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isle

isle

isle Sentence Examples

  • (The connexion of the Isle of Man with Norway is considered s.v.

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  • 1 Including Channel Islands and Isle of Man.

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  • In 1908 the output of limestone was valued at $20,731; there are limestone quarries in Washington and Orange counties and on Isle La Motte.

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  • It is found also in the Isle of Pines, and in the New Hebrides.

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  • With this apparatus some of Marconi's earliest successes, such as telegraphing across the English Channel, were achieved, and telegraphic communication at the rate of fifteen words or so a minute established between the East Goodwin lightship and the South Foreland lighthouse, also between the Isle of Wight and the Lizard in Cornwall.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • Belle Isle (the site of a Confederate prison camp during the Civil War), about a m.

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  • Phosphatic nodules occur also in the Chloritic Marl of the Isle of Wight and Dorsetshire, and at Wroughton, near Swindon.

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  • Phosphatic nodules occur also in the Chloritic Marl of the Isle of Wight and Dorsetshire, and at Wroughton, near Swindon.

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  • He at once began love-making, and in spite of his ugliness succeeded in winning the heart of the lady to whom his colonel was attached; this led to such scandal that his father obtained a lettre de cachet, and the young scapegrace was imprisoned in the isle of Re.

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  • In July 1643 Cromwell had been appointed governor of the Isle of Ely; on the 22nd of January 1644 he became second in command under the earl of Manchester as lieutenant-general of the Eastern Association, and on the 16th of February 1644 a member of the Committee of Both Kingdoms with greatly increased influence.

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  • He at once began love-making, and in spite of his ugliness succeeded in winning the heart of the lady to whom his colonel was attached; this led to such scandal that his father obtained a lettre de cachet, and the young scapegrace was imprisoned in the isle of Re.

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  • The forest vegetation, largely confined to the "Isle of Isles" and the southern uplands, includes the Adansonia (baobab), which in the Fazogli district attains gigantic proportions, the tamarind, of which bread is made, the deleb palm, several valuable gum trees (whence the term Sennari often applied in Egypt to gumarabic), some dyewoods, ebony, ironwood and many varieties of acacia.

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  • Of the nominally independent states the chief were the kingdom of Sardinia, ruled over by the house of Savoy, and comprising Piedmont, the isle of Sardinia and nominally Savoy and Nice, though the two provinces last named had virtually been lost to the monarchy since the campaign of 1793.

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  • Moore, History of the Isle of Man (London, 1900).

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  • In the German poem this is a veritable "Isle of Maidens," where no man ever enters, and where it is perpetual spring.

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  • Later the Bournemouth station was removed to Poole Harbour, and the Alum Bay station to Niton in the Isle of Wight, the distance being thus increased to 30 m.

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  • Sulphur containing selenium, such as occurs in the isle of Vulcano in the Lipari Isles, may be orange-red; and a similar colour is seen in sulphur which contains arsenic sulphide, such as that from La Solfatara near Naples.

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  • In 78 Agricola went to Britain, and both extended and consolidated the Roman dominion in that province, pushing his arms into North Wales and the Isle of Anglesey.

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  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

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  • Below the town of Bergerac it enters the department of Gironde, where at Libourne it is joined by the Isle and widens cut, attaining at its union with the Garonne 45 m.

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  • Regular passenger steamers serve Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Below the town of Bergerac it enters the department of Gironde, where at Libourne it is joined by the Isle and widens cut, attaining at its union with the Garonne 45 m.

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  • Two years later Valdemar, urged by Archbishop Anders Suneson, also appeared off the Esthonian coast and occupied the isle of Oesel.

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  • In May Bruce was again in England, and though he failed to take Carlisle, he subdued the Isle of Man.

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  • A further X100,000 was paid for the Jersey, Guernsey, Isle of Man and other undertakings, and about £2,000,000 was.

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  • In the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands courts Christian have now jurisdiction substantially as in England.

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  • For this service he was promoted in rank, and received a gift of the castle and isle of Indre, near Nantes.

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  • (Norse Sudr-eyjar, Sudreys, or southern isles, in distinction from Nordr-eyjar, the northern isles of Orkney and Shetland) and the Isle of Man.

