Israel sentence example

israel
  • The sanctuaries of Shiloh and Dan lasted until the deportation of Israel (Judges xviii.
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  • This happened when Israel Putnam was a young man.
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  • It evidently suffered in the bloody conflicts of Damascus with Israel (1 Kings xv.
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  • So it was in old Israel: the Sabbath was one of the stated religious feasts, like the new moon and the three great .agricultural sacrificial celebrations (Hosea ii.
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  • All access to the Deity is restricted to the one priesthood and to the one sanctuary at Jerusalem; the worshipping subject is the nation of Israel as a unity, and the function of worship is discharged on its behalf by divinely chosen priests.
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  • "He led them forth like sheep," in Israel in Egypt, and the music of the Witch of Endor, and the appearance of Samuel's spirit in Saul) are as modern as Gluck's.
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  • "I will fetch her out," said Israel Putnam.
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  • of Israel, it may be observed that no adequate interpretation has yet been found of the ethnological traditions of Levi and other sons of Leah in their historical relation to one another or to the other tribes.
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  • Budde, Religion of Israel to the Exile, ch.
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  • 50-53), and they are taken by Yahweh as a surrogate for the male first-born of Israel (iii.
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  • In spite of his own leaning towards mysticism he was a strong opponent of the IIasidim, a mystical sect founded by Israel Ba'al Shem Tobh (Besht) and promoted by Baer of Meseritz.
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  • 24, Omri, king of Israel, bought Samaria from a certain Shemer (whose name is said to be the origin of that of the city), and transferred thither his capital from Tirzah.
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  • - The entrance of Israel into Canaan marks the beginning of a new epoch in the development of Israel's religious life.
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  • The bitter invectives against Ammon, Moab, Edom, Philistia, Tyre, Sidon and Egypt, put into Yahweh's mouth, are based wholly on the fact that these peoples are regarded as hostile and hurtful to Israel; Babylonia, though nowise superior to Egypt morally, is favoured and applauded because it is believed to be the instrument for securing ultimately the prosperity of Yahweh's people.
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  • The administration of the affairs of the world by the God of Israel is represented, in a word, as determined not by ethical considerations but by personal preferences.
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  • LEVITES, or sons of Levi (son of Jacob by Leah), a sacred caste in ancient Israel, the guardians of the temple service at Jerusalem.'
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  • Lastly it should be recollected that the entire body of the fragments of tradition and literature belonging to northern Israel has come down to us through the channel of Judaean recensions.
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  • Probably he believed in the existence of other gods, though he does not express himself clearly on this point; in any case he held that the worship of other deities was destructive to Israel.
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  • But he conceives of him, on the other hand, as limited locally and morally - as having his special abode in the Jerusalem temple, or elsewhere in the midst of the Israelite people, and as dealing with other nations solely in the interests of Israel.
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  • 4 ff.) gives the duration of the national punishment in loose chronological reckoning: 40 years (a round number) for Judah, and 150 more (according to the corrected text) for Israel, the starting-point, probably, being the year 722, the date of the capture of Samaria; the procedure described in v.
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  • 2 After a comparison of Israel to a worthless wild vine (xv.) come two allegories, one portraying idolatrous Jerusalem as the unfaithful spouse of Yahweh (xvi.), the other describing the fate of Zedekiah (xvii.).
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  • to the vicegerent of Yahweh, seated on the throne of Zion, the king of Israel who is also priest after the order of Melchizedek, and then, after the Gospel had ensured the Messianic interpretation of the Psalm (Matt.
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  • "Without a sanctuary Yahweh would have seemed a foreigner to Israel.
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  • He was the foremost Jewish figure of the 18th century, and to him is attributable the renaissance of the House of Israel.
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  • Mendelssohn himself published a German translation of the Vindiciae judaeorum by Menasseh ben Israel.
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  • The men of Judah and Benjamin did not succeed in getting full possession of the place, and the Jebusites still held it when David became king of Israel.
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  • Joash, king of Israel, captured the city from Amaziah, king of Judah, and destroyed part of the fortifications, but these were rebuilt by Uzziah, the son of Amaziah, who did much to restore the city to its original prosperity.
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  • 8-11), Levi is a collective name for the priesthood, probably that of (north) Israel.
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  • But this certainly was not the leading point of view with the mass of the Rabbins; 1 and at any rate it is quite certain that the synagogue is a post-exilic institution, and therefore that the Sabbath in old Israel must have been entirely different from the Sabbath of the Scribes.
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  • 13), and the character of a sign between Yahweh and Israel ascribed to it in the post-exilic law.
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  • His primary object was to prove that the world was built after the same shape and fashion as the Ark made by the Children of Israel in the desert; but he was able to show that the Malay Peninsula had to be rounded and thereafter a course steered in a northerly direction if China was to be reached.
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  • Bowman (1900); Cromwell's Jewish Intelligencies (1891), Crypto-Jews under the Commonwealth (1894), Menasseh Ben Israel's Mission to Oliver Cromwell (1901), by L.
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  • Asia had been in vassalage; in the case of Israel at least since Menahem (2 Kings xv.
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  • He was succeeded by Shalmaneser IV., and the king of Israel, with the rest, attempted to revolt.
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  • Indian Vedic henotheism (otherwise called kathenotheism); 3 Semitic monolatry, so important as the probable starting-point of religious development in Israel; the Greek use of " Zeus " almost as we say " God " - even the attempt to arrange deities in a monarchical pantheon, all show the tendency, though it so seldom attains a real victory.
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  • BENI-ISRAEL (" Sons of Israel"), a colony of Jews settled on the Malabar coast in Kolaba district, Bombay presidency, chiefly centring in the native state of Janjira.
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  • 7), Yahweh made for Israel "statute and judgment" and "proved them."
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  • In estimating the work of one who stands at the head of the religious and legal institutions of Israel, it is necessary to refrain from interpreting the traditions from a modern legal standpoint or in the light of subsequent ideas and beliefs for which the sources themselves give no authority.
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  • The traditions would seem to point to the institution of new principles in the religion of Yahweh, and would associate with it not merely Moses but those foreign elements which are subsequently found in Israel and Judah.
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  • in Jewish Church and Prophets of Israel are most helpful; see also J.-M.
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  • 26, so far from the name Yahweh having been made known to Israel by Moses (Exod.
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  • Romans stands on an eminence on the right bank of the Isere, a fine stone result will be the inclusion of all Israel in the heritage of the messianic kingdom of Christ.
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  • (2) The eldest son of Saul, who, together with his father, freed Israel from the crushing oppression of the Philistines (I Sam.
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  • For modification in light of recent scholarship of argument from prophecy, to Riehm's Messianic Prophecy, Stanton's Jewish and Christian Messiah, and Woods's Hope of Israel.
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  • Two goats were provided by the ancient Hebrews on the Day of Atonement; the high priest sent one into the desert, after confessing on it the sins of Israel; it was not permitted to run free but was probably cast over a precipice; the other was sacrificed as a sin-offering.
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  • (3) The Tell el-Amarna inscriptions indicate that the term Elohim might even be applied in abject homage to an Egyptian monarch as the use of the term ilani in this connexion obviously implies.3 The religion of the Arabian tribes in the days of Mahomet, of which a picture is presented to us by Wellhausen in his Remains of Arabic Heathendom, furnishes some suggestive indications of the religion that prevailed in nomadic Israel before as well as during the lifetime of Moses.
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  • How far totemism, or belief in deified animal ancestors, existed in prehistoric Israel, as evidenced by the tribal names Simeon (hyena, wolf), Caleb (dog), IIamor (ass), Rahel (ewe) and Leah (wild cow), as well as by the laws respecting clean and unclean animals, is too intricate and speculative a problem to be discussed here.
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  • In fact, while Robertson Smith (in Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia, as well as his Religion of the Semites, followed by Stade and Benzinger) strongly advocated the view that clear traces of totemism can be found in early Israel, later writers, such as Marti, Gesch.
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  • Religion, 4th ed., p. 24, Kautzsch in his Religion of Israel already cited, p. 613, and recently Addis in his Hebrew Religion, p. 33 foll., have abandoned the theory as applied to Israel. ?
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  • On the other hand, the evidence for the existence of ancestor-worship in primitive Israel cannot be so easily disposed of as Kautzsch (ibid.
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  • 5 See Kautzsch, " Religion of Israel," in Hastings's Dict.
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  • Cook, " Israel and Totemism," in J.Q.R.
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  • the effects of Babylonian culture in western Asia on Israel and Israel's religion in early times even preceding the advent of Moses.
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  • xvii.) that consolidated the prestige of Yahweh, Israel's war-god.
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  • 19) which fought on high while the earthly armies of Israel, His people, contended below (Judges v.
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  • While the ark carried with Israel's host symbolized His presence in their midst, He was also known to be present in the cloud which hovered before the host and in the lightning ('esh Yahweh or " fire of Yahweh ") and the thunder (kol Yahweh or " voice of Yahweh ") which played around Mount Sinai.
