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jahan

jahan Sentence Examples

  • The sultan Jahan Begum, succeeded on the death of her mother, Shah Jahan Begum, in June 1901, being the only female ruler in India.

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  • Har Rai was charged with friendship for Dara Shikoh, the son of Shah Jahan, and also with preaching a religion di s tinct from Islam.

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  • Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb extracted a larger land revenue than the British do.

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  • Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb extracted a larger land revenue than the British do.

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  • SHAH JAHAN (fl.

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  • Shah Jahan erected many splendid monuments, the most famous of which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, built as a tomb for his wife Mumtaz Mahal; while the Pearl Mosque at Agra and the palace and great mosque at Delhi also commemorate him.

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  • After a time Jahangir died and was succeeded by Shah Jahan, with whom the guru was constantly at war.

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  • It was sacked by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1017-18; about 150o Sultan Sikandar Lodi utterly destroyed all the Hindu shrines, temples and images; and in 1636 Shah Jahan appointed a governor expressly tQ " stamp out idolatry."

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  • AURANGZEB (1618-1707), one of the greatest of the Mogul emperors of Hindustan, was the third son of Shah Jahan, and was born in November 1618.

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  • His father's express orders prevented Aurangzeb from following up this success, and, not long after, the sudden and alarming illness of Shah Jahan turned his thoughts in another direction.

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  • Of Shah Jahan's four sons, the eldest, Dara, a brave and honourable prince, but disliked by the Mussulmans on account of his liberality of thought, had a natural right to the throne.

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  • Meanwhile Shah Jahan had recovered, and though Dara resigned the crown he had seized, the other brothers professed not to believe in their father's recovery, and still pressed on.

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  • He was a dissolute ruler, much addicted to drunkenness, and his reign is chiefly notable for the influence enjoyed by his wife Nur Jahan, "the Light of the World."

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  • At first she influenced Jahangir for good, but surrounding herself with her relatives she aroused the jealousy of the imperial princes; and Jahangir died in 1627 in the midst of a rebellion headed by his son, Khurram or Shah Jahan, and his greatest general, Mahabat Khan.

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  • 1626), but in the first year of Shah Jahan's reign it was again brought under the sway of the Mogul empire.

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  • The circumstance of their alleged discovery and presentation to Shah Jahan in 1637 was of itself open to suspicion.

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  • Another palace of even greater extent was added to this in 1516; both Jehangir and Shah Jahan added palaces to these two - the whole making a group of edifices unequalled for picturesqueness and interest by anything of their class in Central India.

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  • Tavernier states that it was the famous stone given to Shah Jahan by the emir Jumla.

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  • He suggests that the other and larger diamond of antiquity which was given to Shah Jahan may be one which is now in the treasury of Teheran, and that this is the true Great Mogul which was confused by Tavernier with the one he saw.

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  • The victories of the Delhi emperors, Akbar, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb, crushed the rest.

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  • It formed the chief seat of the government of the Deccan provinces of the Mogul empire till Shah Jahan removed the capital to Aurangabad in 1635.

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  • The Mogul emperors of India occasionally interfered in these provinces, notably Shah Jahan in 1646; but, finding the difficulty of maintaining so distant a frontier, they abandoned it to the Uzbeg princes.

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  • It is chiefly remarkable for the influence exercised over the emperor by his favourite wife, surnamed Nur Jahan.

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  • Jahangir was succeeded by his son Shah Jahan, who had rebelled against his father, as Jahangir had rebelled against Akbar.

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  • Shah Jahan's reign is generally regarded as the period when the Mogul empire attained its greatest magnificence, though not its greatest extent of territory.

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  • Shah Jahan had four sons, whose fratricidal wars for the succession during their father's lifetime it would be tedious to dwell upon.

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  • Suffice it to say that Aurangzeb, by mingled treachery and violence, supplanted or overthrew his brothers and proclaimed himself emperor in 1658, while Shah Jahan was yet alive.

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  • During the reign of his father Shah Jahan he had been viceroy of the Deccan or rather of the northern portion only, which had been annexed to the Mogul empire since the reign of Akbar.

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  • During the early years of his reign Aurangzeb had fixed his capital at Delhi, while he kept his dethroned father, Shah Jahan, in close confinement at Agra.

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  • In 1664 Shaista Khan, the brother of the empress Nur Jahan, became viceroy of Bengal, and though a strong and just ruler from the native point of view, was not favourable The to the foreign traders.