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  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.

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  • He attended the queen in her flight to France in 1646, but disapproved of the prince's journey thither, and retired to Jersey, subsequently aiding in the king's escape to the Isle of Wight.

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  • Among other islands are Inch Cailliach (the "Island of Women," from the fact that a nunnery once stood there), Inchfad ("Long Island"), Inchcruin ("Round Island"), Inchtavannach ("Monks' Isle"), Inchconnachan ("Colquhoun's Isle"), Inchlonaig ("Isle of the Yews," where Robert Bruce caused yews to be planted to provide arms for his bowmen), Creinch, Torrinch and Clairinch (which gave the Buchanans their war-cry).

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  • In May 1223 he was seized at midnight in his tent on the isle of Lyo, whither he had come to hunt, by his vassal and guest.

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  • The distance from Dennis Head in North Ronaldshay of the Orkneys to Sumburgh Head in Shetland is 50 m., but Fair Isle, which belongs to Shetland, lies midway between the groups.

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  • The distance from Dennis Head in North Ronaldshay of the Orkneys to Sumburgh Head in Shetland is 50 m., but Fair Isle, which belongs to Shetland, lies midway between the groups.

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  • The cathedral of Sodor was on St Patrick's Isle at Peel, and it is possible that the name Sodor being lost, its meaning was applied to the isle as the seat of the bishop. The termination "and Man" seems to have been added in the 17th century by a legal draughtsman ignorant of the proper application of the name of Sodor to the bishopric of Man.

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  • P. Granville put into practice between Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight and the Needles lighthouse a method which depends upon conduction through sea water.

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  • With the help of a strong detachment of officers and men from the Atlantic coast he equipped a squadron consisting of one brig, six fine schooners and one sloop. Other vessels were laid down at Presque Isle (now Erie), where he concentrated the Lake Erie fleet in July.

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  • ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703), English experimental philosopher, was born on the 18th of July 1635 at Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, where his father, John Hooke, was minister of the parish.

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  • With the help of a strong detachment of officers and men from the Atlantic coast he equipped a squadron consisting of one brig, six fine schooners and one sloop. Other vessels were laid down at Presque Isle (now Erie), where he concentrated the Lake Erie fleet in July.

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  • ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703), English experimental philosopher, was born on the 18th of July 1635 at Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, where his father, John Hooke, was minister of the parish.

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  • In January 1901 he established communication by his system between the Lizard in Cornwall and Niton in the Isle of Wight, a distance of 200 m.

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  • MARGATE, a municipal borough and seaside resort in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 74 m.

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  • It has a river-frontage of 4.1 m., the Thames making two deep bends, enclosing the Isle of Dogs on the north and a similar peninsula on the Greenwich side.

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  • On Isle La Motte, Grand Isle county, there are marble quarries, the characteristic colours of the marble being "Fisk black" and "Fisk grey."

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  • THOMAS ARNOLD (1795-1842), English clergyman and headmaster of Rugby school, was born at West Cowes, in the Isle of Wight, on the 13th of June 1795.

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  • the country between the Blue Nile and the Atbara, and the land between the Blue Nile and its most eastern tributary the Rahad, this latter district being known as the "Isle of Isles."

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  • Stralsund entertains passengerboat communications with Barth, Stettin, Rostock and Lubeck as well as with various small ports on the isle of Riigen.

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  • SODOR AND MAN, the name of the bishopric of the Church of England which includes the Isle of Man and adjacent islets.

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  • He sent a missionary to the isle of Manaar, and himself visited Ceylon and Mailapur (Meliapur), the traditional tomb of St Thomas the apostle, which he reached in April 1544, remaining there four months.

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  • With reference to the Celtic race, P. cordata, it is interesting to note its connexion with Arthurian legend and the Isle of Avalon or Isle of Apples.

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  • and on Grand Isle, North Hero Island, and Isle La Motte in Lake Champlain.

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  • Burton-upon-Trent (Burhton) is first mentioned towards the close of the 9th century, when St Modwen, an Irish virgin, is said to have established a convent on the Isle of Andressey opposite Burton.

