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isomerism

isomerism

isomerism Sentence Examples

  • In this domain his first research was on the fulminates of mercury and silver, and his study of these bodies led him to the discovery of the isomerism of cyanic and fulminic acids, for the composition of fulminic acid as found by him was the same as that of cyanic acid, as found by F.

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  • The first of the numerous cases of isomerism now known was noted, but unexplained, by J.

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  • Such isomerism, named stereoisomerism (q.v.),hasbeen assiduously developed during recentyears; it prevails among many different classes of organic compounds and many examples have been found in inorganic chemistry.

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  • Their full significance is treated in the section of this article dealing with organic chemistry, and in the articles Isomerism and STEREO-Isomerism.

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  • isomerism, or the existence of two or more chemically different substances having identical molecular weights, is adequately shown; and, most important of all, once the structure is determined, the synthesis of the compound is but a matter of time.

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  • The former pointed out that the supposed isomerism was not due to an arrangement of atoms, but to the disposition of a valency, and therefore it was doubtful whether such a subtle condition could exert any influence on the properties of the substance.

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  • Identity in composition, but difference in constitution, is generally known as " isomerism " (q.v.), and compounds satisfying this relation differ in many of their physical properties.

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  • Beckmann, Ber., 1886, 1 9, p. 9 8 9; 188 7, 20, p. 2580), yielding as final products an acid-amide or anilide, thus: RC(:N OH)R'-RC(OH) :NR' ---> As regards the constitution of the oximes, two possibilities exist, namely >C: NOH, or > C' ?, and the first of these is presumably correct, since on alkylation and subsequent hydrolysis an alkyl hydroxylamine of the type NH 2 OR is obtained, and consequently it is to be presumed that in the alkylated oxime, the alkyl group is attached to oxygen, and the oxime itself therefore contains the hydroxyl group. It is to be noted that the oximes of aromatic aldehydes and of unsymmetrical aromatic ketones frequently exist in isomeric forms. This isomerism is explained by the HantzschWerner hypothesis (Ber., 1890, 23, p. II) in which the assumption is made that the three valencies of the nitrogen atom do not lie in the same plane.

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  • The aldehyde group reacts with hydrocyanic acid to produce two stereo-isomeric cyanhydrins; this isomerism is due to the conversion of an originally non-asymmetric carbon atom into an asymmetric one.

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  • (For the isomerism of the aldoximes see Ox1MES).

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  • The constitution of the benzene ring, the isomerism of its derivatives, and their syntheses from aliphatic or openchain compounds, are treated in the article Chemistry.

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  • Many derivatives are known, some of which exist in two structural forms, exhibiting geometrical isomerism after the mode of fumaric and maleic acids.

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  • Isomerism >>

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  • The isomerism which occurs as soon as the molecule contains a few carbon atoms renders any classification based on empirical molecular formulae somewhat ineffective; on the other hand, a scheme based on molecular structure would involve more detail than it is here possible to give.

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  • Isomerism in the olefine series does not appear until the third member of the series is reached.

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  • Custom has to some extent restricted its use to inorganic chemistry; the corresponding property of organic compounds being generally termed isomerism.

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  • According to Hantzsch the isomeric diazo hydroxides are structurally identical, and the differences in behaviour are due to stereo-chemica l relations, the isomerism being comparable with that of the oximes.

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  • ISOMERISM, in chemistry.

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  • This fact, inconsistent with the then dominating conception that difference in qualities was due to difference in chemical composition, was soon corroborated by others of analogous nature, and so Berzelius introduced the term isomerism (Gr.

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  • A further distinction is necessary to a survey of the subdivisions of isomerism regarded in its widest sense.

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  • There are subtle and more subtle differences causing isomerism.

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  • Before entering into detail it may be useful to consider the nature of isomerism from a general standpoint.

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  • It is probable that the whole phenomenon of isomerism is due to the possibility that compounds or systems which in reality are unstable yet persist, or so slowly change that practically one can speak of their stability; for instance, such systems as explosives and a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, where the stable form is water, and in which, according to some, a slow but until now undetected change takes place even at ordinary temperatures.

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  • The possession of this peculiar property by carbon seems to be related to its high valency, amounting to four; and, generally, when we consider the most primitive expression of isomerism, viz.