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  • On this subject of Babylonian influence over Israel see Jeremias, Monotheistische Stromungen innerhalb der babylonischen Religion, and E.
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  • Another special characteristic of Israel's religion in Canaan was the considerable increase of sacrificial offerings.
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  • 16) belonged to early nomadic Israel (as seems probable) it is not possible to determine with any certainty.
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  • But when the nomadic clans of Israel came to occupy the settled abodes of the agricultural Canaanites who had a stake in the soil which they cultivated, these conditions evidently reacted on their religion.
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  • Yahweh ceased to be exclusively regarded as god of the atmosphere, worshipped in a distant mountain, Horeb-Sinai, situated in the south country (negebh),and moving in the clouds of heaven before the Israelites in the desert, but he came to be associated with Israel's life in Canaan.
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  • He manifested His presence either by a signal victory over Israel's foes (Josh.
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  • The history of Jerusalem during the succeeding three centuries consists for the most part of a succession of wars against the kingdom of Israel, the Moabites and the Syrians.
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  • These are followed by a scathing sketch of Israel's religious career (xx.
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  • In this way Yahweh came to be called the Baal or " lord " of any sacred place where the armies of Israel by their victories attested " his mighty hand and outstretched arm."
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  • For when Yahweh gradually became Israel's local Baal he became worshipped like the old Canaanite deity, and all the sensuous accompaniments of Kedeshoth,' as well as the presence of the asherah or sacred pole, became attached to his cult.
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  • Similarly in the earlier pre-exilian period of Israel's occupation of Canaanite territory the Hebrews were always subject to this tendency to worship the old Baal or `Ashtoreth (the goddess who made the cattle and flocks prolific).3 A few years of drought or of bad seasons would make a Hebrew settler betake himself to the old Canaanite gods.
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  • Israel) the corn, the new wine and the oil, and have bestowed on her silver and gold in abundance which they have wrought into a Baal image " (Hos.
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  • External danger from a foreign foe, such as Midian or the Philistines, at once brought into prominence the claim and power of Yahweh, Israel's national war-god since the great days of the exodus.
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  • Times of peace meant national disintegration and the lapse of Israel into the Canaanite local cults, which is interpreted by the redactor as the prophets of the 8th century would have interpreted it, viz.
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  • It was the religious expression of the unity of Israel which the life and death struggle with the Philistines had gradually wrought out.
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  • Yahweh was god only of Israel and of Israel's land.
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  • An invasion of foreign territory would bring Israel under the power of its patron-deity.
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  • It is probable that necromancy, like the worship of Asherah and `Ashtoreth, as well as the cult of graven images, was a Canaanite importation into Israel's religious practices.
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  • The lifeand-death struggle between Israel and the Philistines in the reign of Saul called forth under Samuel's leadership a new order of " men of God," who were called " prophets " or divinely inspired speakers.'
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  • such enthusiastic devotees of Yahweh, in days when religion meant patriotism, did much to keep alive the flame of Israel's hope and courage in the dark period of national disaster.
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  • We again find Elisha intervening with effect on behalf of Israel in the wars against Syria, so that his fame spread to Syria itself (2 Kings v.-viii.
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  • Lastly it was the fiery counsels of the dying prophet, accompanied by the acted magic of the arrow shot through the open window, and also of the thrice smitten floor, that gave nerve and courage to Joash, king of Israel, when the armies of Syria pressed heavily on the northern kingdom (2 Kings xiii.
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  • This is due to the fact that it for the first time unfolded the true character of Yahweh, implicit in the old Mosaic religion and submerged in the subsequent centuries of Israel's life in Canaan, but now at length made clear and explicit to the mind of the 1 In Isa.
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  • Yahweh was Israel's wargod.
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  • That larger conceptions prevailed in some of the loftier minds of Israel, and may be held to have existed even as far back as the age of Moses, is a fact which the Yahwistic cosmogony in Gen.
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  • Israel) would have led us to suppose.
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  • If Assyria finally overthrew Israel and carried off Yahweh's shrine, Assur (Asur), the tutelary deity of Assyria, was mightier than Yahweh.
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  • This was precisely what was happening among the northern states, and Amos foresaw that this might eventually be Israel's doom.
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  • Palestinian states on the other, and that they could scarcely have escaped the all-pervading Babylonian influences of 2000-1400 B.C. It is now becoming clearer every day, especially since the discovery of the laws of Khammurabi, that, if we are to think sanely about Hebrew history before as well as after the exile, we can only think of Israel as part of the great complex of Semitic and especially Canaanite humanity that lived its life in western Asia between 2060 and 600 B.C.; and that while the Hebrew race maintained by the aid of prophetism its own individual and exalted place, it was not less susceptible then, than it has been since, to the moulding influences of great adjacent civilizations and ideas.
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  • Such a universal God of the world would hardly make Israel His exclusive concern.
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  • The prophet also emphasized with passionate earnestness that Yahweh was a God whose character was righteous, and God's demand upon His people Israel was not for sacrifices but for righteous conduct.
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  • In the younger contemporary prophet of Ephraim, Hosea, the stress is laid on the relation of love (hesed) between Yahweh, the divine husband, and Israel, the faithless spouse.
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  • Israel's faithlessness is shown in idolatry and the prevailing corruption of the high places in which the old Canaanite Baal was worshipped instead of Yahweh.
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  • Compacts with a powerful foreign state, under whose aegis Israel was glad to shelter, involved covenants sealed by sacrificial rites in which the deity or deities of the foreign state were involved as well as Yahweh, the god of the weaker.
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  • While these aspects of Israel's relation to Yahweh are emphasized by the Ephraimite prophet, the larger conceptions of Yahweh's character as universal Lord and the God of righteousness, whose government of the world is ethical, emphasized by the prophet of Tekoah, are scarcely presented.
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  • In Isaiah both aspects - divine universal sovereignty and justice, taught by Amos, and divine loving-kindness to Israel and God's claims on His people's allegiance, taught by Hosea - are fully expressed.
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  • Yahweh's relation of love to Israel is exhibited under the purer symbol of fatherhood (Isa.
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  • 18, 19), or the " rod of His wrath," for the chastisement of Israel (x.
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  • And so the old limitations of Israel's popular religion, - the same limitations that encumbered also the religions of all the neighbouring races that succumbed in turn to Assyria's invincible progress, - now began to disappear.
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  • Therefore, while every other religion which was purely national was extinguished in the nation's overthrow, the religion of Israel survived even amid exile and dispersion.
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  • The onward progress of the Persian Cyrus and his anticipated conquest of Babylonia marked him out as Yahweh's anointed instrument for effecting the deliverance of exiled Israel and their restoration to their old home and city (Isa.
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  • Of far more vital importance is the conception of Israel as God's suffering servant.
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  • This is not the place to enter into the prolonged controversy as to the real significance of this term, whether it signifies the nation Israel or the righteous community only, or finally an idealized prophetic individual who, like the prophet Jeremiah, was destined to suffer for the well-being of his people.
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  • It probably arose from the fact that the calamities from which Israel had suffered both before and during the exile had drawn the reflective minds of the race to the contemplation of the problem of suffering.
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  • In the Deutero-Isaiah the meaning of Israel's sufferings is exhibited as vicarious.
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  • Israel is suffering for a great end.
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  • This noble conception of Israel's great destiny is conveyed in Isa.
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  • 6, in words which may be regarded as perhaps the noblest utterance in Hebrew prophecy: " To establish the tribes of Jacob and bring back the preserved of Israel is less important than being my servant.
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  • 2 This passage, which belongs to the second of the brief " servant-songs," sets the mission of Israel in its true relation to the world.
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  • If Jerusalem has been chosen as His sanctuary and Israel as His own people, it is only that Israel may diffuse God's blessings in the world even at the cost of Israel's own humiliation, exile and dispersion.
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  • Finally the Deutero-Isaiah conveyed to captive Israel the message of Yahweh's unceasing love and care, and the certainty of their return to Judaea and the restoration of the national prosperity which Ezekiel had already announced in the earlier period of the exile.
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  • To this is united the noble ideal of the suffering servant, which serves both as a contribution to the great problem of suffering as purifying and vicarious and as the interpretation to the mind of the nation itself of that nation's true function in the future, a lesson which the actual future showed that Israel was slow to receive.
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  • But the prevalence of the worship of " other gods " and of graven images in these " high places," and the moral debasement of life which accompanied these cults, made it clear that the " high places " were sources of grave injury to Israel's social life.
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  • the midnight darkness of Israel's exile to prepare for the nation's renewed life.
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  • The external bases of Israel's religion had been swept away, and in exchange for these Jeremiah had led his countrymen to the more permanent internal grounds of a spiritual renewal.
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  • It was the task of Ezekiel to take up once more the broken threads of Israel's religious traditions, and weave them anew into statelier forms of ritual and national polity.
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  • We are here moving in a realm of ideas prevailing in ancient Israel respecting holiness, uncleanness and sin, which are ceremonial and not ethical; see especially Robertson Smith's Religion of the Semites, 2nd ed., p. 446 foll.
