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jedburgh

jedburgh Sentence Examples

  • The delegates found the king at Jedburgh, and the mission, which was a dangerous one, was successfully accomplished.

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  • Shortly afterwards another convention was held at Edinburgh, and it was resolved that the delegates sent to Jedburgh should again meet the king at Linlithgow and repeat their former instructions.

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  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

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  • DAVID GEORGE RITCHIE (1853-1903), Scottish philosopher, was born at Jedburgh, son of the Rev. George Ritchie, D.D.

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  • In the gallant discharge of its duties he was dangerously wounded by a leading outlaw, whom he slew in single combat; and while yet confined to Hermitage Castle he received a visit of two hours from the queen, who rode thither from Jedburgh and back through 20 miles of the wild borderland where her person was in perpetual danger from the freebooters whom her father's policy had striven and had failed to extirpate.

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  • About 1604 he became minister of Crailing, near Jedburgh, where he became conspicuous for his resolute opposition to the introduction of Episcopacy.

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  • Calderwood died at Jedburgh on the 29th of October 1650.

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  • of Jedburgh, via St Boswells and Roxburgh, by the North British railway.

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  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

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  • The bishoprics erected by him, and his many Lowland abbeys, Holyrood, Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso, Jedburgh and others, confirmed the freedom of the Scottish church from the claims of the see of York, encouraged the i mprovement of agriculture and endowed the country with beautiful examples of architecture.

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  • On the 7th or 9th of October, Mary went to Jedburgh on the affairs of Border justice, and a week later she rode with Murray to Hermitage castle, where for several days Bothwell had lain, wounded nearly to death by Eliot, a border reiver.

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  • On her return she fell into an almost fatal illness and prepared for her end with great courage and piety; Darnley now visited her, but was ill-received, while Bothwell was borne to Jedburgh from Hermitage in a litter.

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  • JEDBURGH, a royal and police burgh and county-town of Roxburghshire, Scotland.

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  • Of the name Jedburgh there have been many variants, the earliest being Gedwearde (800), Jedwarth (1251), and Geddart (1586), while locally the word is sometimes pronounced Jethart.

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  • Of the renowned group of Border abbeys - Jedburgh, Melrose, Dryburgh and Kelso - that of Jedburgh is the stateliest.

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  • Jedburgh was made a royal burgh in the reign of David I., and received a charter from Robert I.

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  • of the present town, the first site of the burgh, is now marked by a few grassy mounds, and of the great Jedburgh forest, only the venerable oaks, the "Capon Tree" and the "King of the Woods" remain.

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  • south-west of Jedburgh, commands a fine view of the capital of the county.

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  • of Jedburgh by road and 524 m.

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  • Denholm, about midway between Hawick and Jedburgh, was the birthplace of John Leyden the poet.

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  • MARY SOMERVILLE (1780-1872), British scientific writer, was the daughter of Admiral Sir William George Fairfax, and was born on the 26th of December 1780 in the manse of Jedburgh, the house of her mother's sister, wife of Dr Thomas Somerville (1741-1830), author of My Own Life and Times, whose son was her second husband.

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  • (For early history see Lothian; Northumbria; Strathclyde.) In the 12th century were founded the abbeys of Hexham and Alnwick, the priory church of Lindisfarne and the cathedral of Carlisle on the English side, and on the Scottish the abbeys of Jedburgh, Kelso, Melrose and Dryburgh.

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  • Gif they be twenty he shall take ane; 1620 Jedburgh B. Rec.

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  • A former army bandmaster, he has often wielded the baton at Jedburgh.

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  • A former army bandmaster, he has often wielded the baton at Jedburgh.

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  • David founded many new bishoprics and abbeys including Melrose, Kelso and Jedburgh and endowed many of the monasteries.

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  • The delegates found the king at Jedburgh, and the mission, which was a dangerous one, was successfully accomplished.

    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards another convention was held at Edinburgh, and it was resolved that the delegates sent to Jedburgh should again meet the king at Linlithgow and repeat their former instructions.

    0
    0
  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

    0
    0
  • DAVID GEORGE RITCHIE (1853-1903), Scottish philosopher, was born at Jedburgh, son of the Rev. George Ritchie, D.D.

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    0
  • In the gallant discharge of its duties he was dangerously wounded by a leading outlaw, whom he slew in single combat; and while yet confined to Hermitage Castle he received a visit of two hours from the queen, who rode thither from Jedburgh and back through 20 miles of the wild borderland where her person was in perpetual danger from the freebooters whom her father's policy had striven and had failed to extirpate.

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    0
  • About 1604 he became minister of Crailing, near Jedburgh, where he became conspicuous for his resolute opposition to the introduction of Episcopacy.

    0
    0
  • Calderwood died at Jedburgh on the 29th of October 1650.

    0
    0
  • of Jedburgh, via St Boswells and Roxburgh, by the North British railway.

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    0
  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

    0
    0
  • The bishoprics erected by him, and his many Lowland abbeys, Holyrood, Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso, Jedburgh and others, confirmed the freedom of the Scottish church from the claims of the see of York, encouraged the i mprovement of agriculture and endowed the country with beautiful examples of architecture.

    0
    0
  • On the 7th or 9th of October, Mary went to Jedburgh on the affairs of Border justice, and a week later she rode with Murray to Hermitage castle, where for several days Bothwell had lain, wounded nearly to death by Eliot, a border reiver.

    0
    0
  • On her return she fell into an almost fatal illness and prepared for her end with great courage and piety; Darnley now visited her, but was ill-received, while Bothwell was borne to Jedburgh from Hermitage in a litter.

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    0
  • JEDBURGH, a royal and police burgh and county-town of Roxburghshire, Scotland.

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  • Of the name Jedburgh there have been many variants, the earliest being Gedwearde (800), Jedwarth (1251), and Geddart (1586), while locally the word is sometimes pronounced Jethart.

    0
    0
  • Of the renowned group of Border abbeys - Jedburgh, Melrose, Dryburgh and Kelso - that of Jedburgh is the stateliest.

    0
    0
  • Jedburgh was made a royal burgh in the reign of David I., and received a charter from Robert I.

    0
    0
  • of the present town, the first site of the burgh, is now marked by a few grassy mounds, and of the great Jedburgh forest, only the venerable oaks, the "Capon Tree" and the "King of the Woods" remain.

    0
    0
  • south-west of Jedburgh, commands a fine view of the capital of the county.

    0
    0
  • of Jedburgh by road and 524 m.

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    0
  • Denholm, about midway between Hawick and Jedburgh, was the birthplace of John Leyden the poet.

    0
    0
  • MARY SOMERVILLE (1780-1872), British scientific writer, was the daughter of Admiral Sir William George Fairfax, and was born on the 26th of December 1780 in the manse of Jedburgh, the house of her mother's sister, wife of Dr Thomas Somerville (1741-1830), author of My Own Life and Times, whose son was her second husband.

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    0
  • (For early history see Lothian; Northumbria; Strathclyde.) In the 12th century were founded the abbeys of Hexham and Alnwick, the priory church of Lindisfarne and the cathedral of Carlisle on the English side, and on the Scottish the abbeys of Jedburgh, Kelso, Melrose and Dryburgh.

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    0
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