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jefferson

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jefferson

jefferson Sentence Examples

  • You are right to quote Jefferson, but you chose the wrong quote.

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  • Didn't Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, believe the Constitution should be rewritten every twenty years so that no one was governed by a document they had no say in creating?

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  • His battle suit was rolled to his elbows, revealing roped forearms and a Thomas Jefferson quote tattooed on his inner forearm.

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  • Stuart, by Frederick Moynihan, and at the west end of Monument Avenue is the Jefferson Davis Monument, by W.

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  • In 1805-1806, at the instance of President Thomas Jefferson, Lieut.

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  • In June 1861 Jefferson City was occupied by Union forces, and in September - October 1864 it was threatened by Confederate troops under General Sterling Price.

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  • Smith and fifty-nine others lost their lives; and St Paul's Church, where Jefferson Davis was attending services, on the 2nd of April 1865, when he received news from 1 As built in Richmond in 1845 by Luther Libby, it was a brick structure, three storeys high in front and four in the rear.

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  • Jefferson Davis was a prisoner here for two years, from the 22nd of May 1865, and Clement Claiborne Clay (1819-1882), a prominent Confederate, from the same date until April 1866.

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  • He and Jefferson were both imbued with the idea that government could be carried on upon a priori principles resting on the assumed perfectness of human nature, and the chief burden of carrying out this theory fell upon Gallatin.

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  • Some rice also is grown on the lowlands of the Mississippi valley, notably in Plaquemines, Jefferson and Lafourche parishes.

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  • Evarts to prosecute Jefferson Davis, whose admission to bail he counselled.

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  • "Mr. Jefferson," he said, "I have come to ask your pardon.

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  • Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, however, declared that they had never heard of it before, and both believed it spurious.

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  • "Mr. Jefferson!" cried the landlord.

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  • of the mouth of the Osage, and a commission selected in 1821 the site of Jefferson City, on which a town was laid out in 1822, the name being adopted in honour of Thomas Jefferson.

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  • Several biographies and memoirs of Davis have been published, of which the best are: Jefferson Davis, Ex-President of the Confederate States (2 vols., New York, 1890), by his widow; F.

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  • The Executive Mansion of the Confederate States of America, built in 1819, purchased by the city in 1862, and leased to the Confederate government and occupied by President Jefferson Davis in 1862-65, was acquired in 1890 by the Confederate Memorial Library Society, and is now a Confederate Museum with a room for each state of the Confederacy and a general library in the " Solid South " room; it has valuable historical papers, collected by the Southern Historical Society, and the society has published a Calendar of Confederate Papers (1908).

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  • There are 29 counties in which coal is produced, but 81.4% of it in 1908 came from Belmont, Athens, Jefferson, Guernsey, Perry, Hocking, Tuscarawas and Jackson counties.

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  • When, after this contest, Jefferson became president (1801), there were two men whose commanding abilities marked them for the first places in the cabinet.

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  • Jefferson declared in regard to slavery, " I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just."

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  • But notwithstanding this slaves; he said to Jefferson that it was " among mildness of the code, its provisions were habitually and glaringly violated in the colonies of Spain, and in Cuba particularly the conditions of slavery were very bad.

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  • Alfriend's Life of Jefferson Davis (Cincinnati, 1868), which defended him from the charges of incompetence and despotism brought against him; E.

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  • Pollard's Life of Jefferson Davis, with a Secret History of the Southern Confederacy (Philadelphia, 1869), a somewhat partisan arraignment by a prominent Southern journalist; and W.

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  • "Mr. Jefferson!" said the landlord.

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  • "That was Mr. Jefferson," said the gentleman.

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  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.

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  • Mr. Jefferson recited the best dialogues of "Rip Van Winkle," in which the tear came close upon the smile.

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  • The city is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio, and the Southern railways, and is best known as the seat of the University of Virginia, which was founded by Thomas Jefferson.

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  • Monticello, Jefferson's home, is still standing about 2 m.

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  • He refused the naval portfolio in Jefferson's cabinet.

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  • In 1850 the commission accepted the model submitted by Thomas Crawford (1814-1857), an American sculptor, the corner-stone of the monument was laid in that year, and the equestrian statue of Washington, with sub-statues of Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, was unveiled on the 22nd of February 1858.

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  • C. Nowland, in front of which is a statue of Jefferson Davis, by E.

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  • Throughout the war, too, he was so intensely concerned about states' rights and civil liberty that he opposed the exercise of extra-constitutional war powers by President Jefferson Davis lest the freedom for which the South was fighting should be destroyed.

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  • On the 8th of June he was appointed on a committee with Jefferson, Franklin, Livingston and Sherman to draft a Declaration of Independence; and although that document was by the request of the committee written by Thomas Jefferson, it was John Adams who occupied the foremost place in the debate on its adoption.

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  • Conditions were not then favourable for peace, however; the French government, moreover, did not approve of the choice, inasmuch as Adams was not sufficiently pliant and tractable and was from the first suspicious of Vergennes; and subsequently Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Jay and Henry Laurens were appointed to co-operate with Adams. Jefferson, however, did not cross the Atlantic, and Laurens took little part in the negotiations.

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  • In 1796, on the refusal of Washington to accept another election, Adams was chosen president, defeating Thomas Jefferson; though Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists had asked that an equal vote should be cast for Adams and Thomas Pinckney, the other Federalist in the contest, partly in order that Jefferson, who was elected vice-president, might be excluded altogether, and partly, it seems, in the hope that Pinckney should in fact receive more votes than Adams, and thus, in accordance with the system then obtaining, be elected president, though he was intended for the second place on the Federalist ticket.

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  • It was Boston commerce that was most sorely hurt by the embargo and non-importation policy of President Jefferson.

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  • It was the losses entailed upon her commerce by the commercial policy of Jefferson's administration that embittered Boston against the Democratic-Republican party and put her public men in the forefront of the opposition to its policies that culminated in lukewarmness toward the War of 1812, and in the Hartford Convention of 1814.

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  • They may be divided into three classes: the pine lands, which often have a surface of dark vegetable mould, under which is a sandy loam resting on a substratum of clay, marl or limestone - areas of such soil are found throughout the state; the " hammocks," which have soil of similar ingredients and are interspersed with the pine lands - large areas of this soil occur in Levy, Alachua, Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Gadsden, Leon, Madison, Jefferson and Jackson counties; and the alluvial swamp lands, chiefly in E.

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  • Still he held on, making a national struggle in the national legislature, and relying very little upon the rights of States so eagerly grasped by Jefferson and Madison.

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  • In the exciting contest for the presidency in the house of representatives between Jefferson and Burr, it was Gallatin who led the Republicans.

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  • Amid many difficulties, and thwarted even by Jefferson himself in the matter of the navy, Gallatin pushed on; and after six years the public debt was decreased (in spite of the Louisiana purchase) by $14,260,000, a large surplus was on hand, a comprehensive and beneficent scheme of internal improvements was ready for execution, and the promised land seemed in sight.

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  • The sworn foe of strong government, he was compelled, in pursuance of Jefferson's policy, to put into execution the Embargo and other radical and stringent measures.

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  • Commercial warfare failed, the Embargo was repealed, and Jefferson, having entangled foreign relations and brought the country to the verge of civil war, retired to private life, leaving to his successor Madison, and to Gallatin, the task of extricating the nation from its difficulties.

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  • He stood, with Jefferson and Madison, at the head of his party, and won his place by force of character, courage, application and intellectual power.

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  • From the surplus of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was constructed in 1914 the Jefferson Memorial costing 8485,000 and devoted to the collections of the Missouri Historical Society.

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  • Seward and Salmon P. Chase, and those of the South, led by Jefferson Davis.

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  • With James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, Mason carried through the Virginia legislature measures disestablishing the Episcopal Church and protecting all forms of worship. In politics he was a radical republican, who believed that local government should be kept strong and central government weak; his democratic theories had much influence in Virginia and other southern and western states.

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  • JEFFERSON CITY (legally and officially the City of Jefferson), the capital of Missouri, U.S.A., and the county-seat of Cole county, on the Missouri river, near the geographical centre of,the state, about 125 m.

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  • The legislature first met here in 1826; Jefferson City became the county-seat in 1828, and in 1839 was first chartered as a city.

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  • New York politics after 1800, the year of the election of Jefferson and the down fall of the Federalists, were peculiarly bitter and personal.

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  • JEFFERSON DAVIS (1808-1889), American soldier and statesman, president of the Confederate states in the American Civil War, was born on the 3rd of June 1808 at what is now the village of Fairview, in that part of Christian county, Kentucky, which was later organized as Todd county.

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  • Jefferson Davis was educated at Transylvania University (Lexington, Kentucky) and at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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  • He was assigned for duty to Jefferson Barracks at St Louis, and on reaching this post was ordered to Fort Crawford, near Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.

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  • Dodd's Jefferson Davis (Philadelphia, 1907), which embodies the results of recent historical research.

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  • The Prison Life of Jefferson Davis (New York, 1866) by John J.

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  • In 1780 he began the study of law under Thomas Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, and between the two there developed an intimacy and a sympathy that had a powerful influence upon Monroe's later career.

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  • Resolved upon peaceful measures, President Jefferson in January 1803 appointed Monroe envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to France to aid Robert R.