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  • Following on this he made an interesting experiment, using Morse's method, to connect the Isle of Wight telegraphically with the mainland, by conduction across the Solent in two places, during a temporary failure of the submarine cable in 1882 in that channel.

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  • In January 1901 he telegraphed without difficulty by electric waves from the Isle of Wight to the Lizard, viz.

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  • As his eyes adjusted to the light, he started down the side isle.

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  • of Scalloway, and Papa (priest's isle, 16), to the E.

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  • It seemed like only a few minutes before they were at church, making the last minute checks before she walked down the isle.

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  • The woman picked up a basket and started down an isle.

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  • Table XIII., in which the totals for the United Kingdom include those for the Channel Islands and Isle of Man, illustrates the preponderance of the sheep-breeding industry in the drier climate of Great Britain, and of the cattle-breeding industry in the more humid atmosphere of Ireland.

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  • Besides Mainland, the principal member of the group, the more important are Yell, Unst and Fetlar in the north, Whalsay and Bressay in the east, Trondra, East and West Burra, Papa Stour, Muckle Roe and Foula in the west, and Fair Isle in the south.

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  • Fair Isle (147) lies '24 m.

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  • The broch, which stands on a rocky promontory at the south-west of the isle, now measures about 45 ft.

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  • Holm of Papal, "isle of the priest" (2), belonging to Bressay parish, and Linga, "heather isle" (8), to the parish of Tingwall, lie S.E.

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  • Gruay, "green isle" (10), Housay (68), Bruray (44), Bound (2) are members of the group of Out Skerries, about 4 m.

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  • Fetlar (347) lies off the east coast of Yell, from which it is divided by Colgrave Sound and the isle of Hascosay and is 5 m.

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  • Uyea, "the isle," from the Old Norse oy (3), to the south of Unst, from which it is divided by the narrow sounds of Uyea and Skuda, yields a beautiful green serpentine.

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  • ALFRED MILNER MILNER, VISCOUNT (1854-), British statesman and colonial administrator, was born at Bonn on the 23rd of March 1854, the only son of Charles Milner, M.D., whose wife was a daughter of Major-General Ready, sometime governor of the Isle of Man.

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  • thick), on Week's Island, on Belle Isle and probably beneath the intervening marshes.

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  • The Isle of Pines in its northern part is hilly and wooded; in its southern part, very low, level and rather barren; a tidal swamp almost cuts the island in two.

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  • There are extensive and valuable deposits of beautiful marbles in the Isle of Pines, and lesser ones near Santiago.

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  • Mineral waters, though not yet important in trade, are extremely abundant, and a score of places in Cuba and the Isle of Pines are already known as health resorts.

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  • John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.

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  • Experiments made by Moore and Whitley at Port Erin in the Isle of Man show that the hydrogen-ion concentration falls from about 1084 in Dec. to about 108 ' 4 in April.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • It is formed of Weymouth, a fishing town and seaport on the southwest of the Wey, and Melcombe Regis on the north-east of the river, the two towns being contiguous The situation on Weymouth Bay, which is enclosed to the south by the Isle of Portland, and north by the eastward trend of the coast, is picturesque.

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  • It is probable that the town suffered considerably at the hands of the French at the beginning of the 15th century, though in 1404 the men of Weymouth were victorious over a party which landed in the Isle of Portland.

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  • An outlawed Englishman, Hereward by name, fortified the Isle of Ely and attracted a number of desperate spirits to his side; amongst others came Morcar, formerly earl of Northumbria, who had been disappointed in the hopes which he based on William's personal favour.

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  • Dying at Rouen in 1439, he left by Isabel, widow of Richard Beauchamp, earl of Worcester, a son, Earl Henry, who was created duke of Warwick, 1445, and is alleged, but without authority, to have been crowned king of the Isle of Wight by Henry VI.

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  • The stronghold of the Wends was the isle of Riigen.

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  • 1857), under-secretary for war 1900-2, lieutenantgovernor of the Isle of Man (1902) and a prominent militia officer.

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  • QUEENBOROUGH, a municipal borough in the Faversham parliamentary division of Kent, England, in the Isle of Sheppey, close to the junction of the Swale and Medway, 2 m.

