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johannesburg

johannesburg

johannesburg Sentence Examples

  • of Johannesburg.

  • A small proportion go to the Johannesburg gold mines, and others obtain employment on the railways.

  • Johannesburg was in a ferment, while General Sir William Butler, who acted as high commissioner in Milner's absence, had allowed it to be seen that he did not take a favourable view of the Uitlander grievances.

  • He was back in Johannesburg in December 1903, and had to consider the crisis in the gold-mining industry caused by the shortage of native labour.

  • Speaking at Johannesburg on the eve of his departure, he recommended to all concerned the promotion of the material prosperity of the country and the treatment of Dutch and British on an absolute equality.

  • In his farewell speech at Johannesburg he concluded with a reference to the subject.

  • of Johannesburg by rail.

  • Thence the railway is continued to Johannesburg, &c. The distances from Durban to the places mentioned by this route are: Johannesburg, 483 m.; Pretoria 511 m.; Kimberley, 793 m.; Bulawayo, 1508 m.; Delagoa Bay, 860 m.

  • from Durban) on the main Cape Town, Bloemfontein and Johannesburg railway and is the shortest route between Durban and Cape Town (1271 m.).

  • north of Ladysmith on the direct line to Johannesburg, a branch railway goes N.E.

  • The chief market for cattle is Johannesburg.

  • The rise of Johannesburg and the opening up of the Dundee coal-fields, as well as the development of agriculture, now caused a rapid increase on both sides of the account.

  • The Imperial Light Horse and other irregular corps were recruited in Natal, although the bulk of the men in the forces were Uitlanders from Johannesburg.

  • That part of the plateau east of Johannesburg is from 5000 to 6400 ft.

  • This edge is marked by ranges of hills such as the Witwatersrand, Witwatersberg and Magaliesberg; the Witwatersrand, which extends eastward to Johannesburg, forming the watershed between the rivers flowing to the Atlantic and Indian Ocean.

  • and north to south loo m., consists of rolling grass covered downs, absolutely treeless, save where, as at Johannesburg, plantations have been made by man, the crest of the rolls being known as builts and the hollows as laagtes or vleys.

  • In places, as between Mafeking and Johannesburg, the descent is in terracelike steps, each step marked by a line of hills; in other places there is a gradual slope and elsewhere the descent is abrupt, with outlying hills and deep well-wooded valleys.

  • Compared with other formations they occupy restricted areas, being only met with south of Johannesburg, around Wolmaransstad, Lichtenburg and east of Marico.

  • in the year, but it diminishes rapidly towards the centre of the plateau where it averages, at Johannesburg about 30 in., 2 while in the extreme west as the Kalahari is approached it sinks to about 12 in.

  • Ronaldson, Edinburgh and Johannesburg, 5904); Reports and Memoirs, Geol.

  • Africa (Johannesburg).

  • Many trees have been introduced and considerable plantations made, as for instance on the slopes between Johannesburg and Pretoria.

  • The British element is chiefly gathered in Johannesburg and other towns on the Rand and in Pretoria.

  • Johannesburg, the centre of the gold-mining industry, had a population, within the municipal boundary, of 155,642 (83,36 3 whites).

  • Other towns within the Witwatersrand district are Germiston (29,477), Boksburg (14757) and Roodepoort-Maraisburg (19,949), virtually suburbs of Johannesburg, and Krugersdorp (20,073) and Springs (5270), respectively at the western and east ends of the district.

  • Meantime, in September 1892, the Cape railway system had been extended to Johannesburg and in December 1895 the through line between Durban and Pretoria was completed.

  • The following table gives the distances from that city to other places in South Africa' :- Besides the lines enumerated the other railways of importance are: (I) A line from Johannesburg eastward via Springs and Breyten to Machadodorp on the Pretoria-Delagoa Bay railway.

  • By (1) the distance between Johannesburg and Lourengo Marques is 364 m., by (2) 370 m.

  • Probably connected with the Rand i For projected routes, shortening the journey between Europe and Johannesburg, see the Geog.

  • (see Gold, and Johannesburg).

  • There are few manufacturing undertakings other than those connected with mining, agriculture and the development of Johannesburg.

  • A local division of the Supreme Court, formerly known as the Witwatersrand high court (consisting of one or more judges of the Supreme Court) sits permanently at Johannesburg and has civil and criminal jurisdiction throughout the Rand.

  • Pretoria and Johannesburg have their own police forces.