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  • In passing over these matters Monroe and Pinkney had disregarded their instructions, and Jefferson was so displeased with the treaty that he refused to present it to the senate for ratification, and returned it to England for revision.

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  • Jefferson, Madison, John Quincy Adams, Calhoun, and Benton all speak loudly in Monroe's praise; but he suffers by comparison with the greater statesmen of his time.

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  • His great work is his History of the United States (1801 to 1817) (9 vols., 1889-1891), which is incomparably the best work yet published dealing with the administrations of Presidents Jefferson and Madison.

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  • MOUNT VERNON, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Illinois, U.S.A., about 75 m.

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  • Three Sisters, Jefferson and St Helens.

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  • In his double capacity as governor of the Territory and commanding officer of the army, reasonably certain of his hold on Jefferson, and favourably situated upon the frontier remote from the centre of government, he attempted to realize his ambition to conquer the Mexican provinces of Spain.

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  • Before his agent returned, however, he had betrayed his colleague's plans to Jefferson, formed the Neutral Ground Agreement with the Spanish commander of the Texas frontier, placed New Orleans under martial law, and apprehended Burr and some of his alleged accomplices.

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  • of Jefferson City.

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  • The old state capitol, dating from 1839, is of considerable interest; in it were held the secession convention (1861), the "Black and Tan Convention" (1868), and the constitutional convention of 1890, and in it Jefferson Davis made his last speech (1884).

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  • In 1901 an extraordinary "gusher" well was drilled near Beaumont, Jefferson county; in the nine days before this well was capped, it threw a stream of oil 160 ft.

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  • In 1902 gas was discovered in Jefferson county.

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  • Immediately after his return from Montreal he was a member of the committee of five appointed to draw up the Declaration of Independence, but he took no actual part himself in drafting that instrument, aside from suggesting the change or insertion of a few words in Jefferson's draft.

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  • In 1781 Franklin, with John Adams, John Jay, Jefferson, who remained in America, and Henry Laurens, then a prisoner in England, was appointed on a commission to make peace with Great Britain.

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  • Jefferson, when asked if he replaced Franklin, replied, " No one can replace him, sir; I am only his successor."

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  • Before Franklin left Paris on the 12th of July 1785 he had made commercial treaties with Sweden (1783) and Prussia (1785; signed after Franklin's departure by Jefferson and John Adams).

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  • Her leading politicians were out of sympathy with the conduct of national affairs (in the conduct of foreign relations, the distribution of political patronage, naval policy, the question of public debt) from 1804 - when Jefferson's party showed its complete supremacy - onward; and particularly after the passage of the Embargo Act of 1807, which caused great losses to Massachusetts commerce, and, so far from being accepted by her leaders as a proper diplomatic weapon, seemed to them designed in the interests of the Democratic party.

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  • With some modifications introduced by Jefferson, notably the adoption of a higher unit of value (the dollar instead of one-tenth of a cent), this plan constitutes the basis of the present American system.

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  • Hamilton's action in counselling Federalists not to vote for Burr for governor just as he had counselled them not to support Burr against Jefferson in 1800, was one of the contributary causes of Burr's hostility to Hamilton which ended in the duel (July 1804) in which Burr killed Hamilton.

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  • Just before the purchase of Louisiana, President Jefferson had recommended to Congress (18th January 1803) the sending of an expedition to explore the headwaters of the Missouri, cross the Rockies and follow the streams to the Pacific. In accordance with the recommendation Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, both officers of the United States Army, with a considerable party left St Louis on the 14th of May 1804, ascended the Missouri to the headwaters, crossed the Rockies and, following the Columbia river, reached the ocean in November 1805.

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  • Some months later he signed the bail bond of Jefferson Davis, and this provoked a torrent of public indignation.

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  • The Missouri is formed by a union of the Jefferson, the Madison and the Gallatin.

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  • Cabinet (1,020,960 acres), Custer (590,720 acres), Deerlodge (I, 080,220 acres), Flathead (2,092,785 acres), Gallatin (907,160 acres), Helena (930,180 acres), Jefferson (1, 2 55,3 20 acres), Kootenai (1,661,260 acres), Lewis and Clark (844,136 acres), Lolo (1,211,680 acres), Madison (1,102,860 acres), Missoula (1,237,509 acres) and Sioux (145,253 acres in Montana; 104,400 acres in SouthDakota).

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  • The most important copper mines are in Silverbow, Broadwater, Jefferson and Beaverhead counties.

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  • of the present site, was the county seat of Jefferson county until 1825 (when Fayette succeeded it), and later became the county-seat of Washington county.

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  • WATERTOWN, a city of Dodge and Jefferson counties, Wisconsin, U.S.A., on both banks of the Rock river, about 45 m.

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  • In Maine four peaks exceed 3000 ft., including Katandin (5200 ft.), Mount Washington, in the White Mountains (6279 ft.), Adams (5805), Jefferson (5725), Clay (5554), Monroe (5390), Madison (5380), Lafayette (5269); and a number of summits rise above 4000 ft.

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  • He graduated at Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1851, studied law under his father, and was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1853.

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  • He graduated from Washington (now Washington and Jefferson) College, Pennsylvania, in 1825, and began to practise law in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1828.

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  • In the election of 1800 he was placed on the Democratic-Republican presidential ticket with Thomas Jefferson, and each received the same number of electoral votes.

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  • It was well understood that the party intended that Jefferson should be president and Burr vice-president, but owing to a defect (later remedied) in the Constitution the responsibility for the final choice was thrown upon the House of Representatives.

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  • On Jefferson's election, Burr of course became vice-president.

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  • Jefferson Davis was chosen president of this confederacy, and an energetic government prepared to repel the expected attack of the "Union" states.

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  • Jefferson, Jessamine, Warren, Grayson and Caldwell counties have valuable quarries of an excellent light-coloured Oolitic limestone, resembling the Bedford limestone of Indiana, and best known under the name of the finest variety, the " Bowling Green stone " of Warren county; and sandstones good for structural purposes are found in both coal regions, and especially in Rowan county.

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  • Four years later, this in turn was divided into three counties, Jefferson, Lincoln and Fayette, but the name Kentucky was revived in 1782 and was given to the judicial district which was then organized for these three counties.

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  • The original draft of the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 was prepared by Vice-President Thomas Jefferson, although the fact that he was the author of them was kept from the public until he acknowledged it in 1821.

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  • The ancient life of the Atlantic border of North America was also becoming known through the work of the pioneer verte.rate palaeontologists Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), Richard Harlan (1796-1843), Jeffries Wyman (1814-1874) and Joseph Leidy (1823-1891).

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  • in height: Mount Adams, 5805 ft.; Mount Jefferson, 5725 ft.; Mount Sam Adams, 5585 ft.; Mount Clay, 5554 ft.; Boot Spur, 5520 ft.; Mount Monroe, 5390 ft.; J.

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  • National elections in New Hampshire were carried by the Federalists until 1816, except in 1804 when President Thomas Jefferson won by a small majority; but within this period of Federalist supremacy in national politics the Democrat-Republicans elected the governor from 1805 to 1812 inclusive except in 1809.

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  • WATERTOWN, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, New York, U.S.A., 73 m.

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  • At the latter place Jefferson, governor of the state, barely escaped capture by Tarleton's men.

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  • Marcy of New York, secretary of state; Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, secretary of war; James Guthrie (1792-1869) of Kentucky, secretary of the treasury; James C. Dobbin (1814-1857) of North Carolina, secretary of the navy; Robert McClelland (1807-1880) of Michigan, secretary of the interior; James Campbell (1813-1893) of Pennsylvania, postmaster-general; and Caleb Cushing of Massachusetts, attorney-general.

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  • Lee, Jefferson Davis, " Stonewall " Jackson and A.

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  • When President Jefferson, and after him President Madison, attempted to secure redress for these rnjuries by the imposition of an embargo on American vessels, the West Indian trade was temporarily ruined, the war of 181215 with Great Britain contributing to the same end.

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  • The purchase of Louisiana from France by President Jefferson is an instance.

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  • FAIRFIELD, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Iowa, U.S.A., about 51 m.

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  • Nearly 85% of the coal is produced in three counties (Jefferson, Walker and Bibb), though the coal-bearing formations cover about 40% of the northern half of the state.

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  • and passing through Baker, Worth, Dooly, Dodge, Laurens, Johnson, Jefferson and Burke counties, has three distinct kinds of soil; a sand, forming what is known as the sand-hill region; red clay derived from silicious rock in the red hills; and grey, sandy soils with a subsoil of yellow loam.

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  • The largest city in 1900 was Atlanta, the capital since 1868 (Louisville, Jefferson county, was the capital in 1795-1804, and Milledgeville in 1804-1868), with 89,872 inhabitants.

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  • Wilson with a body of cavalry entered the state from Alabama, seized Columbus and West Point on the 16th of April, and on the 10th of May captured Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, at Irwinville in Irwin county.

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  • Returning to Ohio in 1825, he studied law at Canfield, was admitted to the bar in 1827, and began practice at Jefferson, Ashtabula county, where from 1831 to 1837 he was a law partner of Joshua R.

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  • He died at Jefferson, Ohio, on the 2nd of March 1878.

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  • Jefferson Davis >>

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  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

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  • A Republican in politics, and a firm believer in the doctrines of strict construction and state sovereignty which Thomas Jefferson had been principally instrumental in formulating, he opposed consistently the demand for internal improvements and increased tariff duties, and declined to follow Henry Clay in the proposed recognition of the independence of the Spanish colonies in South America and in the Missouri Compromise legislation.

