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iud

iud

iud Sentence Examples

  • intrauterine device should show you how to check the IUD by feeling for the threads.

  • An IUD prevents the fertilized egg from implanting in the lining of the uterus and may have other effects as well.

  • These methods include Depo Provera, Norplant, the IUD, and tubal sterilization.

  • Intra-uterine: The IUD is inserted into the uterus.

  • IUD: This device can increase the risk of serious pelvic infection.

  • The IUD can also injure the uterus by poking into or through the uterine wall.

  • However, a woman must be sure that she is not already pregnant before using a hormonal method or having an IUD placed.

  • IUD: The device is a foreign object that stays inside the uterus, and the uterus tries to get it out.

  • A woman may have heavier menstrual periods and more menstrual cramping with an IUD in place.

  • If you're not planning to become pregnant any time soon, consider asking your doctor about an IUD.

  • It's expensive to have an IUD placed, but they last for five or more years with very little additional cost.

  • IUC is another name for Intrauterine Device, or IUD.

  • An IUD is a small metal or plastic device that is inserted into the uterus.

  • Like any IUD, Mirena birth control is a very low-maintenance choice.

  • The IUD lasts for five years, after which it does need to be removed and a new one placed.

  • If you decide you want to become pregnant, the IUD can be removed by a doctor at any time before the five years are up.

  • An IUD fits inside your uterus and won't get in the way of having sex.

  • In other cases, using hormonal birth control like the pill or an IUD can increase chances for this type of pregnancy.

  • Your physician will help you determine whether a different form of hormonal birth control, such as the IUD or patch, is an option.

  • You may be thinking about getting an intrauterine device and wonder, is it possible to get pregnant with an IUD?

  • WebMD has statistical information on women who have conceived with an IUD.

  • Among women who decided to have the copper IUD, 6 out of 1000 women conceived and after 10 years of using this type, 20-30 out of 1000 women ended up pregnant.

  • Dislodging and expulsion of the IUD are two main causes for pregnancy.

  • Now that you know the answer to 'is it possible to become pregnant with an IUD', you might want to know what the risks are to your developing fetus if you do get pregnant.

  • Go to this website to read some women's stories about becoming pregnant with the IUD.

  • There are advantages to using the IUD that will make it less likely for you to become pregnant.

  • While on the IUD, your periods may be lighter and you may have less premenstrual symptoms.

  • If you have a hard time with heavy periods, the IUD can help you manage this annoyance.

  • Finally, an IUD gives you the freedom to do what you want when you want.

  • Comfort, convenience, and effectiveness are three of the main reasons why many women have chosen the IUD.

  • The only effective alternative to emergency contraception pills is the use of a Copper-T IUD.

  • The Copper-T IUD reduces the risk of pregnancy following unprotected intercourse by more than 99 percent when inserted by a trained physician within 5 days after sex.

  • Once inserted into the uterus, the Copper-T IUD can remain in place for as long as ten years to prevent future pregnancies.

  • Fears of infection and other complications may deter some women, though research proves the IUD does not increase risks of infections and does not cause infertility (as previously supposed).

  • Two of the next most effective methods of birth control are having an IUD inserted (which prevents eggs and sperm from coming together to create a fetus) and emergency contraception pills.

  • Before you visit your doctor, become familiar with several modes of birth control, such as the IUD, male and female condoms, the patch, and several different types of birth control pills.

  • Possible IUD complications are a matter of great concern for women deciding which birth control method is best.

  • The IUD birth control is a popular choice that has been around since the 1970s.

  • However, you should consider possible IUD complications before making a decision.

  • A doctor inserts an IUD during an outpatient procedure that takes just a few minutes to complete.

  • The IUD must be inserted properly to ensure that it does not come out and a physician should show you how to find the string attached to the device.

  • Though the occurrence is rare, it is a matter of concern because it can be difficult to tell that the IUD is no longer in place.

  • Women who have an IUD are at greater risk of developing an infection caused by a sexually transmitted disease.

  • The insertion procedure can cause damage to the uterus, but this IUD complication rarely occurs.

  • There is an extremely small chance of becoming pregnant while using an IUD.

  • Heavier and longer menstrual cycles may occur for the first few months after the IUD is inserted.

  • Women who think they are experiencing IUD complications should contact their physicians immediately.

  • If you have experienced IUD complications, you are encouraged to report the problem to the Food and Drug Administration by visiting the FDA website or by calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

  • IUD complications can make difficult to decide which type of birth control to use.

  • The makers of Mirena, a type of IUD, suggest women should not use Mirena if you have certain types of cancer, tend to get infections easily, or if you already have a pelvic infection.

  • If you are considering birth control, you may be interested in both the positive and negative Mirena IUD side effects.

  • Mirena is a type of intrauterine device or IUD.

  • Three months after insertion, it is recommended that your doctor check to make sure the IUD is placed well.

  • Each month your doctor may recommend that you manually feel the cervix to make sure the IUD has not moved.

  • After the doctor inserts the IUD, it slowly releases hormones to prevent pregnancy for 5 years.

  • The shape of the IUD prevents the sperm from fertilizing the eggs.

  • One of the best side effects of the Mirena IUD is that the hormones cause menstruation to become significantly lighter or even stop altogether.

