Jassy sentence example

jassy
  • By the peace of Jassy, signed in January 1792, she retained Ochakov and the coast between the Bug and the Dniester, and she secured certain privileges for the Danubian principalities, but the Turks remained in Constantinople, and the realization of the famous Greek project, as it was termed, had to be indefinitely postponed.
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  • In 1790 he conducted the military operations on the Dniester and held his court at Jassy with more than Asiatic pomp. In 1791 he returned to St Petersburg where, along with his friend Bezborodko (q.v.), he made vain efforts to overthrow the new favourite, Zubov, and in four months spent 850,000 roubles in banquets and entertainments, a sum subsequently reimbursed to him from the treasury.
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  • Then the empress grew impatient and compelled him (1791) to return to Jassy to conduct the peace negotiations as chief Russian plenipotentiary.
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  • from Jassy, in consequence of eating a whole goose while in a high state of fever.
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  • Lopukhin, Sketch of the Congress of Jassy, 1791 (Rus.; St Petersburg, 1893); The Papers of Prince Potemkin, 1744-1793 (Rus.; St Petersburg, 1893-1895).
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  • The Turks drove back the Austrians from Mehadia and overran the Banat (1789); but in Moldavia Romanzov was successful and captured Jassy and Khotin.
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  • with Russia at Jassy (Jan.
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  • VASLUI, the capital of the department of Vaslui, Rumania; on a hill at the confluence of the Berlad and Vaslui rivers, and on the railway from Jassy to Galatz.
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  • It was written in 1640 in Russian, was translated into Greek, and approved by the council of Jassy and the patriarchs of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem.
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  • But Austria and Russia gave him no time for anything but defence, and it was not until the peace of Jassy (1792) that a breathing space was allowed him in Europe, while Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt and Syria soon called for Turkey's strongest efforts and for the time shattered the old-standing French alliance.
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  • KISHINEV (Kishlanow of the Moldavians),a town of south-west Russia, capital of the government of Bessarabia, situated on the right bank of the Byk, a tributary of the Dniester, and on the railway between Odessa and Jassy in Rumania, 120 m.
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  • Even when the peace of Jassy (Jan.
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  • Conventuals: Jassy (Rumania).
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  • A man of liberal education, he established the first high school, a kind of university, in Jassy.
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  • DEMETRIUS [Dimitrie] STURDZA, Rumanian statesman, was born in 1833 at Jassy, and educated there at the Academia Michaileana.
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  • On the sudden death of Potemkin he was despatched to Jassy to prevent the peace congress there from breaking up, and succeeded, in the face of all but insuperable difficulties, in concluding a treaty exceedingly advantageous to Russia (9th of January 17 9 2).
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  • On his return from Jassy, however, he found his confidential post of secretary of petitions occupied by the empress's last favourite, P. A.
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  • The empress reassured him by fresh honours and distinctions on the occasion of the solemn celebration of the peace of Jassy (2nd of September 1793), when she publicly presented him with a golden olive-branch encrusted with brilliants.
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  • Instead, he remained at Jassy, disgracing his cause by condoning the massacres of Turkish merchants and others.
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  • The best white wines came from Cotnar in the Jassy department, but here phylloxera ruined the vineyards.
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  • The chief .towns, with their estimated population in 1910, are Bucharest, the capital (300,000); Jassy, the capital of Moldavia (80,000); Galatz (66,000), Braila (60,000), Ploesci (50,000), Craiova (46,000), Botoshani (34,000), Berlad (25,000), Focshani (25,000), Tulcea (20,000), [Constantza (16,000), Giurgevo (15,000).
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  • valleys of the Carpathians, and, on the other, to Jassy and the principal Danubian ports.
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  • A direct line connects Jassy with Galatz; another traverses the Dobrudja from Constantza to Cernavoda, where it crosses the Danube and proceeds north-west to join the main line.
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  • Besides the junctions at Suczawa and Verciorova, the Rumania system meets the Hungarian through the Gyimes, Rothenthurm and Vulkan Passes; the Russian by lines from Jassy and Galatz to Kishinev in Bessarabia; the Bulgarian and Servian by means of numerous] ferries.
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  • Any appeal from the departmental courts is brought before the appeal courts of Bucharest, Craiova, Galatz or Jassy; and thence, if necessary, to the supreme tribunal, or court .of cassation (Curtea de Casatie), which sits in Bucharest.
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  • In time of peace the field army consists of four complete army corps, with headquarters at Craiova, Bucharest, Jassy and Galatz; besides an independent brigade in the Dobrudja, and a separate cavalry division with headquarters at Bucharest.
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  • The metropolitan archbishop of Bucharest, officially styled metropolitan primate of Rumania, presides over the Holy Synod; the other members being the metropolitan of Jassy (primate of Moldavia), the six bishops of Ramnicu Valcea, Roman, Hushi, Buzeu, Curtea de Argesh and the Lower Danube (Galatz); together with eight bishops in partibus, their coadjutors.
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  • Technical instruction is given in the agricultural schools; in various arts and crafts institutes, such as those of Bucharest and Jassy; in the veterinary and engineering colleges of Bucharest; in numerous commercial schools, and in schools of domestic economy for girls.
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  • At Bucharest and Jassy there are universities with faculties of law, philosophy, science and medicine and theology.
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  • He brought the Moldavian Church into more direct relation with the patriarch of Constantinople, but also showed considerable favour to the Latins, allowing them to erect churches at Suciava, Jassy and Galatz.