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  • Jefferson b Kirke's m m.

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  • See Jefferson Davis, Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (New York, 1881); A.

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  • PINE BLUFF, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Arkansas, U.S.A., situated at an altitude of about 200 ft.

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  • An incline railway, originally used to transport coal from the mines to the river and named the "Switch-Back," now carries tourists up the steep slopes of Mount Pisgah and Mount Jefferson, to Summit Hill, a rich anthracite coal region, with a famous "burning mine," which has been on fire since 1832, and then back.

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  • HARPER'S FERRY, a town of Jefferson county, West Virginia, U.S.A., finely situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers (which here pass through a beautiful gorge in the Blue Ridge), 55 m.

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  • Jefferson Davis.

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  • States of America," with Jefferson Davis as president, was organized by the seceding states, which seized by force nearly all the forts, arsenals and public buildings within their limits.

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  • Adams's Review of Mr Ames's Works (1809), New England Patriot, being a Candid Comparison of the Principles and Conduct of the Washington and Jefferson Administrations (1810), Appeals to the People on the Causes and Consequences of War with Great Britain (1811) and Mr Madison's War (1812).

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  • BEAUMONT, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Texas, U.S.A., situated on the Neches river, in the E.

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  • 1684-1687 Nathaniel Bacon, President of the Council 1687-1690 Francis Nicholson, Lieutenant Governor 1690-1692 Sir Edmund Andros, Governor..1692-1698Francis Nicholson, Lieutenant Governor.1698-17041 704-1737-1705-17061706-1710 1707-1710-17221722-1726-1726-17271727-1740-1737-17541740-1741-1741-17491 749 (June to Sept.)1749-1750-1750-17511751-1758125 1830-183418 34 -1836-1836-1837183 7 -1840-1840-184118411841-1842-1842-18431843-1846-1846-18491849-1852-1852-18561856-1860-1860-18641864-1865-1865-18671868-1870-1870-18741874-1878-1878-18821882-1886-1886-18901890-189418 94 -1898-1898-19021902-1906-1906-19101910 a large rectangular lawn and erected from a plan prepared by Thomas Jefferson, are noted for their architectural effect.

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  • There are also a chapel, a gymnasium, a hospital, and on the summit of Mount Jefferson Hill, a mile south-west of the campus, is the M ` Cormick Observatory.

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  • In 1814, before the site of this proposed institution had been chosen, Thomas Jefferson was elected a trustee, and under his influence the legislature, in February 1816, authorized the establishment of Central College in lieu of Albemarle Academy.

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  • The corner-stone of Central College was laid in October 1817, and Jefferson, who was rector of its board of trustees, evolved a plan for its development into the university of Virginia.

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  • The legislature, thanks to the efforts of Joseph Carrington Cabell, a close personal friend of Jefferson, adopted the plan in 1818 and 1819, and seven independent schools - ancient languages, modern languages, mathematics, natural philosophy, moral philosophy, chemistry and medicine - were opened to students in March 1825; a school of law was opened in 1826.

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  • Under Jefferson's plan only two degrees were granted: "Graduate," to any student who had completed the course of any one school; and "Doctor" to a graduate in more than one school who had shown powers of research.

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  • Patton, Jefferson, Cabell and the University of Virginia (New York, 1906).

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  • On the 2nd of January 1794 he succeeded Thomas Jefferson as secretary of state.

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  • Henry Hines, of the Confederate army, was appointed by Jefferson Davis to co-operate with these societies.

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  • On Thomas Jefferson's election to the presidency in 1800, the elder Adams recalled his son, who returned home in 1801.

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  • In December 1807 he warmly seconded Jefferson's suggestion of an embargo and vigorously urged instant action, saying: "The president has recommended the measure on his high responsibility.

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  • He subsequently allied himself with the Federalists, and was an opponent of Thomas `Jefferson, who in 1807 spoke of him as the "Federal Bull-Dog."

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  • In 1783 he had married a daughter of the Captain Michael Cresap (1742-1775), who was unjustly charged by Jefferson, in his Notes on Virginia, with the murder of the family of the Indian chief, John Logan, and whom Martin defended in a pamphlet long out of print.

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  • With Jefferson and Chancellor George Wythe he drew up a new law code for Virginia.

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  • In 1882 he founded the "Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science," and at the time of his death some forty volumes had been issued under his editorship. After 1887 he also edited for the United States Bureau of Education the series of monographs entitled "Contributions to American Educational History," he himself preparing the College of William and Mary (1887), and Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia (1888).

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  • THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826), third president of the United States of America, and the most conspicuous apostle of democracy in America, was born on the 13th of April 1743, at Shadwell, Albemarle county, Virginia.

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  • His father, Peter Jefferson (1707-1757), of early Virginian yeoman stock, was a civil engineer and a man of remarkable energy, who became a justice of the peace, a county surveyor and a burgess, served the Crown in,' inter-colonial boundary surveys, and married into one of the most prominent colonial families, the Randolphs.

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  • Unlike his Randolph connexions, Peter Jefferson was a whig and a thorough democrat; from him, and probably, too, from the Albemarle environment, his son came naturally by democratic inclinations.

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  • Jefferson carried with him from the college of William and Mary at Williamsburg, in his twentieth year, a good knowledge of Latin, Greek and French (to which he soon added Spanish, Italian and Anglo-Saxon), and a familiarity with the higher mathematics and natural sciences only possessed, at his age, by men who have a rare natural taste and ability for those studies.

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  • With a liberal Scotsman, Dr William Small, then of the faculty of William and Mary and later a friend of Erasmus Darwin, and George Wythe (1726-1806), a very accomplished scholar and leader of the Virginia bar, Jefferson was an habitual member, while still in college, of a partie carree at the table of Francis Fauquier (c. 1720-1768), the accomplished lieutenant-governor of Virginia.

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  • Jefferson was an expert violinist, a good singer and dancer, proficient in outdoor sports, and an excellent horseman.

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  • On the 1st of January 1772, Jefferson married Martha Wayles Skelton (1749-1782), a childless widow of twenty-three, very handsome, accomplished, and very fond of music. Their married life was exceedingly happy, and Jefferson never remarried after her early death.

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  • Jefferson was emotional and very affectionate in his home, and his generous and devoted relations with his children and grandchildren are among the finest features of his character.

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  • Jefferson began his public service as a justice of the peace and parish vestryman; he was chosen a member of the Virginia house of burgesses in 1769 and of every succeeding assembly and convention of the colony until he entered the Continental Congress in 1775.

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  • Jefferson was prominent in all; was a signer of the Virginia agreement of non-importation and economy (1769); and was elected in 1774 to the first Virginia convention, called to consider the state of the colony and advance intercolonial union.

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  • Prevented by illness from attending, Jefferson sent to the convention elaborate resolutions, which he proposed as instructions to the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress that was to meet at Philadelphia in September.

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  • It placed Jefferson among the foremost leaders of revolution, and procured for him the honour of drafting, later, the Declaration of Independence, whose historical portions were, in large part, only a revised transcript of the Summary View.

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  • Jefferson soon drafted the reply of Congress to the same propositions.

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  • The local work to which Jefferson attributed such importance was a revision of Virginia's laws.

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  • Of the measures proposed to this end he says: "I considered four, passed or reported, as forming a system by which every trace would be eradicated of ancient or future aristocracy, and a foundation laid for a government truly republican" - the repeal of the laws of entail; the abolition of primogeniture and the unequal division of inheritances (Jefferson was himself an eldest son); the guarantee of freedom of conscience and relief of the people from supporting, by taxation, an established church; and a system of general education.

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  • The last two were parts of a body of codified laws prepared (1776-1779) by Edmund Pendleton, 3 George Wythe, and Jefferson, and principally by Jefferson.

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  • Not so fortunate were Jefferson's ambitious schemes of education.

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  • At this time Jefferson championed the natural right of expatriation, and gradual emancipation of the slaves.

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  • But Jefferson was throughout the chief inspirer and foremost worker.

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  • In 1779, at almost the gloomiest stage of the war in the southern states, Jefferson succeeded Patrick Henry as the governor of Virginia, being the second to hold that office after the organization of the state government.

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  • In his second term (1780-1781) the state was overrun by British expeditions, and Jefferson, a civilian, was blamed for the ineffectual resistance.

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  • Capital punishment was confined to treason and murder; the former was not to be attended by corruption of blood, drawing, or quartering; all other felonies were made punishable by confinement and hard labour, save a few to which was applied, against Jefferson's desire, the principle of retaliation.

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  • He was already particularly associated with the great territory north-west of the Ohio; for Virginia had tendered to Congress in 1781, while Jefferson was governor, a cession of her claims to it, and now in 1784 formally transferred the territory by act of Jefferson and his fellow delegates in congress: a consummation for which he had laboured from the beginning.

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  • From 1784 to 1789 Jefferson was in France, first under an appointment to assist Benjamin Franklin and John Adams in negotiating treaties of commerce with European states, and then as Franklin's successor (1785-1789) as minister to France.

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  • Though the commercial principles of the United States were far too liberal for acceptance, as such, by powers holding colonies in America, Jefferson won some specific concessions to American trade.