  • (In 1906 members of the Dutch community established a " Christian National Education " organization and opened a number of denominational schools.) Secondary education is provided in the towns and high schools are maintained at Pretoria, Johannesburg and Potchefstroom.

  • There are University colleges at Pretoria and Johannesburg.

  • In later years this complaint was precisely that of the Uitlanders at Johannesburg.

  • In 1886 the Rand goldfields, which had just been discovered, were proclaimed and Johannesburg was founded.

  • At the end of 1886 Johannesburg consisted of a few stores and some few thousand inhabitants.

  • During this year Kruger visited Johannesburg, and what was known as " the flag incident " occurred.

  • The Delagoa Bay railway being at length completed to Pretoria and Johannesburg, Kruger determined to take steps to bring the Rand traffic over The Netherlands railway Drifts began by putting a prohibitive tariff on goods from the Vaal river.

  • In September a meeting of the chambers of mines and commerce was held at Johannesburg, and a letter on various matters of the greatest importance to the mining industry was addressed to the Boer executive.

  • The arsenal at Pretoria was to be seized; the Uitlanders in Johannesburg were to rise and hold the town.

  • Jameson was to make a rapid march to Johannesburg.

  • Johannesburg had the greatest difficulty in smuggling in and distributing the rifles with which the insurgents were to be armed.

  • Finally, to make confusion worse confounded, Jameson, becoming impatient of delay, in spite of receiving direct messages from the leaders at Johannesburg telling him on no account to move, marched into the Transvaal.

  • The reform leaders in the Transvaal, down to and including the Johannesburg rising, had always recognized as a cardinal principle the maintenance of the independence of the state.

  • It was determined nevertheless to postpone action; however, on the 29th of December, Jameson started, and the news of his having done so reached Johannesburg from outside sources.

  • warning all British subjects in Johannesburg or elsewhere from aiding and abetting Jameson.

  • This was freely distributed among the public of Johannesburg.

  • On the following day, the 7th of January, Sir Hercules telegraphed again through the British agent, who was then at Johannesburg, saying: " That if the Uitlanders do not comply with my request they will forfeit all claims to sympathy from Her Majesty's government and from British subjects throughout the world, as the lives of Jameson and the prisoners are now practically in their hands."

  • It was after the Johannesburg disarmament that Kruger had sixty-four members of the reform committee arrested, announcing at the same time that his motto would be ".

  • His conduct immediately after Johannesburg had given up its arms, and while the reform committee were in prison, was distinctly disingenuous.

  • Instead of discussing grievances, as before the Johannesburg disarmament he had led the high commissioner to believe was his intention, he proceeded to request the withdrawal of the London Convention, because, among other things, " it is injurious to dignity of independent republic."

  • to make one more effort towards conciliation, the financial houses of Johannesburg offered to lend the Transvaal government 600,000 wherewith to buy out the dynamite company, and so terminate the scandal and bring some relief to the industry.

  • The police afford no adequate protection to the lives and property of the inhabitants of Johannesburg; they are rather a source of danger to the peace and safety of the Uitlander population.

  • No arrangement was possible on such terms. Meanwhile feeling was running high at Johannesburg and throughout South Africa.

  • After a halt of eight days at Kroonstad, the main army again moved forward, and, meeting but small resistance, marched without a halt into Johannesburg, which was occupied on the 31st of May, the Orange Free State having been formally annexed by proclamation three days earlier.

  • Large forces had been left behind during the advance on Johannesburg for the protection of the railway and the conquered terri tory, and these were now reinforced from Kimberley and elsewhere as well as from detachments of the main army.

  • away to the east, crossing the line between Johannesburg and Pretoria with impunity.

  • The corps of National Scouts (formed of burghers who had taken the oath of allegiance) was inaugurated and the Johannesburg stock exchange reopened.

  • Meantime Johannesburg had been given a town council, and some of the gold mines permitted to restart crushing (May 1901).

  • More than one plot on the part of Boers who had taken the oath of allegiance was hatched in Johannesburg, the most serious, perhaps, being that of Brocksma, formerly third public prosecutor under the republic. On the i 5th of September 1901 Brocksma and several others were arrested as spies and conspirators.

  • In November another conspiracy, to seize Johannesburg with the help of General De la Rey,was discovered and frustrated.

  • The first instalment of this loan, to be issued in 1904, was guaranteed by the great mining firms of Johannesburg.

  • D., of Chatteris, England, and was a member of the Johannesburg Reform committee at the time of the Jameson Raid.