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  • 23 foil.) we find one shepherd ruling over united Israel, viz.
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  • We also know that from earliest times Israel believed in the evil as well as good spirits.
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  • angelology and demonology of Israel.
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  • (It is hurled against offending Israel, Isa.
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  • And thus Israel's old prophetic Torah was at length to achieve its victory, for after Jesus came St Paul.
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  • Duhm's Theologie der Propheten and Robertson Smith's Prophets of Israel should also be consulted.
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  • Budde's Die Religion des Volkes Israel bis zur Verbannung, as well as Addis's recent Hebrew Religion (1906), is a most careful and scholarly compendium.
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  • Buchanan Gray's Divine Discipline of Israel, and A.
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  • Older material (often of composite origin) has been used, not so much for the purpose of providing historical information, as with the object of showing the religious significance of past history; 3 Or land Israel, W.
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  • Volkes Israel (1843; 3rd ed., 1864-1868; Eng.
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  • of Israel, Eng.
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  • trans., 1885, also the brilliant article " Israel " in the 9th ed.
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  • in Jewish Church, 1881, 2nd ed., 1892; Prophets of Israel, 1882, 2nd ed.
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  • (a) The first, that of the two rival kingdoms: Israel (Ephraim or Samaria) in the northern half of Palestine, and Judah in the south.
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  • The traditions which prevailed among the Hebrews concerning their origin belong to a time when Judah and Israel were regarded as a unit.
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  • Twelve divisions or tribes, of which Judah was one, held together by a traditional sentiment, were traced back to the sons of Jacob (otherwise known as Israel), the son of Isaac and grandson of Abraham.
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  • It is on this occasion that Jacob's name is changed to Israel.
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  • The story of the settlement of the national and tribal ancestors in Palestine is interrupted by an account of the southward movement of Jacob (or Israel) and his sons into a district under the immediate influence of the kings of Egypt.
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  • No longer individual sons of Jacob or Israel, united tribes were led out by Moses and Aaron; and, after a series of incidents extending over forty years, the " children of Israel " invaded the land in which their ancestors had lived.
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  • The story of the " exodus " is that of the religious birth of " Israel," joined by covenant with the national god Yahweh' whose aid in times of peril and need ' On the name see Jehovah, Tetragrammaton.
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  • In Moses (q.v.) was seen the founder of Israel's religion and laws; in Aaron (q.v.) the prototype of the Israelite priesthood.
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  • Yahweh had admittedly been the God of Israel's ancestors, but his name was only now made known (Exod.
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  • The other, part of the religious history of " Israel," is essentially bound up with the religious genius of the people, and is partly connected with clans from the south of Palestine whose influence appears in later times.
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  • The Monarchy of Israel.
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  • - The book of Joshua continues the fortunes of the " children of Israel " and describes a successful occupation of Palestine by the united tribes.
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  • The best historical narratives belong to Israel and Gilead; Judah scarcely appears, and in a relatively old poetical account of a great fight of the united tribes against a northern adversary lies outside the writer's horizon or interest (Judg.
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  • alludes to an escape from Egypt; Israel is merely a desert tribe inspired to settle in Palestine.
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  • 15) some traditions of the wilderness must have represented Israel in a very favourable light; for the " canonical " view, see Ezekiel xvi., xx., xxiii.
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  • He himself held supreme sway over all Israel as the last of the " judges " until compelled to accede to the popular demand for a king.
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  • (2) But other traditions represent the people scattered and in hiding; Israel is groaning under the Philistine yoke, and the unknown Saul is raised up by Yahweh to save his people.
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  • At all events the first of a series of annalistic notices of the kings of Israel ascribes to Saul conquests over the surrounding peoples to an extent which implies that the district of Judah formed part of his kingdom (I Sam.
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  • In circumstances which are not detailed, the kingdom seems to have regained its strength, and Ishbaal is credited with a reign of two years over Israel and Gilead (2 Sam.
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  • Both Israel and Judah had their own annals, brief excerpts from which appear in the books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, and they are supplemented by fuller narratives of distinct and more popular origin.
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  • After being the popular favourite of Israel in the little district of Benjamin, he was driven away by the jealousy and animosity of Saul.
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  • Gradually strengthening his position by alliance with Judaean clans, he became king at Hebron at the time when Israel suffered defeat in the north.
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  • Yet again, Saul had been chosen by Yahweh to free his people from the Philistines; he had been rejected for his sins, and had suffered continuously from this enemy; Israel at his death was left in the unhappy state in which he had found it; it was the Judaean David, the faithful servant of Yahweh, who was now chosen to deliver Israel, and to the last the people gratefully remembered their debt.
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  • Judah and Israel dwelt at ease, or held the superior position of military officials, while the earlier inhabitants of the land were put to forced labour.
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  • The Edomites, who had been almost extirpated by David in the valley of Salt, south of the Dead Sea, were now strong enough to seek revenge; and the powerful kingdom of Damascus, whose foundation is ascribed to this period, began to threaten Israel on the north and north-east.
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  • These words were calculated to inflame a people whom history proves to have been haughty and high-spirited, and the great Israel renounced its union with the small district of Judah.
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  • - Biblical history previous to the separation of Judah and Israel holds a prominent place in current ideas, since over two-fifths of the entire Old Testament deals with these early ages.
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  • On the one hand, a sweeping invasion of all the tribes of Israel moved by a common zeal may, like the conquests of Islam, have produced permanent results.
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  • This inquiry is further complicated by (c), where the history of Israel and Judah, as related in Judges and I Samuel, has caused endless perplexity.
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  • The traditions of the Ephraimite Joshua and of Saul the first king of (north) Israel virtually treat Judah as part of Israel and are related to the underlying representations in (a).
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  • The Rival Kingdoms. - The Palestine of the Hebrews was but part of a great area breathing the same atmosphere, and there was little to distinguish Judah from Israel except when they were distinct political entities.
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  • The kingdom of Israel lasts exactly half the time.
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  • Israel.
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  • Next, the Judaean compiler regularly finds in Israel's troubles the punishment for its schismatic idolatry; nor does he spare Judah, but judges its kings by a standard which agrees with the standpoint of Deuteronomy and is scarcely earlier than the end of the 7th century B.C. (§§ 16, 20).
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  • But the history of (north) Israel had naturally its own independent political backgrounds and the literary sources contain the same internal features as the annals and prophetic narratives which are already met with in 1 Samuel.
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  • Israel, on the other hand, had signed its death-warrant by the institution of calf-cult, a cult which, however, was scarcely recognized as contrary to the worship of Yahweh before the denunciations of Hosea.
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  • Judah had natural connexions with Edom and southern Palestine; Israel was more closely associated with Gilead and the Aramaeans of the north.
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  • That Israel was the stronger may be suggested by the acquiescence of Judah in the new situation.
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  • On the contrary, the statement that there was continual warfare is supplemented in Chronicles by the story of a victory over Israel by Abijah the son of Rehoboam.
    0
    0
  • These sent troops to harry north Israel, and Baasha was compelled to retire.
    0
    0
  • Israel was divided into two camps, until, on the death of Tibni and his brother Joram, Omri became sole king (c. 887 B.C.).
    0
    0
  • - Omri (q.v.), the founder of one of the greatest dynasties of Israel, was contemporary with the revival of Tyre under Ithobaal, and the relationship between the states is seen in the marriage of Omri's son Ahab to Jezebel, the priest-king's daughter.
    0
    0
  • The discovery of the inscription of a later king of Moab (q.v.) has proved that the east-Jordanic tribes were no uncivilized or barbaric folk; material wealth, a considerable religious and political organization, and the cultivation of letters (as exemplified in the style of the inscription) portray conditions which allow us to form some conception of life in Israel itself.
    0
    0
  • Tribute was received from Tyre and Sidon; and Jehu, who was now king of Israel, sent his gifts of gold, silver, &c., to the conqueror.
    0
    0
  • The value of this external evidence for the history of Israel is enhanced by the fact that biblical tradition associates the changes in the thrones of Israel and Damascus with the work of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, but handles the period without a single reference to the Assyrian Empire.
    0
    0
  • A massacre ensued in which the royal families of Israel and Judah perished.
    0
    0
  • The descendants of the detested Phoenician marriage were rooted out, and unless the close intercourse between Israel and Judah had been suddenly broken, it would be supposed that the new king at least laid claim to the south.
    0
    0
  • Damascus, Israel and Judah.
    0
    0
  • Hazael of Damascus, Jehu of Israel and Elisha the prophet are the three men of the new age linked together in the words of one writer as though commissioned for like ends (1 Kings xix.
    0
    0
  • It is a natural assumption that Damascus could still count upon Israel as an ally in 842; not until the withdrawal of Assyria and the accession of Jehu did the situation change.
    0
    0
  • " In those days Yahweh began to cut short " (or, altering the text, " to be angry with ") " Israel."