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  • The criticism is even to-day current with the uninformed that Jefferson took his manners, 4 morals, "irreligion" and political philosophy from his French residence; and it cannot be wholly ignored.

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  • Jefferson in the first draft of the Ordinance of 1784, suggested the names to be given to the states eventually to be formed out of the territory concerned.

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  • 4 Patrick Henry humorously declaimed before a popular audience that Jefferson, who favoured French wine and cookery, had" abjured his native victuals."supports, that Jefferson's morals were pure.

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  • Jefferson was deeply interested in all the events leading up to the French Revolution, and all his ideas were coloured by his experience of the five seething years passed in Paris.

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  • When Jefferson left France it was with the intention of soon returning; but President Washington tendered him the secretaryship of state in the new federal government, and Jefferson reluctantly accepted.

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  • These two men, antipodal in temperament and political belief, clashed in irreconcilable hostility, and in the conflict of public sentiment, first on the financial measures of Hamilton, and then on the questions with regard to France and Great Britain, Jefferson's sympathies being predominantly with the former, Hamilton's with the latter, they formed about themselves the two great parties of Democrats and Federalists.

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  • The schools of thought for which they stood have since contended for mastery in American politics: Hamilton's gradually strengthened by the necessities of stronger administration, as time gave widening amplitude and increasing weight to the specific powers - and so to Hamilton's great doctrine of the" implied powers "- of the general government of a growing country; Jefferson's rooted in colonial life, and buttressed by the hopes and convictions of democracy.

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  • The most perplexing questions treated by Jefferson as secretary of state arose out of the policy of neutrality adopted by the United States toward France, to whom she was bound by treaties and by a heavy debt of gratitude.

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  • Separation from European politics - the doctrine of" America for Americans "that was embodied later in the Monroe declaration - was a tenet cherished by Jefferson as by other leaders (not, however, Hamilton) and by none cherished more firmly, for by nature he was peculiarly opposed to war, and peace was a fundamental part of his politics.

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  • Jefferson did not read excesses in Paris as warnings against democracy, but as warnings against the abuses ' Jefferson did not sympathize with the temper of his followers who condoned the zealous excesses of Genet, and in general with the"'misbehaviour "of the democratic clubs; but, as a student of English liberties, he could not accept Washington's doctrine that for a self-created permanent body to declare" this act unconstitutional, and that act pregnant with mischiefs "was" a stretch of arrogant presumption "which would, if unchecked," destroy the country."6 John Basset Moore, American Diplomacy (New York, 1905)..

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  • It is the key to an understanding of the times to remember that the War of Independence had disjointed society; and democracy - which Jefferson had proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence, and enthroned in Virginia - after strengthening its rights by the sword, had run to excesses, particularly in the Shays' rebellion, that produced a conservative reaction.

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  • Jefferson, however, far from America in these years and unexposed to reactionary influences, came back with undiminished fervour of democracy, and the talk he heard of praise for England, and fearful recoil before even the beginning of the revolution in France, disheartened him, and filled him with suspicion.'

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  • Hating as he did feudal class institutions and Tudor-Stuart traditions of arbitrary rule, 2 his attitude can be imagined toward Hamilton's oft-avowed partialities - and Jefferson assumed, his intrigues - for British class-government with its eighteenth-century measure of corruption.

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  • In short, Hamilton took from recent years the lesson of the evils of lax government; whereas Jefferson clung to the other lesson, which crumbling colonial governments had illustrated, that governments derived their strength (and the Declaration had proclaimed that they derived their just rights) from the will of the governed.

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  • Each built his system accordingly: the one on the basis of order, the other on individualism - which led Jefferson to liberty alike in religion and in politics.

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  • The educated classes characteristically furnished Federalism with a remarkable body of alarmist leaders; and thus it happened that Jefferson, because, with only a few of his great contemporaries, he had a thorough trust and confidence in the people, became the idol of American democracy.

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  • As Hamilton was somewhat officious and very combative, and Jefferson, although uncontentious, very suspicious and quite independent, both men holding inflexibly to opinions, cabinet harmony became impossible when the two secretaries had formed parties about them and their differences were carried into the 1 It was at this period of his life that Jefferson gave expression to some of the opinions for which he has been most severely criticized and ridiculed.

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  • newspapers;3 and Washington abandoned perforce his idea" if parties did exist to reconcile them."Partly from discontent with a position in which he did not feel that he enjoyed the absolute confidence of the president,' and partly because of the embarrassed condition of his private affairs, Jefferson repeatedly sought to resign, and finally on the 31st of December 1793, with Washington's reluctant consent, gave up his portfolio and retired to his home at Monticello, near Charlottesville.

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  • Jefferson was never truly happy except in the country.

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  • Jefferson seems to have been the first discoverer of an exact formula for the construction of mould-boards of least resistance for ploughs.

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  • In the presidential election of 1796 John Adams, the Federalist candidate, received the largest number of electoral votes, and Jefferson, the Republican candidate, the next largest number, and under the law as it then existed the former became president and the latter vice-president.

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  • Jefferson re-entered public life with reluctance, though doubtless with keen enough interest and resolution.

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  • In answer to those odious measures Jefferson and Madison prepared and procured the passage of the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions.

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  • It is, however, unquestionably true, that as a startling protest against measures" to silence,"in Jefferson's words," by force and not by reason the complaints or criticisms, just or unjust, of our citizens against the conduct of our agents,"they served, in this respect, a useful purpose; and as a counterblast against Hamiltonian principles of centralization they were probably, at that moment, very salutary; while even as pieces of constitutional interpretation it is to be remembered that they did not contemplate nullification by any single state, and, moreover, are not to be judged by constitutional principles established later by courts and war.

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  • The Republican candidates, Jefferson and Aaron Burr, receiving equal votes, it devolved upon the House of Representatives, in accordance with the system which then obtained, to make one of the two president, the other vicepresident.

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  • Party feeling in America has probably never been more dangerously impassioned than in the three years preceding 3 Hamilton wrote for the papers himself; Jefferson never did.

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  • It was alleged that Jefferson appointed him for the purpose, and encouraged him.

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  • The Federalist outcry could only have been silenced by removal of Freneau, or by disclaimers or admonitions, which Jefferson did not think it incumbent upon himself - or, since he thought Freneau was doing good, desirable for him - to make.

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  • this election; discount as one will the contrary obsessions of men like Fisher Ames, Hamilton and Jefferson, the time was fateful.

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  • Better counsels, however, prevailed; Hamilton used his influence in favour of Jefferson as against Burr, and Jefferson became president, entering upon his duties on the 4th of March 180 1.

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  • disclosures returned; very many of the Federalists themselves Jefferson placated and drew over."

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  • Jefferson's administrations were distinguished by the simplicity that marked his conduct in private life.

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  • One minister who appeared in gold lace and dress sword for his first, and regularly appointed, official call on the president, was received - as he insisted with studied purpose - by Jefferson in negligent undress and slippers down at the heel.

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  • If it be possible,"he said," to be certainly conscious of anything, I am conscious of feeling no difference between writing to the highest and lowest being on earth."Jefferson's first administration was marked by a reduction of the army, navy, diplomatic establishment and, to the uttermost, of governmental expenses; some reduction of the civil service, accompanied by a large shifting of offices to Republicans; and, above all, by the Louisiana Purchase, following which Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, sent by Jefferson, con 1 See also Jefferson to E.

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  • It is often said that Jefferson established the "spoils system" by his changes in the civil service.

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  • Moreover, Jefferson's ideals were high; his reasons for changes were in general excellent; he at least so far resisted the great pressure for office - producing by his resistance dissatisfaction within his party - as not to have lowered, apparently, the personnel of the service; and there were no such blots on his administration as President Adams's "midnight judges."

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  • In his diplomacy with Napoleon and Great Britain Jefferson betrayed a painful incorrigibility of optimism.

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  • It is possible to regard the embargo policy dispassionately as an interesting illustration of Jefferson's love of peace.

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  • The idea - a very old one with Jefferson - was not entirely original; in essence it received other attempted applications in the Napoleonic period - and especially in the continental blockade.

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  • Jefferson's statesmanship had the limitations of an agrarian outlook.

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  • When, on the 4th of March 1809, Jefferson retired from the presidency, he had been almost continuously in the public service for forty years.

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  • 4 Jefferson's dislike of a navy was due to his desire for an economical administration and for peace.

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  • A large number of these boats were constructed and they afforded some protection to coasting vessels against privateers, but in bad weather, or when employed against a frigate, they were worse than useless, and Jefferson's "gunboat system" was admittedly a failure.

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  • Jefferson was one of the greatest political managers his country has known.

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  • Jefferson had the full courage of his convictions.

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  • only the dismal passport to a more dismal hereafter"; and, with it, appraised Jefferson's word in his first inaugural for those who, "in the full tide of successful experiment," were ready to abandon a government that had so far kept them "free and firm, on the visionary fear that it might by possibility lack energy to preserve itself."

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  • Jefferson, in short, had unlimited faith in the honesty of the people; a large faith in their common sense; believed that all is to be won 1 See e.g.

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  • Jefferson's distrust of governments was nothing exceptional for a consistent individualist.

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  • Such a comparison measures also the relative judgment, temper and charity of these writers and Jefferson.

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  • It must still remain true, however, that Jefferson's Ana present him in a far from engaging light.

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  • Jefferson's last years were devoted to the establishment of the university of Virginia at Charlottesville, near his home.