  • He went to the Transvaal in 1884 and became honorary secretary to the Johannesburg Reform committee.

  • Leo Weinthal), The Bawenda of the Spelonken (1908); Report on the Census of 1904 (Pretoria, 1906); Reports of the South African Assoc.; Annual Reports of the Transvaal Chamber of Mines (Johannesburg); L.

  • P. Hillier, Raid and Reform (1898) and South African Studies (1900); Report of the Trial of the (Johannesburg) Reform Prisoners (1896); Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on the Jameson Raid, Blue-book (165) of 1897; Report of the Select Committee of the Cape Parliament on the Jameson Raid (Cape Town, 1896); Jameson Trial, Transcript from Shorthand Writers' Notes and Copies of Exhibits (2 vols., 1896); E.

  • lower than Johannesburg.

  • To Pretoria Dr Jameson and his troopers were brought prisoners (January 1896) after the fight at Doornkop (to be handed over in few days to the British government), and thither also were brought the Reform Committee prisoners from Johannesburg.

  • JOHANNESBURG, a city of the Transvaal and the centre of the Rand gold-mining industry.

  • The distances by rail from Johannesburg to the following seaports are: Lourengo Marques, 364 m.; Durban, 483 m.; East London, 6S9 m.; Port Elizabeth, 714 m.; Cape Town, 957 m.

  • Johannesburg has several theatres and buildings adapted for public meetings.

  • south of the town under the control of the Johannesburg Turf Club.

  • of Johannesburg, and Krugersdorp, 21 m.

  • of Johannesburg, is obtained much of the coal used in the Rand mines.

  • The other industries of Johannesburg include brewing, printing and bookbinding, timber sawing, flour milling, iron and brass founding, brick making and the manufacture of tobacco.

  • The elevation of Johannesburg makes it, despite its nearness to the tropics, a healthy place for European habitation.

  • In its social life Johannesburg differs widely from Cape Town and Durban.

  • Johannesburg owes its existence to the discovery of gold in the Witwatersrand reefs.

  • Notwithstanding the increased production of gold, Johannesburg during1905-1907passed through a period of severe commercial depression, the result in part of the unsettled political situation.

  • An excellent compilation, entitled Johannesburg Statistics, dealing with almost every phase of the city's life, is issued monthly (since January 1905) by the town council.

  • See also the Post Office Directory, Transvaal (Johannesburg, annually), which contains specially prepared maps, and the annual reports of the Johannesburg chamber of commerce.

  • For the political history of Johannesburg, see the bibliography under Transvaal.

  • Johannesburg >>

  • by sea from London and 957 by rail south-west of Johannesburg.

  • The capital, Bloemfontein (pop. in 1904, 33,883), is fairly centrally situated on the trunk railway to Johannesburg.

  • from Norvals Pont), being continued thence to Johannesburg.

  • It is also a favourite residential place and resort of visitors from Johannesburg.

  • The station, formerly called Elandsfontein Junction,, is the meeting-point of lines from the ports of the Cape and Natal, and from Johannesburg, Pretoria and Delagoa Bay.

  • suburb of Johannesburg (q.v.).

  • The building by-laws of the municipality of Johannesburg, in South Africa, contain the following table: Safe Working Stresses for Timber.

  • Railway connexion with Durban was made in 1880, and in 1895 the line was extended to Johannesburg.

  • In 1898 the House of the Resurrection at Mirfield, near Huddersfield, became the centre of the community; in 1903 a college for training candidates for orders was established there, and in the same year a branch house, for missionary work, was set up in Johannesburg in South Africa.

  • of Johannesburg and 192 m.

  • The chief cities are Cape Town (pop. 1904, 77, 66 8), Port Elizabeth (32,959), East London (25,220) and Kimberley (34331) in the Cape province; Durban (67,847) in Natal; Johannesburg (155,642) and Pretoria (36,839) in the Transvaal; and Bloemfontein (33,883) in the Orange Free State.

  • From the seaports of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Lourenco Marques and Beira railway lines run to Kimberley, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Pretoria, while a trunk line extends north from Kimberley through Rhodesia (in which gold mining began on an extensive scale in 1898) and across the Zambezi below the Victoria Falls into the Congo basin, where it serves the Katanga mineral area.

  • A large population grew up, first at Kimberley, afterwards at Barberton, and finally at Johannesburg - a population modern in its ideas, energetic, educated, cosmopolitan, appreciating all the resources that modern civilization had to offer them, and with a strong partiality for the life of the town or the camp rather than that of the farm and the veld.

