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james

james

james Sentence Examples

  • Before you start following the poor woman like in a James Bond movie, maybe we should give the entire Dawkins clan a rest.

  • David was knee deep in a can't-put-down-able James Lee Burke mystery, while Cynthia plodded through her zillion-page saga, a real flower-presser in Dean's mind.

  • Music began to play, and with the first chord, Jackson recognized the accompaniment to Etta James' "At Last".

  • Norton in 1877, and his Letters were edited and privately printed at Cambridge, Mass., in 1878 by James Bradley Thayer.

  • JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD (1831-1881), twentieth president of the United States, was born on the 19th of November 1831 in a log cabin in the little frontier town of Orange, Cuyahoga county, Ohio.

  • When, in 1877, James G.

  • Opposed to them were two other factions, one supporting James G.

  • For his secretary of state he chose James G.

  • In August he skirmished with Sir James Yeo's small squadron of six vessels, but made little effective use of his own fourteen.

  • Sir James Yeo began by blockading Sackett's Harbor in the early part of 1814, but when the American squadron was ready he was compelled to retire by the disparity of the forces.

  • As Mr Henry James puts it, she interviews herself.

  • Assured by Sir James Hudson of the sympathy of England, he began active preparations for the expedition to Marsala.

  • The marriage of this youth to James IV.'s widow on the 6th of August 1514 did much to identify the Douglases with the English party in Scotland, as against the French party led by Albany, and incidentally to determine the political career of his uncle Gavin.

  • In the interval, Douglas's rights in Aberbrothock had been transferred to James Beaton, archbishop of Glasgow, and he was now without title or temporality.

  • The poem is dedicated to James IV., not without some lesson in commendation of virtue and honour.

  • It dates from 1817 and bears the name of its founder, James Duff, 4th earl of Fife.

  • Hastings always maintained that he did not cause the charge to be instituted, and the legality of Nuncomar's trial is thoroughly proved by Sir James Stephen.

  • The difficulty of the succession also occupied him, and he co-operated thus early in the design of legitimizing Monmouth as a rival to James.

  • On the 2nd of November he opened the great attack by proposing an address declaring the necessity for the king's dismissing James from his council.

  • He urged on the bill by which Catholics were prohibited from sitting in either House of Parliament, and was bitter in his expressions of disappointment when the Commons passed a proviso excepting James, against whom the bill was especially aimed, from its operation.

  • In April, upon the king's declaration that he was resolved to send for James from Scotland, Shaftesbury advised the popular leaders at once to leave the council, and they followed his advice.

  • See James Mackintosh, Dissertation on the Progress of Ethical Philosophy (Edinburgh, 1832); and specially Sir Leslie Stephen, English Thought in the 18th Century, iii.

  • Peter died in 1285, leaving Aragon to his eldest son Alphonso, and Sicily to his second son James.

  • When Alphonso died in 1291 James became king of Aragon, and left his brother Frederick as regent of Sicily.

  • Before she was six years old negotiations were opened, which dragged on for several years, for marrying the princess to James IV.

  • The whole of Margaret's life after her marriage with James IV.

  • was killed on the 9th of September 1513, having by his will appointed Margaret sole guardian of her infant son, now King James V.

  • Albany had to blockade Margaret in Stirling Castle before she would surrender her sons, After being obliged to capitulate, Margaret returned to Edinburgh, and being no longer responsible for the custody of the king she fled to England in September, where a month later she bore to Angus a daughter, Margaret, who afterwards became countess of Lennox, mother of Lord Darnley and grandmother of James I.

  • Margaret and her new husband, who was created Lord Methven, now became for a time the ruling influence in the counsels of James V.

  • But when her desire to arrange a meeting between James and Henry VIII.

  • In 1537 she was anxious to obtain a divorce from Methven, and her desire was on the point of being realized when it was defeated by the intervention of James.

  • The building was enlarged by Edward IV., by Henry VIII., who made it one of his chief residences, by James I.

  • The church of St James dates from 1763, and the other numerous places of worship and public buildings are all modern.

  • In the Book of Sports (1618), James I.

  • Dingley, Touchers and Rubs (Glasgow, 1893); Sam Aylwin, The Gentle Art of Bowling, with 26 diagrams (London, 1904); James A.