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  • He died on the 4th of July 1826, the fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, on the same day as John Adams. He chose for his tomb the epitaph: "Here was buried Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the statute of Virginia for religious freedom, and father of the university of Virginia."

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  • Jefferson was about 6 ft.

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  • - See the editions of Jefferson's Writings by H.

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  • Washington (9 vols., New York, 1853-1854), and - the best - by Paul 3 "Jefferson, in 1789, wrote some such stuff about the will of majorities, as a New Englander would lose his rank among men of sense to avow."

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  • Forman, The Letters and Writings of Thomas Jefferson, including all his Important Utterances on Public Questions (1900); J.

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  • P. Foley, The Jefferson Cyclopaedia (New York, 1900); the Memoir, Correspondence, &c., by T.

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  • Adams, Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia (U.

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  • Randolph, Domestic Life of Thomas Jefferson (New York, 1871); and an illuminating appreciation by W.

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  • Jefferson City >>

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  • In 1781 Jay was commissioned to act with Franklin, John Adams, Jefferson and Henry Laurens in negotiating a peace with Great Britain.

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  • On the 7th of May Congress had already chosen him to be secretary for foreign affairs, and in December Jay resigned his seat in Congress and accepted the secretaryship. He continued to act in this capacity until 1790, when Jefferson became secretary of state under the new constitution.

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  • On the 26th of December 1785 Jefferson's Bill for establishing religious freedom in Virginia, which had been introduced by Madison, was passed.

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  • It is very probable that Jefferson's influence over Madison, which was greater than Hamilton's, contributed to this result.

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  • Madison, Jefferson and Randolph were consulted by Washington, and they advised him not to sign the bill providing for the Bank, but Hamilton's counterargument was successful.

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  • The Virginia resolutions and the Kentucky resolutions (the latter having been drafted by Jefferson) were met by dissenting resolutions from the New England states, from New York, and from Delaware.

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  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.

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  • Nearly all his arguments, especially where he attempts to interpret Jefferson's writings on the point, notably the Kentucky resolutions, are rather strained and specious, but it does seem that the Virginia resolutions were based on a different idea from Calhoun's doctrine of nullification.

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  • During Jefferson's presidency and whilst Madison was secretary of state, by the purchase of Louisiana, Madison's campaign begun in i 780 for the free navigation of the Mississippi was brought to a successful close.

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  • the preceding administration was one with which he was in harmony, his position was different from that of Jefferson in 1801, and he had less occasion for removing Federalists from office.

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  • Jefferson's peace policy - or, more correctly, Madison's peace policy - of commercial restrictions to coerce Great Britain and France he continued to follow until 1812, when he was forced to change these futile commercial weapons for a policy of war, which was very popular with the extreme French wing of his party.

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  • Montpelier, like Jefferson's Monticello and Monroe's Oak-Hill, was an expensive bit of "gentleman farming," which with his generous Virginia hospitality nearly ruined its owner financially.

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  • She had great social charm, and upon Madison's entering Jefferson's cabinet became "first lady" in Washington society.

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  • Henry Clay, contrasting him with Jefferson, said that Jefferson had more genius, Madison more judgment and common sense; that Jefferson was a visionary and a theorist; Madison cool, dispassionate, practical, and safe.'

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  • Here are hotels, large apartment-houses, many private residences and a number of clubs, including the Brooklyn, the Crescent, the Hamilton, the Jefferson and the Germania.

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  • Jones 1897-1901 Jefferson Davis 1901-1907 John S.

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  • He even became one of the securities for Jefferson Davis, thereby incurring the resentment of Northern radical leaders.

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  • The original plan of the city, which was prepared by Major Pierre Charles L'Enfant (1755-1825), under the supervision of President Washington and Thomas Jefferson,' was a masterpiece in landscape architecture and in the main it has been preserved.

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  • Virginia and Maryland promised such a cession; President Washington was known to be in favour of a site on the Potomac, and in July 1790 Alexander Hamilton, in return for Thomas Jefferson's assistance in passing the bill for the assumption of the state war debts by the Federal government, helped Jefferson to pass a bill for establishing the capital on the Potomac, by which the president was authorized to select a site anywhere along the Potomac between the Eastern Branch (Anacostia) and the Conococheague river, a distance of about So m., and to appoint three commissioners who under his direction should make the necessary surveys and provide accommodations for the reception of Congress in r800.

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  • Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, with Thomas Jefferson, a new up-country leader of great ability, were the leaders.

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  • Although Henry, Lee and Jefferson exercised great power, they were unable to secure a Constitution which embodied the demands of their party: universal suffrage, proportional representation and religious freedom.

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  • A draft for such a Constitution was submitted by Jefferson, but the Conservatives rejected it.

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  • Jefferson was the author of the Kentucky resolutions, and his friend Madison prepared those passed by the Virginia Assembly.

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  • The election of 1800 rendered unnecessary all further agitation by putting Jefferson in the President's chair.

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  • Ford, Writings of Thomas Jefferson (to vols., New York, 1892-99); W.

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  • They were visited about 1800 by French hunters; and by members of the Lewis and Clark party in 1804 under instructions from President Thomas Jefferson.

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  • MADISON, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Indiana, U.S.A., on the N.

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  • He joined Jefferson Davis's provisional government as attorney-general, becoming afterwards his secretary for war (1861-1862), and chief secretary of state (1862-1865).

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  • Although at times subject to fierce criticism with regard to matters of administration and finance, he was recognized as one of the ablest men on the Confederate side, and he remained with Jefferson Davis to the last, sharing his flight after the surrender at Appomattox, and only leaving him shortly before his capture, because he found himself unable to go farther on horseback.

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  • An early portrait of him is to be found in Jefferson Davis's Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government.

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  • Jefferson's high opinion of Du Pont was shown in using him in 1802 to convey to Bonaparte unofficially a threat against the French occupation of Louisiana; and also, earlier, in requesting him to prepare a scheme of national education, which was published in 1800 under the title Sur l'education nationale dans les Etats-Unix d'Amerique.

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  • HOWELL COBB (1815-1868), American political leader, was born at Cherry Hill, Jefferson county, Georgia, on the 7th of September 1815.

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  • The consequence was that the two leading members of the cabinet, Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, exponents for the most part of diametrically opposite political doctrines, soon occupied the position, to use the words of one of them, of "two game-cocks in a pit."

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  • The most unpleasant portions of Jefferson's Anas are those in which, with an air of psychological dissection, he details the storms of passion into which the president was driven by the newspaper attacks upon him.

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  • "Arapahoe County," including all Colorado, was organized as a part of Kansas Territory in 1858; but a delegate was also sent to Congress to work for the admission of an independent territory (called "Jefferson").

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  • Accordingly the Territory of Jefferson arose, assuming to rule over six degrees of latitude (37 0 -43°) and eight of longitude (102°-IIo°).

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  • To Danville, after the evacuation of Richmond on the 2nd of April 1865, the archives of the Confederacy were carried, and here President Jefferson Davis paused for a few days in his flight southward.

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  • In 1896 a constitutional amendment to remove the state capital from Jefferson City to Sedalia was defeated by popular vote.

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  • The success of the Baptists of Virginia in securing step by step the abolition of everything that savoured of religious oppression, involving at last the disestablishment and the disendowment of the Episcopal Church, was due in part to the fact that Virginia Baptists were among the foremost advocates of American independence, while the Episcopal clergy were loyalists and had made themselves obnoxious to the people by using the authority of Great Britain in extorting their tithes from unwilling parishioners, and that they secured the co-operation of free-thinking statesmen like Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and, in most measures, that of the Presbyterians.

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  • STEUBENVILLE, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Ohio, U.S.A., on the west bank of the Ohio river, about 40 m.

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  • Steubenville was platted as a town in 1797, immediately after the erection of Jefferson county, and was built on the site of Fort Steuben, erected in 1786-1787, and named in honour of Baron Frederick William von Steuben; it received a city charter in 1851, and its city limits.

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  • The illness of Lee's wife prevented him from being a member of that committee, but his first resolution was adopted on the 2nd of July, and the Declaration of Independence, prepared principally by Thomas Jefferson, was adopted two days later.

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  • In 1838 a theatre was opened, one of whose proprietors was Joseph Jefferson, the father of the celebrated actor of that name.

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  • More certain, and also more striking, is the fact that the leading statesmen in the American War of Independence were emphatically deists; Benjamin Franklin (who attributes his position to the study of Shaftesbury and Collins), Thomas Paine, Washington and Jefferson, although they all had the greatest admiration for the New Testament story, denied that it was based on any supernatural revelation.

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  • His grandfather, John Breckinridge (1760-1806), who revised Jefferson's draft of the "Kentucky Resolutions" of 1798, was a United States senator from Kentucky in1801-1805and attorney-general in President Jefferson's cabinet in 1805-1806.

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  • His uncles, John Breckinridge (1797-1841), professor of pastoral theology in the Princeton Theological Seminary in1836-1838and for many years after secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871), for several years superintendent of public instruction in Kentucky, an important factor in the organization of the public school system of the state, a professor from 18J3 to 1871 in the Danville Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Danville, Kentucky, and the temporary chairman of the national Republican convention of 1864, were both prominent clergymen of the Presbyterian Church.

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  • The facts are as follows: In 1861 the Southern States of North America seceded from the rest on the slavery question and set up a separate government under President Jefferson Davis.