    0
    0
  • It has been assumed that Israel had withdrawn from the great coalition, that Jehu sent tribute to Shalmaneser to obtain that monarch's recognition, and that Hazael consequently seized the first opportunity to retaliate.
    0
    0
  • Certain traditions, it is true, indicate that Israel had been at war with the Aramaeans from before 854 to 842, and that Hazael was attacking Gilead at the time when Jehu revolted; but in the midst of these are other traditions of the close and friendly relations between Israel and Damascus !
    0
    0
  • Moreover, the account of the joint undertaking by Judah (under Jehoshaphat) and Israel against Syria at Ramoth-Gilead at the time of Ahab's death, and again (under Ahaziah) when Jehoram was wounded, shortly before the accession of Jehu, are historical doublets, and they can hardly be harmonized either with the known events of 854 and 842 or with the course of the intervening years.
    0
    0
  • point clearly to the very close union of Israel and Judah at this period, a union which is apt to be obscured by the fact that the annalistic summaries of each kingdom are mainly independent.
    0
    0
  • It is a new source which is here suddenly introduced, belonging apparently to a history of the Temple; it throws no light upon the relations between Judah with its priests and Israel with its prophets, the circumstances of the regency under the priest Jehoiada are ignored, and the Temple reforms occupy the first place in the compiler's interest.
    0
    0
  • The Judaean narratives do not allow us to fill the gap or to determine whether Judaean policy under the regent Jehoiada would be friendly or hostile to Israel, or whether Judaean nobles may have severed the earlier bond of union.
    0
    0
  • Israel, on the other hand, was almost annihilated.
    0
    0
  • Thrice Joash smote the Syrians - in accordance with the last words of the dying prophet - and Aphek in the Sharon plain, famous in history for Israel's disasters, now witnessed three victories.
    0
    0
  • Syria had not been crushed, and the failure to utilize the opportunity was an act of impolitic leniency for which Israel was bound to suffer (2 Kings xiii.
    0
    0
  • Those in Israel who remembered the previous war between 1 Careful examination shows that no a priori distinction can be drawn between " trustworthy " books of Kings and " untrustworthy books " of Chronicles.
    0
    0
  • It is interesting to find that Hadad-nirari claims tribute from Tyre, Sidon and Beth-Omri (Israel), also from Edom and Palastu (Philistia).
    0
    0
  • There are no signs of an extensive coalition as in the days of Shalmaneser; Ammon is probably included under Damascus; the position of Moab - which had freed itself from Jehoram of Israel - can hardly be calculated.
    0
    0
  • A vaunting challenge to Joash (of Israel) gave rise to one of the two fables that are preserved in the Old Testament (Judg.
    0
    0
  • The importance of the historical questions regarding relations between Damascus, Israel and Judah is clear.
    0
    0
  • The defeat of Syria by Joash (of Israel) was not final.
    0
    0
  • He saved Israel from being blotted out, and through his successes " the children of Israel dwelt in their tents as of old " (2 Kings xiii.
    0
    0
  • In particular, the overthrow of Israel as foreshadowed in I Kings xxii.
    0
    0
  • For the understanding of these great wars between Syria and Israel (which the traditional chronology spreads over eighty years), for the significance of the crushing defeats and inspiring victories, and for the alternations of despair and hope, a careful study of all the records of relations between Israel and the north is at least instructive, and it is important to remember that, although the present historical outlines are scanty and incomplete, some - if not all - of the analogous descriptions in their present form are certainly later than the second half of the 9th century B.C., the period in which these great events fa11.4 13.
    0
    0
  • was king of Israel.
    0
    0
  • 5 Special mention is made of Jonah, a prophet of Zebulun in (north) Israel (2 Kings xiv.
    0
    0
  • All that can be recognized from the biblical records, however, is the period of internal prosperity which Israel and Judah enjoyed under Jeroboam and Uzziah (qq.v.) respectively.
    0
    0
  • that of " Israel " and " Samaria ") is involved with the incorporation of non-Judaean elements.
    0
    0
  • Its monarchy traced its origin to Hebron in the south, and its growth is contemporary with a decline in Israel (§ 7).
    0
    0
  • It is at least probable that when Israel was supreme an independent Judah would centre around a more southerly site than Jerusalem.
    0
    0
  • The Hebrews of Israel and Judah were, political history apart, men of the same general stamp, with the same cult and custom; for the study of religion and social usages, therefore, they can be treated as a single people.
    0
    0
  • This was Israel's fate.
    0
    0
  • Kent, Israel's Laws and Legal Enactments (1907); and in general I.
    0
    0
  • Yahwism presents itself under a variety of aspects, and the history of Israel's relations to the God Yahweh (whose name is not necessarily of Israelite origin) can hardly be disentangled amid the complicated threads of the earlier history.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1907), p. 67: " Prophecy of the Hebrew type has not been limited to Israel; it is indeed a phenomenon of almost world-wide occurrence; in many lands and in many ages the wild, whirling words of frenzied men and women have been accepted as the utterances of an in-dwelling deity.
    0
    0
  • - The prosperity of Israel was its undoing.
    0
    0
  • Israel was once more in league with Damascus and Phoenicia, and the biblical records must be read in the light of political history.
    0
    0
  • Israel was punished by the ravaging of the northern districts, and the king claims to have carried away the people of " the house of Omri."
    0
    0
  • Assyrian officers were placed in the land and Judah thus gained its deliverance at the expense of Israel.
    0
    0
  • When at length Tiglathpileser died, in 7 27, the slumbering revolt became general; Israel refused the usual tribute to its overlord, and definitely threw in its lot with " Egypt."
    0
    0
  • of Israel to Exile, pp. 165-167.
    0
    0
  • The fall of Samaria, Sennacherib's devastation of Judah, and the growth of Jerusalem as the capital, had tended to raise the position of the Temple, although Israel itself, as also Judah, had famous sanctuaries of its own.
    0
    0
  • If Israel could appear to be better than Judah (iii.
    0
    0
  • The scantiness of historical tradition makes a final solution impossible, but the study of these years has an important bearing on the history of the later Judaean state, which has been characteristically treated from the standpoint of exiles who returned from Babylonia and regard them selves as the kernel of " Israel."
    0
    0
  • The agriculturists and herdsmen who had been left in Palestine formed, as always, the staple population, and it is impossible to imagine either Judah or Israel as denuded of its inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • It had scarcely been otherwise in Israel.
    0
    0
  • But Israel after the fall of Samaria is artificially excluded from the Judaean horizon, and lies as a foreign land, although Judah itself had suffered from the intrusion of foreigners in the preceding centuries of war and turmoil, and strangers had settled in her midst, had formed part of the royal guard, or had even served as janissaries (§ 15, end).
    0
    0
  • In Israel as in Judah the political disasters not only meant a shifting of population, they also brought into prominence the old popular and non-official religion, the character of which is not to be condemned because of the attitude of lofty prophets in advance of their age.
    0
    0
  • It is a gratuitous assumption that the history of (north) Israel ceased with the fall of Samaria or that Judah then took over Israelite literature and inherited the old Israelite spirit: the question of the preservation of earlier writings is of historical importance.
    0
    0
  • It is true that the situation in Israel or Samaria continues obscure, but a careful study of literary productions, evidently not earlier than the 7th century B.C., reveals a particular loftiness of conception and a tendency which finds its parallels in Hosea and approximates the peculiar characteristics of the Deuteronomic school of thought.
    0
    0
  • 8, 6) has been carried back to the earliest ages; yet the present period, after the age of rival kingdoms, Judah and Israel, and before the foundation of Judaism, is that in which the historical background for the inclusion of Judah among the " sons " of Israel is equally suitable (§§ 5, 20, end).
    0
    0
  • Settled in and around Jerusalem, they look upon themselves as the sole community, the true Israel, even as it was believed that once before Israel entered and developed independently in the land of its ancestors.
    0
    0
  • His main object is to make the new Israel, the post-exilic community at Jerusalem, continuous, as a society, with the old Israel.'
    0
    0
  • Toffteen, In either case the history of separate sections of people may have been extended to Israel as a whole, but there is no evidence for any adequate reconstruction.
    0
    0
  • " Israel," § 2, Ency.
    0
    0
  • of Israel (i.
    0
    0
  • Smith, Prophets of Israel, pp. 28 seq., 379.
    0
    0
  • The true seed of Israel separated themselves from all foreigners (not, however, without some opposition) and formed an exclusively religious body or " congregation."
    0
    0
  • Dreams of political freedom gave place to hopes of religious independence, and " Israel " became a church, the foundation of which it sought in the desert of Sinai a thousand years before.
    0
    0
  • Kent, Israel's Hist.
    0
    0
  • Bibilical history ends with the triumph of the Judaean community, the true " Israel," the right to which title is found in the distant past.
    0
    0
  • It is from this narrower standpoint of an exclusive and confined Judah (and Benjamin) that the traditions as incorporated in the late recensions gain fresh force, and in Israel's renunciation of the Judaean yoke the later hostility between the two may be read between the lines.
    0
    0
  • " Israel," Ency.
