soon as he emerged, he took one look at Winston and turned away.

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  • Fred was so sticky-sweet on the phone with the landlady that Dean took a break and used the john just so he wouldn't have to listen to the dribble.

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  • John Kitto >>

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  • John La Farge >>

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  • Weissenfels is a place of considerable antiquity, and from 1656 till 1746 it was the capital of the small duchy of Saxe-Weissenfels, a branch of the electoral house of Saxony, founded by Augustus, second son of the elector John George I.

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  • The last twelve years were the reign of John III.

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  • John I Of Portugal >>

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  • John Dillon >>

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  • The church of All Saints is mentioned in Domesday, and tradition ascribes the building of its nave to King John, while the western side of the tower must be older still.

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  • John Randolph ate in silence.

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  • John Randolph, of Roanoke, lived in Virginia one hundred years ago.

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  • That is John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States.

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  • Of the numerous churches in the city the most interesting are the Stiftskirche, with two towers, a fine specimen of 15th-century Gothic; the Leonhardskirche, also a Gothic building of the 15th century; the Hospitalkirche, restored in 1841, the cloisters of which contain the tomb of Johann Reuchlin; the fine modern Gothic church of St John; the new Roman Catholic church of St Nicholas; the Friedenskirche; and the English church.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ Wrentham, Mass.

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  • Dean could be back on Collingswood Avenue, listening to John Coltrane or Charlie Parker and patting Mrs. Lincoln, or catching a Phillies game on the tube, or eating pizza and slugging down a cold Coors beer.

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  • He was on the way to suppress a revolt in Swabia when he was murdered on the st of May 1308, at Windisch on the Reuss, by his nephew John, afterwards called "the Parricide," whom he had deprived of his inheritance.

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  • The detective seemed unconvinced until I told him John Luke Grasso wanted something from my friend and he might have contacted him.

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  • While it would take time for precise confirmation, we all knew the burned out vehicle contained the bodies of Howie Abbott and John Luke Grasso.

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  • We don't even know if John Luke Grasso was Annie Abbott's killer

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  • Fitzgerald made a move to stop him, but John Wayne's twin with a bigger belly in a grey suit shook his head.

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  • You want the John Doe they fished out of the bay, huh?

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  • Her friend, Mr. John Hitz, whose native tongue is German, says that her pronunciation is excellent.

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  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.

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  • John Farmer sat at his door one September evening, after a hard day's work, his mind still running on his labor more or less.

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  • "My turn," Julie said as she dashed off to the John.

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  • Lunch was at a rustic little seafood place in Rogers called Catfish John's, and afterward she directed him to the War Eagle Mill.

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  • The almshouses, known as St John's hospital, were founded in 1602; and in 1637 a free grammar school was endowed by Lady Grace Manners.

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  • His first college at Oxford, in perishing, gave birth to St John's College, which now holds its site.

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  • Hayes, the new president, having chosen John Sherman to be his secretary of the treasury, an effort was made to send Garfield to the United States Senate in Sherman's place.

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  • Blaine, of Maine, and the other John Sherman, of Ohio.

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  • He came into relations with John a Lasco, and with Menno Simons.

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  • John Jortin >>

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  • John Ericsson >>

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  • John Almon >>

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  • To Thackeray her diction recalled the sound of village bells falling sweetly and softly on the ear, and it sent a shiver through John Stuart Mill, like a symphony of Haydn or Mozart.

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  • Another point of great importance is well brought out in the experiments of John Tyndall (Phil.

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  • is said to have granted letters of protection to John Kemp, a Flemish weaver who settled in the town; and, although the coarse cloth known to Shakespeare as "Kendal green" is no longer made, its place is more than supplied by active manufactures of tweeds, railway rugs, horse clothing, knitted woollen caps and jackets, worsted and woollen yarns, and similar goods.

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  • Nests of this species were found in 1821 by Johana Wilhelm Zetterstedt near Juckasj,rwi in Swedish Lapland, but little was known concerning its nidification until 1855, when John Wolley, after two years' ineffectual search, succeeded in obtaining near the Finnish village Muonioniska, on the Swedish frontier, well-authenticated specimens with the eggs, both of which are like exaggerated bullfinches'.

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  • Lever's grammar school, founded in 1641, had Robert Ainsworth, the Latin lexicographer, and John Lempriere, author of the classical dictionary, among its masters.

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  • John Van Metre, an Indian trader, penetrated into the northern portion in 1725, and Morgan ap Morgan, a Welshman, built a cabin in the present Berkeley county in 1727.

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  • In 1863 General John D.

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  • The first recorded headmaster after the foundation of the college, John Melton, had been presented by Wykeham to the mastership of this hospital in 1393 shortly before his retirement.

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  • Thirteen M.A.'s and seven bachelors, besides the president, John Hornley, B.D., were named in the charter.

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  • With a view to an ampler site for his college, Waynflete obtained on the 5th of July 1456 a grant of the Hospital of St John the Baptist outside the east gate at Oxford and on the 15th of July licence to found a college there.

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  • It must have been at this time that an addition was made by Waynflete to the Eton college statutes, compelling the fellows to forswear the heresies of John Wycliffe and Pecock.

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  • The foundation is commonly dated from this year and not from 1448, when Magdalen Hall was founded, though if not dated from 1448 it surely dates from 1458, when that hall and St John's Hospital were converted into Magdalen College.

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  • Magdalen College School was established at the gates and as a part of the college, to be, like Eton, a free grammar school, free of tuition fees for all corners, under a master and usher, the first master being John Ankywyll, a married man, with a salary of CIO a year, the same as at Winchester and Eton.

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  • The church of St John the Baptist, though largely altered by modern restoration, retains Early English to Perpendicular portions, and some early monuments and brasses.

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  • In 1862 he succeeded John Bird Sumner as archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • John Forster >>

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  • Giovanni, dating from 1576, is famous for its rich inlaid marbles, its Brussels tapestries, its roof painted by Matteo Preti (1661-1699), the picture by Michael Angelo da Caravaggio of the beheading of John the Baptist, numerous memorials of the knights and other relics.

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  • 213, 237; see also St John Timberhill, Norwich, case, 1889 Prob.

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  • During the War of Independence Norfolk was bombarded on the 1st of January 1776 by the British under John Murray, 4th earl of Dunmore (1732-1809); much of the town was burned by the American troops to prevent Dunmore from establishing himself here.

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  • Romilly, Sir Samuel and Howard, John.

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  • granted it to Sir John Ramsey, whose brother and heir, Sir George Ramsey, sold it in 1633 to thirteen inhabitants of the town on behalf of all the tenants of the manor.

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  • In 1836-1838 Lundy edited in Philadelphia a new anti-slavery weekly, The National Enquirer, which he had founded, and which under the editorship of John G.

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  • Dr John Bevis (Phil.

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  • Mission Park (10 acres) here is adorned by native and foreign shrubs and by maples, elms, pines and arbor vitae, and "Haystack Monument" in this park marks the place where Samuel John Mills (1783-1818), in 1806, held the prayer meeting which was the forerunner of the American foreign missionary movement.

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  • until the death of his great-grandson, John I., in 1340, when it was again united with upper Bavaria.

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  • But in 1696 for his boldness in granting absolution on the scaffold to Sir John Friend and Sir William Parkyns, who had attempted the assassination of William, he was obliged to flee, and for the rest of his life continued under sentence of outlawry.

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  • John Payne Collier >>

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  • Pope John XVIII.

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  • He also published works on the Last Days of the Life of Jesus, on Judaism in the Time of Christ, on John of Damascus (1879) and an Examination of the Vatican Dogma in the Light of Patristic Exegesis of the New Testament.

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  • At the age of eighteen he was enrolled as a sizar at St John's College, Cambridge, whence he graduated in 1830 as fourth wrangler.

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  • Pritchard became a fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1883, and an honorary fellow of St John's College, Cambridge, in 1886.

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  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.

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  • John Floyd >>

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  • SPENCER PERCEVAL (1762-1812), prime minister of England from 1809 to 1812, second son of John, 2nd earl of Egmont, was born in Audley Square, London, on the 1st of November 1762.

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  • ANTHONY ASHLEY COOPER SHAFTESBURY, 1ST EARL OF (1621-1683), son of Sir John Cooper of Rockbourne in Hampshire, and of Anne, the only child of Sir Anthony Ashley, Bart., and was born at Wimborne St Giles, Dorset, on the 22nd of July 1621.