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  • At first he was in accord with Jefferson's administration; he approved the Louisiana Purchase, and as early as 1803 advocated the purchase of Florida.

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  • Nicholson (1770-1817) of Maryland, he was a leader of the group of about ten independents, called the "Quids," who strongly criticized Jefferson and opposed the presidential candidature of Madison.

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  • His residence in Louisiana, his ownership of a large plantation with its slaves, and his family connexion with Jefferson Davis (who had married his daughter), rendered him more acceptable to many of the Southern Democrats than their party candidate, Lewis Cass, an advocate of " squatter sovereignty " and the representative of the democracy of the free North-west.

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  • In that of 1860 at Charleston he advocated the nomination of Jefferson Davis and opposed Stephen A.

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  • It is the seat of Washington and Jefferson College, of Washington Seminary (1836) for girls and of a school of business.

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  • Washington and Jefferson College was incorporated, in 1865, by the consolidation, of two rival institutions, Washington Academy and Jefferson College.

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  • Jefferson College, which was an outgrowth of Canonsburg Academy at Canonsburg, 7 m.

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  • from Washington, was chartered in 1794, and incorporated as Jefferson College in 1802; from 1826 until 1838 the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia was its medical department.

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  • In1909-1910Washington and Jefferson College (including Washington and Jefferson Academy) had 29 instructors, 413 students, about 20,000 volumes in its library and an endowment of $630,000.

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  • THOMAS JEFFERSON CONANT (1802-1891), American Biblical scholar, was born at Brandon, Vermont, on the 13th of December 1802.

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  • He was a friend of Thomas Jefferson and of James Monroe.

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  • In a town was laid out by Absalom Martin and was called Jefferson, but this, too, was abandoned, on account of its not being made the county-seat.

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  • The south-eastern corner is crossed by an annual isotherm of 60°, the north-western by one of 50°; and although in the former region sometimes not a day in the year may show an average temperature below freezing-point, at Jefferson City there are occasionally two months of freezing weather, and at Rockport three.

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  • In the first, of which St Francois county is the centre, it occurs generally alone disseminated in Cambrian limestone; in the second, of which the counties immediately south-west of Jefferson City are the centre, Y.VIII.

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  • St Francois county alone produces about nine-tenths the yield of the field; Madison, Washington, Jefferson and Franklin counties furnish most of the remainder.

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  • Of the total output in 1900, three-fourths were made up by the output of St Louis ($233,629,733; of which $193,732,788 was from establishments under the "factory system"), Kansas City ($36,527,392; $23,588,653 being "factory product"), St Joseph ($31,690,736, including the product of some establishments outside the city limits; $11,361,939 being "factory product" within the city limits), and Springfield ($4,126,871; $3,433, 80 0 being "factory product"); for the same four cities in 1905 the proportion of the state's total product ($439,54 8, 957) manufactured under the "factory system" is smaller, and less than three-fourths was made up by the following seven cities: St Louis ($267,307,038), Kansas City ($35,573,049), St Joseph ($ 11, 573,7 2 0), Springfield ($5,293,315), Hannibal($ 4,44 2, 0 99), Jefferson City ($3,926,632), and Joplin ($3,006,203).

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  • In addition to St Louis, 2 Kansas City and St Joseph, the leading cities in 1900 were Joplin, Springfield, Sedalia, Hannibal, Jefferson City, Carthage, Webb City and Moberly.

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  • 2 St Louis was the capital in 1812-1820, St Charles in 1820-1826, and Jefferson City since 1826.

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  • Charitable and Penal Institutions.-The charitable and penal institutions of the state include the penitentiary at Jefferson City, opened in 1836, which is self-supporting; a training school for boys at Boonville (opened 1889), an industrial home for girls at Chillicothe (established 1887), hospitals for the insane at Fulton (1847), St Joseph (opened 1874), Nevada (1887), and Farmington (1899); a school for the blind at St Louis (opened 1851); a school for the deaf at Fulton (opened 1851); a colony for the feeble-minded and epileptic at Marshall (established 1899); a state sanitorium, for consumptives, at Mount Vernon (established 1905, opened 1907); a Federal soldiers' home at St James, and a Confederate soldiers' home at Higginsville (both established 1897).

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  • A convention of Liberals that met at Jefferson City in January 1872 issued to all Republicans favourable to reform within the party an invitation to meet at Cincinnati in May; and this was the convention of revolters against General Grant that nominated Horace Greeley of New York and B.

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  • x., Jefferson City, 1896); publications of the State Bureau of Geology and Mines, including bulletins and reports of the Missouri Geological Survey (1853 seq.; new series, 15 vols., 1891-1904); publications of United States Geological Survey, particularly Bulletins 132, 213, 267, the 22nd Annual Report, part ii.

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  • On administration: the annual Official Manual of the State of Missouri (really private, Jefferson City); also F.

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  • PORT TOWNSEND, a city, port of entry and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Washington, U.S.A., on Quimper Peninsula, at the entrance to Puget Sound, about 40 m.

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  • Mount Hood (11,225 ft.), which is the highest point in the state, Mount Jefferson (10,200 ft.), the Three Sister Peaks, Mount Adams, Bachelor Mountain, and Diamond Peak (8807 ft.) all have one or more glaciers on their sides.

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  • about 52° 20' N., and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, American explorers acting under the orders of President Jefferson, in1805-1806had passed west of the Rocky Mountains and down the Columbia river to the Pacific Ocean.

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  • Livingston's case was damaged by President Jefferson, who believed that Livingston had favoured Burr in the presidential election of 1800, and that he had afterwards been a party to Burr's schemes.

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  • Jefferson made it impossible for Livingston to secure his title, and in 1812 published a pamphlet "for the use of counsel" in the case against Livingston, to which Livingston published a crushing reply.

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  • The Miami and Erie canal, leading from Maumee river to Cincinnati, 2441m., with a branch to Port Jefferson, 14 m., with locks 90 by 15 by 4 ft., connects with Lake Erie through Toledo.

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  • Bright (1812-1875), who on the 5th of February 1862 was expelled from the United States Senate for writing a letter addressed to Jefferson Davis, as President of the Confederacy, in which he recommended a friend who had an improvement in fire-arms to dispose of.

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  • On the university campus in the quadrangle is the monument of grey granite erected over the grave of Thomas Jefferson, designed after his own plans, and bearing the famous inscription written by him.

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  • It was given to the university by descendants of Jefferson when Congress appropriated money for the monument now standing over his grave.

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  • In the course of 1862 indeed, when the Confederate armies had secured many victories, Gladstone, speaking at Newcastle, used the famous expression that President Jefferson Davis had made a nation;and Lord Palmerston~ language in the House of Commonswhile opposing a motion for the recognition of the Southinduced the impression that his thoughts were tending in the same direetion as MrGlad~tones.

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  • Burke no more adopted the doctrines of Jefferson in 1776 than he adopted the doctrines of Robespierre in 1793.

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  • In February 1879 he was re-elected to the Senate to succeed Isaac P. Christiancy (1812-1890), and soon afterwards, in a speech concerning Mexican War pensions, bitterly denounced Jefferson Davis.

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  • Everett was a member of the Massachusetts legislature in 1830-1835, was president of Jefferson College in Louisiana in 1842-1844, and was appointed commissioner of the United States to China in 1845, but did not go to that country until the following year, and died on the 29th of May 1847 at Canton, China.

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  • Subsequently he purchased a large tract of land in Jefferson county, NewYork, where he founded the town of Brownville.

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  • From each end of the house a curved colonnade and a pavement lead westerly to a row of out-buildings which partially enclose a bowling green and spacious lawn with shaded drives and walks, and beautiful gardens (with trees planted by Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Lafayette and others).

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  • The Federalist party gradually showed broad-construction, nationalistic tendencies; the Anti-Federalist party became a strict-construction party and advocated popular rights against the asserted aristocratic, centralizing tendencies of its opponent, and gradually was transformed into the Democratic-Republican party, mustered and led by Thomas Jefferson, who, however, had approved the ratification of the Constitution and was not, therefore, an Anti-Federalist in the original sense of that term.

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  • LOUISVILLE, the largest city of Kentucky, U.S.A., and the county-seat of Jefferson county, on the Ohio river, i ro m.

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  • The principal public buildings are the United States government building, the Jefferson county court house and the city hall.

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  • In front of the court house stands a bronze statue of Thomas Jefferson, designed by Moses Ezekiel (b.

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  • Early in 1809 some Cherokees in the south-eastern states made known to President Jefferson their desire to remove to hunting grounds W.

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  • After Lincoln's re-election in 1864 Blair thought that his former close personal relations with the Confederate leaders might aid in bringing about a cessation of hostilities, and with Lincoln's consent went unofficially to Richmond and induced President Jefferson Davis to appoint commissioners to confer with representatives of the United States.

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  • Representing the sane and vigorous democracy, and like Jefferson a friend to liberty and self-government, he had been ~j~ ~ obliged to set up the most despotic of governments in face of internal anarchy and foreign invasion.

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  • Parallel with the river is Jefferson Avenue, also 120 ft.

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  • Jefferson is the principal wholesale street at the lower end, and a fine residence avenue E.