    0
    0
  • This is especially true of the history of the exilic and post-exilic periods, where the effort is made to preserve the continuity of Israel and the Israelite community (Chronicles - Ezra - Nehemiah).
    0
    0
  • Moses, Jethro), &c., like the intimate relationship between Israel and surrounding lands, havea significance in the light of recent research.
    0
    0
  • Israel can no longer be isolated from the politics, culture, folk-lore, thought and religion of western Asia and Egypt.
    0
    0
  • And out of one of them came forth a little horn (Antiochus Epiphanes) which waxed exceeding great towards the south (Egypt) and towards the East (Babylon) and towards the beauteous land (the land of Israel)."
    0
    0
  • Cheyne, Traditions and Beliefs of Ancient Israel (1907).
    0
    0
  • At a time when men were attracted by the wisdom and science of the Greeks, he taught that all wisdom came from Yahweh who had chosen Israel to receive it in trust.
    0
    0
  • The race survives - " the days of Israel are unnumbered."
    0
    0
  • Every member of the congregation of Israel must labour, as God has appointed, at some handicraft or profession to provide for his home.
    0
    0
  • The centre of the life of Israel was the Temple, over which the high priest presided and which was inhabited by Yahweh, the God of Israel.
    0
    0
  • " The king's officers who were enforcing the apostasy came into the city of Modein to sacrifice, and many of Israel went over to them, but Mattathias.
    0
    0
  • In 158 Jonathan began to rule as a judge in Michmash and he destroyed the godless out of Israel - so far, that is, as his power extended.
    0
    0
  • In the hundred and seventieth year (142 B.C.) the yoke of the heathen was taken away from Israel and the people began to date their legal documents "in the first year of Simon the great high priest and commander and leader of the Jews."
    0
    0
  • Israel had retired to their tents to study their Bible.
    0
    0
  • In 259 Odenathus, the Palmyrene adventurer whose memory has been eclipsed by that of his wife Zenobia, laid Nehardea waste for the time being, and in its neighbourhood arose the academy of Pumbedita (Pombeditha) which became a new focus for the intellectual life of Israel in Babylonia.
    0
    0
  • At the time, Menasseh ben Israel was in London, on a mission to Cromwell.
    0
    0
  • Wolf, Menasseh ben Israel's Mission to Cromwell, p. lxxv.).
    0
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  • At the moment when Spinoza was publishing a system which is still a dominating note of modern philosophy, this other son of Israel was capturing the very heart of Jewry.
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  • " The expectation that he would lead Israel in triumph to the Holy Land was doomed to end in disappointment.
    0
    0
  • Recently a mission has been sent to the Falashas of Abyssinia, and much interest has been felt in such outlying branches of the Jewish people as the Black Jews of Cochin and the Bene Israel community of Bombay.
    0
    0
  • Montefiore), in literature (Israel Zangwill and Alfred Sutro), in art (S.
    0
    0
  • Most Jews not only confidently believe that their own future lies in progressive development within the various nationalities of the world, but they also hope that a similar consummation is in store for the as yet unemancipated branches of Israel.
    0
    0
  • Leroy-Beaulieu, Israel among the Nations (1895); I.
    0
    0
  • Abbott, Israel in Europe (1905); G.Caro, Wirtschaftsgeschichte der Juden (1908); M.
    0
    0
  • pascha', of the Hebrew name of the Passover festival n4 pesach, from r "he passed over," in memory of the great deliverance, when the destroying angel "passed over the houses, of the children of Israel in Egypt when he smote the Egyptians" (Exod.
    0
    0
  • Shalmanezer destroyed the northern kingdom or Israel in 720, and following the practice of the times deported the majority of the population, whose traces became lost to history.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason why their descendants should not be found to-day in various tribes, but the physical type commonly called Jewish is characteristic not so much of Israel as of western Asia generally.
    0
    0
  • DAVID (a Hebrew name meaning probably beloved 1), in the Bible, the son of Jesse, king of Judah and Israel, and founder of the royal Judaean dynasty at Jerusalem.
    0
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  • Israel, iii.
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  • Meantime Saul had fallen in battle, and northern Israel was in a state of chaos.
    0
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  • Ishbaal lost hope, and after he had been foully assassinated by two of his own followers, all Israel sought David as king.
    0
    0
  • The biblical narrative is admittedly not so constructed as to enable us to describe in chronological order the thirty-three years of David's reign over all Israel.
    0
    0
  • The later views of the history of this period are represented in the book of Chronicles, where immediately after Saul's death David is anointed at Hebron king over all Israel (1 Chron.
    0
    0
  • It is questionable whether David could have become king over all Israel immediately after the death of Ishbaal.
    0
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  • But notwithstanding this, the relation is broken off, and years elapse before David gains hold upon the Hebrews of north Israel, the weakness of the union being proved by the ease with which it was subsequently broken after Solomon's death.
    0
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  • 2 Fundamente Israel.
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  • vi.) represents the act as that of a loyal and God-fearing heart which knew that the true principle of Israel's unity and strength lay in national adherence to Yahweh; but the event was far from having the significance which later times ascribed to it (1 Chron.
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  • 23-26), which was not without a splendour hitherto unknown in Israel.
    0
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  • 2 A deadly conflict with the Ammonites was provoked by a gross insult to friendly ambassadors of Israel; 3 and this war, of which we have pretty full details in 2 Sam.
    0
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  • To the north-west Israel bordered upon Tyre, with whom its relations were friendly.
    0
    0
  • The main problem is whether the account of David's rule has been exaggerated, or whether the attempt has been made to throw back to the time of the first king of all Israel later political conditions.
    0
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  • 8 This policy of leniency towards Israel is characteristic of David, and may well have become a popular theme in the tales of succeeding generations.
    0
    0
  • Thus it was quite in keeping with the romantic attachment between David and Saul's son Jonathan that when he became king of Israel he took Jonathan's son Meribbaal under his care (ix.).
    0
    0
  • According to the prevailing traditions, Saul at his death had left North Israel disunited and humiliated.
    0
    0
  • " Political circumstances naturally led to an ever-increasing appreciation of his person and his work as the unifier of Israel.
    0
    0
  • And meanwhile the religious convictions of the highest minds in Israel were undergoing a marked change.
    0
    0
  • 9 show that according to one view David delivered Israel (not Judah) from the Philistines.
    0
    0
  • See Cheyne, Traditions and Beliefs of Anc. Israel, on Gen.
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    0
  • (1883); Ancient Empires of the East (1884); Introduction to Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther (1885); Assyria (1885); Hibbert Lectures on Babylonian Religion (1887); The Hittites (1889); Races of the Old Testament (1891); Higher Criticism and the Verdict of the Monuments (1894); Patriarchal Palestine (1895); The Egypt of the Hebrews and Herodotus (1895); Early History of the Hebrews (1897); Israel and the Surrounding Nations (1898); Babylonians and Assyrians (1900); Egyptian and Babylonian Religion (1903); Archaeology of the Cuneiform Inscr.
    0
    0
  • The Armenian synaxarium, called the synaxarium of Ter Israel was published at Constantinople in 1834.
    0
    0
  • In 1869-1870 he published his book on the religion of Israel, De godsdienst van Israel tot den ondergang van der Joodschen Staat (Eng.
    0
    0
  • This was followed in 1875 by a study of Hebrew prophecy, De profeten en de profetie onder Israel (Eng.
    0
    0
  • A great part was played in the history of Israel by the state of Aram Dammesek, i.e.
    0
    0
  • There is strong evidence at all events that many of the conceptions are contrary to historical fact, and the points of similarity between native Canaanite cult and Israelite worship are so striking that only the persistent traditions of Israel's origin and of the work of Moses compel the conclusion that the germs of specific Yahweh worship existed from his day.
    0
    0
  • 4) afford complete testimony for the prevalence of Baalism as late as the exile, but prove that the clearest distinction was then drawn between the pure worship of Yahweh the god of Israel and the inveterate and debased cults of the gods of the land.
    0
    0
  • The statements are obscure, and elsewhere Hormah is the scene of a victory over the Canaanites by Israel (Num.
    0
    0
  • The same sentiment recurs in Yahweh's command to Saul to destroy Amalek utterly for its hostility to Israel (1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • 8), and the interchange of the ethnic with "Canaanites" and "Amorites" suggests that the Amalekites are merely one of Israel's traditional enemies of the older period.
    0
    0
  • 7) Amalek is mentioned among the enemies of Israel - just as Greek writers of the 6th century of this era applied the old term Scythians to the Goths (Noldeke), - and the traditional hostility between Saul and Amalek is reflected still later in the book of Esther where Haman the Agagite is pitted against Mordecai the Benjamite.
    0
    0
  • In May 1 775 a British schooner in the Mystic defended by a force of marines was taken by colonial militia under General John Stark and Israel Putnam, - one of the first conflicts of the War of Independence.
    0
    0
  • 31 Continued work at Samaria should reveal some trace of the civilization of Israel, which we know was considerable, unless the devastation of the Assyrian sieges has destroyed it all.