  • By 1886, the year in which Johannesburg was founded, the wealth of the Witwatersrand fields was demonstrated.

  • burdens increased they began to agitate for reforms. In 1892 (the year in which the railway from Cape Town reached the Rand), the National Union was founded at Johannesburg by ex-Cape Colonists of the Imperial progressive party.

  • For three years petitions and deputations, public meetings and newspaper articles, the efforts of the enlightened South African party at Johannesburg and Pretoria, were all addressed to the endeavour to induce President Kruger and his government to give some measure of recognition to the steadily increasing Uitlander population.

  • This manifesto, issued on the 26th of December, called a public meeting for the night of Monday the 6th of January 1896, " not with the intention of holding the meeting, but as a blind to cover the simultaneous rising in Johannesburg and seizing of the arsenal in Pretoria on the night of Saturday the 4th of January " (Fitzpatrick, The Transvaal from Within, ch.

  • It might have succeeded but for a vital difference which arose between the Uitlanders in Johannesburg and Rhodes.

  • the Uitlander leaders, after holding Johannesburg for over a week, also surrendered, and by the 9th of January the plot had ended in complete failure.

  • The Uitlanders, who had fled from Johannesburg just before the war opened, began to return in May 1901, and by the time the war ended most of the refugees were back on the Rand and mining was resumed.

  • Assoc. for Advancement of Science (Johannesburg); J.

  • north of Kimberley, a line goes via Klerksdorp to Johannesburg and Pretoria, this being the most direct route between Cape Town and the Transvaal.

  • (Distance from Cape Town to Johannesburg, 955 m.) The Midland system starts from Port Elizabeth, and the main line runs by Cradock and Naauwpoort to Norval's Pont on the Orange river, whence it is continued through the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal by Bloemfontein to Johannesburg (714 m.

  • From Kroonstad, a station midway betweenBloemfontein and Johannesburg, a railway, opened in 1906, goes via Ladysmith to Durban, and provides the shortest railway route between Cape Town and Port Elizabeth and Natal.

  • (Distance from Cape Town to Johannesburg via Naauwpoort, 1012 m.) The Eastern system starts from East London, and the principal line runs to Springfontein (314 m.) in the Orange River Colony, where it joins the line to Bloemfontein and the Transvaal.

  • (Distance from East London to Johannesburg, 665 m.) From Albert junction (246 m.

  • In 1891 the Free State railway was still farther extended to Viljoen's Drift on the Vaal river, and in 1892 it reached Pretoria and Johannesburg.

  • The Cape government, for the purposes of carrying the railway from the Vaal river to Johannesburg, had advanced the sum of f600,000 to the Netherlands railway and the Transvaal government conjointly; at the same time it was stipulated that the Cape government should have the right to fix the traffic rate until the end of 1894, or until such time as the Delagoa Bay - Pretoria line was completed.

  • of railway from the Vaal river to Johannesburg was raised by the Netherlands railway to no less a sum than 8d.

  • In order to compete against this very high rate, the merchants of Johannesburg began removing their goods from the Vaal river by waggon.

  • east of Johannesburg.

  • This line is the eastern link in the direct railway connexion designed between Johannesburg and Delagoa Bay.

  • From Johannesburg the line runs eastward past Springs and had reached Breyten (143 m.) in 1907.

  • The discovery of gold at Johannesburg and elsewhere in 1885-1886 had led to a large immigration of British and other colonists.

  • Johannesburg had grown into a great and prosperous city.

  • In 1892 the railway connecting it with Cape Town and Johannesburg was completed.

  • Monypenny, an assistant editor of The Times (1894-1899), who was best known to the public as editor of the Johannesburg Star during the crisis of 1899-1903.

  • In 1895 he returned to Cape Town and practised as an advocate of the Supreme Court of the Cape till the end of 1896, when he went to Johannesburg to practise as an advocate there.

  • Anarchy reigns; Johannesburg is the world's capital of murder, street crime is out of control.

  • bearrn 7th August 1975, Charlize Theron was born in Benoni, a town outside of Johannesburg in South Africa.

  • patrolmany outside of Johannesburg two highway patrolmen spotted a stolen car, identified by its license plates.

  • He guards a large house in the wealthy suburb of Melrose in Johannesburg.

  • Rosebank is a relatively upmarket suburb of Johannesburg adjoining Sandton, one South Africa's wealthiest suburbs.

