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japonica

japonica

japonica Sentence Examples

  • Such a transfer has been described in various Aroids, Rohdea japonica (Liliaceae), and other plants.

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  • japonica plena; S.

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  • japonica plena; S.

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  • The Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) is a kind of cypress, the wood of which is very durable.

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  • Of the fresh-water tortoise there are two kinds, the nippon (Tnionyx japonica) and the kame-no-ko (Ernys vulganisjaponica).

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  • Fishing lines are manufacttired from the cocoons of the genjiki-mushi (Caligula japonica), which is one of the commonest moths in the islands.

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  • The best known and most frequent forms are the asari (Tapes philippinarum), the hamaguri (Meretrix lusoria), the baka (Mactra sulcataria), the aka-gai (Scapharca inflata), the kaki (oyster), the awabi (Haliotis japonica), the sazae (Turbo cornutus), the hora-gai (Trilonium tritonius), &c. Among the cephalopods several are of great value as articles of food, e.g.

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  • Thus the seeds of Primula japonica, though sown under precisely similar conditions, yet come up at very irregular intervals of time.

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  • japonica, flowers white and purple, are very easily grown and are particularly fine in autumn.

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  • Besides this, P. Sieboldii (cortusoides amoena), I ft., originally deep rose with white eye, but now including many varieties of colour, such as white, pink, lilac and purple; P. japonica, to 2 ft., crimson-rose; P. denticulate, ft., bright bluish-lilac, with its allies P. erosa and P. purpurea, all best grown in a cold frame; P. viscosa, 6 in., purple, and its white variety nivalis, with P. pedemontana and P. spectabilis, 6 in., both purple; and the charming little Indian P. rosea, 3 to 6 in., bright cherry-rose colour, are but a few of the many beautiful kinds in cultivation.

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  • A form of flint corn, with variegated leaves, is grown for ornament under the name Zea japonica or Japanese striped corn.

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  • Among the indigenous trees are the Abies excelsa, Abies microsperma, Pinus sinensis, Pinus pinea, three species of oak, five of maple, lime, birch, juniper, mountain ash, walnut, Spanish chestnut, hazel, willow, hornbeam, hawthorn, plum, pear, peach, Rhus vernicifera, (?) Rhus semipinnata, Acanthopanax ricinifolia, Zelkawa, Thuja orientalis, Elaeagnus, Sophora Japonica, &c. Azaleas and rhododendrons are widely distributed, as well as other flowering shrubs and creepers, Ampelopsis Veitchii being universal.

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  • japonica, a tall and handsome plant generally grown in gardens under the name A.

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  • CRYPTOMERIA, Or Japanese Cedar, a genus of conifers, containing a single species, C. japonica, native of China and Japan, which was introduced into Great Britain by the Royal Horticultural Society in 1844.

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  • In the far East conifers are richly represented; among them occur Pinus densiflora,Cryptomeria japonica, Cephalotaxus, species of Abies, Larix, Thujopsis, Sciadopitys venticillata, Pseudolarix Kaempferi, &c. In the Himalaya occur Cedrus deodara, Taxus, species of Cupressus, Finns excelsa, Abies Webbiana, &c. The continent of Africa is singularly poor in conifers.

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  • KUMQUAT (Citrus japonica), a much-branched shrub from 8 to 12 ft.

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  • A lengthening of the axis of the female strobilus of Coniferae is not of infrequent occurrence in Cryptomeria japonica, larch (Larix europaea), &c., and this is usually associated with a leaf-like condition of the bracts, and sometimes even with the development of leaf-bearing shoots in place of the scales.

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  • But in spiral flowers we have a different arrangement; thus the leaves of the calyx of Camellia japonica cover each other partially like tiles on a house.

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  • aucuba japonica - a high-gloss plant with large green leaves liberally speckled with bright gold.

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  • However, trees in parks and gardens can also be colonized, including japonica, walnut, cotoneaster and laburnum in Herefordshire.

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  • All of the plants of var. japonica found in the UK are functionally female and originate from the same clone.

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  • japonica subspecies.

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  • japonica variegata.

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  • Skimmia japonica Evergreen, white scented flowers in spring, followed, if male and female plants are grown together, by red berries.

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  • aucuba japonica - a high-gloss plant with large green leaves liberally speckled with bright gold.

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  • cryptomeria japonica ' Tilford Cream ' A dark green conifer clothed with rich cream variegation, slightly bronzed in winter.

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  • Climbers starring this month are many of the clematis, abutilon, climbing roses and the honeysuckle (lonicera japonica ).

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  • mahonia japonica is generally free from pests and diseases.

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  • Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis var. japonica) - creeping rhizomes spread through flowerbeds, they can penetrate cracks in paving and walls.

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  • Or try the Aucuba japonica or spotted laurel, which also has beautiful dark green leaves and scarlet berries through the winter months.

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  • mahonia japonica is generally free from pests and diseases.

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  • Cryptomeria japonica ' Tilford cream ' A dark green conifer clothed with rich cream variegation, slightly bronzed in winter.