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  • ISLE OF THANET, the extreme north-eastern corner of Kent, England, insulated by the two branches of the river Stour, and forming one of the eight parliamentary divisions of the county.

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  • With the drying up of this channel and the closing of Sandwich harbour in the 16th century, the present marshlands or level to the south and west of the isle were left.

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  • - The extent of the Port of London has been variously defined for different purposes, but for those of the Port Authority it is taken to extend from Teddington Lock to a line between Yantlet Creek in Kent and the City Stone opposite Canvey Isle and in Essex.

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  • Following the river down from the Tower these docks, with dates of original opening and existing extent, are - St Katherine's (1828; 102 acres), London (1805; 571 acres), West India, covering the northern part of the peninsula called the Isle of Dogs (1802; 1212 acres), East India, Blackwall (1806; 38 acres), Royal Victoria and Albert Docks (1876 and 1880 respectively), parallel with the river along Bugsby's and Woolwich Reaches, nearly 3 m.

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  • Millwall Docks (1868), in the south part of the Isle of Dogs, are 36 acres in extent.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • He chose the profession of military engineer, spent three years, to the decided injury of his health, at Fort Bourbon, Martinique, and was employed on his return at Rochelle, the Isle of Aix and Cherbourg.

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  • The Isle of Pines, so called from its araucarias (its native name is Kunie), geologically a continuation of New Caledonia, lies 30 m.

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  • The islands annexed to the colony of New Caledonia are the Isle of Pines, used as a place of detention for habitual criminals; the Loyalty Islands, E.

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  • France was now determined on the annexation, and the flag was raised at the same spot in 1853, but simultaneously the commander of a British vessel was in negotiation with the native chief of the Isle of Pines, and the British flag was hoisted there.

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  • After long wandering she reaches the barren isle of Delos, which, according to Pindar (Frag.

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  • ISLE OF DOGS, a district of London, England, on the north bank of the Thames, which surrounds it on three sides.

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  • The suggestion that it is corrupted from the Isle of Docks falls to the ground on the question of chronology; another, that there were royal kennels here, is improbable, though they were situated at Deptford in the 17th century.

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  • (106,470 acres) in extent (roughly equalling the Isle of Wight).

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  • To the south, separated by a strait that is fordable at low water, lies the isle of Oronsay, 21 m.

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  • GODWIT, a word of unknown origin, the name commonly applied to a marsh-bird in great repute, when fattened, for the table, and formerly abundant in the fens of Norfolk, the Isle of Ely and Lincolnshire.

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  • On the 13th of March 1644 the Portsmouth-Newport General Court changed the name of the island from Aquidneck to the Isle of Rhodes or Rhode Island.

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  • In 1640 the Generar Court of Massachusetts declared that the representatives of Aquidneck were " not to be capitulated withal either for themselves or the people of the isle where they inhabit," and in 1644 and again in 1648 the application of the Narragansett settlers for admission to the New England Confederacy was refused except on condition that they should pass under the jurisdiction of either Massachusetts or Plymouth.

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  • In the winter of 1853 Tennyson entered into possession of a little house and farm called Farringford, near Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, which he leased at first, and afterwards bought: this beautiful place, ringed round with ilexes and cedars, entered into his life and coloured it with its delicate enchantment.

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  • Although exceedingly near-sighted, Tennyson was a very close observer of nature, and at the age of eighty his dark and glowing eyes, which were still strong, continued to permit him to enjoy the delicate features of country life around him, both at Aldworth and in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Bloodstone is not very widely distributed, but is found in the basaltic rocks of the Isle of Rum in the west of Scotland, and in a few other localities.

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  • The shores are well wooded, and the lake is studded With several islands, of which Lord's Island, Derwent Isle and St Herbert's are the principal.

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  • St Herbert's Isle receives its name from having been the abode of a holy man of that name mentioned by Bede as contemporary with St Cuthbert of Fame Island in the 7th century.

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  • Derwent Isle, about six acres in extent, contains a handsome residence surrounded by lawns, gardens and timber of large growth.

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  • Passenger steamers serve Belfast and Londonderry regularly, and the Isle of Man and other ports during the season.

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  • Arrested in the Isle of Bourbon under the Terror, he was set free by the revolution of Thermidor (July 1794).