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  • P. St John Mildmay (1905), 7 vols.

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  • To the south and west of the city a large district is laid out as a park, where there is a statue to the memory of John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679), who governed Cleves from 1650 to 1679, and in the western part there are mineral wells with a pump room and bathing establishment.

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  • The death without direct heirs of Duke John William in 1609 led to serious complications in which almost all the states of Europe were concerned; however, by the treaty of Xanten in 1614, Cleves passed to the elector of Brandenburg, being afterwards incorporated with the electorate by the great elector, Frederick William.

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  • But a few of the settlers under the lead of Colonel John Franklin (1749-1831) attempted to form a separate state government.

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  • Of the old castle, called Nenagh Round, dating from the time of King John, there still exists the circular donjon or keep. There are no remains of the hospital founded in 1200 for Austin canons, nor of the Franciscan friary, founded in the reign of Henry III.

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  • A truce was concluded in 1317, but as the Sicilians helped the north Italian Ghibellines in the attack on Genoa, and Frederick seized some Church revenues for military purposes, the pope (John XXII.) excommunicated him and placed the island under an interdict (1321) which lasted until 1 335.

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  • Bain (2 vols., Edinburgh, 1890); John Leslie, History of Scotland, ed.

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  • To the south of this village, on the Rhine, was the castle of Eicholzheim, which acquired some celebrity as the place of confinement assigned to Pope John XXIII.

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  • Ten years later it was rebuilt on an extended scale, and provided with fortifications by the elector John William.

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  • In 1821 Mr John Scott, the editor of the London Magazine, was killed in a duel, and that periodical passed into the hands of some friends of Hood, who proposed to make him sub-editor.

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  • Rohault's version of the Cartesian physics was translated into English; and Malebranche found an ardent follower in John Norris (1667-171 I).

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  • In the castle grounds are the remains of the ancient chapel of St John.

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  • Gyula-Fehervar is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, and has a fine Roman Catholic cathedral, built in the 1 nth century in Romanesque style, and rebuilt in 5443 by John Hunyady in Gothic style.

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  • It contains among other tombs that of John Hunyady.

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  • Aquinas was canonized in 1323 by Pope John XXII., and in 1567 Pius V.

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  • When John Knox visited Calvin at Geneva one Sunday, it is said that he discovered him engaged in a game; and John Aylmer (1521-1594), though bishop of London, enjoyed a game of a Sunday afternoon, but used such language "as justly exposed his character to reproach."

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  • John Aubrey, the antiquary, chronicles that the sisters of Sir John Suckling, the courtier-poet, once went to the bowling-green in Piccadilly, crying, "for fear he should lose all their portions."

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  • So eminently respectable a person as John Evelyn thought no harm in bowling for stakes, and once played at the Durdans, near Epsom, for £io, winning match and money, as he triumphantly notes in his Diary for the 14th of August 1657.

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  • When John Evelyn was in Paris in 1644 he saw it played in the gardens of the Luxembourg Palace.

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  • He was the last notable representative of the New England School, in which his predecessors were the younger Edwards, John Smalley (1734-1820) and Nathaniel Emmons.

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  • John Kenney 14:20, 3 Aug 2006 (PDT)

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  • John Kenney 14:56, 3 Aug 2006 (PDT)

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  • John Kenney 08:54, 6 Aug 2006 (PDT)

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  • John Kenney 10:33, 6 Aug 2006 (PDT)

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  • Many passages in John Barbour's Bruce are almost identical with this book, and it is suggested by G.

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  • Neilson (John Barbour, Poet and Translator, London, 1900) that Barbour was the author, although the colophon states that it was written in 1438.

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  • Later charters were given by Henry II., by John in 1204 (who also granted an annual fair of three days' duration, 29th of October, at the feast of St Modwen, and a weekly market on Thursday), by Henry III.

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  • Hugh de la Marche, whose betrothed wife, Isabella of Angouleme, King John of England seized (thus bringing upon himself the loss of the greater part of his French possessions), was a nephew of Guy of Lusignan.

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  • He ultimately married Isabella, after the death of John, and had by her a number of sons, half-brothers of Henry III.

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  • It is noteworthy that John Hampden and Edmund Burke both represented the borough.

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  • Hugh de Gurnay held a fair in Wendover on the eve, feast and morrow of St John the Baptist, granted him in 1 214.

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  • Another fair was granted to John de Molyns in1347-1348on the eve, feast and morrow of St Barnabas, but in 1464 Edward IV.

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  • In 1204 John gave the manor to William Bruere and granted to the town all the privileges of a free borough which were enjoyed by Nottingham and Derby; but before this it seems to have had prescriptive borough rights.

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  • In 1204 John granted two weekly markets, on Tuesday and Saturday, and an annual fair of eight days at the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (Sept.

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  • That Chesterfield was early a thriving centre is shown by the charter of John Lord Wake, lord of the manor, granting a gild merchant to the town.

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  • Their hereditary chiefs, or capidans, belong to the family known as Dera e Jon Markut (the house of John Marco), which has ruled for 200 years and is supposed to be descended from Scanderbeg.

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  • It first appears as a village (John i.

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  • John Horsley >>

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  • the /aXeiµ of John iii.

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  • John Stuart Blackie >>

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  • John Norquay, in whose veins ran a large admixture of Indian blood.

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  • JOHN LYDGATE (c. 1370 - c. 1451), English poet, was born at the village of Lydgate, some 6 or 7 m.

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  • / ait and John Lydgates Bearbeitungen von Boccaccios De Casibus, Munich, 1885) has thrown much doubt on this statement as regards Italy, but Lydgate knew France and visited Paris in an official capacity in 1426.

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  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.

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  • JOHN NAPIER (1550-1617), Scottish mathematician and inventor of logarithms, was born at Merchiston near Edinburgh in 1550, and was the eighth Napier of Merchiston.

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  • His son, John Napier of Rusky, the third of Merchiston, belonged to the royal household in the lifetime of his father.

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  • His eldest son was Archibald, seventh of Merchiston, and the father of John Napier, the subject of this article.

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  • In 1549 Archibald Napier, at the early age of about fifteen, married Janet, daughter of Francis Bothwell, and in the following year John Napier was born.

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  • About 1565 he was knighted at the same time as James Stirling, his colleague, whose daughter John Napier subsequently married.

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  • As already stated, John Napier was born in 1550, the year in which the Reformation in Scotland may be said to have commenced.

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  • The legend with regard to the origin of the name Napier was given by Sir Alexander Napier, eldest son of John Napier, in 1625, in these words: "One of the ancient earls of Lennox in Scotland had issue three sons: the eldest, that succeeded him to the earldom of Lennox; the second, whose name was Donald; and the third, named Gilchrist.

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  • This committee consisted of six members, two barons, two ministers and two burgesses - the two barons selected being John Napier of Merchiston and James Maxwell of Calderwood.

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  • Set foorth by John Napier L.

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  • John Napier died on the 4th of April 1617, the same year as that in which the Rabdologia was published.

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  • It has been usually supposed that John Napier was buried in St Giles's church, Edinburgh, which was certainly the burialplace of some of the family, but Mark Napier (Memoirs, p. 426) quotes Professor William Wallace, who, writing in 1832, gives strong reasons for believing that he was buried in the old church of St Cuthbert.

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  • On one occasion when Colonel Napier was called from home on foreign service, these papers, together with a portrait of John Napier and a Bible with his autograph, were deposited for safety in a room of the house at Milliken, in Renfrewshire.

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  • Fortunately, however, Robert Napier had transcribed his father's manuscript De Arte Logistica, and the copy escaped the fate of the originals in the manner explained in the following note, written in the volume containing them by Francis, seventh Lord Napier: "John Napier of Merchiston, inventor of the logarithms, left his manuscripts to his son Robert, who appears to have caused the following pages to have been written out fair from his father's notes, for Mr Briggs, professor of geometry at Oxford.

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  • An account of the contents of these manuscripts was given by Mark Napier in the appendix to his Memoirs of John Napier, and the manuscripts themselves were edited in their entirety by him in 1839 under the title De Arte Logistica Joannis Naperi Merchistonii Baronis Libri qui supersunt.

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  • The pultrelands and the office were sold by John Napier in 1610 for 1700 marks.

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  • With regard to the spelling of the name, Mark Napier states that among the family papers there exist a great many documents signed by John Napier.

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  • His letter to the king prefixed to the Flamm Discovery is signed "John Napeir."