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  • Anne's and Sacred Heart of Mary, both Roman Catholic. The municipal museum of art, in Jefferson Avenue, contains some unusually interesting Egyptian and Japanese collections, the Scripps' collection of old masters,other valuable paintings, and a small library; free lectures on art are given here through the winter.

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  • of what is now Jefferson Avenue and between Griswold and Shelby streets, and named it Fort Pontchartrain in honour of the French colonial minister.

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  • But allowance must be made for the mere advantage of initiative which belonged to any party that organized the government - the differences between Hamilton and Jefferson, in this question of neutrality, being almost purely factitious.

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  • 8 That is, while Jefferson hated British aristocracy and sympathized with French democracy, Hamilton hated French democracy and sympathized with British aristocracy and order; but and in their conflicts over Hamilton's financial measures they organized, on the basis of varying tenets and ideals which have never ceased to conflict in American politics, the two great parties of Federalists and Democrats (or DemocraticRepublicans).

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  • his prediction in 1789 of the course of the French Revolution; his judgments of Burr from 1792 onward, and of Burr and Jefferson in 1800.

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  • Confidence in the integrity, the self-control, and the good judgment of the people, which was the content of Jefferson's political faith, had almost no place in Hamilton's theories.

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  • When it is added that Jefferson's assertions, alike as regards Hamilton's talk 3 and the intent and tendency of his political measures, were, to the extent of the underlying basic fact - but discounting Jefferson's somewhat intemperate interpretations - unquestionably true, 4 it cannot be accounted strange that Hamilton's Democratic opponents mistook his theoretic predilections for positive designs.

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  • When he says (p. 140) that " In Hamilton's successful policy there were certainly germs of an aristocratic republic, there were certainly limitations and possibly dangers to pure democracy," this is practically Jefferson's assertion (1792) that " His system flowed from principles adverse to liberty "; but Jefferson goes on to add: " and was calculated to undermine and demolish the republic."

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  • Jefferson merely had exaggerated fears of a moneyed political engine, and seeing that Hamilton's measures of funding and assumption did make the national debt politically useful to the Federalists in the beginning he concluded that they would seek to fasten the debt on the country for ever.

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  • 8 Jeffersonian democracy came into power in 1800 in direct line with colonial development; Hamiltonian Federalism was a break in that development; and this alone can explain how Jefferson could organize the Democratic Party in face of the brilliant success of the Federalists in constructing the government.

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  • In October 1776 he was appointed, upon the refusal of Jefferson, on the commission with Franklin and Silas Deane to negotiate a treaty of alliance, amity and commerce with France, and also to negotiate with other European governments.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning, not under the control of the state, are: the University of Nashville (non-sect., 1785); Washington and Tusculum College (non-sect., 1794), at Greenville; Maryville College (Presbyterian, 1819), at Maryville; Cumberland University (Presbyterian, 1842), at Lebanon; Burritt College (non-sect., 1848), at Spencer; Hiwassee College (non-sect., 1849), at Sweetwater; Bethel College (Presbyterian 1850), at McKenzie; Carson and Newman College (Baptist, 1851), at Jefferson City; Walden University (Methodist, 1866), at Nashville; Fisk University (Congregational, 1866), at Nashville; University of Chattanooga (Methodist, 1867), at Chattanooga; University of the South (Protestant Episcopal, 1868), at Sewanee; King College (Presbyterian, 1869), at Bristol; Christian Brothers College (Roman Catholic, 1871), at Memphis; Knoxville College (United Presbyterian, 1875), at Knoxville; Milligan College (Christian, 1882), at Milligan; South-western Presbyterian College (1885), at Clarkville; and Lincoln Memorial University (non-sect., 1895), at Cumberland Gap.

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  • For Jefferson, a virtuous and active citizenry was vital to the health of a republican nation.

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  • coincideclass="ex">Coinciding nicely with a resurgence of interest in Spirit, Jefferson Starship and Love, comes the new Quicksilver album, Solid Silver.

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  • Drawn up by Thomas Jefferson (with slight emendations ), it was to be one of the great historical documents of all time.

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  • essence of democracy is very simple and, as Jefferson said, self-evident.

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  • eulogyson came to power in 1828 with Jefferson's funeral eulogies still ringing in American ears.

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  • Policies don't jefferson city mo stamping time is to maintain an.

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  • Aaron Burr, in this way, also offers a fascinating prism through which to view the historical personage of Thomas Jefferson.

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  • swear girl later died (from " unhappiness " ), and Jefferson swore revenge on the one who took her away.

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  • trans., President Jefferson, 1811); Essai sur le genie et les ouvrages de Montesquieu (1808).

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  • BIRMINGHAM, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Alabama, U.S.A., in the north-central part of the state, 96 m.

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  • Rather it fell because its great leaders, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton, became bitter enemies; because neither was even distantly comparable to Jefferson as a party leader; because the party could not hold the support of its original commercial, manufacturing and general business elements; because the party opposed sectionalism to a growing nationalism on the issues that ended in the war of 1812; and, above all, because the principles of the party's leaders (e.g.

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  • But Jefferson was charged with plagiarism by those who believed in the authenticity of the " Declaration," and in 1833 there was discovered a proclamation of Governor Martin, dated the 8th of August 1775, in which he mentioned a publication in the Cape Fear Mercury of a series of resolves by a committee of Mecklenburg county which declared " the entire dissolution of the laws, government and constitution of the country."

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  • About 637.8 acres are devoted to city parks, among which are William Byrd Park (300 acres), in the western part of the city, Joseph Bryan Park (262.6 acres), Chimborazo Park (29 acres), near its eastern boundary, Gambles Hill Park (8.8 acres), Monroe Square (72 acres), Jefferson Park (6.3 acres) and Marshall Square (7 acres).

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  • In Hollywood Cemetery (dedicated in 1849) are the graves of many famous men, including presidents James Monroe and John Tyler; Jefferson Davis, John Randolph of Roanoke, the Confederate generals, A.

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  • In 1800, Adams was again the Federalist candidate for the presidency, but the distrust of him in his own party, the popular disapproval of the Alien and Sedition Acts and the popularity of his opponent, Thomas Jefferson, combined to cause his defeat.

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  • Higher schools include: the State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College (1860) at Baton Rouge; Tulane University of Louisiana (1864) in New Orleans; Jefferson College (1864; Roman Catholic) at Convent; the College of the Immaculate Conception (1847; Roman Catholic) in New Orleans; St Charles College (1835; Roman Catholic) at Grand Couteau; St Joseph's College (1849; Roman Catholic) at Baton Rouge; the following colleges for women - Silliman Collegiate Institute (1852; Presbyterian) at Clinton, Mansfield Female College (1854; Methodist Episcopal, South) at Mansfield, the H.

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  • As the British ministry was reluctant to discuss these vexed questions, little progress was made, and in May 1806 Jefferson ordered William Pinkney of Maryland to assist Monroe.

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  • Franklin had repeatedly petitioned Congress for his recall, but his letters were unanswered or his appeals refused until the 7th of March 1785, when Congress resolved that he be allowed to return to America; on the 10th of March Thomas Jefferson, who had joined him in August of the year before, was appointed to his place.

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  • The first break came in the spring of 1804 when Burr, who had incurred the enmity of his Republican colleagues in 1800 by seeking Federalist votes in the electoral college at Jefferson's expense, became an independent candidate for governor against Morgan Lewis.

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  • In politics an extreme States'-Rights Democrat, he opposed the coercion of the South, and after the Civil War became senior counsel for Jefferson Davis on his indictment for treason, and was one of his bondsmen; these facts and O'Conor's connexion with the Roman Catholic Church affected unfavourably his political fortunes.

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  • in 1910, the Immaculate Heart Academy (Roman Catholic), the Jefferson County Orphan Asylum (1859), the St Patrick's Orphanage (1897; under the Sisters of St Joseph), the Henry Keep Home (1879), for aged men and women, St Joachim's Hospital (1896; under the Sisters of Mercy), and the House of the Good Samaritan (1882).

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  • All this was in part premeditated system2 - a part of Jefferson's purpose to republicanize the government and public opinion, which was the distinguishing feature of his administration; but it was also simply the nature of the man.

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  • Randall (3 vols., New York, 1853), a monumental work, although marred by some special pleading, and sharing Jefferson's implacable opinions of the "Monocrats."

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  • In 1794 he tried again his commercial weapons, introducing in the House of Representatives resolutions based on Jefferson's report on commerce, advising retaliation against Great Britain and discrimination in commercial and navigation laws in favour of France; and he declared that the friends of Jay's treaty were "a British party systematically aiming at an exclusive connexion with the British government," and in 1796 strenuously but unsuccessfully opposed the appropriation of money to carry this treaty into effect.

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  • In 1798 he joined Jefferson in opposing the Alien and Sedition Laws, and Madison himself wrote the resolutions of the Virginia legislature declaring that it viewed "the powers of the Federal government as resulting from the compact to which the states are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them."

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  • Accordingly the Territory of Jefferson arose, assuming to rule over six degrees of latitude (37 0 -43°) and eight of longitude (102°-IIo°).

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  • The provisional legis lature of the Territory of Jefferson maintained a wholly illegal but rather creditable existence somewhat precariously and ineffectively until 1861.

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  • Hunter, "The Pathfinders of Jefferson County," and "The Centennial of Jefferson County," in Ohio Archaeological and Historical Review, vol.