  • Ritschl's and die evangelische Kirche der Gegenwart (1897); James Orr, The Ritschlian Theology and the Evangelical Faith (London, 1898); and A.

  • All remaining impurities, including the excess of oxygen, can then be taken out of the gas by Sir James Dewar's ingenious method of absorption with charcoal cooled in liquid air.

  • Bridget's saintly and charitable life soon made her known far and wide; she gained, too, great religious influence over her husband, with whom (1341-1343) she went on pilgrimage to St James of Compostella.

  • stands an obelisk commemorating the battle fought here on the 25th of April 1707, in which the French under the duke of Berwick, a natural son of James II.

  • The mother of the last king, James III.

  • Philip and James.

  • The first Napier of Merchiston, "Alexander Napare," acquired the Merchiston estate before the year 1438, from James I.

  • His eldest son Alexander, who succeeded him in 1 454, was provost of Edinburgh in 1 455, 1 457 and 1469; he was knighted and held various important court offices under successive monarchs; at the time of his death in 1473 he was master of the household to James III.

  • His eldest son, Archibald Napier of Edinbellie, the fourth of Merchiston, belonged to the household of James IV.

  • About 1565 he was knighted at the same time as James Stirling, his colleague, whose daughter John Napier subsequently married.

  • He did not, however, as has been supposed, spend the best years of his manhood abroad, for he was certainly at home in 1571, when the preliminaries of his marriage were arranged at Merchiston; and in 1572 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Stirling of Keir.

  • A few years afterwards he married again, his second wife being Agnes, daughter of Sir James 1 The descent of the first Napier of Merchiston has been traced to "Johan le Naper del Counte de Dunbretan," who was one of those who swore fealty to Edward I.

  • This committee consisted of six members, two barons, two ministers and two burgesses - the two barons selected being John Napier of Merchiston and James Maxwell of Calderwood.

  • It is a Treatise on Trigonometry, by a Scotsman, James Hume of Godscroft, Berwickshire, a place still in possession of the family of Hume.

  • Presbyterianism in Ireland, in modern times at least, dates from the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • They were opposed to James II., though they had benefited by his Declaration of Indulgence, and they were the first to congratulate the Prince of Orange on his arrival in England.

  • A weekly market on Wednesdays was granted to John, earl of Richmond, in 1308 together with an eight days' fair beginning on the vigil of St Margaret's day, and in 1445 John de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, one of his successors as lord of the manor, received a further grant of the same market and also two yearly fairs, one on the feast of St Philip and St James and the other at Michaelmas.

  • In 1850 James Richardson, accompanied by Heinrich Barth and Adolf Overweg, reached the lake, also via Tripoli, and Overweg was the first European to navigate its waters (1851).

  • He was a younger son of David Murray, 5th Viscount Stormont (c. 1665-1731), the dignity having been granted in 1621 by James I.

  • Lord Stormont's family was Jacobite in its politics, and his second son James (c. 1690-1728), being apparently mixed up in some of the plots of the time, joined the court of the exiled Stuarts and in 1721 was created earl of Dunbar by James Edward, the Old Pretender.

  • The four Gothic churches of St Nicholas,' St Mary, with a lofty steeple, St James and The Holy Ghost, and the fine medieval town hall, dating in its oldest part from 1306 and restored in 1882, are among the more striking buildings.

  • and an extreme elevation of 5000 ft.), Narborough or Fernandina, Indefatigable or Santa Cruz, Chatham or San Cristobal, James or San Salvador, and Charles or Santa Maria.

  • James Fergusson was of opinion that the Temple stood near the south-western corner.

  • Frontier Province, called after its founder, Sir James Abbott, who settled this wild district after the annexation of the Punjab.

  • We learn from Oriental writers that one of the Buyid (Buwaihid) sultans in the 10th century of the Flight constructed the great cisterns, which may yet be seen, and have been visited, amongst others, by James Morier and E.

  • In his lecture on Human Immortality (3rd ed., 1906), Professor William James deals with " two supposed objections to the doctrine."

  • James Thomson (" B.V.") speaks " of the restful rapture of the inviolate grave," and sings the praises of death and of oblivion.

  • The great voyage of Captain James Cook, in 1769-1770, was primarily undertaken for the purposes of observing the transit.

  • Near the state house is the former residence of James G.