    0
    0
  • 22 its destruction is foretold, and the Amalekites, of whom they formed a division, are consistently represented as the inveterate enemies of Yahweh and of his people Israel.
    0
    0
  • " The Messiah invokes all the sufferings, pain, and afflictions of Israel to come upon Him.
    0
    0
  • Now if He did not remove them thus and take them upon Himself, no man could endure the sufferings of Israel, due as their punishment for transgressing the law; as it is written (Isa.
    0
    0
  • In the days of Jehu the country was taken from Israel by Hazael, king of Syria (2 Kings x.
    0
    0
  • The external law given, as was believed, by the God of Israel, was held to be the sufficient guide of life, and everything that looked like reliance on human wisdom was regarded as disloyalty to the Divine Lawgiver.
    0
    0
  • This view claims to determine the respective ages and relative chronological position of the various passages in which the Passover is referred to in the Pentateuch, and assumes that each successive stratum represents the practice in ancient Israel at the time of composition, laying great stress upon omissions as implying non-existence.
    0
    0
  • Moses summons the elders of Israel and orders them to kill the Passover and besprinkle the lintel and sideposts with a bunch of hyssop dipped in blood so that the Lord will pass over the door.
    0
    0
  • MENAHEM (Hebrew for "consoler"), a king of Israel.
    0
    0
  • The scene of his revolt was Tirzah, the old seat of the kings of Israel between Jeroboam I.
    0
    0
  • According to the Old Testament account the Assyrian king even advanced against Israel, and only withdrew in consideration of a tribute amounting to about f400,000.
    0
    0
  • As the ark started, it was hailed with the cry,"Arise, Yahweh, let thine enemies be scattered, let them that hate thee flee from before thee," and when it came to rest, the cry again rang out, "Return, O Yahweh, to the myriads of families of Israel" (Num.
    0
    0
  • After a great defeat of Israel by the Philistines it was brought into the field, but was captured by the enemy.
    0
    0
  • A critical examination of the history of the Israelite ark renders it far from certain that the object was originally the peculiar possession of all Israel.
    0
    0
  • 10), and was liable to the same duties and privileges as Israel (see references in Oxford Gesenius, p. 158).
    0
    0
  • Heathens felt in the religion of Israel an escape from their growing scepticism, and a solution to the problem of life.
    0
    0
  • Some rabbis interpreted Israel's dispersion as divinely designed for the very purpose of proselytizing (Pesahim 87b.).
    0
    0
  • In 1896 the central conference of American Rabbis formulated as a proselyte Confession of faith these five principles: (1) God the Only One; (2) Man His Image; (3) Immortality of the Soul; (4) Retribution; and (5) Israel's Mission.
    0
    0
  • 13, interchanged in regard to Israel, on above theory)?
    0
    0
  • 2-4 as referring to the oppression of Israel by a foreign tyrant, whom, however, he holds to be Assyria.
    0
    0
  • which carries no more intrinsic weight than the Davidic titles of the Psalms. The poem begins with a prayer that God will renew the historic manifestation of the exodus, which inaugurated the national history and faith; a thunderstorm moving up from the south is then described, in which God is revealed (3-7); it is asked whether this manifestation, whose course is further described, is against nature only (8-ii); the answer is given that it is for the salvation of Israel against its wicked foes (12-15); the poet describes the effect in terror upon himself (16) and declares his confidence in God, even in utter agricultural adversity (17-19).
    0
    0
  • If the worldpowers were hard as flint in their dealings with Israel, the people of God were steeled to such moral endurance that each clash of their successive onsets kindled some new flame of devotion.
    0
    0
  • This is the great problem of Israel, finding its supreme expression for all time in the book of Job.
    0
    0
  • As the chronicler rewrote the history of Israel and Judah from the basis of the Priests' Code, so our author re-edited from the Pharisaic standpoint of his time the book of Genesis and the early chapters of Exodus.
    0
    0
  • The most remarkable part of the book is the eschatological picture with which it closes; and the way in which the plague of locusts appears to be taken as foreshadowing the final judgment - the great day or assize of Yahweh, in which Israel's enemies are destroyed - is so unique as greatly to complicate the exegetical problem.
    0
    0
  • In Joel the enemies of Israel are the nations collectively, and among those specified by name neither Assyria nor Chaldaea finds a place.
    0
    0
  • The absence of all mention of one great oppressing world-power seems most natural before the westward march of Assyria involved Israel in the general politics of Asia.
    0
    0
  • See Cheyne, Traditions and Beliefs of Ancient Israel (on Gen.
    0
    0
  • To Joel Judah and the people of Yahweh are synonyms; northern Israel has disappeared.
    0
    0
  • 19, that the seasons shall henceforth be fruitful, is given after Yahweh has shown his zeal and pity for Israel, not of course by mere words, but by acts, as appears in verses 20, 21, where the verbs are properly perfects recording that Yahweh hath already done great things, and that vegetation has already revived.
    0
    0
  • The truth that underlies the tradition is that the collection is essentially the hymn-book of the second Temple,' and it was therefore ascribed to David, because it was assumed, as we see clearly from Chronicles, that the order of worship in the second temple was the same as in the first, and had David as its father: as Moses completed the law of Israel for all time before the people entered Canaan, so David completed the theory and contents of the Temple psalmody before the Temple itself was built.
    0
    0
  • to David; here the doxology is peculiar, " Blessed be Jehovah God of Israel from everlasting and to everlasting.
    0
    0
  • Now, both the Korahite and Asaphic groups of psalms are remarkable that they hardly contain any recognition of present sin on the part of the community of Jewish faith - though they do confess the sin of Israel in the past - but are exercised with the observation that prosperity does not follow righteousness either in the case of the individual (xlix., lxxiii.) or in that of the nation, which suffers notwithstanding its loyalty to God, or even on account thereof (xliv., lxxix.).
    0
    0
  • Malachi, Ezra and Nehemiah, like Haggai and Zechariah, are still very far from holding that the sin of Israel lies all in the past.
    0
    0
  • In some of the following psalms there are still references to deeds of oppression and violence, but more generally Israel appears as happy under the law.
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  • Israel, indeed, is still scattered and not triumphant over the heathen, but even in the dispersion the Jews are under a mild rule (cvi.
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  • Israel, led by the house of Aaron - this is a notable point - has emerged triumphant from a desperate conflict, and celebrates at the Temple a great day of rejoicing for the unhoped-for victory: in Ps.
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  • Such an enthusiasm of militant piety, plainly based on actual successes of Israel and the house of Aaron, can only be referred to the first victories of the Maccabees, culminating in the purification of the Temple in 164 B.C. This restoration of the worship of the national sanctuary, under circumstances that inspired religious feelings very different from those of any other generation since the return from Babylon, might most naturally be followed by an extension of the Temple psalmody; it certainly was followed by some liturgical innovations, for the solemn service of dedication on the 25th day of Chisleu was made the pattern of a new annual feast (that mentioned in John x.
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  • From the time of Hyrcanus downwards the ideal of the princely high priests became more and more divergent from the ideal of the pious in Israel, and in the Psalter of Solomon we see religious poetry turned against the lords of the Temple and its worship.
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  • And it is not too much to say that that view - which to some extent appears in the historical psalms of the Ehohistic Psalter - implies absolute incapacity to understand the difference between old Israel and later Judaism, and makes almost anything possible in the way of the ascription of comparatively modern pieces to ancient authors.
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  • and of this last passage it may be said that all the translatable portions of it can be naturally explained, if it refers to the time when the resistance of the Hasidim, whom the Sadducees had despised and shunned, had won freedom for Israel as a whole, and at no other known period; the fragment, Ps.
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  • But he would be a bold man who would profess to give trustworthy dates either for the kings of Israel or for the prophetic writers.
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  • I-II ought undoubtedly to be read in immediate connexion with chap. vii.; it presupposes the alliance of Syria and northern Israel, whose destruction it predicts, though opening a door of hope for a remnant of Israel.
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  • The development of the prophet's message is full of contrasts and surprises: the vanity of the idol-gods and the omnipotence of Israel's helper, the sinfulness and infirmity of Israel and her high spiritual destiny, and the selection (so offensive to patriotic Jews, xlv.
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  • Then another mysterious form appears on the scene, bearing the honourable title of "Servant of Yahweh," through whom God's gracious purposes for Israel and the world are to be realized.
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  • [True, there was not so much said about Babylon as we should have expected even in the first book; the paucity of references to the local characteristics of Babylonia is in fact one of the negative arguments urged by older scholars in favour of the Isaianic origin of the prophecy.] Israel himself, with all his inconsistent qualities, becomes the absorbing subject of the prophet's meditations.
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  • io); and (3) that at the close of the prophecy, Assyria and Egypt are apparently mentioned as the principal foes of Israel (xxvii.
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  • These two oracles agree in the elaborateness of their description of the fearful fate of the enemies of Yahweh (Babylon and Edom are merely representatives of a class), and also in their view of the deliverance and restoration of Israel as an epoch for the whole human race.