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  • The south-eastern corner is crossed by an annual isotherm of 60°, the north-western by one of 50°; and although in the former region sometimes not a day in the year may show an average temperature below freezing-point, at Jefferson City there are occasionally two months of freezing weather, and at Rockport three.

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  • about 52° 20' N., and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, American explorers acting under the orders of President Jefferson, in1805-1806had passed west of the Rocky Mountains and down the Columbia river to the Pacific Ocean.

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  • After that he forced a quarrel on a trivial bit of hearsay (that Hamilton had said he had a " despicable " opinion of Burr); and Hamilton, believing as he explained in a letter he left before going to his death - that a compliance with the duelling prejudices of the time was inseparable from the ability to be in future neither wanted war; and indeed Jefferson, throughout life, was the more peaceful of the two.

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  • He wanted a system strong enough, he would have said, to overcome the anarchic tendencies loosed by war, and represented by those notions of natural rights which he had himself once championed; strong enough to overbear all local, state and sectional prejudices, powers or influence, and to control - not, as Jefferson would have it, to be controlled by - the people.

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  • About an hour later, a well-dressed gentleman came into the hotel and said, "I wish to see Mr. Jefferson."

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  • "No," answered Mr. Jefferson.

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  • While Jefferson's "all men are created equal" statement was not meant by him to include slaves, we have broadened the application of the principle and should continue to do so.

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  • As true as that was in Jefferson's time, our age has amplified all of it: both the miseries war can produce and the blessings peace can produce.

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  • I also know Mr. Jefferson.

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  • Mr. Jefferson's, beautiful, pathetic representation quite carried me away with delight.

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  • The girl later died (from " unhappiness "), and Jefferson swore revenge on the one who took her away.

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  • Early presidents including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson did not have middle names.

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  • Other common monikers included the names of presidents, such as Washington and Jefferson.

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  • Washington, D.C. Architecture with the U.S. Capitol, the White House, the Jefferson Memorial, the Washington Monument, Georgetown, and the Lincoln Memorial.

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  • Thomas Jefferson's Monticello is located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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  • If you've ever seen or visited this landmark, you know that Jefferson, the third President of the United States, was quite an accomplished architect.

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  • Jefferson had a great appreciation for Neoclassical architecture, especially Italian Renaissance designs, so it's no wonder that he designed his home, Monticello, using many of the classical architectural features.

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  • Like most creative people, Jefferson was constantly studying and seeking out new ideas and inspirations.

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  • Jefferson was excited to make changes to Monticello when he returned to America upon accepting the position as the first Secretary of the State.

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  • Many doubt that Jefferson had envisioned his remodeling project would take 15 years.

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  • Some of the significant changes that Jefferson made to Monticello were immediately obvious.

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  • All of the changes reflected Jefferson's travels in France and the different architectural styles and features he saw.

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  • The remodeled mansion had forty-three rooms, including three indoor privies, one of which adjoined Jefferson's bedroom.

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  • This is one of the most whimsical pieces in the home and clearly reveals Jefferson's personality.

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  • It's said that Jefferson felt the hour hand was all those working on his plantation needed in order to tell time.

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  • This wasn't the only clock Jefferson had.

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  • When you enter the house, you'll find a clock that Jefferson designed.

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  • Jefferson was a minimalist when it came to certain things.

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  • Jefferson liked the practical functionality of bed alcoves and the remodel included bed alcoves in all of the bedrooms.

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  • When it came to Jefferson's bedroom, the alcove bed design was unique and unlike the other ones he created because of the available wall space.

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  • This arrangement allowed Jefferson to access the bed from either room, which suited his utilitarian philosophy of design and function.

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  • With about 60% of the furnishings being Jefferson's original pieces, including over 150 paintings and other art objects, you're assured of a memorable visit at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello.

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  • Apparently, Steven Seagal has been a deputy of the Jefferson Parrish sheriff's department for over 20 years.

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  • Seagal believes that the show is necessary to depict the "…passion and commitment of the Jefferson Parrish sheriff's office."

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  • Thomas Jefferson University: Physically located in the heart of the Chinatown district of Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson offers numerous distance and e-learning opportunities for students.

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  • However, for continuing medical education, Jefferson School of Nursing, the Occupational Therapy Department and the Jefferson School of Health Professions offer the ability for full program completion online.

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  • Famous for their Wall of Sound, the Grateful Dead were at the forefront of Psychedelic Rock with other bands such as Jefferson Airplane, The Doors and more.

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  • A bed that belonged to Thomas Jefferson will be more valuable than a bed from the same era that has no documented past.

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  • Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2002.

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  • Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2001.

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  • The popular lodging is situated at 495 Jefferson Street, near Fisherman's Wharf.

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  • Jefferson County Schools provides game boards and the option of designing your own game boards using a Powerpoint template.

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  • If you are holding a fundraiser in the Berkeley or Jefferson counties of West Virginia, you will be able to participate in this program.

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  • Other coins that are great for your child to collect include Indian head pennies, buffalo nickels, Jefferson Nickels, Roosevelt Dimes, and Mercury Dimes.

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  • The Jefferson Hotel is reportedly one of the oldest buildings in the town, originally built as a warehouse for cotton.

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  • In 1936, near Jefferson, WI, Mark Shackelman reported driving down highway 18 and seeing a figure of a wolf-like man.

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  • Tara's later marriage to Jeff Jefferson produced daughter Kelsey who shared a child with Bobby Warner (Cortlandt family) and their son Sam was adopted by the Greys.

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  • The neo-classical building was one of the first in Washington to feature classical Greek columns and arcades, a style that was later echoed in the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, among other Washington Buildings.

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  • Aerosmith, The Doors, Led Zepplin, Pink Floyd, Jefferson Airplane, Guns n' Roses, Nirvana, David Bowie, The Beatles, Nine Inch Nails, Tool, Soundgarden, Sublime, Rolling Stones, Alice and Chains, Enya and Jimi Hendrix.

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  • Cameras follow Steven Seagal as he participates as an official representative of the Jefferson Parish Police Department in Louisiana.

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  • Many times, the assignments are patrolling the streets of Jefferson Parish until a call comes in or until they see something suspicious.

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  • Then he and the other cops suit up and patrol areas of Jefferson Parish.

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  • Lt. Boomer - Again, gender and racial differences between Herbert Jefferson Jr.and Grace Park aside, in the re-imagined series Boomer is a Cylon humanoid model.

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  • In 1771 Thomas Jefferson described a " burning spring " in the Kanawha Valley, and when wells were drilled for salt brine near Charleston petroleum and natural gas were found here before there was any drilling for oil in Pennsylvania.

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  • Berkeley and Jefferson counties lying on the Potomac east of the mountains, in 1863, with the consent of the " Reorganized " government of Virginia voted in favour of annexation to West Virginia.

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  • south-east of the city on a fine hill, called Little Mountain until Jefferson Italianised the name.

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  • The south pavilion of the present house is the original brick building, one and a half storeys high, first occupied by Jefferson in 1770.

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  • In June 1781 Tarleton raided Charlottesville and the vicinity, nearly captured Thomas Jefferson, and destroyed the public records and some arms and ammunition.

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  • In Jefferson county there were in 1900 more than 300 mining and manufacturing establishments, engaged, chiefly, in the production of iron, coal and coke, and a majority of these are in Birmingham and its suburban towns.

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  • In 1900 the Birmingham district produced six-sevenths of the total pig iron exported from the United States, and in 1902 nine-tenths of Alabama's coal, coke and pig iron; in 1905 Jefferson county produced 67.5% of the total iron and steel product of the state, and 62.5% of the pig iron produced by the state.

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  • Alfred Langdon Elwyn has edited Letters by Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Others, Written During and After the Revolution, to John Langdon of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1880), a book of great interest and value.

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  • The first school established in the state was Jefferson College, now Jefferson Military College, near Natchez, Adams county, incorporated in 1802.

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  • On the death of John C. Calhoun in 1850 the state, under the leadership of Jefferson Davis, began to rival South Carolina as leader of the extreme pro-slavery States' Rights faction.

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  • Liberal support was given to the Confederacy, both in men and supplies, but Governor Vance, one of the ablest of the Southern war governors, engaged in acrimonious controversies with President Jefferson Davis, contending that the general government of the Confederacy was encroaching upon the prerogatives of the separate states.

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  • He graduated at Jefferson College (now Washington and Jefferson College) in 1850 and was admitted to the bar in 1854.

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  • Among the conspirators was one Jose Alves Maciel, who had just returned from France where he had met Thomas Jefferson and had become infected with French revolutionary ideas.

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  • In the following year Webster delivered his oration in commemoration of the second and third presidents of the United States - John Adams and Thomas Jefferson - who died on the 4th of July 1826; it is particularly remarkable for Adams's imaginary reply in the Continental 'Congress to the arguments against a Declaration of Independence, beginning with the familiar quotation: "Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish, I gave my hand and my heart to this vote."

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  • The Capitol (begun in 1785 and completed in 1792 - the wings were added in 1906) was designed from a model and plans of the Maison Carree, at Nimes, supplied by Thomas Jefferson, while he was minister to France.

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  • Jefferson died on the same day.

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  • SACKETT'S HARBOR, a village in Jefferson county, New York, U.S.A., at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, on the south shore of Black River Bay, about i m.

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  • Mr. Joseph Jefferson was once explaining to Miss Keller what the bumps on her head meant.

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