  • Most women enjoy the freedom of not worrying about birth control while using an IUD.

  • One of the best Mirena IUD side effects si that it will probably slowly decrease the heaviness of your menstrual cycle.

  • IUD failure is unusual but it is important to know the risk factors for potential mishaps with this birth control device.

  • Unlike many other forms of birth control, an IUD is not necessarily subject to user error since the device is put into place by a physician.

  • An IUD is supposed to work without a woman needing to think about it and, in most instances, this is the case.

  • IUD failure may also occur when the birth control falls out of place.

  • It appears that women of advanced age are less likely to experience IUD failure, according to a study published by Oxford University Press in 2006.

  • The study found that women with a history of IUD expulsion and women younger than 35 years of age had the highest risk of IUD failure.

  • An IUD has strings that can be detected by touch and are easy to check before having intercourse.

  • With little incidence of IUD failure, this birth control remains a popular choice for many women.

  • IUD removal is necessary in some circumstances.

  • Removing an IUD is typically faster and less uncomfortable than insertion.

  • An IUD has "arms" that easily contract as the device is removed, which makes the process easier and less painful.

  • The IUD can become embedded in the uterine wall, which complicates the procedure.

  • Anesthesia may be required to remove an embedded IUD and, in rare cases, surgery may be necessary.

  • Preparing for an IUD removal is simple and the procedure can take place during any time of your cycle.

  • Once the birth control device is out, the doctor may replace it right away or you can opt to leave it out, depending on your specific reason for removing the IUD.

  • Reasons for removing an IUD vary but many women choose to have the device removed when they decide to start a family.

  • If you are undergoing an IUD removal procedure because you want to get pregnant, your doctor may recommend that you wait 60 to 90 days before trying to conceive.

  • Women using a copper Paragard IUD need to have it replaced every 10 years.

  • Those using the hormonal IUD, Mirena, need to replace it every five years.

  • Complications can lead some women to seek IUD removal.

  • IUD birth control is a special kind of contraceptive device.

  • While many forms of birth control require daily attention (taking a pill or using a condom during every sexual encounter), an IUD, once inserted, can work for years.

  • For women who don't want the daily hassle, an IUD is an effective form of birth control.

  • An IUD (intra-uterine device) is inserted inside the woman's uterus and left there until the woman wants to become pregnant, or until it needs to be replaced with a new one.

  • There are two types of IUD birth control and they work very differently: copper IUD and hormonal IUD.

  • Hormonal IUDs are, in some ways, similar to taking birth control pills because the medicine in the IUD changes the hormonal environment in the uterus, preventing 99.9 percent of pregnancies.

  • The small amounts of copper that enter the woman's body from the IUD effectively prevent sperm from fertilizing an egg.

  • Furthermore, women who cannot take hormonal birth control pills also cannot use a hormonal IUD, in which case a copper IUD may be a good alternative.

  • An IUD must be chosen in consultation with your doctor, and must be inserted by your doctor as well.

  • Your doctor is the best person to visit in order to discuss the possibility of IUD birth control; however, family planning clinics can offer similar services.

  • An IUD is generally recommended for women who have a single sexual partner who is also sexually faithful to just one person.

  • For example, the risk of cramping and heavier periods caused by the IUD is generally much higher in women who have never been pregnant and delivered a baby.

  • For many of these women, a copper IUD is an alternative.

  • The best way to decide if an IUD may be the right form of birth control for you is to visit your doctor and discuss all of the possibilities with him or her.

  • If you plan to become pregnant in the next coming years, an IUD may not be the best option because it will have to be removed long before it has stopped being effective.

  • A woman who becomes pregnant while using an intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control is at a higher risk of having an ectopic pregnancy.

  • Another type of device contains copper and is the most commonly-used type of IUD.

  • One form of copper IUD that is prescribed in the US is the TCu380A, which is also called ParaGard device.

  • About 6 of 1,000 women get pregnant during the first year with the copper IUD.

  • Most pregnancies associated with the use of an IUD occur because the IUD may have accidently gotten dislodged or expelled from the uterus.

  • Menstrual problems: Most of the side effects of the IUD are related to the menstrual cycle, like cramps, spotting, and increased menstrual bleeding.

  • If this occurs, the IUD should be removed.

  • If you notice pain, severe bleeding, fever, infection, or a missed period while an IUD is in place, you should contact your physician for further evaluation.

  • Its effectiveness is not immediate; it will be necessary to use an alternative form of birth control (not an IUD) until you have an Essure confirmation test.

  • An intrauterine device (IUD) is not a birth control option after having the Essure procedure.

  • Some women experience bleeding after Mirena IUD removal.

  • This device is inserted into your uterus by your physician and must be removed after five years; you can also have the IUD removed at any time before that if so desired.

  • Placing the Mirena IUD can change the blood flow of your cycle and you may find yourself spotting or bleeding at different times.

  • Even if your menstrual cycle had stopped completely while you had the Mirena in place, your regular period should restart after you have the IUD removed.

  • It is expected to restart within six weeks after IUD removal.

  • Although this bleeding after Mirena IUD removal seems to be a common occurrence, you need to make sure that no other complications, like uterine perforation, have taken place.

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