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  • The form "Neper" is the oldest, as John, third Napier of Merchiston, so spelt it in the 15th century.

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  • John Selden >>

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  • JOHN MILL (c. 1645-1707), English theologian, was born about 1645 at Shap in Westmorland, entered Queen's College, Oxford, as a servitor in 166r, and took his master's degree in 1669 in which year he spoke the "Oratio Panegyrica" at the opening of the Sheldonian Theatre.

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  • John Stuart Mill >>

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  • s Knox, Winran, Spotswood and Douglas - all of them John - were the other commissioners.

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  • During the reign of Edward, the title of superintendent was often adopted instead of bishop, and it will be recollected that John Knox was an honoured worker in England with the title of superintendent during this reign.

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  • Within the Episcopal Church and supported by its endowments, Robert Blair, John Livingstone and other ministers maintained a Scottish Presbyterian communion.

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  • Under John Witherspoon the college of New Jersey was the favoured school of the reunited church.

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  • The Reformed Presbyterian Church (Covenanters) sent John Cuthbertson in 1751; he was joined in 1773 by Matthew Lind and Alexander Dobbin from the Reformed Presbytery of Ireland, and they organized in March 1 774 the Reformed Presbytery of America.

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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.

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  • In 1822, under the influence of John Mitchell Mason (1770-1829), the Associate Reformed Synod combined with the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, but the majority was too slender to make the union thorough.

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  • Thomas, and a monolithic shaft to the memory of General John Ellis Wool (1784-1869), who served with distinction in the War of 1812 and in the Mexican War, and in the Civil War commanded for a time the Department of Virginia.

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  • The first newspaper, The 1 Emma Hart was born in Berlin, Connecticut, became a teacher in 1803, and in 1809 married Dr John Willard of Middlebury.

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  • See the biography (1873) by John Lord.

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  • A weekly market on Wednesdays was granted to John, earl of Richmond, in 1308 together with an eight days' fair beginning on the vigil of St Margaret's day, and in 1445 John de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, one of his successors as lord of the manor, received a further grant of the same market and also two yearly fairs, one on the feast of St Philip and St James and the other at Michaelmas.

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  • John Lowin >>

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  • John are by Correggio, and the arabesques on the vault of the nave by Anselmi.

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  • John Seymour Lucas >>

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  • John Strange Winter >>

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  • John Tiplady Carrodus >>

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  • of England, daughter of John IV.

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  • After a year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, French spent a month in the studio of John Q.

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  • Among his other works are: a monument to John Boyle O'Reilly, Boston; "Gen.

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  • He and his friend Sir John Cheke were the great classical scholars of the time in England.

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  • John Daniel Morell >>

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  • In compliment to King Philip, the general command of the league's fleet was given to his natural brother, Don John of Austria.

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  • It was formed in the traditional order of the galleys - a long line abreast, subdivided into the centre or "battle" commanded by Don John in person, the left wing under the proveditore Barbarigo, and the right under Gianandrea Doria.

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  • Stirling Maxwell, Don John of Austria (1883); and Jurien de la Graviere, La Guerre de Chypre la bataille de Lepanto (1888).

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  • The king put forward his chaplain, Hugh; the pope supported the archdeacon, John the Scot, who had been canonically elected.

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  • The story of William's relations with King John is interesting, although the details are somewhat obscure.

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  • Soon after John's accession in 1199 the Scottish king asked for the earldom of Northumberland, which Richard I., like his father, had refused to restore to Scotland.

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  • Both these treaties seem to have been more favourable to England than to Scotland, and it is possible that William acknowledged John as overlord of his kingdom.

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  • His father, John Bouguer, one of the best hydrographers of his time, was regius, professor of hydrography at Croisic in lower Brittany, and author of a treatise on navigation.

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  • Of these the most remarkable is the Pavilion, built as a residence for the prince regent (afterwards George IV.) and remodelled in 1819 by the architect, John Nash, in a grotesque Eastern style of architecture.

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  • On the west side are the institution of the sisters of St Vincent; the Ratisbon school; the Montefiore hospice; the British ophthalmic hospital of the knights of St John; the convent and church of the Clarisses; and the Moravian leper hospital.

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  • Lauenburg, or Saxe-Lauenburg, as it is generally called, became a separate duchy ruled by his son John, and had its own lines of dukes for over 400 years, one of them, Magnus I.

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  • The reigning family, however, became extinct when Duke Julius Francis died in September 1689, and there were at least eight claimants for his duchy, chief among them being John George III., elector of Saxony, and George William, duke of Brunswick-Luneburg-Celle, the ancestors of both these princes having made treaties of mutual succession with former dukes of Saxe-Lauenburg.

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  • JOHN WILLIAM STRUTT RAYLEIGH, 3rd baron (1842-), English physicist, was born in Essex on the 12th of November 1842, being the son of the 2nd baron.'

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  • At the verge of the rock on the western side is the old baronial castle, erected by King John in 1185, which was the residence of the bishops till the 14th century.

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  • JOHN MORTON (c. 1420-1500), archbishop of Canterbury, cardinal and statesman, belonged to a family which had migrated from Nottinghamshire into Dorset, and was born either at Bere Regis or Milborne St Andrew.

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  • John Maddison Morton >>

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  • 1574), which is said to have been bought by John II.

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  • JOHN II.

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  • In his youth he was one of the infantes (princes) of Aragon who took part in the dissensions of Castile during the minority and reign of John II.

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  • John was first married to Blanche of Navarre, of the house of Evreux.

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  • John from the first regarded his son with jealousy, which after his second marriage with Joan Henriquez, and under her influence, grew into absolute hatred.

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  • In conflict with these the last years of King John were spent.

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  • The Catalan revolt was pacified in 1472, but John had war, in which he was generally unfortunate, with his neighbour the French king till his death on the 20th of January 1479.

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  • The reign of John II.

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  • John Of Bohemia >>

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  • King John confiscated the countship in 1350, and gave it to John of Artois (1352).

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  • His sister's son, John of Burgundy, count of Nevers, now received the countship, which passed through heiresses, in the 15th century, to the house of Cleves, and to that of Lorraine-Guise.

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  • These fortifications are all the work of the Knights of St John.

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  • The modern city of Rhodes is in general the work of the Knights of St John, and has altogether a medieval aspect.

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  • The principal buildings which remain are the church of St John, which is become the principal mosque; the hospital, which has been transformed into public granaries; the palace of the grand master, now the residence of the pasha; and the senate-house, which still contains some marbles and ancient columns.

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  • The foundations also of the moles that separate the harbours are of Hellenic work, though the existing moles were erected by the Knights of St John.

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  • In 1309 it was conquered by the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem at the instigation of the pope and the Genoese, and converted into a great fortress for the protection of the southern seas against the Turks.

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  • The leading men of the party were Mr Robert O'Hara Burke, an officer of police, and Mr William John Wills, of the Melbourne observatory.

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  • John (afterwards Sir John) Forrest was despatched by the Perth government with general instructions to obtain information regarding the immense tract of country out of which flow the rivers falling into the sea on the northern and western shores of Western Australia.

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  • able trade of rearing fine wool sheep, first commenced by Captain John McArthur in 1803.

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  • In 1873 John Ruskin set up at Orpington a private publishing house for his works, in the hands of his friend George Allen.

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  • HENRY JOHN STEPHEN SMITH (1826-1883), English mathematician, was born in Dublin on the 2nd of November 1826, and was the fourth child of his parents.

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  • JOHN DOUGLAS (1721-1807), Scottish man of letters and Anglican bishop, was the son of a small shopkeeper at Pittenweem, Fife, where he was born on the 14th of July 1721.

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  • See the articles by John D.

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  • 1 3p6xcv-ros, shortest, and Xpovos, time), a term invented by John Bernoulli in 1694 to denote the curve along which a body passes from one fixed point to another in the shortest time.

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  • It next passed to the crown, and subsequently to the family of St John and to the earls Spencer.

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  • The state of Alabama appropriated $2000 for teachers' salaries in 1880, increased the appropriation to $3000 in 1884, and for many years gave $4500 annually; the school receives $10,000 annually from the John F.

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  • While still an undergraduate he formed a league with John Herschel and Charles Babbage, to conduct the famous struggle of "d-ism versus dot-age," which ended in the introduction into Cambridge of the continental notation in the infinitesimal calculus to the exclusion of the fluxional notation of Sir Isaac Newton.