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  • The Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) is a kind of cypress, the wood of which is very durable.

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  • Missing the perfume-laden air of the Occident, a visitor is prone to infer paucity of blossoms. But if some familiar European flowers are absent, they are replaced by others strange to Western eyesa wealth of lespedeza and Indigo-fera; a vast variety of lilies; graceful grasses like the eulalia and the ominameshi (Patriaa scabiosaefolia); the richly-hued Pyrus japonica; azaleas, diervillas and deutzias; the kikyo (Platycodon grandifiorum), the giboshi (Funkia ovala), and many another.

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  • To these the lark, hibari (Alauda japonica), joins its voice, and the cooing of the pigeon (hato) is supplemented by the twittering of the ubiquitous sparrow (suzume)

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  • Of the fresh-water tortoise there are two kinds, the nippon (Tnionyx japonica) and the kame-no-ko (Ernys vulganisjaponica).

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  • Fishing lines are manufacttired from the cocoons of the genjiki-mushi (Caligula japonica), which is one of the commonest moths in the islands.

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  • The best known and most frequent forms are the asari (Tapes philippinarum), the hamaguri (Meretrix lusoria), the baka (Mactra sulcataria), the aka-gai (Scapharca inflata), the kaki (oyster), the awabi (Haliotis japonica), the sazae (Turbo cornutus), the hora-gai (Trilonium tritonius), &c. Among the cephalopods several are of great value as articles of food, e.g.

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  • Such a transfer has been described in various Aroids, Rohdea japonica (Liliaceae), and other plants.

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  • The number of fruit-bearing trees, shrubs and plants that have been introduced and are successfully cultivated or grow wild is much greater; among them are the mango, orange, banana, pineapple, coconut, palm, grape, fig, strawberry, litchi (Nephelium litchi) - the favourite fruit of the Chinese - avocado or alligator pear (Persea gratissi ma), Sapodilla pear (Achras sapota), loquat or mespilus plum (Eriobotrya japonica), Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana), tamarind (Tamarindus indica), papaw (Carica papaya), resembling in appearance the cantaloupe, granadilla (Passiflora quadrangularis) and guava (Psidium guajava).

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  • japonica (Japan) are greenhouse evergreens with respectively red or white and pinkish-purple flowers.

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  • Thus the seeds of Primula japonica, though sown under precisely similar conditions, yet come up at very irregular intervals of time.

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  • There are various herbaceous plants which may be similarly treated, such as sea-kale and horseradish, and, among ornamental plants, the beautiful autumn-blooming Anemone japonica, Bocconia cordata, Dictamnus Fraxinella - the burning bush; the sea hollies (Eryngium), the globe thistle (Echinops ritro), the Oriental poppy (Papaver orientale), the sea lavender (Statice latifolia), Senecio pulcher, &c. The sea-kale and horseradish require to be treated in the open garden, where the cut portions should be planted in lines in wellworked soil; but the roots of the others should be planted in pots and kept in a close frame with a little warmth till the young shoots have started.

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  • japonica, flowers white and purple, are very easily grown and are particularly fine in autumn.

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  • japonica, I to 12 ft., better known as Hoteia japonica or Spiraea japonica, thrives in peaty or sandy soil; its glossy tripinnate leaves, and feathery panicles of white flowers early in summer, are very attractive.

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  • Besides this, P. Sieboldii (cortusoides amoena), I ft., originally deep rose with white eye, but now including many varieties of colour, such as white, pink, lilac and purple; P. japonica, to 2 ft., crimson-rose; P. denticulate, ft., bright bluish-lilac, with its allies P. erosa and P. purpurea, all best grown in a cold frame; P. viscosa, 6 in., purple, and its white variety nivalis, with P. pedemontana and P. spectabilis, 6 in., both purple; and the charming little Indian P. rosea, 3 to 6 in., bright cherry-rose colour, are but a few of the many beautiful kinds in cultivation.

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  • A form of flint corn, with variegated leaves, is grown for ornament under the name Zea japonica or Japanese striped corn.

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  • Among the indigenous trees are the Abies excelsa, Abies microsperma, Pinus sinensis, Pinus pinea, three species of oak, five of maple, lime, birch, juniper, mountain ash, walnut, Spanish chestnut, hazel, willow, hornbeam, hawthorn, plum, pear, peach, Rhus vernicifera, (?) Rhus semipinnata, Acanthopanax ricinifolia, Zelkawa, Thuja orientalis, Elaeagnus, Sophora Japonica, &c. Azaleas and rhododendrons are widely distributed, as well as other flowering shrubs and creepers, Ampelopsis Veitchii being universal.

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  • japonica, a tall and handsome plant generally grown in gardens under the name A.

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  • CRYPTOMERIA, Or Japanese Cedar, a genus of conifers, containing a single species, C. japonica, native of China and Japan, which was introduced into Great Britain by the Royal Horticultural Society in 1844.