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  • In 1638, during the reign of the emperor Shah Jahan, the Assamese descended the Brahmaputra, and pillaged the country round the city of Dacca; they were expelled by the governor of Bengal, who retaliated upon the plunderers by ravaging Assam.

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  • During the civil wars between the sons of Shah Jahan, the king of Assam renewed his predatory incursions into Bengal; upon the termination of the contest, Aurangzeb determined to avenge these repeated insults, and despatched a considerable force for the regular invasion of the Assamese territory (1660-1662).

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  • As regards his Persian possessions, he had some trouble in the north-west, where the Turkomans of Asia Minor, known as the Kara Kuyun,i or Black Sheep, led by Kara Yusuf2 and his sons Iskandar and Jahan Shah, had advanced upon Tabriz, the capital of Azerbaijan.

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  • After him Abu Said, grandson of Miran Shah, and once governor of Fars, became a candidate for empire, and allied himself with the Uzbeg Tatars, seized Bokhara, entered Khorasan, and waged war upon the Turkoman tribe aforesaid, which, since the invasion of Azerbaijan, had, under Jahan Shah, overrun Irak, Fars and Kermgn, and pillaged Herat.

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  • The nearest approach to a sovereignty in those parts on the death of Abu Said is that of Uzun Ijasan, the leader of the Ak Kuyun, or White Sheep Turkomans, and conqueror of the Black Sheep, whose chief, Jahan Shah, he defeated and slew.

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  • There is good reason to suppose that Jahan Shah, the Black Sheep Turkoman, before his defeat by Uzun IJasan, had set up the standard of royalty; and Zeno, at the outset of his travels, calls him king of Persia 1 in 1450.

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  • 1061 A.il.), another panegyrist of Shah jahan; Atashis Adilnama, in honor of Shah Mahommed Adil of Bijapur, who ascended the throne in 1629 (1039 A.H.) or 1627; the Tawarikhi-ICuli ~utbs/zak, a metrical history of the I~utb shbs of Golconda; and many more, down to the Fat,~mnama-i-Tipil Su4an by Ghulam 1{asan (1784; 1198 A.H.).

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  • 1632) by the emperor Shah Jahan for the remains of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, in which he himself also lies buried.

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  • The pietra Jura work belongs to the Persian school; and the common belief that it was designed by Austin de Bordeaux, a French architect in the service of Shah Jahan, is probably incorrect.

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  • m., modern Delhi dates only from the middle of the 17th century, when Shah Jahan rebuilt the city on its present site, adding the title.

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  • The great wall of Delhi, which was constructed by Shah Jahan, was strengthened by the English by the addition of a ditch and glacis, after Delhi was captured by Lord Lake in 1803; and its strength was turned against the British at the time of the Mutiny.

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  • It was erected in 1648-1650, two years after the royal palace, by Shah Jahan.

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  • Between 1638 and 1658, however, Shah Jahan rebuilt it almost in its present form; and his city remains substantially the Delhi of the present time.

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  • The imperial palace, the Jama Masjid or Great Mosque, and the restoration of what is now the western Jumna canal, are the work of Shah Jahan.

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  • 1656), the rise of the Mahratta power under Sivaji began to make inroads upon it, and it was exposed to the yet more formidable ambition of Shah Jahan.

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  • The kingdom had been for some time rapidly falling to ruin, and in 1686 the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb, who as Shah Jahan's general had unsuccessfully besieged the city under Mahommed Adil Shah, took Bijapur and annexed the kingdom to the Delhi empire.

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  • This Ahmad established a new monarchy, which lasted till its overthrow by Shah Jahan in 1636.

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  • This amazing 17th century marble Mausoleum was built by the Emperor Shah Jahan in memory of his second wife, who died during childbirth.

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  • The sultan Jahan Begum, succeeded on the death of her mother, Shah Jahan Begum, in June 1901, being the only female ruler in India.

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  • Two other distinguished chiefs of the house were Karan Singh (1631-1669), who in the struggle of the sons of Shah Jahan for the throne threw in his lot with Aurangzeb, and his eldest son, Anup Singh (1669-1698), who fought with distinction in the Deccan, was conspicuous in the capture of Golconda, and earned the title of maharaja.

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  • SHAH JAHAN (fl.