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  • A permanent memorial of it remains in the famous Order of the Golden Fleece, which was instituted by the duke at Bruges in 1430 on the occasion of his marriage with Isabel of Portugal, a descendant of John of Gaunt, and was so named from the English wool, the raw material used in the Flemish looms, for which Bruges was the chief mart.

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  • A body of some 2000 men drawn principally from Antwerp were cut to pieces at Austruweel (March 13, 1567), and their leader John de Marnix, lord of Thouseule, slain.

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  • Meanwhile Philip had appointed his natural brother, Don John of Austria, to be governor-general in the place of Requesens.

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  • The popular support given to the Union of Brussels forced Don John to yield.

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  • Don John of Austria becomes General.

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  • He promised to accept the " Pacification of Ghent," and finally an agreement was drawn up, styled the " Perpetual Edict," which was signed by Don John (February 12th) and like force.

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  • At the same time negotiations were successfully carried on with John Casimir, with Elizabeth and with Henry of Navarre, and their help secured for the national cause.

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  • general undertook to accept Don John as governor general and to uphold the Catholic religion, while Don John, in the name of the king, agreed to carry out the provisions of the " Pacification."

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  • Don John made his state entry into Brussels on the 1st of May, but only to find that he had no real authority.

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  • He was but twenty years of age, and his sudden intrusion was as embarrassing to the prince of Orange as to Don John.

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  • But Philip had now become thoroughly alarmed, and he despatched Alexander Farnese, son of the duchess of Parma, to join his uncle Don John with a veteran force of 20,000 troops.

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  • Strengthened by this powerful reinforcement, Don John fell upon the patriot army at Gemblours near Namur on the 31st of January 1578, and with scarcely any loss completely routed the Netherlanders.

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  • At the same time John Casimir, brother of the elector palatine, at the invitation of the Calvinist party and with the secret financial aid of Queen Elizabeth, entered the country at the head of a body of German mercenaries from the east.

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  • Alexander Ghent had fallen into the hands of John Casimir, Farnese and under his armed protection a fierce and intolerant governor= Calvinism reigned supreme in that important city.

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  • This famous compact was the work of John of Nassau, at that time governor of Gelderland, and did not at first commend itself to his brother.

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  • 5' The Duke of Anjou and John Casimir.

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  • He supported John with all the weight of papal authority.

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  • After John's death he crowned the infant Henry III.

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  • But his courage did not fail him, and in his last year, in a public Latin letter, he exhorted his friend John Campanus to maintain freedom of thought in face of the charge of heresy., See Hegler, in Hauck's Realencyklopildie (1899); C. A.

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  • In 1177 John de Courci, with the countenance of Henry II., set out to the conquest of Ulster.

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  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

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  • From 1761 to 1763 Governor John Wentworth of New Hampshire issued 108 grants, and settlements were established in Brattleboro, Putney, Westminster, Halifax, Marlborough, Wilmington, New Fane, Rockingham, Townshend, Vernon (Hinsdale) and Dummerston (all in Windham county, except Vernon, which is in Cheshire county).

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  • John Jacob Astor >>

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  • Thirty-five years later John of Eltham granted to the burgesses the whole town of Grauntpount.

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  • Many of these marbles contain memorial inscriptions relating to the English residents (voluntary and involuntary) of Algiers from the time of John Tipton, British consul in 1580.

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  • Fermanagh was formed into a county on the shiring of Ulster in 1585 by Sir John Perrot, and was included in the well-known scheme of colonization of James I., the Plantation of Ulster.

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  • Nine days later, while lying ill at his home at Washington, he was attacked by one Lewis Powell, alias Payne, a fellow-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth, at the same time that Lincoln was assassinated.

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  • He was also one of the members who refused to adjourn at the king's command till Sir John Eliot's resolutions had been passed.

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  • In 1631 he converted his landed property into money, and John Hampden, his cousin, a patentee of Connecticut in 1632, was on the point of emigrating.

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  • John he was intimately associated with the leaders of the parliamentary party.

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  • His first recorded intervention in debate in the Long Parliament was on the 9th of November 1640, a few days after the meeting of the House, when he delivered a petition from the imprisoned John Lilburne.

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  • In May he defeated a greatly superior royalist force at Grantham, proceeding afterwards to Nottingham in accordance with Essex's plan of penetrating into Yorkshire to relieve the Fairfaxes; where, however, difficulties, arising from jealousies between the officers, and the treachery of John Hotham, whose arrest Cromwell was instrumental in effecting, obliged him to retire again to the association, leaving the Fairfaxes to be defeated at Adwalton Moor.

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  • In the afternoon he dissolved the council in spite of John Bradshaw's remonstrances, who said, "Sir, we have heard what you did at the House this morning ...; but you are mistaken to think that the parliament is dissolved, for no power under heaven can dissolve them but themselves; therefore take you notice of that."

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  • Firth, Cromwell, p. 324.2 John Morley, Oliver Cromwell, p. 393.

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  • Meanwhile the West Indian expedition had been defeated 1 John Morley, Oliver Cromwell, p. 483.

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  • A small expedition sent by Cromwell in February 1654 to capture New Amsterdam (New York) from the Dutch was abandoned on the conclusion of peace, and the fleet turned to attack the French colonies; Major Robert Sedgwick taking with a handful of men the fort of St John's, Port Royal or Annapolis, and the French fort on the river Penobscot, the whole territory from this river to the mouth of the St Lawrence remaining British territory till its cession in 1667.

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  • Of these Bridget was the wife successively of Ireton and Fleetwood, Elizabeth married John Claypole, Mary was wife of Thomas Belasyse, Lord Fauconberg; and Frances was the wife of Sir Robert Rich, and secondly of Sir John Russell.

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  • des Staatssekretdrs John Thurloe, by Freiherr v.

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  • In the quarrel between Jackson and John C. Calhoun, Green supported the latter, and through the columns of the Telegraph violently attacked the administration.

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  • John Richard Green >>

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  • that Siger and Boetius fled to Italy and, according to John Peckham, archbishop of Canterbury, perished miserably.

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  • John Rich >>

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  • John Arbuthnot Fisher >>

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  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, and successively held the livings of Islington (1662), of All-Hallows the Great, Thames Street, London (1679),(1679), and of Isleworth in Middlesex (1690).

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  • The Terre d'Auvergne was first an appanage of Count Alphonse of Poitiers (1241-1271), and in 1360 was erected into a duchy in the peerage of France (duch y -pairie) by King John II.

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  • in favour of his son John, through whose daughter the new title passed in 1416 to the house of Bourbon.

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  • In the hope of drawing away the Spaniards from the siege of Leiden by a diversion in the south, Louis, with his brothers John and Henry, at the head of a force of mixed nationalities and little discipline, crossed the frontier near Maastricht, and advanced as far as the Mookerheide near Nijmv,-egen.

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  • The biography of St Francis de Sales was written immediately after his death by the celebrated P. de La Riviere and Dom John de St Francois (Goulu), as well as by two other authors of less importance.

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  • It quickly recovered from these injuries: when John Hyrcanus besieged it in 120 B.C. it was "a very strong city" which offered a vigorous resistance (Jos.

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  • The crusaders did something to develop it by establishing a bishopric with a large church, which still exists (as a mosque); here were shown the tombs of Elisha, Obadiah and St John the Baptist.

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  • Bancroft's The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, of which the principal authorities are the Noticias del Estado de Chihuahua of Escudero, who visited the ruins in 1819; an article in the first volume of the Album Mexicano, the author of which was at Casas Grandes in 1842; and the Personal Narrative of Explorations and Incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora and Chihuahua (1854), by John Russell Bartlett, who explored the locality in 1851.

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  • The almshouse established in 1592 by Sir John Hawkins for decayed seamen and shipwrights is still extant, the building having been re-erected in the 19th century; but the fund called the Chatham Chest, originated by Hawkins and Drake in 1588, was incorporated with Greenwich Hospital in 1802.

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  • Pope Clement V.; and the procession of the Host in connexion with the festival was instituted, if the accounts we possess are trustworthy, by Pope John XXII.

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  • Gisborne for a land line connecting St John's, Newfoundland, and Cape Ray, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, and proceeded himself to get control of the points on the American coast most suitable as landing places for a cable.

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  • Visiting England in 1856, Field entered into an agreement with Bright and with John Watkins Brett, who with his brother Jacob had proposed the constructing of an Atlantic cable eleven years previously, with the object of forming a company for establishing and working electric telegraphic communication between Newfoundland and Ireland.