  • of the barrack field is the Royal Military Repository, within the enclosure of which is the Rotunda, originally erected in St James's Park for the reception of the allied sovereigns in 1814, and shortly afterwards transferred to its present site.

  • SIR JAMES STANSFELD (1820-1898), English politician, was born at Moorlands, Halifax, on the 5th of October 1820, the son of James Stansfeld, a county-court judge.

  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • After studying at the university of Prague he travelled through Europe, and among other countries he visited England, where he became acquainted with James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) and other leaders of the Tractarian party.

  • See James Hall, A History of Nantwich or Wich Milbank (1883).

  • In James v.

  • Fermanagh was formed into a county on the shiring of Ulster in 1585 by Sir John Perrot, and was included in the well-known scheme of colonization of James I., the Plantation of Ulster.

  • In 1689 battles were fought between William III.'s army and the Irish under Macarthy (for James II.), Lisnaskea (26th July) and Newtownbutler (30th July).

  • On the 22nd of August 1620 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Bourchier, a city merchant of Tower Hill, and of Felstead in Essex; and his father having died in 1617 he settled at Huntingdon and occupied himself in the management of his small estate.

  • and James II.

  • Faringdon House, close to the church, was built by Henry James Pye (1745-1813), poet laureate from 1790 to 1813, who also caused to be planted the conspicuous group of fir-trees on the hill east of the town called Faringdon Clump, or locally (like other similar groups) the Folly.

  • PETER III., king of Aragon (1236-1286), son of James the Conqueror, and his wife Yolande, daughter of Andrew II.

  • The population, estimated by James Bruce in 1770 at 10,000 families, had dwindled in 1905 to about 7000.

  • CLAUDIUS JAMES RICH (1787-1821), English traveller and scholar, was born near Dijon on the 28th of March 1787.

  • At Bombay, which he reached in September 1807, he was the guest of Sir James Mackintosh, whose eldest daughter he married in January 1808, proceeding soon after to Bagdad as resident.

  • James Grant >>

  • Journ., June 1900; James, ibid., Sept.

  • James Bowman Lindsay of Dundee, between 1845 and 1854, reinvented and even patented Morse's method, and practically put the plan into operation for experimental purposes across the river Tay.

  • of Castile in 1243, restored by the Moors, and finally conquered by James I.

  • St Michael's church in East Teignmouth was rebuilt in 1824 in Decorated style, but retains a Norman doorway and other ancient portions; of St James', in West Teignmouth, the south porch and tower are Norman.

  • This, if we do not count the proclamation of James I.

  • He terminated the war with Holland in 1674, and from that time maintained a friendly correspondence with William; while in 1677, after two years of tedious negotiations, he overcame all obstacles, and in spite of James's opposition, and without the knowledge of Louis XIV., effected the marriage between William and Mary that was the germ of the Revolution and the Act of Settlement.

  • Though a strong Tory and supporter of the hereditary principle, James's attacks on Protestantism soon drove him into opposition.

  • He appears to have thought that William would not claim the crown,' and at first supported the theory that the throne having been vacated by James's flight the succession fell as of right to Mary; but as this met with little support, and was rejected both by William and by Mary herself, he voted against the regency and joined with 7 Add.

  • What James Martineau calls A Study of Religion is really in the main a re-statement of old theistic arguments.'

  • William James stood almost alone in being.

  • On this ground James is a libertarian.

  • Similarly, James is willing to believe in many universes nebeneinander or durcheinander but not (ineinander.

  • 7 It does not seem as if James's " Pragmatism " could lend itself to anything so concrete as a theistic conclusion.

  • James (Edinburgh: Varieties of Relig.

  • James Ward's masterly criticism of Herbert Spencer (Naturalism and Agnosticism) has been mentioned above.

  • James, opens up new suggestions in philosophy; the bearing of these upon theistic (or other) beliefs is hard to define.

  • He became rector of St James's, Westminster, in 1733, and bishop of Bristol in 1735.

  • The modern doctrine of evolution or " evolving," as opposed to that of simple creation, has been defined by Prof. James Sully in the 9th edition of this encyclopaedia as a " natural history of the cosmos including organic beings, expressed in physical terms as a mechanical process."

  • There was in the time of Elizabeth, James I.

  • Then parliament enacted a new system of Church courts which, though to some extent in its turn superseded by the revival of episcopacy under James VI., was revived or ratified by the act of 1690, c. 7, and stands to this day.