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  • This connexion of isomerism with resistant linking, and of this with high valency, explains, in considerable measure, why inorganic compounds afforded, as a rule, no phenomena of this kind until the systematic investigation of metallic compounds by Werner brought to light many instances of isomerism in inorganic compounds.

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  • Whereas carbon renders isomerism possible in organic compounds, cobalt and platinum are the determining elements in inorganic chemistry, the phenomena being exhibited especially by complex ammoniacal derivatives.

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  • The conception of metamerism, or isomerism in restricted sense, has been of the highest value for the development of our notions concerning molecular structure, i.e.

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  • A general philosophical interest is attached to the phenomena of isomerism.

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  • The phenomenon of isomerism will probably supply the crucial test, at least for the chemist, and the question will be whether the Ostwaldian conception, while substituting the Daltonian hypothesis, will also explain isomerism.

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  • Considering the predicted series of compounds C7,H2,,+2, which is the well-known homologous series of methane, the first member, the possible of isomerism lies in that of a different linking of the carbon atoms. This first presents itself when four are present, i.e.

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  • in the difference between C - C - C - C C-C-C and With this compound C 4 H 10, named butane, C isomerism is actually observed, being limited to a pair, whereas the former members ethane, C 2 H 6, and propane, C 3 H 8, showed no isomerism.

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  • In this case it is readily seen that isomerism introduces itself in the three carbon atom derivative: the propyl alcohols, expressed by the formulae CH 3 CH2 CH 2 0HandCH 3 CHOH CH3, are known as propyl and isopropyl alcohol respectively.

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  • Certain investigations on isomerism which have become especially prominent in recent times bear on the possibility of the mutual transformation of isomers.

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  • Nevertheless, the relations obtained in reversible cases such as sulphur have not yet found application in the highly interesting cases of ordinary irreversible isomerism.

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  • For a discussion as to the composition, and whether it is to be regarded as possessing the "keto" form CH3�CO�CH2�000C2H5 or the "enol" form CH 3 �C(OH): CH�C00C 2 H 5, see Isomerism, and also papers by J.

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  • As regards the isomerism of the pyridine substitution products, three mono-derivatives are known, the different positions being indicated by the Greek, letters a, s and y, as shown in the inset formula.

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  • Isomerism.

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  • - No isomerism can occur in the monosubstitution derivatives but ordinary position isomerism exists in the dian .d poly-substitution compounds.

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  • Candidates should be able to show an understanding of isomerism by predicting some of the structures of the isomers of given higher alkanes.

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  • geometric isomerism.

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  • In fact the situation is even more complicated than it looks, because but-2-ene exhibits geometric isomerism.

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  • It is an example of structural isomerism, and is also called nuclear isomerism.

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  • Isomerism in the alkenes Structural isomerism in the alkenes Structural isomerism All the alkenes with 4 or more carbon atoms in them show structural isomerism.

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  • In AS and A2 Chemistry, we only need to know about geometrical isomerism caused by a C=C bond in the molecule.

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  • For a full discussion of geometric isomerism follow this link.

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  • Note: One of the worrying things about optical isomerism is the number of obscure words that suddenly get thrown at you.

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  • In structural isomerism, the atoms are arranged in a completely different order.

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  • Positional isomerism, an example of structural isomerism, occurs when functional groups are in different positions on the same carbon chain.

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  • chain isomerism is the type of isomerism you meet in GCSE Chemistry - see the isomers of hexane.

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  • You can easily have a mixture of chain isomerism and position isomerism - you aren't restricted to one or the other.

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  • Geometric isomerism (also known as cis / trans isomerism) is a form of stereoisomerism.

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  • Structural isomerism occurs when two or more organic compounds have the same molecular formulae, but different structures.

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  • The first of the numerous cases of isomerism now known was noted, but unexplained, by J.

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  • He regarded the chemical properties of a substance as due to (1) the chemical atoms composing it, and (2) the structure, and he asserted that while different compounds might have the same components (isomerism), yet only one compound could have a particular structure.

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  • Such isomerism, named stereoisomerism (q.v.),hasbeen assiduously developed during recentyears; it prevails among many different classes of organic compounds and many examples have been found in inorganic chemistry.