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  • Among the men of business it was undoubtedly Sir John Pender (1815-1896) who contributed most to the development of this colossal industry, and to his unfailing faith in their ultimate realization must be ascribed the completion of the first successful Atlantic cables.

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  • At St John's in Newfoundland he erected a temporary receiving antenna consisting of a wire 400 ft.

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  • In 1706, in the War of the Spanish Succession, it was occupied by Sir John Leake; and in the next year it was retaken by the duke of Berwick.

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  • Sir John Robert Seeley >>

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  • Among his numerous critical works are Ecrivains modernes d'Angleterre (3rd series, 1885-1892) and Heures de lecture d'un critique (1891), studies of John Aubrey, Pope, Wilkie Collins and Sir John Mandeville.

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  • It was in raiment of camel's hair that John the Baptist appeared as a preacher.

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  • It is not necessary to relate the scandals of Marozias and Theodoras female reign, the infamies of John XII.

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  • Otto entered Lombardy Saxon in 961, deposed Berengar, assumed the crown in San and FranAmbrogio at Milan, and in 962 was proclaimed conlan emperor by John XII.

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  • Equally contemptible in its political results and void of historical interest was the brief visit of John of Bohemia, son of Henry VII., whom the Ghibellines next invited to assume their leadership. He sold a few privileges, conferred a few titles, and recrossed the Alps in 1333.

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  • Therefore, when he died in 1458, he bequeathed Naples to his natural son Ferdinand, while Sicily and Aragon passed together to his brother John, and so on to Ferdinand the Catholic. The twenty-three years of Alfonsos reign were the most prosperous and splendid period of South Italian history.

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  • Lucchinos brother John, arch bishop of Milan, now assumed the lordship of the city, and extended the power of the Visconti over Genoa and the whole of north Italy, with the exception of Piedmont, Verona, Mantua, Ferrara and Venice.

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  • He married his daughter Violante to our duke of Clarence, and his son Gian Galeazzo to a daughter of King John of France.

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  • Worst of all was the arrival of a small British force in Calabria under Sir John.

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  • In June 1809, during his campaign against Austria, Sir John Stuart with an Anglo-Sicilian force sailed northwards, captured Ischia and threw Murat into great alarm; but on the news of the Austrian defeat at Wagram Stuart sailed back again.

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  • ~er his immediate command, to operate on the ncio, while Cialdini with 80,000 men was to operate on the The Austrian southern army consisting of 95,000 men was amanded by the archduke Albert, with General von John chief of the staff.

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  • The extension of the Italian zone excited the suspicions of John, negus of Abyssinia, whose apprehensions were assiduously fomented by Alula, ras of Tigr, and by French and Greek adventurers.

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  • Portal returned to Massawa on the 25th of December 1887, and warned the Italians that John was preparing to attack them in the following spring with an army of 100,000 men.

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  • His death gave rise to an Abyssinian war of succession between Mangash, natural son of John, and Menelek, grandson of the Negus Sella-Sellassi.

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  • He opposed the prosecution of Sir John Fenwick, but supported the action taken by members of both Houses in defence of William's rights in the same year.

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  • Memoirs of Sir John Macky (Roxburghe Club, 18 95), 46.

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  • dying before the proclamation establishing it could be made, and it remained unpublished until 1571, when a Latin translation by Dr Walter Haddon and Sir John Cheke appeared under the title Reformatio legum ecclesiasticarum.

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  • They use it with strong condemnation, from the standpoint of rigorous Christian orthodoxy; but it comes into England within very few years upon the Christian side - religion against irreligion - in Bishop John Wilkins's Principles and Duties of Natural Religion (1678).

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  • It is intelligible that Locke (Treatises of Civil Government) should have a relish in quoting Hooker against the divineright royalism of Sir John Filmer; but in Locke there is already 1 Recorded in J.

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  • Mill tried to reconcile criminal law and its punishments with his very hard type of determinism by saying that law was needed in order to weight the scale, and in order to hold out a prospect of penalties which might deter from crime and impel towards good citizenship, so Paley held that virtue was not merely obedience to God but obedience " for 1 Criticism of the scheme, from the point of view of an idealist theism, will be found in John Caird's Introduc to the Phil.

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  • One may regard him as an idealist, though Scottish intuitionalism - especially in the writings of Professor John Veitch - has claimed him for its own; and indeed Descartes's two substances of active mind and passive extended matter are very much akin to " Natural Dualism."

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  • John Locke, the real father of English philosophy, took the field against what he regarded as Descartes's impossible programme of " Innate Ideas."

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  • John Fiske, however, an able interpreter of Spencer, reached what he called " Cosmic Theism.

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  • MAGNA CARTA, or the Great Charter, the name of the famous charter of liberties granted at Runnimede in June 1215 by King John to the English people.

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  • The actual crisis may be said to begin with the quarrel between John and Pope Innocent III.

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  • But before this event John had instituted a great inquiry, the inquest of service of June 1212, for the purpose of finding out how much he could exact from each of his vassals, a measure which naturally excited some alarm; and then, fearing a baronial rising, he had abandoned his proposed expedition into Wales, had taken hostages from the most prominent of his foes, and had sought safety in London.

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  • Nothing, however, was done during the remainder of the year, and John, feeling his position had grown stronger, went abroad early in 1214, and remained for some months in France.

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  • While they were collecting troops in order to enforce their threats, John on his part tried to divide his enemies by a concession to the clerical section.

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  • On the 5th of May the barons formally renounced their allegiance to John, and appointed Robert Fitzwalter as their leader.

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  • They marched towards London, while John made another attempt to delay the crisis, or to divide his foes, by granting a charter to the citizens of London (May 9, 1215), and then by offering to submit the quarrel to a court of arbitrators under the presidency of the pope.

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  • Other towns showed also that their sympathies were with the insurgents, and John was forced to his knees.

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  • At the famous conference, which lasted from Monday the 15th to Tuesday the 23rd of June, the hostile barons were present in large numbers; on the other hand John, who rode over each day from Windsor, was only attended by a few followers.

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  • John accepted the Articles on the same day and at once the great seal was affixed to them.

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  • It should be mentioned that, although the charter was evidently not sealed until the 19th, the four existing copies of it are dated the 15th, the day on which John accepted the articles.

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  • The document itself provided for an elected committee of twenty-five barons, whose duty was to compel John, by force if necessary, to keep his promises; but this was evidently regarded as insufficient, and the matter was dealt with in a supplementary treaty (Conventio facia inter regem Angliae et barones ejusdum regni).

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  • John then asked the barons for a charter that they on their part would keep the peace.

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  • John and his friends feared lest the inquiry promised into the extent of the hated forest areas would be carried out too rigorously, and that these would be seriously curtailed, if not abolished altogether.

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  • No securities, however, could bind John.

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  • Capturing Rochester castle, John met with some other successes, and the disheartened barons invited Louis, son of Philip Augustus of France and afterwards king as Louis VIII., to take the English crown.

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  • In spite of the veto of the pope Louis accepted the invitation, landed in England in May 1216, and occupied London and Winchester, the fortune of war having in the meantime turned against John.

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  • Previously John, disregarding the custom of the past, had taken as much as he could extort.

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  • John had oppressed his subjects in this way before he visited a district for purposes of sport, and the hardship was a real one.

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  • In the past John had evidently stretched his authority and seized lands over which others had really the right of wardship.

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  • John undertakes to disforest all forests which have been made in his time, and also to give up such river banks as he has seized for his own use when engaged in sport.

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  • John had been in the habit of taking the children of powerful subjects as pledges for the good behaviour of their parents.

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  • By denouncing the evil deeds of John and the innovations practised by him, it shows what these were and how they were hated; how money had been raised, how forest areas had been extended, how minors and widows had been cheated and oppressed.

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  • By declaring, as it does, what were the laws and customs of a past age wherein justice prevailed, it shows what was the ideal of good government formed by John's prelates and barons.

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  • The story of Magna Carta after the death of John is soon told.

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  • Other provisions, the object of which had been to restrain John from demanding more money from various classes of his subjects, were also deleted, and the same fate befell such chapters as dealt with mere temporary matters.

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  • Roger of Wendover asserts that John issued a separate charter of this kind when Magna Carta appeared.

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  • There are at present in existence four copies of Magna Carta, sealed with the great seal of King John, and several unsealed copies.

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  • Modern commentators, who also print the various texts of the charter, are Richard Thomson, An Historical Essay on the Magna Carta of King John (1829); C. Bemont, in his Charles des libertes anglaises (1892); and W.