  • James Prinsep was then devoting his rare genius to the decipherment of the early inscriptions of northern India, especially those of Asoka in the 3rd century B.C. He derived the greatest assistance from Tumour's work not only in historical information, but also as regards the forms of words and grammatical inflexions.

  • On the 12th of April 1769 the British expedition to observe the transit of Venus, under the naval command of James Cook, arrived at Tahiti.

  • The government continued to struggle against this spirit of defiance; proclamations of James I.

  • So late as 1687, James II.

  • The apothecaries, who were the pharmacists of those days, were not represented by any corporate body, but in the reign of King James I., in 1606, were incorporated with the Company of Grocers.

  • Thus he was in some cases, as in that of St James's, Piccadilly, content to make the exterior of an almost barnlike plainness.

  • Of species common to the two, Maximowicz finds that Manchuria possesses 40% and scarcely 9% that are endemic. Of a collection of about 500 species made in that country by Sir Henry James nearly a third are British.

  • James Lancaster made a voyage to the Indian Ocean from 1591 to 1594; and in 1599 the merchants and adventurers of London resolved to form a company, with the object of establishing a trade with the East Indies.

  • On the 31st of December 1 599 Queen Elizabeth granted the charter of incorporation to the East India Company, and Sir James Lancaster, one of the directors, was appointed general of their first fleet.

  • James Bruce of Kinnaird, the contemporary of Niebuhr, was equally devoted to Eastern travel; and his principal geographical Africa .

  • The three voyages of Captain James Cook form an era in the history of geographical discovery.

  • He voted for the exclusion of James, duke of York, from the throne, and made overtures to William, prince of Orange, and consequently in 168r he lost both his secretaryship and his seat on the privy council.

  • By this time he had made his peace with the duke of York, and when in February 1685 James became king, he retained his position of secretary, to which was soon added that of lord president of the council.

  • He was a member of the commission for ecclesiastical causes, and although afterwards he claimed that he had used all his influence to dissuade James from removing the tests, and in other ways illegally favouring the Roman Catholics, he signed the warrant for the committal of the seven bishops, and appeared as a witness against them.

  • It should be mentioned that while Sunderland was thus serving James II., he was receiving a pension from France, and through his wife's lover, Henry Sidney, afterwards earl of Romney, he was furnishing William of Orange with particulars about affairs in England.

  • In the last months of James's reign he was obviously uncomfortable.

  • Consistency of conduct was not among the objects which he aimed at, nor did he shrink from thwarting in secret a policy which he supported in public. A large share of the discredit attaching to the measures of James II.

  • Hayes, James A.

  • JAMES HEPBURN BOTHWELL, 4TH Earl Of, duke of Orkney and Shetland (c. 1536-1578), husband of Mary, queen of Scots, son of Patrick, 3rd earl of Bothwell, and of Agnes, daughter of Henry, Lord Sinclair, was born about 1536.

  • Having fought against King James III.

  • at the battle of Sauchieburn in 1488, he was rewarded by the new king, James IV., with the earldom of Bothwell, the office of lord high admiral and other dignities.

  • 1513), the favourite of James III.

  • James Hepburn succeeded in 1556 to his father's titles, lands and hereditary offices, including that of lord high admiral of Scotland.

  • 2 Sir James Melville's Mem.

  • He left no lawful descendants; but his nephew, Francis Stewart Hepburn, who, through his father, John Stewart, prior of Coldingham, was a grandson of King James V., and was thus related to Mary, queen of Scots, and the regent Murray, was in 1581 created earl of Bothwell.

  • He was lord high admiral of Scotland, and was a person of some importance at the court of James VI.

  • But almost at once he reverted to his former manner of life, and, although James failed to apprehend him, he was forced to take refuge in France about 1595.

  • Bannatyne Club, 1829); "Memoirs of James, Earl of Bothwell," in G.

  • Buchanan (1721); Sir James Melville's Memoirs (Bannatyne Club, 1827); A Lost Chapter in the Hist.

  • was ill and childless; his sister-in-law, the prospective queen, Anne, had just lost her only surviving child, William, duke of Gloucester; and abroad the supporters of the exiled king, James II., were numerous and active.