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  • The capital of the country was now Jassy, to which city Stephen the Great had trans tion of ferred his court from Suciava, the earlier residence of the voivodes.
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  • Gregory Ghica (1774-77), who himself spoke French and Italian, founded a school or " gymnasium " at Jassy, where Greek, Latin and theology were taught in a fashion.
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  • By the peace of Jassy in 1792 the Dniester was recognized as the Russian frontier, and the privileges of the principalities as specified in the hattisherif confirmed.
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  • The seat of the president was at Jassy, and General Engelhart was appointed as vice-president at Bucharest.
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  • The internal constitution of the countries was to be regulated by an " Organic Law," which was drawn up b y assemblies of bishops and boiars at Jassy and Bucharest, acting, however, under Russian control.
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  • In accordance with this convention the deputies of Moldavia and Walachia met in separate assemblies at Bucharest and Jassy, but the choice of both fell unanimously on Prince Alexander John Cuza (January 1859).
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  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.
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  • Among other less judicious measures, a decree was passed ostensibly directed against all vagabond foreigners, but really aimed at the Jews, large numbers of whom, including many respected landowners and men of business, were imprisoned, or expelled, from Jassy, Bacau and other parts of Moldavia.
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  • The name was taken from the Junimea, a literary society formed in Jassy in 1874 by P. Carp, T.
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  • Carra, Histoire de Moldavie et de Valachie, avec une dissertation sur l'etal actuel de ces deux Provinces (Jassy, 1 777); A.
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  • Xenopol, Istoria Rominilor din Dacia Traiana (Jassy, 1888-93, 6 vols.
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  • Nadejde, Gramateca limbei romdne (Bucharest, 1884), id., Istoria limbei si literaturei romdne (Jassy, 1886); B.
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  • These were translated independently by Dositheiu under the title of Pirimiar (Jassy, 1683), and were almost the last work that came from his prolific pen.
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  • As far back as 1600 Dositheiu had made a new translation of the Psalter from the Slavonic and printed it in both languages (Jassy, 1680).
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  • One year later appeared the first book printed in Moldavia, the collection of homilies Carte romdneasca de invdteiturci (Jassy, 1643).
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  • The Liturgy proper was also translated by bishop Dositheiu in 1679, but a translation from the Greek, by Jeremia Kakavela (Jassy, 1697), was the one adopted in the churches.
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  • In addition to the activity of the Reformers in Transylvania, there was also a Roman Catholic propaganda in Rumania, and the Orthodox Church found it necessary to convoke a synod in Jassy for the purpose of formulating anew its own dogmatic standpoint.
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  • Of the lives of saints, the Prolog, translated from the Slavonic at the beginning of the 17th century (MS.), and the Vietile Sfintilor, by Dositheiu (2 vols., Jassy, 1682), are the most important.
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  • The Panoplia of Euthymius Zygabenus ('1775) and the Commentary of Theophylact were printed by Veniamin (Jassy, 1805).
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  • The great polemical work of Simeon of Thessalonica, the Greek original of which was published by Dositheiu (Jassy, 1683), had been translated into Rumanian long before it was printed (Bucharest, 1756).
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  • (Jassy, 1833).
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  • One more collection, an abstract from the Greek Basilica, published by Donici (Jassy, 1814), must be mentioned, for through it the legal.
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  • Kritil, si Andronius (Jassy, 1794) is almost the last novel or story translated direct from the Greek.
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  • Among such translators was Skavinschi, who came originally from Transylvania to Jassy, and translated Regnald's Democrit into verse.
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  • 1839), who was then a professor at Jassy.
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  • In 1866 it was brought into railway connexion with Kiev and Kharkov via Balta, and with Jassy in Rumania.
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  • JASSY (Iagii), also written Jasii, Jaschi and Yassy, the capital of the department of Jassy, Rumania; situated on the left bank of the river Bahlui, an affluent of the Jijia, about 10 m.
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  • Jassy communicates by rail with Galatz on the Danube, Kishinev in Bessarabia, and Czernowitz in Bukowina.
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  • Jassy itself stands pleasantly amid vineyards and gardens, partly on two hills, partly in the hollow between.
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  • Jassy is the seat of the metropolitan of Moldavia, and of a Roman Catholic archbishop. Synagogues and churches abound.
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  • The main hospital in Jassy is a large building, and possesses a maternity institution, a midwifery school, a chemical institute, an inoculating establishment, &c. A society of physicians and naturalists has existed in Jassy since the early part of the 9th century, and a number of periodicals are published.
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  • About 1564, Prince Alexander Lapusneanu, after whom one of the chief streets is named, chose Jassy for the Moldavian capital, instead of Suceava (now Suczawa, in Bukowina).
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  • Jassy was burned by the Tatars in 1 513, by the Turks in 1538, and by the Russians in 1686.
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  • By the Peace of Jassy the second RussoTurkish War was brought to a close in 1792.
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  • W.; and there is railway communication with Botoshani and Jassy.
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  • He encouraged the settlement of German Protestant colonists in the country, some of whom set up as watchmakers in Jassy, where they were further allowed to build an evangelical church.
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  • The country, however, was again ravaged by the retiring troops, quarters of Jassy and Bucharest burnt, and the complete evacuation delayed till 1824, when the British government again remonstrated with the Porte (see Eastern Question; Greece; Ypsilanti; Alexander).
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