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  • He therefore withdrew to the isle of Oland till the abdication of Christina (June 5, 1654) called him to the throne.

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  • Sand may be taken as the predominating deposit on the continental shelves, often with a large admixture of remains of calcareous organisms, for instance the deposits of marl made up of nullipores off the coasts of Brittany and near Belle Isle.

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  • To avenge Richard's death he made a raid on the Isle of Wight, and then took part in the civil wars in France.

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  • New York is served by the American line, the North German Lloyd line, &c. Regular steamers serve the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and Havre, the principal English ports, Dublin, Belfast and Glasgow; and local steamers serve Cowes (Isle of Wight) and other neighbouring ports.

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  • His eldest brother, Charles d'Amboise, was governor of the Isle of France, Champagne and Burgundy, and councillor of Louis XI.

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  • But the Greenland colony was obscure, the country was believed to form part of Europe, and the records of the farther explorations were contained in sagas which were only rediscovered by modern scholarship. Throughout the middle ages, legendary tales of mythical lands lying in the western ocean - the Isle of St Brandan, of Brazil and Antilia - had been handed down.

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  • Between 1534 and 1542 this seaman, a native of St Malo, explored the Strait of Belle Isle and the Gulf of St Lawrence, and visited the Indian village of Hochelaga, now Montreal.

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  • WESTGATE-ON-SEA, a watering-place in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 2 m.

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  • Seven years before this the estate of Osborne had been purchased in the Isle of Wight, in order that the queen might have a home of her own.

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  • The funeral in London on the 1st and 2nd of February, including first the passage of the coffin from the Isle of Wight to Gosport between lines of warships, and secondly a military procession from London to Windsor, was a memorable solemnity: the greatest of English sovereigns, whose name would in history mark an age, had gone to her rest.

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  • The next year he took part in the desperate stand against the Conqueror's rule made in the isle of Ely, and, on its capture by the Normans, escaped with his followers through the fens.

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  • And in such passages as the famous "Voila de la pervenche" of the Confessions, as the description of the isle of St Pierre in the Reveries, as some of the letters in the Nouvelle Helotise and others, he had achieved absolute perfection in doing what he intended to do.

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  • The estuary of the Thames may be said to stretch from London Bridge to Sheerness in the Isle of Sheppey, which is divided from the mainland by the narrow channel (bridged at Queensbridge) of the Swale.

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  • Sheerness lies at the mouth of the Medway, a narrow branch of which cuts off a tongue of land termed the Isle of Grain lying opposite Sheerness.

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  • The marshes extend along the Swale to Whitstable, whence stretches a low line of clay and sandstone cliffs towards the Isle of Thanet, when they become lofty and grand, extending round the Foreland southward to Pegwell Bay, The coast from Sheppey round to the South Foreland is skirted by numerous flats and sands, the most extensive of which are the Goodwin Sands off Deal.

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  • wide stretching southwards from Whitstable to Canterbury, and extending eastwards to the Isle of Thanet.

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  • In the Isle of Thanet a light mould predominates, which has been much enriched by fish manure.

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  • Seaside resorts are numerous and populous - on the north coast are Minster (Sheppey), Whitstable and Herne Bay; there is a ring of watering-places round the Isle of ThanetBirchington, Westgate, Margate, Broadstairs, Ramsgate; while to the south are Sandwich, Deal, Walmer, St Margaret's-at-Cliffe, Dover, Folkestone, Sandgate and Hythe.

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  • The county (extra-metropolitan) is divided into 8 parliamentary divisions, namely, North-western or Dartford, Western or Sevenoaks, South-western or Tunbridge, Mid or Medway, North-eastern or Faversham, Southern or Ashford, Eastern or St Augustine's and the Isle of Thanet, each returning one member; while the boroughs of Canterbury, Chatham, Dover, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone and Rochester each return one member.

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  • Eighteen more islands are on the average as large as Jamaica; and more than a hundred are as large as the Isle of Wight."

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  • In 1758, under the duke of Marlborough, he shared in the ineffective raid on Cancale Bay, and the troops, after a short sojourn in the Isle of Wight, were sent to join the allied army of Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick in Germany.