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  • In the far East conifers are richly represented; among them occur Pinus densiflora,Cryptomeria japonica, Cephalotaxus, species of Abies, Larix, Thujopsis, Sciadopitys venticillata, Pseudolarix Kaempferi, &c. In the Himalaya occur Cedrus deodara, Taxus, species of Cupressus, Finns excelsa, Abies Webbiana, &c. The continent of Africa is singularly poor in conifers.

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  • KUMQUAT (Citrus japonica), a much-branched shrub from 8 to 12 ft.

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  • A lengthening of the axis of the female strobilus of Coniferae is not of infrequent occurrence in Cryptomeria japonica, larch (Larix europaea), &c., and this is usually associated with a leaf-like condition of the bracts, and sometimes even with the development of leaf-bearing shoots in place of the scales.

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  • But in spiral flowers we have a different arrangement; thus the leaves of the calyx of Camellia japonica cover each other partially like tiles on a house.

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  • Among other cultivated kinds are japonica, viridis, cordifolia, barbata, occidentalis, oregona, and serrulata, all of easy culture.

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  • Among the species is Japonica, a dwarf form, but hardier.

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  • Caesalpinia Japonica - A graceful and distinct summer-leafing shrub, one of a genus usually tropical, but this is hardy in the country around London.

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  • Coriaria Japonica - A handsome shrub with red-brown woody stems 8 or 10 feet high.

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  • Thunbergi and japonica are forms of this species.

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  • Eulalia Japonica - A hardy and ornamental perennial grass of robust growth, 6 to 7 feet high.

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  • There are eight kinds in cultivation, the best known of which are A. japonica and A. rivularis.

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  • Their habit is that of an enlarged A. japonica, both in foliage and flower, the chief colors being pink, rose, salmon, and carmine.

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  • In H. japonica the flowers are larger, but only two or three on a stalk, their color a deep rose with blue anthers.

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  • Other species are C. caroliniana, cordata, japonica, orientalis, and Turczaninovii.

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  • C. japonica, C. cordata, and C. laxiflora, the last belonging to the true Hornbeams typfied in our native species C. betulus; the other two to the group which some botanists have made a separate genus.

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  • Hoteia - H. japonica is a fine tufted herbaceous plant 1 foot to 16 inches high, with silvery-white flowers early in summer in a panicled cluster.

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  • E. japonica: Loquat (Eriobotrya) - A large-leaved shrub from Japan; in England tender, and only suitable for walls in warm and sheltered places.

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  • Jews Mallow (Kerria) - The double variety of this Japanese shrub, K. japonica, is an old favourite in cottage gardens.

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  • Kadsura Japonica - A climbing evergreen of Japan, belonging to the Magnolia family, bearing scarlet berries in clusters.

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  • Among a crowd of synonyms, the following are the names:-C. australis, caucasica, glabrata, japonica, mississipiensis, occidentalis, and Tournefortii.

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  • Pagoda Tree (Sophora Japonica) - One of the finest of flowering trees, elegant in foliage, and in September covered with clusters of white bloom.

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  • Orixa Japonica - A very interesting summer-leafing shrub of graceful habit.

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  • P. chilina is a handsome tree which has reached a fair size in a few sheltered gardens, and P. japonica and P. macrophylla from Japan, and P.

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  • Skimmia - The ones best worth cultivating are S. japonica and S.

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  • Fortunei. There has been much confusion between these plants, that universally known in gardens as S. japonica not being Japanese at all, but a native of China, its proper name being Skimmia Fortunei.

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  • Fortunei, the true Japanese plant is dioecious, and both sexes have received specific names, S. fragrans being simply the male of the true S. japonica.

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  • S. japonica is one of the very best town evergreens we possess.

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  • Fortunei (the S. japonica of gardens), S. rubella is a seedling form.

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  • It is an excellent alpine perennial, forming a hardy woody root-stock, is 9 inches high, and produces an abundance of rich, velvety, dark blue flowers, finer in color than those of S. japonica, though this is a handsome plant.

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  • An allied plant, P. japonica gigantea, has recently come to us from the Far East, where the great rounded leaves, as large as a small sunshade and used as such by Japanese children, rise on stout fleshy stems as high as a man.

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  • America; W. japonica and W. orientalis, from Japan; and W. radicans from Madeira.

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  • The flowers became known in Europe after a specimen was recorded near Nagasaki in 1695, and by the time the first plants were introduced in 1844, they were already known as Anemone japonica.

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  • Flowering quince was called Japonica by old-timers to distinguish it from fruit-bearing quince plants.

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  • Japanese honeysuckle, or Lonicera japonica, is an invasive species that should not be purposefully cultivated in any planting zone.

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  • Chinese herbal remedies used for acne include cnidium seed (Cnidium monnieri) and honeysuckle flower (Lonicera japonica).

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  • japonica (Japan) are greenhouse evergreens with respectively red or white and pinkish-purple flowers.

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  • japonica, I to 12 ft., better known as Hoteia japonica or Spiraea japonica, thrives in peaty or sandy soil; its glossy tripinnate leaves, and feathery panicles of white flowers early in summer, are very attractive.

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