  • upmarket suburb of Johannesburg adjoining Sandton, one South Africa's wealthiest suburbs.

  • of Johannesburg.

  • A small proportion go to the Johannesburg gold mines, and others obtain employment on the railways.

  • Johannesburg was in a ferment, while General Sir William Butler, who acted as high commissioner in Milner's absence, had allowed it to be seen that he did not take a favourable view of the Uitlander grievances.

  • He was back in Johannesburg in December 1903, and had to consider the crisis in the gold-mining industry caused by the shortage of native labour.

  • Speaking at Johannesburg on the eve of his departure, he recommended to all concerned the promotion of the material prosperity of the country and the treatment of Dutch and British on an absolute equality.

  • In his farewell speech at Johannesburg he concluded with a reference to the subject.

  • of Johannesburg by rail.

  • Thence the railway is continued to Johannesburg, &c. The distances from Durban to the places mentioned by this route are: Johannesburg, 483 m.; Pretoria 511 m.; Kimberley, 793 m.; Bulawayo, 1508 m.; Delagoa Bay, 860 m.

  • from Durban) on the main Cape Town, Bloemfontein and Johannesburg railway and is the shortest route between Durban and Cape Town (1271 m.).

  • north of Ladysmith on the direct line to Johannesburg, a branch railway goes N.E.

  • The chief market for cattle is Johannesburg.

  • The rise of Johannesburg and the opening up of the Dundee coal-fields, as well as the development of agriculture, now caused a rapid increase on both sides of the account.

  • The Imperial Light Horse and other irregular corps were recruited in Natal, although the bulk of the men in the forces were Uitlanders from Johannesburg.

  • That part of the plateau east of Johannesburg is from 5000 to 6400 ft.

  • This edge is marked by ranges of hills such as the Witwatersrand, Witwatersberg and Magaliesberg; the Witwatersrand, which extends eastward to Johannesburg, forming the watershed between the rivers flowing to the Atlantic and Indian Ocean.

  • and north to south loo m., consists of rolling grass covered downs, absolutely treeless, save where, as at Johannesburg, plantations have been made by man, the crest of the rolls being known as builts and the hollows as laagtes or vleys.

  • In places, as between Mafeking and Johannesburg, the descent is in terracelike steps, each step marked by a line of hills; in other places there is a gradual slope and elsewhere the descent is abrupt, with outlying hills and deep well-wooded valleys.

  • Compared with other formations they occupy restricted areas, being only met with south of Johannesburg, around Wolmaransstad, Lichtenburg and east of Marico.

  • in the year, but it diminishes rapidly towards the centre of the plateau where it averages, at Johannesburg about 30 in., 2 while in the extreme west as the Kalahari is approached it sinks to about 12 in.

  • Ronaldson, Edinburgh and Johannesburg, 5904); Reports and Memoirs, Geol.

  • Africa (Johannesburg).

  • Many trees have been introduced and considerable plantations made, as for instance on the slopes between Johannesburg and Pretoria.

  • The British element is chiefly gathered in Johannesburg and other towns on the Rand and in Pretoria.

  • Johannesburg, the centre of the gold-mining industry, had a population, within the municipal boundary, of 155,642 (83,36 3 whites).

  • Other towns within the Witwatersrand district are Germiston (29,477), Boksburg (14757) and Roodepoort-Maraisburg (19,949), virtually suburbs of Johannesburg, and Krugersdorp (20,073) and Springs (5270), respectively at the western and east ends of the district.

  • Meantime, in September 1892, the Cape railway system had been extended to Johannesburg and in December 1895 the through line between Durban and Pretoria was completed.

  • The lines all converge on Johannesburg.

  • The following table gives the distances from that city to other places in South Africa' :- Besides the lines enumerated the other railways of importance are: (I) A line from Johannesburg eastward via Springs and Breyten to Machadodorp on the Pretoria-Delagoa Bay railway.

  • By (1) the distance between Johannesburg and Lourengo Marques is 364 m., by (2) 370 m.

  • Probably connected with the Rand i For projected routes, shortening the journey between Europe and Johannesburg, see the Geog.

  • (see Gold, and Johannesburg).

  • Cullinan (a Cape colonist and one of the chief contractors in the building of Johannesburg), whose faith in the richness of the ground was speedily justified.

  • There are few manufacturing undertakings other than those connected with mining, agriculture and the development of Johannesburg.