  • In these circumstances the Act of Settlement was passed, enacting that, in default of issue to either William or: Anne, the crown of England, France 4 and Ireland was to pass to "the most excellent princess Sophia, electress and duchess dowager of Hanover," a grand-daughter of James I., and "the heirs of her body being Protestants."

  • The Public Library building is Romanesque and elaborately ornamented; the building was presented to the city by James P. Baxter; in the library is the statue, by Benjamin Paul Akers (1825-1861), of the dead pearl-diver, well known from Hawthorne's description in The Marble Faun.

  • The cemetery also contains monuments to Alonzo P. Stinson, the first soldier from Portland killed in the Civil War, to the Portland soldiers in the War of Independence, and to Rear-Admiral James Alden (1810-1877), of the U.S. Navy, a native of Portland.

  • By the death of this little girl, John Howard became one of the coheirs of her illustrious house, which was now represented by the issue of Margaret Mowbray, his mother, and of her sister Isabel, who had married James, Lord Berkeley.

  • In the first year of James I., Thomas, the young son of Earl Philip, was restored in blood and given the titles of Arundel and Surrey.

  • Later charters from Elizabeth, James I., James II., George II.

  • James II.

  • James Scarlett Abinger >>

  • JAMES III.

  • (1451-1488), king of Scotland, eldest son of James II., was born on the 10th of July 1451.

  • After the death of his mother in 1463, and of her principal supporter, James Kennedy, bishop of St Andrews, two years later, the person of the young king, and with it the chief authority in the kingdom, were seized by Sir Alexander Boyd and his brother Lord Boyd, while the latter's son, Thomas, was created earl of Arran and married to the king's sister, Mary.

  • About 1479, probably with reason both suspicious and jealous, James arrested his brothers, Alexander, duke of Albany, and John, earl of Mar; Mar met his death in a mysterious fashion at Craigmillar, but Albany escaped to France and then visited England, where in 1482 Edward IV.

  • War broke out with England, but James, made a prisoner by his nobles, was unable to prevent Albany and his ally, Richard, duke of Gloucester (afterwards Richard III.), from taking Berwick and marching to Edinburgh.

  • Fleeing into the north of his kingdom James collected an army and came to terms with his foes; but the rebels, having seized the person of the king's eldest son, afterwards James IV., renewed the struggle.

  • The rival armies met at the Sauchieburn near Bannockburn, and James soon fled.

  • He left three sons - his successor, James IV.; James Stewart, duke of Ross, afterwards archbishop of St Andrews, and John Stewart, earl of Mar.

  • James was a cultured prince with a taste for music and architecture, but was a weak and incapable king.

  • James IV Of Scotland >>

  • A third son, James Gore King (1791-1853), was an assistant adjutant-general in the war of 1812, was a banker in Liverpool and afterwards in New York, and was president of the New York & Erie railroad until 1837, when by his visit to London he secured the loan to American bankers of £i,000,000 from the governors of the Bank of England.

  • The now censorious Squarcione found much to carp at in the earlier works of this series, illustrating the life of St James; he said the figures were like men of stone, and had better have been coloured stone-colour at once.

  • The acts of St James and St Christopher are the leading subjects of the series.

  • St James Exorcizing may have been commenced by Pizzolo, and completed by Mantegna.

  • The Calling of St James to the Apostleship appears to be Mantegna's design, partially carried out by Pizzolo; the subjects of St James baptizing, his appearing before the judge, and going to execution, and most of the legend of St Christopher, are entirely by Mantegna.

  • Orihuela was captured by the Moors in 713, and retaken by James I.

  • This condition being unfulfilled, the charter lapsed in the reign of James I., and an attempt to obtain its renewal in the 18th century failed.

  • William Foxon of Deptford in 1772, James Guerimand of Middlesex in 1776 (by his "marine perambulator"), and R.

  • These are the Epistles of James and Jude, 2 Peter, 2 and 3 John, the Apocalypse of John, and the Epistle to the Hebrews.

  • James (1897).

  • Rusden, History of New Zealand (1895); Alfred Saunders, History of New Zealand (1896); James Cowan, The Maoris of New Zealand (1909).

  • The most noteworthy, however, of the earlier travellers was James Bruce, the explorer of the Blue Nile.