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  • Their full significance is treated in the section of this article dealing with organic chemistry, and in the articles Isomerism and STEREO-Isomerism.

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  • To this problem there was added another in about the third decade of the 19th century - namely, to determine the manner in which the atoms composing the radical were combined; this supplementary 'requisite was due to the discovery of the isomerism of silver fulminate and silver cyanate by Justus von Liebig in 1823, and to M.

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  • isomerism, or the existence of two or more chemically different substances having identical molecular weights, is adequately shown; and, most important of all, once the structure is determined, the synthesis of the compound is but a matter of time.

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  • The former pointed out that the supposed isomerism was not due to an arrangement of atoms, but to the disposition of a valency, and therefore it was doubtful whether such a subtle condition could exert any influence on the properties of the substance.

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  • Another form of isomerism is occasioned by spatial arrangements, many of the reduced terephthalic acids existing in two stereo-isomeric forms. Baeyer explains this by analogy with fumaric and maleic acids: he assumes the reduced benzene ring to lie in a plane; when both carboxyl groups are on the same side of this plane, the acids, in general, resemble maleic acids, these forms he denotes by rcis-cis, or shortly cis-; when the carboxyl groups are on opposite sides, the acids correspond to fumaric acid, these forms are denoted by rcis-trans, or shortly trans-.

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  • (The stereo-chemistry of carbon compounds has led to the spatial representation of a carbon atom as being situated at the centre of a tetrahedron, the four valencies being directed towards the apices; see above, and Isomerism.) A form based on Kekule's formula consists in taking three pairs of tetrahedra, each pair having a side in common, and joining them up along the sides of a regular hexagon by means of their apices.

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  • Identity in composition, but difference in constitution, is generally known as " isomerism " (q.v.), and compounds satisfying this relation differ in many of their physical properties.

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  • If, however, two compounds only differ with regard to the spatial arrangement of the atoms, the physical properties may be (I) for the most part identical, differences, however, being apparent with regard to the action of the molecules on polarized light, as is the case when the configuration is due to the presence of an asymmetric atom (optical isomerism); or (2) both chemical and physical properties may be different when the configuration is determined by the disposition of the atoms or groups attached to a pair of doubly-linked atoms, or to two members of a ring system (geometrical isomerism or allo-isomerism).

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  • Beckmann, Ber., 1886, 1 9, p. 9 8 9; 188 7, 20, p. 2580), yielding as final products an acid-amide or anilide, thus: RC(:N OH)R'-RC(OH) :NR' ---> As regards the constitution of the oximes, two possibilities exist, namely >C: NOH, or > C' ?, and the first of these is presumably correct, since on alkylation and subsequent hydrolysis an alkyl hydroxylamine of the type NH 2 OR is obtained, and consequently it is to be presumed that in the alkylated oxime, the alkyl group is attached to oxygen, and the oxime itself therefore contains the hydroxyl group. It is to be noted that the oximes of aromatic aldehydes and of unsymmetrical aromatic ketones frequently exist in isomeric forms. This isomerism is explained by the HantzschWerner hypothesis (Ber., 1890, 23, p. II) in which the assumption is made that the three valencies of the nitrogen atom do not lie in the same plane.

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  • The isomerism of the oximes of unsymmetrical ketones is explained in the same manner, and their configuration is determined by an application of the Beckmann transformation (see Ber., 1891, 24, p. 1 3); thus: R C R' - R C(OH): NR'-->R Conhr'(R' and OH, " syn ").

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  • The aldehyde group reacts with hydrocyanic acid to produce two stereo-isomeric cyanhydrins; this isomerism is due to the conversion of an originally non-asymmetric carbon atom into an asymmetric one.

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  • (For the isomerism of the aldoximes see Ox1MES).

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  • The constitution of the benzene ring, the isomerism of its derivatives, and their syntheses from aliphatic or openchain compounds, are treated in the article Chemistry.

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  • Many derivatives are known, some of which exist in two structural forms, exhibiting geometrical isomerism after the mode of fumaric and maleic acids.

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  • In this domain his first research was on the fulminates of mercury and silver, and his study of these bodies led him to the discovery of the isomerism of cyanic and fulminic acids, for the composition of fulminic acid as found by him was the same as that of cyanic acid, as found by F.