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  • Shah Jahan erected many splendid monuments, the most famous of which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, built as a tomb for his wife Mumtaz Mahal; while the Pearl Mosque at Agra and the palace and great mosque at Delhi also commemorate him.

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  • After a time Jahangir died and was succeeded by Shah Jahan, with whom the guru was constantly at war.

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  • Har Rai was charged with friendship for Dara Shikoh, the son of Shah Jahan, and also with preaching a religion di s tinct from Islam.

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  • It was sacked by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1017-18; about 150o Sultan Sikandar Lodi utterly destroyed all the Hindu shrines, temples and images; and in 1636 Shah Jahan appointed a governor expressly tQ " stamp out idolatry."

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    0
  • AURANGZEB (1618-1707), one of the greatest of the Mogul emperors of Hindustan, was the third son of Shah Jahan, and was born in November 1618.

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  • His father's express orders prevented Aurangzeb from following up this success, and, not long after, the sudden and alarming illness of Shah Jahan turned his thoughts in another direction.

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    0
  • Of Shah Jahan's four sons, the eldest, Dara, a brave and honourable prince, but disliked by the Mussulmans on account of his liberality of thought, had a natural right to the throne.

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  • Meanwhile Shah Jahan had recovered, and though Dara resigned the crown he had seized, the other brothers professed not to believe in their father's recovery, and still pressed on.

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  • He was a dissolute ruler, much addicted to drunkenness, and his reign is chiefly notable for the influence enjoyed by his wife Nur Jahan, "the Light of the World."

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  • At first she influenced Jahangir for good, but surrounding herself with her relatives she aroused the jealousy of the imperial princes; and Jahangir died in 1627 in the midst of a rebellion headed by his son, Khurram or Shah Jahan, and his greatest general, Mahabat Khan.

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  • 1626), but in the first year of Shah Jahan's reign it was again brought under the sway of the Mogul empire.

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  • The circumstance of their alleged discovery and presentation to Shah Jahan in 1637 was of itself open to suspicion.

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  • One contained in the Shah Jahan Nama - a gorgeous specimen of illuminated Persian manuscript and exquisite calligraphy - represents a most ordinary, middle-aged Oriental, with narrow black whisker fringing the cheek and meeting the tip of the chin in a scanty, pointed beard; a thin moustache sweeps in a semicircle from above the upper lip; the eyebrow over the almond-shaped eye is marked but not bushy.

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  • Another palace of even greater extent was added to this in 1516; both Jehangir and Shah Jahan added palaces to these two - the whole making a group of edifices unequalled for picturesqueness and interest by anything of their class in Central India.

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  • Tavernier states that it was the famous stone given to Shah Jahan by the emir Jumla.

    0
    0
  • He suggests that the other and larger diamond of antiquity which was given to Shah Jahan may be one which is now in the treasury of Teheran, and that this is the true Great Mogul which was confused by Tavernier with the one he saw.

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    0
  • The victories of the Delhi emperors, Akbar, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb, crushed the rest.

    0
    0
  • It formed the chief seat of the government of the Deccan provinces of the Mogul empire till Shah Jahan removed the capital to Aurangabad in 1635.

    0
    0
  • The Mogul emperors of India occasionally interfered in these provinces, notably Shah Jahan in 1646; but, finding the difficulty of maintaining so distant a frontier, they abandoned it to the Uzbeg princes.

    0
    0
  • It is chiefly remarkable for the influence exercised over the emperor by his favourite wife, surnamed Nur Jahan.

    0
    0
  • Jahangir was succeeded by his son Shah Jahan, who had rebelled against his father, as Jahangir had rebelled against Akbar.

    0
    0
  • Shah Jahan's reign is generally regarded as the period when the Mogul empire attained its greatest magnificence, though not its greatest extent of territory.

    0
    0
  • That most chaste and most ornamental of buildings was erected by Shah Jahan as the mausoleum of his favourite wife Mumtaz Mahal, and he himself lies by her side (see Agra).

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  • Shah Jahan had four sons, whose fratricidal wars for the succession during their father's lifetime it would be tedious to dwell upon.

    0
    0
  • Suffice it to say that Aurangzeb, by mingled treachery and violence, supplanted or overthrew his brothers and proclaimed himself emperor in 1658, while Shah Jahan was yet alive.