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  • From time immemorial the isle of Gotland had been the staple of the Baltic trade, and its capital, Visby, whose burgesses were more than half German, the commercial intermediary between east and west, was the wealthiest city in northern Europe.

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  • FRESHWATER, a watering place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • Sailing into the Caspian, he ravaged the Persian coasts from Derbend to Baku, massacred the inhabitants of the great emporium of Resht, and in the spring of 1669 established himself on the isle of Suina, off which, in July, he annihilated a Persian fleet sent against him.

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  • RAMSGATE, a municipal borough, watering-place, seaport and member of the Cinque Port of Sandwich, in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 79 m.

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  • Such in particular were the Greek Isles of the Blest, or Fortunate Islands, the Welsh Avalon, the Portuguese Antilia or Isle of Seven Cities, and St Brendan's island, the subject of many sagas in many languages.

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  • Somewhat similar legends are those of the island of Brazil, of Lyonnesse, the sunken land off the Cornish coast, of the lost Breton city of Is, and of Mayda or Asmaide - the French Isle Verte and Portuguese Ilha Verde or "Green Island" - which appears in many folk-tales from Gibraltar to the Hebrides, and until 1853 was marked on English charts as a rock in 44° 48' N.

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  • The whole population of Garz was then baptized, and Absalon laid the foundations of twelve churches in the isle of Rugen.

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  • But he continued to keep a watchful eye over the Baltic, and in 1170 destroyed another pirate stronghold, farther eastward, at Dievenow on the isle of Wollin.

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  • The following table illustrates the growth and progress of British home shipping: Number and Tonnage of Steamers and Sailing Vessels registered in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man and Channel Islands on 31st of December of various Years.

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  • Galena is met with at all places where lead is mined; of localities which have yielded finely crystallized specimens the following may be selected for mention: Derbyshire, Alston in Cumberland, Laxey in the Isle of Man (where crystals measuring almost a foot across have been found), Neudorf in the Harz, Rossie in New York and Joplin in Missouri.

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  • In that year Walsingham married a second time, his first wife having died in 1564; his second was also a widow, Ursula, daughter of Henry St Barbe and widow of Sir Richard Worsley of Appuldurcombe, captain of the Isle of Wight.

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  • Formerly the term was held to embrace not only all the islands off the Scottish western coast, including the islands in the Firth of Clyde, but also the peninsula of Kintyre, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Rathlin, off the coast of Antrim.

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  • Soon afterwards they began to make incursions against their mother-country, and on this account Harald fitted out an expedition against them, and placed Orkney, Shetland, the Hebrides and the Isle of Man under Norwegian government.

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  • The long stretches of sheltered navigation from the Straits of Belle Isle north of Newfoundland to Quebec, and for 600 m.

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  • The isle is surrounded by shoals, and high-level and low-level lighthouses have been erected, the one at the north-west and the other at the north-east corner.

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  • Here also lived King Radbod, a pagan, and on this isle St Willibrord in the 7th century first preached Christianity; and for its ownership, before and after that date, many sea-rovers have fought.

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  • Cienfuegos is served by the United railways and by steamers connecting with Santiago, Batabano, Trinidad and the Isle of Pines.

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  • By such measures Spain was induced to sue for peace, which was finally signed in the Isle of Pheasants on the Bidassoa, and is known as the Treaty of the Pyrenees.

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  • The plant is widely distributed in temperate and tropical regions, and is occasionally found in the western counties of England, the Isle of Man, and west Ireland, growing on damp rocks or walls especially near the sea.

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  • Black Isle >>

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  • Landowners refused sites, and in the Isle of Wight the people worshipped for many months in a quarry.

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  • The peaks of the mountain are irregular, abrupt and broken; its sides are deeply furrowed by gorges and ravines; the shore plain is broken by ridges and by broad and deep valleys; no other island of the group is so well watered on all sides by large mountain streams; and it is called " garden isle."

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  • The causeway connecting the isle with the mainland was long submerged too deeply for use, but the reclamation operations already referred to almost brought it into view again.