  • A local division of the Supreme Court, formerly known as the Witwatersrand high court (consisting of one or more judges of the Supreme Court) sits permanently at Johannesburg and has civil and criminal jurisdiction throughout the Rand.

  • Pretoria and Johannesburg have their own police forces.

  • (In 1906 members of the Dutch community established a " Christian National Education " organization and opened a number of denominational schools.) Secondary education is provided in the towns and high schools are maintained at Pretoria, Johannesburg and Potchefstroom.

  • There are University colleges at Pretoria and Johannesburg.

  • In later years this complaint was precisely that of the Uitlanders at Johannesburg.

  • In 1886 the Rand goldfields, which had just been discovered, were proclaimed and Johannesburg was founded.

  • At the end of 1886 Johannesburg consisted of a few stores and some few thousand inhabitants.

  • During this year Kruger visited Johannesburg, and what was known as " the flag incident " occurred.

  • The Delagoa Bay railway being at length completed to Pretoria and Johannesburg, Kruger determined to take steps to bring the Rand traffic over The Netherlands railway Drifts began by putting a prohibitive tariff on goods from the Vaal river.

  • In September a meeting of the chambers of mines and commerce was held at Johannesburg, and a letter on various matters of the greatest importance to the mining industry was addressed to the Boer executive.

  • The arsenal at Pretoria was to be seized; the Uitlanders in Johannesburg were to rise and hold the town.

  • Jameson was to make a rapid march to Johannesburg.

  • Johannesburg had the greatest difficulty in smuggling in and distributing the rifles with which the insurgents were to be armed.

  • Finally, to make confusion worse confounded, Jameson, becoming impatient of delay, in spite of receiving direct messages from the leaders at Johannesburg telling him on no account to move, marched into the Transvaal.

  • The reform leaders in the Transvaal, down to and including the Johannesburg rising, had always recognized as a cardinal principle the maintenance of the independence of the state.

  • It was determined nevertheless to postpone action; however, on the 29th of December, Jameson started, and the news of his having done so reached Johannesburg from outside sources.

  • warning all British subjects in Johannesburg or elsewhere from aiding and abetting Jameson.

  • This was freely distributed among the public of Johannesburg.

  • While in Pretoria the high commissioner in the first instance addressed himself to inducing Johannesburg to lay down its arms. He telegraphed to the reform committee that Kruger had insisted " that Johannesburg must lay down arms unconditionally as a precedent to any discussions and consideration of grievances."

  • On the following day, the 7th of January, Sir Hercules telegraphed again through the British agent, who was then at Johannesburg, saying: " That if the Uitlanders do not comply with my request they will forfeit all claims to sympathy from Her Majesty's government and from British subjects throughout the world, as the lives of Jameson and the prisoners are now practically in their hands."

  • It was after the Johannesburg disarmament that Kruger had sixty-four members of the reform committee arrested, announcing at the same time that his motto would be ".

  • His conduct immediately after Johannesburg had given up its arms, and while the reform committee were in prison, was distinctly disingenuous.

  • Instead of discussing grievances, as before the Johannesburg disarmament he had led the high commissioner to believe was his intention, he proceeded to request the withdrawal of the London Convention, because, among other things, " it is injurious to dignity of independent republic."

  • to make one more effort towards conciliation, the financial houses of Johannesburg offered to lend the Transvaal government 600,000 wherewith to buy out the dynamite company, and so terminate the scandal and bring some relief to the industry.

  • The police afford no adequate protection to the lives and property of the inhabitants of Johannesburg; they are rather a source of danger to the peace and safety of the Uitlander population.

  • No arrangement was possible on such terms. Meanwhile feeling was running high at Johannesburg and throughout South Africa.

  • After a halt of eight days at Kroonstad, the main army again moved forward, and, meeting but small resistance, marched without a halt into Johannesburg, which was occupied on the 31st of May, the Orange Free State having been formally annexed by proclamation three days earlier.

  • Large forces had been left behind during the advance on Johannesburg for the protection of the railway and the conquered terri tory, and these were now reinforced from Kimberley and elsewhere as well as from detachments of the main army.

  • away to the east, crossing the line between Johannesburg and Pretoria with impunity.

  • Rawlinson captured a laager and guns at Klerksdorp, and, though neither De Wet nor De la Rey had been brought to book, matters had so far improved in May that municipal government was given to Johannesburg, and a certain number of mines were allowed to recommence working.