  • Four years afterwards he made his first appearance as an author with an elegy called Fame's Memorial, or the Earl of Devonshire deceased, and dedicated to the widow of the earl (Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy, "coronized," to use Ford's expression, by King James in 1603 for his services in Ireland) - a lady who would have been no unfitting heroine for one of his own tragedies of lawless passion, the famous Penelope, formerly Lady Rich.

  • Ford's tract of Honor Triumphant, or the Peeres Challenge (printed 1606 and reprinted by the Shakespeare Society with the Line of Life, in 1843), and the simultaneously published verses The Monarches Meeting, or the King of Denmarkes Welcome into England, exhibit him as occasionally meeting the festive demands of court and nobility; and a kind of moral essay by him, entitled A Line of Life (printed 1620), which contains references to Raleigh, ends with a climax of fulsome praise to the address of King James I.

  • There is more than one meaning of William James discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • For further information see the following papers and the discussions on them: " Transition Curves for Railways," by James Glover, Proc. Inst.

  • He took a deep interest in the campaign which resulted in the election of James A.

  • A "campaign" biography was published by Lew Wallace (Philadelphia, 1888), and a sketch of his life may be found in Presidents of the United States (New York, 1894), edited by James Grant Wilson.

  • JAMES WEDDERBURN (1495?-1533), John (1500-1556) and Robert (1510?

  • - ?1556), Scottish poets and religious re - formers, were natives of Dundee, where their father James Wedderburn was a prosperous merchant.

  • James Wedderburn, who had gone to St Andrews in 1514, was for a time in France prepar - ing for a mercantile career.

  • The death of James V.

  • "Vedderburn's" Complainte of Scotlande (1549) has been variously assigned to Robert Wedderburn, to Sir David Lyndsay and to Sir James Inglis, who was chaplain of the Abbey of Cambuskenneth from about 1508 to 1550.

  • Murray inclines to assign it to Sir James Inglis, or an unknown priest of the name of Wedderburn.

  • person of Sir James Butler.

  • He was educated at King Edward's school, Birmingham, under James Prince Lee, afterwards bishop of Manchester, and had as contemporaries B.

  • James W.

  • Before the 13th century the burgesses held a weekly market on Sunday and a yearly fair on St James's day, but in 1218 Henry III.

  • After the birth of his first child, Augusta, in 1737, Frederick was ordered by the king to quit St James' Palace, and the foreign ambassadors were requested to refrain from visiting him.

  • JAMES HALYBURTON (1518-1589), Scottish reformer, was born in 1518, and was educated at St Andrews, where he graduated M.A.

  • See also, James Thacher's History of the Town of Plymouth (Boston, 1832); W.

  • James S.

  • Lord Anglesey married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Sir James Altham of Oxey, Hertfordshire, by whom, besides other children, he had James, who succeeded him, Altham, created Baron Altham, and Richard, afterwards 3rd Baron Altham.

  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.

  • In 1246 he married Beatrice, daughter and heiress of Raymond Berenger V., the last count of Provence, and after defeating James I.

  • Marcy, who had ordered American ministers to wear a plain civilian costume), and by joining with James Buchanan and Pierre Soule, ministers to Great Britain and Spain respectively, in drawing up (Oct.

  • He also dealt with the condemnation of Pope Honorius, carried on a controversial correspondence with John Stuart Mill, and took a leading part in the discussions of the Metaphysical Society, founded by Mr James Knowles, of which Tennyson, Huxley and Martineau were also prominent members.

  • JAMES CLERK MAXWELL (1831-1879), British physicist, was the last representative of a younger branch of the wellknown Scottish family of Clerk of Penicuik, and was born at Edinburgh on the 13th of November 1831.

  • This was directed against the oath of allegiance which James I.

  • James caused it to be burned by the common hangman, and forbade its perusal under the 'severest penalties, complaining bitterly at the same time to Philip III.

  • In Dublin, whither he proceeded with Mountjoy, he heard of the accession of King James, at whose court he presented himself in June accompanied by Rory O'Donnell, who had become chief of the O'Donnells after the departure of his brother Hugh Roe.

  • The English courtiers were greatly incensed at the gracious reception accorded to these notable rebels by King James; but although Tyrone was confirmed in his title and estates, he had no sooner returned to Ireland than he again engaged in dispute with the government concerning his rights over certain of his feudatories, of whom Donnal O'Cahan was the most important.

  • His son, Sir Neill O'Neill fought for James II.