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  • In addition to Blackstone, Coke and these later writers, the following works may also be consulted: John Reeves, History of English Law (1783-1784); L.

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  • Holdsworth, A History of English Law (1903), and Kate Norgate, John Lackland (1902).

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  • John Barnett >>

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  • In 1617 and 1621 the college allowed him to act as chaplain to Sir John Digby, ambassador in Spain.

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  • According to John Scotus Erigena, the nothing out of which the world is created is the divine essence.

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  • From Hartlepool Hilda moved to Whitby, where in 657 she founded the famous double monastery which in the time of the first abbess included among its members five future bishops, Bosa, 'Etta, Oftfor, John and Wilfrid II.

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  • Before he reached Rome, Pope John XV., who had invited him to Italy, had died, whereupon he raised his own cousin Bruno, son of Otto duke of Carinthia, to the papal chair as Pope Gregory V., and by this pontiff Otto was crowned emperor on the 21st of May 996.

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  • On his return to Germany, the emperor learned that Gregory had been driven from Rome, which was again in the power of John Crescentius, patrician of the Romans, and that a new pope, John XVI., had been elected.

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  • St Cyprian, St Ambrose and St Augustine, St Paulinus of Nola and St John Chrysostom had practised law as teachers or advocates.

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  • provides that a recent decree of the usurper John should be disregarded and that clerks whom he had brought before secular judges should be reserved for the episcopal jurisdictions," since it is not lawful to subject the ministers of the divine office to the arbitrament of temporal powers."

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  • The appeal was heard at great length, in a synod of 703 under John VI., deputies from the archbishop of Canterbury being present.

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  • The chief bridge, which carries the high road from Edinburgh to Berwick, was built by John Rennie in 1807.

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  • Her father (the Congregational minister of the town) and her mother were both descended from members of the company that, under John Davenport, founded New Haven in 1638; and the community in which she spent her childhood was one of the most intellectual in New England.

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  • JOHN INGLIS GLENCORSE, Lord (1810-1891), Scottish judge, son of a minister, was born at Edinburgh on the 21st of August 1810.

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  • "I have often noted," writes John Taylor, the water-poet, in his Jack a Lent (1620), "that if any superfluous feasting or gormandizing, paunch-cramming assembly do meet, it is so ordered that it must be either in Lent, upon a Friday, or a fasting: for the meat does not relish well except it be sauced with disobedience and comtempt of authority."

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  • JOHN THOMAS ROMNEY ROBINSON (1792-1882), Irish astronomer and physicist, was born in Dublin on the 23rd of April 1792.

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  • by John de Stratford, who rebuilt the south aisle.

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  • chantry for priests, and in 1351 Ralph de Stratford built for John's chantry priests "a house of square stone," which came to be known as the college, and in connexion with which the church became collegiate.

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  • A beautiful house of the 16th century belonged to one Thomas Rogers, whose daughter was mother of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, U.S.A. Among public buildings are the town hall, originally dated 1633, rebuilt 1767, and altered 186 3; market house, corn exchange and three hospitals.

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  • Sir John Clopton destroyed the house in 1702 (as it had reverted to his family), and the mansion he built was in turn destroyed by Sir Francis Gastrell in 1759.

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  • The college in 1907-1908 had 150 students and a faculty of 16; it publishes an endowed historical series called The John P. Branch Historical Papers of Randolph-Macon College; and it is a part of the "RandolphMacon System of Colleges and Academies," which includes, besides, Randolph-Macon Academy (1890) at Bedford City, Virginia, and Randolph-Macon Academy (1892) at Front Royal, Virginia, both for boys; Randolph-Macon Woman's College (1893) at Lynchburg, Virginia, which in 1907-1908 had an enrolment of 390; and Randolph-Macon Institute, for girls, Danville, Virginia, which was admitted into the "System" in 1897.

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  • "SIR ARTHUR JOHN EVANS (1851-), English archaeologist, was born at Nash Mills, Herts., July 8 185r, the eldest son of Sir John Evans, K.C.B.

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  • MATTHEW NEWCOMEN (c. 1610-1669), English nonconformist divine, was born about 1610 and educated at St John's College, Cambridge (M.A.

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  • Sharing in the attack on the Saxon electorate, Albert was taken prisoner at Rochlitz in March 1547 by John Frederick, elector of Saxony, but was released as a result of the emperor's victory at Miihlberg in the succeeding April.

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  • The treatises on physical geography by Mrs Mary Somerville and Sir John Herschel (the lattewritten for the eighth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica) showed the effect produced in Great Britain by the stimulus of Humboldt's work.

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  • Among them were John of Monte Corvino, a Franciscan monk, Andrew of Perugia, John Marignioli and Friar Jordanus, who visited the west coast of India, and above all Friar Odoric of Pordenone.

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  • Ibn Batuta, the great Arab traveller, is separated by a wide space of time from his countrymen already mentioned, and he finds his proper place in a chronological notice after the days of Marco Polo, for he did not begin his wanderings until 1325, his career thus coinciding in time with the fabled journeyings of Sir John Mandeville.

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  • The king of Portugal next despatched Bartolomeu Diaz in 1486 to continue discoveries southwards; while, in the following year, he sent Pedro de Covilhao and Affonso de Payva to discover the country of Prester John.

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  • had addressed to Prester John to the Negus Alexander of Abyssinia, but he was detained by that prince and never allowed to leave the country.

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  • was first aroused by John and Sebastian Cabot, father and son, who came from Venice and settled at Bristol in the time of Henry VII.

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  • The Cabots received a patent in 1496, empowering them to seek unknown lands; and John Cabot discovered Newfoundland and part of the coast of America.

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  • The French followed closely on the track of John Cabot, and Norman and Breton fishermen frequented the banks of Newfoundland at the beginning of the 16th century.

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  • under the heading of Polar Regions, and only the names of Martin Frobisher (1576), John Davis (1585), Henry Hudson (1607) and William Baffin (1616) need be mentioned here in order to preserve the complete conspectus of the history of discovery.

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  • Sir John Narborough took two ships through the Strait of Magellan in 1670 and touched on the coast of Chile, but it was not until 1685 that Dampier sailed over the part of the Pacific where Hawkins met his defeat.

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  • He was accompanied by John Davis, the great Arctic navigator, as pilot-major.

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  • In the voyage of Sir Edward Michelborne in 1605, John Davis lost his life in a fight with a Japanese junk.

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  • In 1738 John Elton traded between Astrakhan and the Persian port of Enzeli on the Caspian, and undertook to build a fleet for Nadir Shah.

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  • The association first employed John Ledyard (who had previously made an extraordinary journey into Siberia) to cross Africa from east to west on the parallel of the Niger, and William Lucas to cross the Sahara to Fezzan.

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  • But a romantic interest attaches to the wreck of the " Wager," one of Anson's fleet, on a desert island near Chiloe, for it bore fruit in the charming narrative of Captain John Byron, which will endure for all time.

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  • Sir John Barrow, Sir John Cam Hobhouse (Lord Broughton), Sir Roderick Murchison, Mr Robert Brown and Mr Bartle Frere formed the foundation committee of the Royal Geographical Society, and the first president was Lord Goderich.

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  • Sir John Murray deduced the mean height of the land of the globe as about 2250 ft.

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  • John Frederick Kensett >>

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  • 1715), daughter of John Digby, 3rd earl of Bristol; she was both a beauty and an heiress, and is also famous for her knowledge and love of intrigue.

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  • From the bottom of this sea they have been raised to form the dry lands along the shores of Suffolk, whence they are now extracted as articles of commercial value, being ground to powder in the mills of Mr [afterwards Sir John] Lawes, at Deptford, to supply our farms with a valuable substitute for guano, under the accepted name of coprolite manure."

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  • THOMAS TORQUEMADA (1420-1498), inquisitor-general of Spain, son of Don Pedro Ferdinando, lord of Torquemada, a small town in Old Castile, was born in 1420 at Valladolid during the reign of John II.

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  • He left no lawful descendants; but his nephew, Francis Stewart Hepburn, who, through his father, John Stewart, prior of Coldingham, was a grandson of King James V., and was thus related to Mary, queen of Scots, and the regent Murray, was in 1581 created earl of Bothwell.

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  • He soon, however, became entirely engrossed with colonial affairs, and, having impressed John Stuart Mill, Colonel Torrens and other leading economists with the value of his ideas, became a leading though not a conspicuous manager of the South Australian Company, by which the colony of South Australia was ultimately founded.