  • The corps of National Scouts (formed of burghers who had taken the oath of allegiance) was inaugurated and the Johannesburg stock exchange reopened.

  • Meantime Johannesburg had been given a town council, and some of the gold mines permitted to restart crushing (May 1901).

  • More than one plot on the part of Boers who had taken the oath of allegiance was hatched in Johannesburg, the most serious, perhaps, being that of Brocksma, formerly third public prosecutor under the republic. On the i 5th of September 1901 Brocksma and several others were arrested as spies and conspirators.

  • In November another conspiracy, to seize Johannesburg with the help of General De la Rey,was discovered and frustrated.

  • The first instalment of this loan, to be issued in 1904, was guaranteed by the great mining firms of Johannesburg.

  • D., of Chatteris, England, and was a member of the Johannesburg Reform committee at the time of the Jameson Raid.

  • He went to the Transvaal in 1884 and became honorary secretary to the Johannesburg Reform committee.

  • Leo Weinthal), The Bawenda of the Spelonken (1908); Report on the Census of 1904 (Pretoria, 1906); Reports of the South African Assoc.; Annual Reports of the Transvaal Chamber of Mines (Johannesburg); L.

  • P. Hillier, Raid and Reform (1898) and South African Studies (1900); Report of the Trial of the (Johannesburg) Reform Prisoners (1896); Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on the Jameson Raid, Blue-book (165) of 1897; Report of the Select Committee of the Cape Parliament on the Jameson Raid (Cape Town, 1896); Jameson Trial, Transcript from Shorthand Writers' Notes and Copies of Exhibits (2 vols., 1896); E.

  • lower than Johannesburg.

  • To Pretoria Dr Jameson and his troopers were brought prisoners (January 1896) after the fight at Doornkop (to be handed over in few days to the British government), and thither also were brought the Reform Committee prisoners from Johannesburg.

  • JOHANNESBURG, a city of the Transvaal and the centre of the Rand gold-mining industry.

  • The distances by rail from Johannesburg to the following seaports are: Lourengo Marques, 364 m.; Durban, 483 m.; East London, 6S9 m.; Port Elizabeth, 714 m.; Cape Town, 957 m.

  • In Kerk Street, on the outskirts of central Johannesburg, is the Roman Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception, the headquarters of the vicar apostolic of the Transvaal.

  • Johannesburg has several theatres and buildings adapted for public meetings.

  • south of the town under the control of the Johannesburg Turf Club.

  • of Johannesburg, and Krugersdorp, 21 m.

  • of Johannesburg, is obtained much of the coal used in the Rand mines.

  • The other industries of Johannesburg include brewing, printing and bookbinding, timber sawing, flour milling, iron and brass founding, brick making and the manufacture of tobacco.

  • The elevation of Johannesburg makes it, despite its nearness to the tropics, a healthy place for European habitation.

  • In its social life Johannesburg differs widely from Cape Town and Durban.

  • Johannesburg owes its existence to the discovery of gold in the Witwatersrand reefs.

  • Notwithstanding the increased production of gold, Johannesburg during1905-1907passed through a period of severe commercial depression, the result in part of the unsettled political situation.

  • An excellent compilation, entitled Johannesburg Statistics, dealing with almost every phase of the city's life, is issued monthly (since January 1905) by the town council.

  • See also the Post Office Directory, Transvaal (Johannesburg, annually), which contains specially prepared maps, and the annual reports of the Johannesburg chamber of commerce.

  • For the political history of Johannesburg, see the bibliography under Transvaal.

  • by sea from London and 957 by rail south-west of Johannesburg.

  • The capital, Bloemfontein (pop. in 1904, 33,883), is fairly centrally situated on the trunk railway to Johannesburg.

  • from Norvals Pont), being continued thence to Johannesburg.

  • It is also a favourite residential place and resort of visitors from Johannesburg.

  • The station, formerly called Elandsfontein Junction,, is the meeting-point of lines from the ports of the Cape and Natal, and from Johannesburg, Pretoria and Delagoa Bay.

  • suburb of Johannesburg (q.v.).

  • The building by-laws of the municipality of Johannesburg, in South Africa, contain the following table: Safe Working Stresses for Timber.

  • He incurred much ill-informed odium by sanctioning the scheme of importing Chinese coolies into Johannesburg, in order to remedy the shortness of native labour and to restart the mines, and thereby the whole economic machinery of S.

  • Railway connexion with Durban was made in 1880, and in 1895 the line was extended to Johannesburg.