    0
    0
  • During the reign of his father Shah Jahan he had been viceroy of the Deccan or rather of the northern portion only, which had been annexed to the Mogul empire since the reign of Akbar.

    0
    0
  • During the early years of his reign Aurangzeb had fixed his capital at Delhi, while he kept his dethroned father, Shah Jahan, in close confinement at Agra.

    0
    0
  • In 1664 Shaista Khan, the brother of the empress Nur Jahan, became viceroy of Bengal, and though a strong and just ruler from the native point of view, was not favourable The to the foreign traders.

    0
    0
  • In 1638, during the reign of the emperor Shah Jahan, the Assamese descended the Brahmaputra, and pillaged the country round the city of Dacca; they were expelled by the governor of Bengal, who retaliated upon the plunderers by ravaging Assam.

    0
    0
  • During the civil wars between the sons of Shah Jahan, the king of Assam renewed his predatory incursions into Bengal; upon the termination of the contest, Aurangzeb determined to avenge these repeated insults, and despatched a considerable force for the regular invasion of the Assamese territory (1660-1662).

    0
    0
  • As regards his Persian possessions, he had some trouble in the north-west, where the Turkomans of Asia Minor, known as the Kara Kuyun,i or Black Sheep, led by Kara Yusuf2 and his sons Iskandar and Jahan Shah, had advanced upon Tabriz, the capital of Azerbaijan.

    0
    0
  • After him Abu Said, grandson of Miran Shah, and once governor of Fars, became a candidate for empire, and allied himself with the Uzbeg Tatars, seized Bokhara, entered Khorasan, and waged war upon the Turkoman tribe aforesaid, which, since the invasion of Azerbaijan, had, under Jahan Shah, overrun Irak, Fars and Kermgn, and pillaged Herat.

    0
    0
  • The nearest approach to a sovereignty in those parts on the death of Abu Said is that of Uzun Ijasan, the leader of the Ak Kuyun, or White Sheep Turkomans, and conqueror of the Black Sheep, whose chief, Jahan Shah, he defeated and slew.

    0
    0
  • There is good reason to suppose that Jahan Shah, the Black Sheep Turkoman, before his defeat by Uzun IJasan, had set up the standard of royalty; and Zeno, at the outset of his travels, calls him king of Persia 1 in 1450.

    0
    0
  • 1061 A.il.), another panegyrist of Shah jahan; Atashis Adilnama, in honor of Shah Mahommed Adil of Bijapur, who ascended the throne in 1629 (1039 A.H.) or 1627; the Tawarikhi-ICuli ~utbs/zak, a metrical history of the I~utb shbs of Golconda; and many more, down to the Fat,~mnama-i-Tipil Su4an by Ghulam 1{asan (1784; 1198 A.H.).

    0
    0
  • 1632) by the emperor Shah Jahan for the remains of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, in which he himself also lies buried.

    0
    0
  • The pietra Jura work belongs to the Persian school; and the common belief that it was designed by Austin de Bordeaux, a French architect in the service of Shah Jahan, is probably incorrect.

    0
    0
  • m., modern Delhi dates only from the middle of the 17th century, when Shah Jahan rebuilt the city on its present site, adding the title.

    0
    0
  • The great wall of Delhi, which was constructed by Shah Jahan, was strengthened by the English by the addition of a ditch and glacis, after Delhi was captured by Lord Lake in 1803; and its strength was turned against the British at the time of the Mutiny.

    0
    0
  • It was erected in 1648-1650, two years after the royal palace, by Shah Jahan.

    0
    0
  • Between 1638 and 1658, however, Shah Jahan rebuilt it almost in its present form; and his city remains substantially the Delhi of the present time.

    0
    0
  • The imperial palace, the Jama Masjid or Great Mosque, and the restoration of what is now the western Jumna canal, are the work of Shah Jahan.

    0
    0
  • 1656), the rise of the Mahratta power under Sivaji began to make inroads upon it, and it was exposed to the yet more formidable ambition of Shah Jahan.

    0
    0
  • The kingdom had been for some time rapidly falling to ruin, and in 1686 the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb, who as Shah Jahan's general had unsuccessfully besieged the city under Mahommed Adil Shah, took Bijapur and annexed the kingdom to the Delhi empire.

    0
    0
  • This Ahmad established a new monarchy, which lasted till its overthrow by Shah Jahan in 1636.

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    0
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