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  • Wakefield seceded, and joined Lord Lyttelton and John Robert Godley in establishing the Canterbury settlement as a Church of England colony.

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  • Portland is served by the Maine Central, the Boston & Maine, and the Grand Trunk railways; by steamboat lines to New York, Boston, Bar Harbor, Saint John, N.B., and other coast ports, and, during the winter season, by the Allan and Dominion transatlantic lines.

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  • St John Chrysostom died there on the way to Constantinople from his exile at Cocysus in the Anti-Taurus.

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  • Doubtless the judge was the son of John Howard of Wiggenhall, living about 1260, whose widow Lucy, called by the genealogists the daughter of John Germund, was probably the wife of John Germund by her second marriage.

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  • Before his death his eldest son, John Howard, was a knight and already advanced by his marriage with Joan of Cornwall, one of the bastard line founded by Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans.

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  • Sir John Howard served in Edward II.'s wars in Scotland and Gascony, was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and governor of Norwich Castle.

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  • His son and heir, another Sir John, admiral of the king's navy in the north, was a banneret who displayed his banner in the army that laid siege to Calais.

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  • From Sir John Howard, the only son of Sir Robert, two branches of the house of Howard spring.

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  • By his first wife, Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John Plays, Sir John Howard had a son who died before him, leaving a daughter through whom descended to her issue, the Veres, earls of Oxford, the ancient Norfolk estates of the Howards at East Winch and elsewhere, with the lands of the houses of Scales, Plays and Walton, brought in by the brides of her forefathers.

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  • Sir John Howard, only son of the match between Howard and Mowbray, took service with his cousin the third duke of Norfolk, who had him returned as knight of the shire for Norfolk, where, according to the Paston Letters, this Howard of the Essex branch was regarded by the gentry as a strange man.

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  • Offices and lands came to John Howard by reason of that fellowship. Henry VI., when restored, summoned him to parliament in 1470 as Lord Howard, a summons which may have been meant to lure him to London into Warwick's power, but he proclaimed the Yorkist sovereign on his return and fought at Barnet and Tewkesbury.

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  • By the death of this little girl, John Howard became one of the coheirs of her illustrious house, which was now represented by the issue of Margaret Mowbray, his mother, and of her sister Isabel, who had married James, Lord Berkeley.

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  • About 1479, probably with reason both suspicious and jealous, James arrested his brothers, Alexander, duke of Albany, and John, earl of Mar; Mar met his death in a mysterious fashion at Craigmillar, but Albany escaped to France and then visited England, where in 1482 Edward IV.

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  • He left three sons - his successor, James IV.; James Stewart, duke of Ross, afterwards archbishop of St Andrews, and John Stewart, earl of Mar.

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  • Rufus King's son, John Alsop King (1788-1867), was educated at Harrow and in Paris, served in the war of 1812 as a lieutenant of a cavalry company, and was a member of the New York Assembly in1819-1821and of the New York Senate in 1823.

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  • JOHN POND (c. 1767-1836), English astronomer-royal, was born about 1767 in London, where his father made a fortune in trade.

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  • 37; John vii.

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  • "JOHN BUCHAN (1875-), British author, was born at Perth Aug.

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  • 26 1875, the son of the Rev. John Buchan.

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  • His African experiences suggested The African Colony (1903), A Lodge in the Wilderness (1906), and Prester John (1910).

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  • John Evelyn >>

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  • JOHN LANGDON (1741-1819), American statesman, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the 25th of June 1741.

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  • He was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Royal .Assembly of New Hampshire and then to the second Continental Congress in 1775, and was a member of the first Naval Committee of the latter, but he resigned in 1776, and in June 1776 became Congress's agent of prizes in New Hampshire and in 1778 continental (naval) agent of Congress in this state, where he supervised the building of John Paul Jones's "Ranger" (completed in June 1777), the "America," launched in 1782, and other vessels.

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  • Alfred Langdon Elwyn has edited Letters by Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Others, Written During and After the Revolution, to John Langdon of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1880), a book of great interest and value.

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  • See a biographical sketch of John Langdon by Charles R.

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  • John Freeman-Mitford, baron Redesdale >>

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  • 1 The Christian Church, warned perhaps by the words of Christ, appears at first to have avoided a similar use of the term, while St Paul, St Peter and St John speak of their converts as spiritual children (1 Cor.

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  • 13, i John ii.

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  • Such quotations were multiplied, as theologians learnt to depend increasingly upon their predecessors, until the testimony of "our holy father" Athanasius, or Gregory the Divine, or John the Golden-mouthed, came to be regarded as decisive in reference to controverted points of faith and practice.

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  • In the West the Church enters the medieval stage of its history with the death of Gregory, while in the East even John of Damascus is rather a compiler of patristic teaching than a true "father."

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  • From Alexandria we get Athanasius, Didymus and Cyril; from Cyrene, Synesius; from Antioch, Theodore of Mopsuestia, John Chrysostom and Theodoret; from Palestine, Eusebius of Caesarea and Cyril of Jerusalem; from Cappadocia, Basil, Gregory of Nyssa and Gregory of Nazianzus.

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  • The reader to whom the study is new will gain some idea of the bulk of the extant patristic literature, if we add that in Migne's collection ninety-six large volumes are occupied with the Greek fathers from Clement of Rome to John of Damascus, and seventysix with the Latin fathers from Tertullian to Gregory the Great.2 For a discussion of the more important fathers the student is referred to the articles which deal with them separately.

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  • Shortly after he settled at Laleham, he married Mary, youngest daughter of the Rev. John Penrose, rector of Fledborough, Nottinghamshire.

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  • On the death of Alphonso in 1481, his counsellors and favourites were harshly treated by his successor John, and Abrabanel was compelled to flee to Spain, where he held for eight years (1484-1492) the post of a minister of state under Ferdinand and Isabella.

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  • JOHN McALLISTER SCHOFIELD (1831-1906), American soldier, was born at Gerry, Chautauqua county, New York, on the 29th of September 1831.

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  • Here on the 17th of June 1861, Captain (Major-General) Nathaniel Lyon, commanding about 2000 Union troops, defeated a slightly larger, but undisciplined Confederate force under BrigadierGeneral John S.

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  • In the autumn of 1786 there was an encounter near the village of East Lee between about 250 adherents of Daniel Shays (many of them from Lee township) and a body of state troops under General John Paterson, wherein the Shays contingent paraded a bogus cannon (made of a yarn beam) with such effect that the state troops fled.

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  • In June 1835 Airy was appointed Astronomer Royal in succession to John Pond, and thus commenced that long career of wisely directed and vigorously sustained industry at the national observatory which, even more perhaps than his investigations in abstract science or theoretical astronomy, constitutes his chief title to fame.

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  • Maskelyne and John Pond, to defray the expense of which a large sum of money was allotted by the Treasury.

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  • John Aislabie >>

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  • John Logan (Chief) >>

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  • The name expresses the most universal character of the class, the importance of which was first noticed by John Ray, namely, the presence of a pair of seed-leaves or cotyledons, in the plantlet or embryo contained in the seed.

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  • The art association of Indianapolis was founded in 1883; and under its auspices is conducted an art school (1902) in accordance with the bequest of John Herron (1817-1895), the school and museum of the association being housed in the John Herron Art Institute, dedicated in 1906.

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  • " House of Mercy," John v.

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  • These are the Epistles of James and Jude, 2 Peter, 2 and 3 John, the Apocalypse of John, and the Epistle to the Hebrews.

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  • JOHN OF FORDUN (d.

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  • of Kolomea, near the Dniester, lies the village of Czernelica, with ruins of a strongly fortified castle, which served as the residence of John Sobieski during his campaigns against the Turks.

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  • uniformly assign these treatises to Boetius, they are to be regarded as his; that it is probable that Symmachus and John (who afterwards became Pope) were the men of highest distinction who took charge of him when he lost his father; and that these treatises are the first-fruits of his studies, which he dedicates to his guardians and benefactors.

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  • John Cowell >>

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  • in the Nimba mountains, where also rise the Nuon, St John's and Dukwia rivers.

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  • The Nuon (or Nipwe), which up to 1908 was described sometimes as the western Cavalla and sometimes as the upper course of the St John's river, has been shown to be the upper course of the Cestos.

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  • The St John's river of the Basa country appears to be of considerable importance and volume.

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  • Richard John Seddon >>

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  • (John i.

