Jeroboam sentence example

jeroboam
  • The kingdom reached its highest point of importance during the reign of Solomon, but, shortly after his death, it was broken up by the rebellion of Jeroboam, who founded the separate kingdom of Israel with its capital at Shechem.
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  • Only the Temple records recall the spoliation of the sanctuary of Jerusalem, and traditions of Jeroboam I.
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  • The decisive victories were gained by Jeroboam II.
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  • All that can be recognized from the biblical records, however, is the period of internal prosperity which Israel and Judah enjoyed under Jeroboam and Uzziah (qq.v.) respectively.
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  • The scene of his revolt was Tirzah, the old seat of the kings of Israel between Jeroboam I.
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  • And it is perhaps not arbitrary to suppose that the splendour of the ritual in Amos's time implies a tremulous anxiety that Israel's seeming prosperity under Jeroboam II.
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  • There is a curious resemblance between one form of the story and the Septuagint account of the rise of Jeroboam.
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  • If these situations can with difficulty find a place in our picture of Solomon's might, it is clear that some of them form the natural introduction to the subsequent history, when his death brought internal discontent to a head, when the north under Jeroboam refused allegiance to the south, and when the divided monarchy enters upon its eventful career by the side of the independent states of Edom, Damascus and Phoenicia.
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  • The following are examples of the standing formulae used by the compiler for the purpose :-" In the twentieth year of Jeroboam king of Israel began Asa to reign over Judah.
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  • On the events which led to his accession and the partition of the Hebrew monarchy, see Jeroboam, Solomon.
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  • Of Rehoboam's successor Abijah (or Abijam) little is known except a victory over Jeroboam recorded in 2 Chron.
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  • Israel at the death of Jeroboam was rent by divided factions, whereas Judah (under Uzziah) has now become a powerful kingdom, controlling both Philistia and the Edomite port of Elath on the gulf of `Akaba.
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  • It may perhaps be no mere chance that with the dynasties of Omri and Jehu the historical continuity is more firm, that older forms of prophetical narrative are preserved (the times from Ahab to Jehu), and that to the reign of the great Jeroboam (first half of the 8th century), the canonical writers have ascribed the earliest of the extant prophetical writings (Amos and Hosea).
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  • It finds a place in the northern boundaries of Israel under David, Solomon and Jeroboam II.
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  • Consequently it is uncertain whether Edom was the vassal of the next great Israelite king Jeroboam II., or whether the Assyrian evidence for its independent position belongs to this later time.
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  • Dan, he declares, sooner than join in Jeroboam's scheme of an Israelite war against Judah, had migrated to Cush, and finally, with the help of Naphthali, Asher and Gad, had founded an independent Jewish kingdom in the Gold Land of Havila, beyond Abyssinia.
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  • Under Jehu's successor Jehoahaz there was continual war with Hazael and his son Ben-hadad, but relief was obtained by his grandson Joash, and the land recovered complete independence under Jeroboam.
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  • Jeroboam became the recognized leader of the northern tribes.'
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  • Jeroboam fortified Shechem in the hill country of Ephraim and lived there.
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  • Jeroboam's son Nadab perished in a conspiracy whilst besieging the Philistine city of Gibbethon, and Baasha of (north) Israel seized the throne.
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  • As the relations with Israel are not specified, the sequel to Amaziah's defeat is a matter for conjecture; although, when at the death of Jeroboam Israel hastened to its end amid anarchy and dissension, it is hardly likely that the southern kingdom was unmoved.
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  • Opposition to social abuses and enmity towards religious innovations are regarded as the factors which led to the overthrow of Omri's dynasty by Jehu, and when Israel seemed to be at the height of its glory under Jeroboam II.
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  • The disorders that hastened its end find an analogy in the events of the more obscure period after the death of the earlier Jeroboam.
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  • The Judaean view pervades the present sources, and whilst its David and Solomon ruled over a united land, the separation under Jeroboam is viewed as one of calf-worshipping northern tribes from Jerusalem with its one central temple and the legitimate priesthood of the Zadokites.
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  • The growing power of Judah, however, aroused the jealousy of Israel, which, after the death of Jeroboam (2), had fallen on evil days (see Menahem).
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  • No notice has survived of Shishak's invasion of Israel (see Rehoboam), and after a reign of twenty-two years Jeroboam was succeeded by Nadab, whose violent death two years later brought the whole house of Jeroboam to an end.
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  • Presumably he ought to have said something to Jeroboam about the ungodly behavior.
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