  • The final rupture seems to have arisen on the question of the declaration of "the armed neutrality of the North;" but we know that Potemkin and the English ambassador, James Harris (afterwards 1st earl of Malmesbury), were both working against him some time before that.

  • This has been a point of coast defence since the time of James I.

  • In 1604 James I.

  • James I.

  • granted a Friday market, and two fairs, at the feast of St Philip and St James, and on St Luke's day.

  • 2 This specimen had been given to Canning (a tribute, perhaps, to the statesman who boasted that he had "called a New World into existence to redress the balance of the Old") by Mr Schenley, a diplomatist, and was then thought to be unique in Europe; but, apart from those which had reached Spain, where they lay neglected and undescribed, James Wilson says (Illustr.

  • James Hamilton, 3rd marquess of Hamilton, was the king's commissioner; and when the Assembly insisted on proceeding with the trial of the bishops, he formally dissolved the meeting under pain of treason.

  • This castle was erected in the reign of James VI.

  • under General Ginkel, over those of James II.

  • This defeat rendered the adherents of James in Ireland incapable of further efforts, and was speedily followed by the complete submission of the country.

  • In the 14th century it passed to the Courtenays, and in 1698 Sir William Courtenay was confirmed in the right of holding court leet, view of frankpledge and the nomination of a portreeve, these privileges having been surrendered to James II.

  • The "correctness" of his attitude on all public questions won for him the commendation of Catholic writers; he is not included in Nicol Burne's list of "periurit apostatis"; but his policy and influence were misliked by James VI., who, when the Assembly had elected Arbuthnot to the charge of the church of St Andrews, ordered him to return to his duties at King's College.

  • Some have discovered in the publication of this work a false clue to James's resentment against the principal of King's College.

  • JAMES CRICHTON (1560 - ?

  • 1851 James Whitfield (ad int.)..1851-1852Henry Stuart Foote Unionist1852-1854John Jones Pettus 7 (ad int.).

  • Stone Anselm Joseph McLaurin Andrew Houston Longino James Kimble Vardaman Edmund Favor Noel .

  • William Tryon James Hasell, president of the council Josiah Martin.

  • Benjamin Williams James Turner Nathaniel Alexander Benjamin Williams David Stone..

  • James Northcote >>

  • It is the object of an ancient and famous pilgrimage due to the tradition that Mary, sister of the Virgin, and Mary, mother of James and John, together with their black servant Sara, Lazarus, Martha, Mary Magdalen and St Maximin fled thither to escape persecution in Judaea.

  • JAMES HENRY MONK (1784-1856), English divine and classical scholar, was born at Buntingford, Herts.

  • Woodthorpe was followed into Burmese fields by many others; and amongst the earliest travellers to those mysterious mountains which hide the sources of the Irrawaddy, the Salween and the Mekong, was Prince Henri d'Orleans Burma was rapidly brought under survey; Siam was already in the 'mapmaking hands of James M'Carthy, whilst Curzon and Warrington Smyth added much to our knowledge of its picturesque coast districts.

  • Hamilton's edition of Reid also contains an account of the university of Glasgow and a selection of Reid's letters, chiefly addressed to his Aberdeen friends the Skenes, to Lord Kames, and to Dr James Gregory.

  • Having attained his majority in 1805, he married on the 28th of July Catherine Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of John James, 1st marquess of Abercorn.

  • John Douglas, and widow of James, Viscount Hamilton, and thus became doubly connected with the family of the marquess of Abercorn.

  • His eldest son, George John James, succeeded as 5th earl; his second son was General Sir Alexander Hamilton-Gordon, K.C.B.; his third son was the Reverend Douglas Hamilton-Gordon; and his youngest son Arthur Hamilton, after holding various high offices under the crown, was created Baron Stanmore in 1893.

  • Harrodsburg was founded on the 16th of June 1774 by James Harrod (1746-1793) and a few followers, and is the oldest permanent settlement in the state.

  • On the right bank of the river is the site of Lovat Castle, which once belonged to the Bissets, but was presented by James VI.

  • "JAMES FRANCK BRIGHT (1832-1920), English historian, was born in London May 29 183 2.

  • In 1508 he was sent to James IV.

  • 44, James the elder, the son of Zebedee and brother of John the evangelist, was seized by his order and put to death.