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  • But in its cool spirit it forecasts the coming age, whose master is John Locke.

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  • The Christian apologist indeed may himself seek, following John Fiske, to philosophize evolution as a restatement of natural theology - " one God, one law, one element and one far-off divine event " - and as at least pointing towards personal immortality.

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  • His most noted supporter was John Rockycana, archbishop-elect of Prague.

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  • In 1501 Bishop Luke of Prague edited the first Protestant hymn-book; in 1502 he issued a catechism, which circulated in Switzerland and Germany and fired the catechetical zeal of Luther; in 1565 John Blahoslaw translated the New Testament into Bohemian; in1579-1593the Old Testament was added; and the whole, known as the Kralitz Bible, is used in Bohemia still.

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  • But their bishop, John Amos Comenius (1592-1672), held them together.

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  • In reply to the very natural question why the Moravians began their work in England, the answer given by history is that John Wesley, on his voyage to Georgia (1735) met some Moravian emigrants; that on his return he met Peter Boehler, who was on his way to North Carolina; that through Boehler's influence both John and Charles Wesley were "converted" (1738).

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  • APOLLYON, the "foul fiend" who assaulted Christian on his pilgrimage through the Valley of Humiliation in John Bunyan's great allegory.

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  • In 1417, however, the Spanish Dominican St Vincent Ferrer pleaded the cause of the flagellants with great warmth at the council of Constance, and elicited a severe reply from John Gerson 29 ` ' '?

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  • John Colepeper, 1st baron Colepeper >>

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  • JOHN FORD (1586 - c.1640), English dramatist, was baptized on the 17th of April 1586 at Ilsington in north Devon.

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  • He came of a good family; his father was in the commission of the peace and his mother was a sister of Sir John Popham, successively attorney-general and lord chief justice.

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  • The name of John Ford appears in the university register of Oxford as matriculating at Exeter College in 1601.

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  • With Thomas Dekker he wrote The Fairy Knight and The Bristowe Merchant (licensed in 1624, but both unpublished), with John Webster A late Murther of the Sonne upon the Mother (licensed in 1624).

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  • In 1382 Sofia was captured by the Turks; in 1443 it was for a brief time occupied by the Hungarians under John Hunyady.

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  • JOHN DUNS SCOTUS (1265 or 1275-1308), one of the foremost of the schoolmen.

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  • John Roberts >>

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  • (1367-1413), king of England, son of John of Gaunt, by Blanche, daughter of Henry, duke of Lancaster, was born on the 3rd of April 1367, at Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.

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  • When John of Gaunt died in February 1399 Richard, contrary to his promise, confiscated the estates of Lancaster.

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  • By Mary Bohun Henry had four sons: his successor Henry V., Thomas, duke of Clarence, John, duke of Bedford, and Humphrey, duke of Gloucester; and two daughters, Blanche, who married Louis III., elector palatine of the Rhine, and Philippa, who married Eric XIII., king of Sweden.

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  • Henry's second wife was Joan, or Joanna, (c. 1370-1437), daughter of Charles the Bad, king of Navarre, and widow of John IV.

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  • The life by John Capgrave (De illustribus Henricis) is of little value.

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  • In 1675 a court intrigue, conducted by his rivals and supported by the younger Don John of Austria, was so far successful that he was driven from court; but the queen gave him the title of marquis of Villa Sierra, and appointed him ambassador to Venice.

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  • By making them in longer lengths a reduction was effected in the number of joints - always the weakest part of the line; and another advance consisted in the substitution of wrought iron for cast iron, though that material did not gain wide adoption until after the patent for an improved method of rolling rails granted in 1820 to John Birkinshaw, of the Bedlington Ironworks, Durham.

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  • The directors having offered a prize of £500 for the best engine, trials were held on a finished portion of the line at Rainhill in October 1829, and three engines took part - the Rocket of George and Robert Stephenson, the Novelty of John Braithwaite and John Ericsson, and the Sanspareil of Timothy Hackworth.

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  • In Canada the Canadian Pacific was the only transcontinental line, extending from St John, on the bay of Fundy, and from Quebec, on the river St Lawrence, to Vancouver, on the strait of Georgia, the distance from St John to Vancouver being approximately 3379 m.

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  • The earliest arrangement of this kind was patented by John Blenkinsop, of the Middleton Colliery, near Leeds, in 1811, and an engine built on his plan by Mathew Murray, also of Leeds, began in 1812 to haul coals from Middleton to Leeds over a line 32 m.

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  • Such troughs were first employed on the London & North-Western railway in 1857 by John Ramsbottom, and have since been adopted on many other lines.

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  • Meanwhile John III., king of Portugal, had resolved on sending a mission to his Indian dominions, and had applied through his envoy Pedro Mascarenhas to the pope for six Jesuits.

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  • While in Malacca he urged King John III.

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  • After a short stay at Singapore, whence he despatched several letters to India and Europe, the ship at the end of August 1552 reached Changchuen-shan (St John Island) off the coast of Kwang-tung, which served as port and rendezvous for Europeans, not then admitted to visit the Chinese mainland.

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  • He inaugurated new missionary enterprises from Hormuz to Japan and the Malay Archipelago, leaving an organized Christian community wherever he preached; he directed by correspondence the ecclesiastical policy of John III.

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  • His father, John Scott Harrison (1804-1878), represented his district in the national House of Representatives in 1853-1857.

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  • JAMES WEDDERBURN (1495?-1533), John (1500-1556) and Robert (1510?

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  • He composed a play on the beheading of St John the Baptist, and another, a morality satirizing church abuses, in the setting of episodes from the story of Dionysius the Tyrant, both of which were performed in 1540 in the play - field of Dundee.

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  • John Wedderburn graduated M.A.

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  • John Wedder - burn was in Dundee as late as 1546, when he was obliged to flee to England.

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  • John Johnston in his Coronis martyrum says he died in exile in 1556.

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  • in 1530, was ordained priest, and succeeded his uncle John Barry as vicar of Dundee; but before he came into actual possession he also was suspected of heresy, and was compelled to flee to France and Germany.

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  • The earliest known edition of the Compendious Book of Psalms and Spiritual Songs (of which an unique copy is extant) dates back to 1567, though the contents were probably published in broad sheets during John Wedderburn's lifetime.

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  • Editions of the book appeared in 1578 (printed by John Rosy, in 1600 (by Robert Smith), in 1621 (by Andro Hart); selections were published by Lord Hailes (1765) and by Sibbald (1802); a reprint of the 1621 volume was edited by Sir J.

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  • Coming to Bombay, he fell under the influence of Dr John Wilson, principal of the Scottish College.

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  • In 18 3 o the respected missionary John Williams paid his first visit to Samoa.

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  • It was founded by Dr John Phillips (1719-1795), a graduate of Harvard College, who acquired considerable wealth as a merchant at Exeter and gave nearly all of it to the cause of education.

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  • The academy is one of the foremost secondary schools in the country, and among its alumni have been Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Lewis Cass (born in Exeter in a house still standing), John Parker Hale, George Bancroft, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Richard Hildreth and Francis Bowen.

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  • The town is one of the oldest in the state; it was founded in 1638 by Rev. John Wheelwright, an Antinomian leader who with a number of followers settled here after his banishment from Massachusetts.

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  • The arrested prophetic movement of Jeremiah and Deutero-Isaiah reappears in John the Baptist and Jesus after an interval of more than five centuries.

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  • There are a Roman Catholic and two Evangelical churches, a pilgrimage chapel, dating from 1100, a ducal chateau, built by a son of the elector John George about the end of the 16th century (now utilized as government offices), classical, technical and commercial schools and a hospital.

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  • All the evidence in Barclay's own work goes to prove that he was sincere in his reproof of contemporary follies and vice, and the gross accusations which John Bale 1 brings against his moral character may be put down to his hatred of Barclay's cloth.

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  • Certayne Ecloges of Alexander Barclay, Priest, written in his youth, were probably printed as early as 1513, although the earliest extant edition is that in John Cawood's reprint (1570) of the Ship of Fools.

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  • The first three eclogues, in the form of dialogues between Coridon and Cornix, were borrowed from the Miseriae Curialium of Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini (Pope Pius II.), and contain an eulogy of John Alcock, bishop of Ely, the founder of Jesus College, Cambridge.

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  • Barclay had, however, no sympathy with the anti-clerical diatribes of John Skelton, whom he more than once attacks.

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  • John Barclay (Poet) >>

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