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  • NORTH FORELAND and South, two chalk headlands on the Kent coast of England, overlooking the Strait of Dover, the North Foreland forming the eastern projection of the Isle of Thanet, and the South standing 3 m.

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  • Lastly, even the Isle of Wight appears to have had a dynasty of its own.

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  • In William Barlowe's Navigator's Supply, published in 1597, we read:- "Some fewe yeeres since, it so fell out that I had severall conferences with two East Indians which were brought into England by master Candish [[[Thomas Cavendish (Candish)|Thomas Cavendish]]], and had learned our language: The one of them was of Mamillia [[[Manila]]] in the Isle of Luzon, the other of Miaco in Japan.

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  • in height and along the foot of this is only a narrow beach, but in front of the city of Erie the shore currents have formed a spit, known as Presque Isle, which affords a good harbour.

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  • The flora is most varied in the Susquehanna Valley below Harrisburg, and on Presque Isle are some plants peculiar to the Lake region.

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  • The Isle of Dogs and Yarmouth, in Norfolk, are reported to be the chief of the English strongholds of the black rat.

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  • On Erie the American headquarters were at Presqu' Isle, now the city of Erie; the English at Fort Malden.

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  • 404 an institution in which Goths might be trained to preach the Gospel to their own people; 3 Martin of Tours, who evangelized the central districts of Gaul; Valentinus, the " apostle of Noricum," about 440; Honoratus, who from his monastic home in the islet of Lerins, about 410, sent missionaries among the masses of heathendom in the neighbourhood of Arles, Lyons, Troyes, Metz and Nice; and St Patrick, who converted Ireland into " the isle of saints " (died either in 463 or 495).

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  • of Portugal, disembarked at Goa on the 6th of May 1542, and before his death on the Isle of St John (Hiang-Shang), on the 2nd of December 155 roused the European Christians of Goa to a new life, laboured with singular success amongst the Paravars, a fisher caste near Cape Comorin, gathered many converts in the kingdom of Travancore, visited Malacca, and founded a mission in Japan.

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  • In 1140 a Benedictine monastery was founded here by Ralph Boteler of Oversley, and received the name of the Church of Our Lady of the Isle, owing to its insulation by a moat meeting the river Arrow.

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  • SHANKLIN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 82 m.

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  • In 1649 he was appointed a governor of the Isle of Wight, and in 1650, as lieutenant-general of the horse, took part in Cromwell's campaign in Scotland and assisted in the victory of Dunbar.

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  • In 530 Cerdic and Cynric are said to have conquered the Isle of Wight, which they gave to two of their relatives, Stuf and Wihtgar.

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  • Suspicion likewise attaches to the name Cerdic, which seems to be Welsh, while we learn from Bede that the Isle of Wight, together with part at least of the Hampshire coast, was colonized by Jutes, who apparently had a kingdom distinct from that of Wessex.

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  • According to Bede, however, the kingdom was in a state of disunion from the death of Cenwalh to the accession of Ceadwalla in 685, who greatly increased its prestige and conquered the Isle of Wight, the inhabitants of which he treated with great barbarity.

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  • in width, and with an average depth of about 20 ft.; it is nearly enclosed by Presque Isle, a long narrow strip of land of about 3000racres from 300 ft.

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  • On the site of Erie the French erected Fort Presque Isle in 1753, and about it founded a village of a few hundred inhabitants.

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  • CORFE CASTLE, a town in the eastern parliamentary division of Dorsetshire, England, in the district called the Isle of Purbeck, 1292 m.

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  • SANDOWN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 62 m.

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  • Here he rescued the pagan folk from an impending famine, sent preachers to the Isle of Wight and founded a monastery at Selsey.

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  • Tan BLACK ISLE, a district in the east of the county of Ross and Cromarty, Scotland, bounded N.

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  • The isle of Gerba off the African coast was held for a short time, and traces of the connexion with Greece went on in various shapes.

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  • In the Isle of Wight there is a pair of pendulums arranged as in fig.

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  • By this treaty Treaty of Sweden gave back the province of Trondhjem and the T Copen= isle of Bornholm and released Denmark from the most hagen, onerous of the obligations of the treaty of Roskilde.