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  • And the Lord said to him, Ye shall be sitting on twelve thrones and judging the tribes of Israel.
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  • His head-dress was as distinctive as that of the high priest at Hierapolis, who wore a golden tiara and a purple dress, while the ordinary priests had a pilos (conical cap, also worn in Israel, Ex.
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  • These were "lost sheep of the house of Israel"; but Christ's freedom from Jewish exclusiveness is also brought out (I) as regards Samaritans, by the rebuke administered to the disciples at ix.52 sqq., the parable in x.
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  • HITTITES, an ancient people, alluded to frequently in the earlier records of Israel, and also, under slightly variant names, in Egyptian records of the XVIIIth, XIXth and XXth Dynasties, and in Assyrian from about 1100 to 700 B.C. They appear also in the Vannic cuneiform texts, and are believed to be the authors of a class of monuments bearing inscriptions in a peculiar pictographic character, and widely distributed over Asia Minor and N.
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  • So far as the Old Testament goes, therefore, we gather that the Hittites were a considerable people, widely spread in Syria, in part subdued and to some extent assimilated by Israel, but in part out of reach.
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  • From this point (c. 1150 B.C.) - the point at which (roughly) the monarchic history of Israel in Palestine opens - Egyptian records cease to mention Kheta; and as we know from other sources that the latter continued powerful in Carchemish for some centuries to come, we must presume that the rise of the Israelite state interposed an effective political barrier.
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  • This is essentially the apocalyptic conception of history, and Ezekiel may be justly represented as in certain essential aspects its founder in Israel.
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  • The judgments predicted by the pre-exilic prophets had indeed been executed to the letter, but where were the promised glories of the renewed kingdom and Israel's unquestioned sovereignty over the nations of the earth ?
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  • 10) Israel should be restored to their own land (xxiv.
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  • Each fresh apocalypse would in the eyes of its writer be in some degree but a fresh edition of the traditions naturally attaching themselves to great names in Israel's past, and thus the books named respectively Enoch, Noah, Ezra would to some slight extent be not pseudonymous.
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  • Thus, whereas prophecy had to deal with temporary reverses at the hands of some heathen power, apocalyptic arose at a time when Israel had been subject for generations to the sway of one or other of the great worldpowers.
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  • Hence to harmonize such difficulties with belief in God's righteousness, it had to take account of the role of such empires in the counsels of God, the rise; duration and downfall of each in turn, till finally the lordship of the world passed into the hands of Israel, or the final judgment arrived.
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  • The book treats of the Messiah and the Messianic kingdom, the woes of Israel in the past and the destruction of Jerusalem in the present, as well as of theological questions relating to original sin, free will, works, &c. The views expressed on several of these subjects are often conflicting.
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  • 26-29, mainly of prophecies on Magog's last attack on Israel.
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  • On the old post-road in Greenwich is the inn, built about 1729, at which Israel Putnam was surprised in February 1779 by a force under General Tryon; according to tradition he escaped by riding down a flight of steep stone steps.
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  • It is usual to regard Abimelech's reign as the first attempt to establish a monarchy in Israel, but the story is mainly that of the rivalries of a half-developed petty state, and of the ingratitude of a community towards the descendants of its deliverer.
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  • When Manasseh ben Israel in 1655 petitioned for the return of the Jews who had been expelled by Edward I., Carvajal took part in the agitation and boldly avowed his Judaism.
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  • He did this, as he himself said, not for his own honour nor for that of his family, but in order that disunion should not prevail in Israel.
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  • 7 f.), that the Law and Prophecy, as meant by God, had never been given to Israel as a people.
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  • The Divine oracles had ever pointed to the Christian Covenant, and had been so understood by the men of God in Israel, whereas the apostate people had turned aside to keep the ceremonial letter of the Law at the instigation of an evil angel (ix.
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  • His Geschichte des Volkes Israel, the result of thirty years' labour, was epoch-making in that branch of research.
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  • Taking up the idea of a divine education of the human race, which Lessing and Herder had made so familiar to the modern mind, and firmly believing that to each of the leading nations of antiquity a special task had been providentially assigned, Ewald felt no difficulty about Israel's place in universal history, or about the problem which that race had been called upon to solve.
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  • The history of Israel, according to him, is simply the history of the manner in which the one true religion really and truly came into the possession of mankind.
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  • Other nations, indeed, had attempted the highest problems in religion; but Israel alone, in the providence of God, had succeeded, for Israel alone had been inspired.
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  • The following have been translated into English: - Hebrew Grammar, by John Nicholson (from 2nd German edition) (London 1836); Introductory Hebrew Grammar (from 3rd German edition) (London, 1870); History of Israel, 5 vols.
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  • Estlin Carpenter (London, 1867-1874); Antiquities of Israel, by H.
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  • Four horns, representing the hostile world-power that oppresses Israel and Jerusalem, are cast down by four smiths.
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  • The scattered exiles return as citizens of the new theocracy, all obstacles in their way parting asunder as when the waves of the Red Sea gave passage to Israel at the founding of the old theocracy (x.
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  • the brotherhood between Judah and Israel.
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  • to), while the neighbours of Israel appear in ix.
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  • 5) could only increase the hostility, and preparations were made by Israel for an alliance with Damascus which culminated in an attack upon Judah in the time of Jotham's son, Ahaz.
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  • JEHOVAH (YAHWEH 2), in the Bible, the God of Israel.
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  • It appears, therefore, that in the tradition followed by the Israelite historian the tribes within whose pasture lands the mountain of God stood were worshippers of Yahweh before the time of Moses; and the surmise that the name Yahweh belongs to their speech, rather than to that of Israel, has considerable probability.
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  • We should thus have in the tablets evidence of the worship of Yahweh among the Western Semites at a time long before the rise of Israel.
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  • Yahweh leads Israel through the desert in a pillar of cloud and fire; he kindles Elijah's altar by lightning, and translates the prophet in a chariot of fire.
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  • As the God of Israel Yahweh becomes its leader and champion in war; he is a warrior, mighty in battle; but he is not a god of war in the specific sense.
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  • 1 Here he announced the impending fate of the priesthood and gained reputation throughout Israel as a prophet.
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  • After a period of oppression, Samuel suddenly reappears as a great religious leader of Israel, summons the people to return to Yahweh, and convenes a national assembly at Mizpah.
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  • 7) - leads an army of Israel and Judah to deliver Jabesh-Gilead from the Ammonites, and is now recognized as king.
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  • So, according to one view, Samuel's death marks a vital change in the fortunes of Israel (xxv.
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  • Despite the straitened circumstances of Israel, an army is mustered, a sudden blow is struck at the Philistines, and, as before, supernatural assistance is at hand.
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  • In early Israel it was considered natural to worship Yahweh by means of images (cp. the story of Gideon, Judg.
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  • But neither Elijah nor Elisha raised a voice against the cult; then, as later, in the time of Amos, it was nominally Yahweh-worship, and Hosea is the first to regard it as the fundamental cause of Israel's misery.
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  • Smith, Prophets of Israel, pp. 175 sqq.; Kennedy, Hastings' Dict.
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  • The internal disorders of the realm depicted by Micah are also prominent in Isaiah's prophecies; they were closely connected, not only with the foreign complications due to the approach of the Assyrians, but with the break-up of the old agrarian system within Israel, and with the rapid and uncompensated aggrandisement of the nobles during those prosperous years when the conquest of Edom by Amaziah and the occupation of the port of Elath by his son (2 Kings xiv.
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  • 5); Yahweh's words are still good to them that walk uprightly; the glory of Israel is driven to take refuge in Adullam, l as in the days when David's band of broken men was the true hope of the nation, but there is no hint that it is banished from the land.
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  • 1-6), and Israel's future recovery from present adversity through Divine grace (vii.
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  • In the rejuvenescence of the nation the old stays of that oppressive kingship which began with Solomon, the strongholds, the fortified cities, the chariots and horses so foreign to the life of ancient Israel, are no more known; they disappear together with the divinations, the soothsayers, the idols, the mazzebah and asherah of the high places.
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  • Then Yahweh shall arise mindful of His oath to the fathers, Israel shall be forgiven and restored, and the heathen humbled.
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  • Smith's The Prophets of Israel, 2nd ed., pp. xxiii.
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  • His son, Lord Lincoln, had heard Gladstone's speech against the Reform Bill delivered in the Oxford Union, and had written home that " a man had uprisen in Israel."
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  • Dayton's site was purchased in 1795 from John Cleves Symmes by a party of Revolutionary soldiers, and it was laid out as a town in 1796 by Israel Ludlow (one of the owners), by whom it was named in honour of Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824), a soldier in the War of Independence, a member of Congress from New Jersey in 1791- ' 799, and a United States senator in 1799-1805.
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  • Let us now collect specimens of the evidence for different varieties of cosmogony, ranging from those of the Red Indian tribes to that of the people of Israel.
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  • also the article on BABYLONIAN AND ASSYRIAN RELIGION; and Cheyne, Traditions and Beliefs of Ancient Israel (1907).