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  • The isomerism which occurs as soon as the molecule contains a few carbon atoms renders any classification based on empirical molecular formulae somewhat ineffective; on the other hand, a scheme based on molecular structure would involve more detail than it is here possible to give.

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  • Isomerism in the olefine series does not appear until the third member of the series is reached.

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  • The isomerism of crotonic and isocrotonic acids is to be explained on the assumption of a different spatial arrangement of the atoms in the molecule (see Stereochemistry).

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  • Custom has to some extent restricted its use to inorganic chemistry; the corresponding property of organic compounds being generally termed isomerism.

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  • According to Hantzsch the isomeric diazo hydroxides are structurally identical, and the differences in behaviour are due to stereo-chemica l relations, the isomerism being comparable with that of the oximes.

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  • ISOMERISM, in chemistry.

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  • This fact, inconsistent with the then dominating conception that difference in qualities was due to difference in chemical composition, was soon corroborated by others of analogous nature, and so Berzelius introduced the term isomerism (Gr.

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  • A further distinction is necessary to a survey of the subdivisions of isomerism regarded in its widest sense.

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  • There are subtle and more subtle differences causing isomerism.

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  • Before entering into detail it may be useful to consider the nature of isomerism from a general standpoint.

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  • It is probable that the whole phenomenon of isomerism is due to the possibility that compounds or systems which in reality are unstable yet persist, or so slowly change that practically one can speak of their stability; for instance, such systems as explosives and a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, where the stable form is water, and in which, according to some, a slow but until now undetected change takes place even at ordinary temperatures.

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  • The possession of this peculiar property by carbon seems to be related to its high valency, amounting to four; and, generally, when we consider the most primitive expression of isomerism, viz.

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  • This connexion of isomerism with resistant linking, and of this with high valency, explains, in considerable measure, why inorganic compounds afforded, as a rule, no phenomena of this kind until the systematic investigation of metallic compounds by Werner brought to light many instances of isomerism in inorganic compounds.

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  • Whereas carbon renders isomerism possible in organic compounds, cobalt and platinum are the determining elements in inorganic chemistry, the phenomena being exhibited especially by complex ammoniacal derivatives.

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  • The conception of metamerism, or isomerism in restricted sense, has been of the highest value for the development of our notions concerning molecular structure, i.e.

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  • A general philosophical interest is attached to the phenomena of isomerism.

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  • The phenomenon of isomerism will probably supply the crucial test, at least for the chemist, and the question will be whether the Ostwaldian conception, while substituting the Daltonian hypothesis, will also explain isomerism.

    0
    0
  • Considering the predicted series of compounds C7,H2,,+2, which is the well-known homologous series of methane, the first member, the possible of isomerism lies in that of a different linking of the carbon atoms. This first presents itself when four are present, i.e.

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  • in the difference between C - C - C - C C-C-C and With this compound C 4 H 10, named butane, C isomerism is actually observed, being limited to a pair, whereas the former members ethane, C 2 H 6, and propane, C 3 H 8, showed no isomerism.

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  • In this case it is readily seen that isomerism introduces itself in the three carbon atom derivative: the propyl alcohols, expressed by the formulae CH 3 CH2 CH 2 0HandCH 3 CHOH CH3, are known as propyl and isopropyl alcohol respectively.

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  • Certain investigations on isomerism which have become especially prominent in recent times bear on the possibility of the mutual transformation of isomers.

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  • Nevertheless, the relations obtained in reversible cases such as sulphur have not yet found application in the highly interesting cases of ordinary irreversible isomerism.

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  • For a discussion as to the composition, and whether it is to be regarded as possessing the "keto" form CH3�CO�CH2�000C2H5 or the "enol" form CH 3 �C(OH): CH�C00C 2 H 5, see Isomerism, and also papers by J.

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  • As regards the isomerism of the pyridine substitution products, three mono-derivatives are known, the different positions being indicated by the Greek, letters a, s and y, as shown in the inset formula.

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  • - No isomerism can occur in the monosubstitution derivatives but ordinary position isomerism exists in the dian .d poly-substitution compounds.

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  • He regarded the chemical properties of a substance as due to (1) the chemical atoms composing it, and (2) the structure, and he asserted that while different compounds might have the same components (isomerism), yet only one compound could have a particular structure.

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