  • See also Beatson's Naval and Military Annals, James's Naval History, and Chevalier's Histoire de la Marine francaise, vols.

  • The church of St James, situated in the older part of the town, is a cruciform Early English building, retaining, in spite of injudicious restoration, many beautiful details.

  • A governing charter, under the title of mayor and burgesses, was given by James II.

  • See James Sully, Pessimism: A History and a Criticism (1877); Caro, Le Pessimisme au xix e siecle (1878); Saltus, The Anatomy of Negation (1886); Tulloch, Modern Theories on Philosophy and Religion (1884); William James, The Will to Believe; Duhring, Der Werth des Lebens (1865); Meyer, Weltelend and Weltschmerz (1872); E.

  • Even before this, however, he had shown a strong inclination for natural science, and this had been fostered by his intimacy with a "self-taught philosopher, astronomer and mathematician," as Sir Walter Scott called him, of great local fame - James Veitch of Inchbonny, who was particularly skilful in making telescopes.

  • The results of his investigations were communicated from time to time in papers to the Philosophical Transactions of London and other scientific journals, and were admirably and impartially summarized by James D.

  • James IV., James V., Mary and her son each visited it.

  • James VI.

  • It is further conjectured that she was a sister of Mary the mother of Jesus, in which case James and John would be cousins of Jesus.

  • JAMES TOD (1782-1835), British officer and Oriental scholar, was born on the 20th of March 1782, and went to India as a cadet in the Bengal army in 1799.

  • RICHMOND, the capital of Virginia, U.S.A., the countyseat of Henrico county, and a port of entry, on the James river (at the head of navigation), about ioo m.

  • above sea-level) along the north and east banks of the James, at a bend where the river changes its south-easterly course for one almost due south.

  • In its rotunda is Jean Antoine Houdon's full-length marble statue of Washington, provided for by the Virginia General Assembly in 1784, and erected in 1796; its base bears a fine inscription written by James Madison.

  • Maury (1806-1873); James A.

  • An exploring party from Jamestown, under command of Captain Christopher Newport (c. 1565-1617), and including Captain John Smith, sailed up the James river in 1607, and on the 3rd of June erected a cross on one of the small islands opposite the site of the present city.

  • In 1645 Fort Charles was erected at the falls of the James as a frontier defence.

  • 1651), born in England, who became an Indian trader on the James river as early as 1637, and had his home near what is now the village of Westover, Charles City county.

  • 1670), who settled at the falls of the James in 1661, and was auditor-general in 1664-1670.

  • He was succeeded by his nephew, William Byrd (1652-1704), who was born in London, went to Virginia about 1670, became a successful Indian trader, was a member of the House of Burgesses in 16 771682, was a supporter of Nathaniel Bacon at the beginning of James river, at the falls, visited: the tract in September 1733, and decided to found there the town of Richmond, at the same time selecting and naming the present site of Petersburg.

  • beyond the heavy batteries, and practically unbroken from the north bank of the James (west of the city) to about 1 m.

  • The approach of the " Monitor " and the Union gunboats up the James river caused a partial and temporary panic; President Davis appointed a day for prayer, and the families of some of the cabinet secretaries and many citizens fled the city precipitately; but confidence, restored by " Bacon's Rebellion," was auditor-general of the colony from 1687 until his death, and was a member of the committee which founded the College of William and Mary.

  • In June Grant's army crossed the James and attacked Lee in Petersburg.

  • Henry, " Richmond on the James " in Historic Towns of the Southern States (New York, 1900), edited by Lyman P. Powell; and Samuel Mordecai, Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond, 1856; 2nd ed., 1860).

  • James V.

  • " The minority of James V., 'the reign of Mary Stuart, the infancy of her son, and the civil wars of her grandson Charles I., were all periods of lasting waste.

  • The first Awe work, written by James Donaldson, was printed in culture in 1697, under the title of Husbandry Anatomized; or, Scotland an Inquiry into the Present Manner of Tilling and in the 18th Manuring the Ground in Scotland.

  • Before the close of the 18th century, and during the first quarter of the 19th, a good deal had been done in the way of draining the land, either by open ditches or by James Elkington's system of deep covered drains.

  • In 1834 James Smith of Deanston promulgated his system of thorough draining and deep ploughing, the adoption of which immeasurably improved the clay lands of the country.

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