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  • Lebanon was included within the ideal boundaries of the land of Israel, and the whole region was well known to the Hebrews, by whose poets its many excellences are often praised.
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  • I) contains the " word of Yahweh to Israel by the hand of Malachi."
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  • These apply, in various ways, the truth emphasized at the outset: Yahweh's love for Israel in contrast with his treatment of Edom (i.
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  • Israel's response should be a proper regard for the ritual of His worship; yet any offering, however imperfect, is thought good enough for Yahweh's altar (i.
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  • In view of these conditions, the prophet's message is to reassert the true relation of Israel to Yahweh, and to call for a corresponding holiness, especially in regard to questions of ritual and of marriage.
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  • 9), the people bound by marriage to heathen women, while the tears of the daughters of Israel, thrust aside to make way for strangers, cover the altar (ii.
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  • To him, as to the Deuteronomic legislation, the forms of legal observance are of value only as the fitting expression of Israel's peculiar sonshin and service, and he shows himself a true prophet when he contrasts the worthless ministry of unwilling priests with the pure offering of prayer and praise that rises from the implicit monotheism of even Gentile worship 2 (i.
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  • 3 The book is a significant landmark in the religious history of Israel.
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  • But when Joab himself killed Abner David's imprecation against him and his brother Abishai showed that he dissociated himself from the act of vengeance, although it brought him nearer to the throne of all Israel (2 Sam.
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  • "Johanan felt the fall of his people more deeply than anyone else, but - and in this lies his historical importance - he did more than any one else to prepare the way for Israel to rise again" (Bacher).
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  • 10, " and they saw the God of Israel " is cited as an example.
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  • The creed of the Jew, to this day, is summed up in the well-remembered words, which have been ever on his lips, living or dying: " Hear, 0 Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord " (Deut.
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  • Alte Test., 2nd ed., 262) suspects a reference to Israel's overlordship in Judah; Burney (Heb.
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  • Text of Kings) reads: "how he fought with Damascus and how he turned away the wrath of Yahweh from Israel"; see also Ency.
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  • The story of Abraham is of greater value for the study of Old Testament theology than for the history of Israel.
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  • From the time when he was bidden to leave his country to enter the unknown land, Yahweh was ever present to encourage him to trust in the future when his posterity should possess the land, and so, in its bitterest hours, Israel could turn for consolation to the promises of the past which enshrined in Abraham its hopes for the future.
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  • It was thence that Jacob, the father of the tribes of Israel, came and the route to Shechem and Bethel is precisely the same in both.
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  • The various literatures of these nations were locked from view for more than two thousand years, while the literature of Israel had not merely been preserved, but had come to be regarded as inspired and sacred among all the cultured nations of the Western world.
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  • EPHRAIM, a tribe of Israel, called after the younger son of Joseph, who in his benediction exalted Ephraim over the elder brother Manasseh (Gen.
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  • Finally, even if "the woman" who is the mother of Christ be taken to be the ideal Israel in the beginning of the chapter, at its close she is clearly the Christian community founded by Him.
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  • The above solution may be regarded as established, though several scholars, as Oscar Holtzmann (Stade's Geschichte des Volkes Israel, ii.
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  • He has no serious preference for the people of Israel as such, but only for the martyrs and confessors, who shall belong to every tribe and tongue and people and nation (vii.
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  • ISRAEL (Hebrew for "God strives" or "rules"; see Gen.
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  • Israel was a name borne by their ancestor Jacob the father of the twelve tribes.
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  • The Talmud itself says that the judgment of capital cases was taken away from Israel forty years before the destruction of the Temple.
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  • KENITES, in the Bible a tribe or clan of the south of Palestine, closely associated with the Amalekites, whose hostility towards Israel, however, it did not share.
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  • 55), this obscure tribe had evidently an important part in shaping the religion of Israel.
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  • See on this question, HEBREW RELIGION, and Budde, Religion of Israel to the Exile, vol.
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  • This sanctuary and camp of Israel held a high place in the national regard, and is often mentioned in Judges and Samuel.
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  • Israel Ben Moses Najara >>
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  • It is difficult to date the alliance of Syria and Philistia against Israel in Isa.
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  • Again, the Aramaean attack upon Israel by Hazael of Damascus leads to the capture of Gath (2 Kings xii.
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  • 17), and this, together with the statement that he took " the Philistine " from Jehoahaz of Israel (ibid.
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  • Alt, Israel u.
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  • Samuel's great defeat of the Philistines leads to " peace between Israel and the Amorites " (I Sam.
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  • This fluctuation, due partly to the different circles in which the biblical narratives took shape, and partly to definite reshaping of the traditions of the past, seriously complicates all attempts to combine the early history of Israel with the external evidence.
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  • Biblical history has presented its own views of the Israelite and Judaean monarchies; Israel has its enemies who come pouring forth from the south (1 Sam.
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  • In the stories of Samson and Samuel, the Philistines are located in the maritime plain, whereas, in the oldest traceable account of Saul's rise (apparently shortly before 1000 B.C.) they hold Israel (I Sam.
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  • Israel had conquered two kings of eastern Palestine - Sihon, king of the Amorites, and Og, king of Bashan.
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  • Balak, king of Moab, became alarmed, and sent for Balaam to curse Israel; Balaam came after some hesitation, but when he sought to curse Israel Yahweh compelled him to bless them.
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  • Balak, king of Moab, alarmed at the Israelite conquests, sends elders of Moab and Midian to Balaam, son of Beor, to the land of Ammon, to induce him to come and curse Israel.
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  • Balak meets Balaam and they go together [and offer sacrifices]; Balaam, however, blesses Israel by divine inspiration; Balak remonstrates, but Balaam reminds him of his message and again blesses Israel.
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  • Balak, king of Moab, alarmed at the conquests of Israel, sends the princes of Moab to Balaam at Pethor on the Euphrates, that he may come and curse Israel.
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  • Balak offers sacrifices, but Yahweh inspires Balaam with a blessing on Israel.
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  • They try to get a more favourable result by sacrificing on a different spot, and by placing Balaam on the top of Pisgah to view Israel, but he is again compelled to bless Israel.
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  • The Priestly Code 3 has a different story to Balaam, in which he advises the Midianites how they may bring disaster on Israel by seducing the people Quoted Neh.
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  • 7-10, prophesies the unique exaltation of Israel, and its countless numbers.
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  • 18-24, celebrates the moral virtue of Israel, the monarchy and its conquests.
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  • "The three concluding oracles seem irrelevant here, being concerned neither with Israel nor Moab.
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  • 14 we read of false teachers at Pergamum who held the "teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to cast a stumblingblock before the children of Israel, to eat things sacrificed to idols, and to commit fornication."
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  • The chief significance of the Balaam narratives for the history of the religion of Israel is the recognition by J and E of the genuine inspiration of a non-Hebrew prophet.
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  • But the retention of the story without modification may imply a continuous recognition through some centuries of the idea that Yahweh revealed his will to nations other than Israel.
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  • Ewald, Geschichte des Volkes Israel i, 'Bd.'
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  • the meaning of his name above), an account is preserved of his alliance with Jehoram of Israel against Moab (2 Kings iii.), on which see JEHORAM; MoAB.
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  • Amongst books dealing with the more modern history of the Vaudois specially are Leger, Histoire des eglises vaudoises; Arnaud, Histoire de la rentree des Vaudois; Perrin, Histoire des Vaudois; Monastier, Histoire de l'eglise vaudoise; Muston, L' Israel des Alpes; Gilly, Excursion to the Valleys of Piedmont, and Researches on the Waldensians; Todd, The Waldensian Manuscripts; Melia, Origin, Persecution and Doctrines of the Waldensians; Jules Chevalier, Memoires sur les heresies en Dauphine avant le X VP siecle, accompannes de documents inedits sur les sorciers et les Vaudois (Valence, 1890); J.
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  • Io, 17), evidently of early origin, which interrupts the series of prophetic visions on the fall of the kingdom of Israel.
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  • The following words show that a prophet in ancient Israel had the utmost freedom of speech.
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  • Amaziah summarizes it thus, "Jeroboam shall die by the sword, and Israel shall go away into captivity from his own land" (vii.
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  • And it is perhaps not arbitrary to suppose that the splendour of the ritual in Amos's time implies a tremulous anxiety that Israel's seeming prosperity under Jeroboam II.
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  • For Amos cannot have been quite alone either in Israel or in Judah; there must have been a little flock of those who felt with Amos that there was small reason indeed to "desire the day of Yahweh" (v.
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  • For instance, how came Amos to transfer himself to northern Israel ?
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  • And how came he by his wide knowledge of people outside the limits of Israel ?
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  • Bib., " Amos," and the introduction to Robertson Smith's Prophets of Israel (2), though in some cases the final decision will have to be preceded by a more thorough examination of the traditional text.
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  • Beyond reasonable doubt, however, the writer seeks to take out the sting of the preceding passage in which Israel is devoted to utter destruction.
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