  • In 1898 the House of the Resurrection at Mirfield, near Huddersfield, became the centre of the community; in 1903 a college for training candidates for orders was established there, and in the same year a branch house, for missionary work, was set up in Johannesburg in South Africa.

  • of Johannesburg and 192 m.

  • The chief cities are Cape Town (pop. 1904, 77, 66 8), Port Elizabeth (32,959), East London (25,220) and Kimberley (34331) in the Cape province; Durban (67,847) in Natal; Johannesburg (155,642) and Pretoria (36,839) in the Transvaal; and Bloemfontein (33,883) in the Orange Free State.

  • From the seaports of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Lourenco Marques and Beira railway lines run to Kimberley, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Pretoria, while a trunk line extends north from Kimberley through Rhodesia (in which gold mining began on an extensive scale in 1898) and across the Zambezi below the Victoria Falls into the Congo basin, where it serves the Katanga mineral area.

  • A large population grew up, first at Kimberley, afterwards at Barberton, and finally at Johannesburg - a population modern in its ideas, energetic, educated, cosmopolitan, appreciating all the resources that modern civilization had to offer them, and with a strong partiality for the life of the town or the camp rather than that of the farm and the veld.

  • By 1886, the year in which Johannesburg was founded, the wealth of the Witwatersrand fields was demonstrated.

  • burdens increased they began to agitate for reforms. In 1892 (the year in which the railway from Cape Town reached the Rand), the National Union was founded at Johannesburg by ex-Cape Colonists of the Imperial progressive party.

  • For three years petitions and deputations, public meetings and newspaper articles, the efforts of the enlightened South African party at Johannesburg and Pretoria, were all addressed to the endeavour to induce President Kruger and his government to give some measure of recognition to the steadily increasing Uitlander population.

  • This manifesto, issued on the 26th of December, called a public meeting for the night of Monday the 6th of January 1896, " not with the intention of holding the meeting, but as a blind to cover the simultaneous rising in Johannesburg and seizing of the arsenal in Pretoria on the night of Saturday the 4th of January " (Fitzpatrick, The Transvaal from Within, ch.

  • It might have succeeded but for a vital difference which arose between the Uitlanders in Johannesburg and Rhodes.

  • the Uitlander leaders, after holding Johannesburg for over a week, also surrendered, and by the 9th of January the plot had ended in complete failure.

  • The killing of Edgar was followed by the breaking up of a public meeting at Johannesburg, and in March the Uitlanders handed to the high commissioner a petition for intervention with 21,684 signatures attached to it '(see' Transvaal: History).

  • The Uitlanders, who had fled from Johannesburg just before the war opened, began to return in May 1901, and by the time the war ended most of the refugees were back on the Rand and mining was resumed.

  • Assoc. for Advancement of Science (Johannesburg); J.

  • north of Kimberley, a line goes via Klerksdorp to Johannesburg and Pretoria, this being the most direct route between Cape Town and the Transvaal.

  • (Distance from Cape Town to Johannesburg, 955 m.) The Midland system starts from Port Elizabeth, and the main line runs by Cradock and Naauwpoort to Norval's Pont on the Orange river, whence it is continued through the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal by Bloemfontein to Johannesburg (714 m.

  • From Kroonstad, a station midway betweenBloemfontein and Johannesburg, a railway, opened in 1906, goes via Ladysmith to Durban, and provides the shortest railway route between Cape Town and Port Elizabeth and Natal.

  • (Distance from Cape Town to Johannesburg via Naauwpoort, 1012 m.) The Eastern system starts from East London, and the principal line runs to Springfontein (314 m.) in the Orange River Colony, where it joins the line to Bloemfontein and the Transvaal.

  • (Distance from East London to Johannesburg, 665 m.) From Albert junction (246 m.

  • In 1891 the Free State railway was still farther extended to Viljoen's Drift on the Vaal river, and in 1892 it reached Pretoria and Johannesburg.

  • The Cape government, for the purposes of carrying the railway from the Vaal river to Johannesburg, had advanced the sum of f600,000 to the Netherlands railway and the Transvaal government conjointly; at the same time it was stipulated that the Cape government should have the right to fix the traffic rate until the end of 1894, or until such time as the Delagoa Bay - Pretoria line was completed.

  • of railway from the Vaal river to Johannesburg was raised by the Netherlands railway to no less a sum than 8d.

  • In order to compete against this very high rate, the merchants of Johannesburg began removing their goods from the Vaal river by waggon.

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