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  • The bishoprics of Bremen and Verden, the province of Farther Pomerania and the isle of Riigen which her armies had actually conquered, and which had been guaranteed to her by a whole catena of treaties, went partly to the upstart electorate of Hanover and partly to the upstart kingdom of Prussia, both of which states had been of no political importance whatever at the beginning of the war of spoliation by which they were, ultimately, to profit so largely and so cheaply.

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  • Mr Jackson and his party landed at "Elmwood" (which was named from Lord Northcliffe's seat in the Isle of Thanet), near Cape Flora, at the western extremity of Northbrook Island, on the 7th of September.

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  • No measures were taken for her deliverance or her ransom, and Normandy and the Isle of France remained in English hands.

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  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

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  • The estuary of the Dee is divided at its head by the peninsula of St Mary's Isle, but though the harbour is the best in south-western Scotland, the great distance to which the tide retreats impairs its usefulness.

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  • On St Mary's Isle was situated the seat of the earl of Selkirk, at whose house Robert Burns gave the famous Selkirk grace: "Some ha'e meat, and canna eat, And some wad eat that want it; But we ha'e meat, and we can eat, And sae the Lord be thankit."

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  • Fergus, lord of Galloway, a celebrated church-builder of the 12th century, had his principal seat on Palace Isle in a lake called after him Loch Fergus, near St Mary's Isle, where he erected the priory de Trayle, in token of his penitence for rebellion against David I.

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  • Its name - of which Maroy and Mourie are older variants - does not, as is often supposed, commemorate the Virgin, but St Maelrubha, who came from Bangor in Ireland in 671 and founded a monastery at Applecross and a chapel (now in ruins) on Isle Maree.

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  • Nearly all the islands lie north and east of Slattadale, the largest being Eilean Subhainn, or St Swithin's Isle, which contains a small lake 750 ft.

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  • foetidissima (stinking iris), Gladiolus communis, a rare plant found in the New Forest and the Isle of Wight, and Romulea Columnae, a small plant with narrow recurved leaves a few inches long and a short scape bearing one or more small regular funnel-shaped flowers, which occurs at Dawlish in Devonshire.

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  • Traces of annelids and probably other organisms have been found in the bands of shale occurring in the south-west of the shire of Ross and Cromarty, in the isle of Raasay, and at Cailleach Head, and are the oldest relics of animal life yet found in Great Britain.

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  • Such strata are well seen in the isle of Raasay and near Heast in Skye.

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  • In the Isle of Eigg, for example, the basalts had already been deeply eroded by river-action and into the river-course a current of glassy lava (pitch-stone) flowed.

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  • Thus for seven ` hundred years the division of the isle of Britain was a constant cause of weakness and public. distress.

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  • In 563-565 he founded his mission and monastery in the isle of Iona, and journeying to Inverness he converted the king of the Picts.

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  • It is impossible will' here to analyse the disputes as to whether, in Freeman's words, " from this time to the 14th century " (he means, to Bannockburn) " the vassalage of Scotland was an essential part of the public law of the Isle of Britain."

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  • Alexander (1260) won the western isles and the Isle of Man from Norway, paying 4000 merks, and promising a yearly rent of 100 merks.

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  • He was driven to an isle off the Irish coast; he thence joined Douglas in Arran, and by a sudden camisade he butchered the English cantoned under his own castle of Turnberry in Carrick.

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  • The name of Athelney signifies the Isle of Princes (A.S.

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  • According to Bede, dEthelwald, king of Sussex, had been previously baptized in Mercia at the suggestion of Wulfhere, who presented him with the Isle of Wight and the district about the Meon.

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  • Remains of camels (C. thomasi) have also been found in the Pleistocene strata of Oran and Ouen Seguen, in Algeria; and certain remains from the Isle of Samos have been assigned to the same genus, although the reference requires confirmation.

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  • In 1829, after short pastorates at Bedford (New Meeting) and Newport, Isle of Wight, he accepted a call to the historic Weigh House chapel, London.

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  • The harbour is screened from south-westerly gales by the isle of Sanday.

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  • In it Macleod of Skye, towards the end of the r6th century, ordered 200 Macdonalds, inhabitants of the isle - men, women and children - to be suffocated, their bones being found long afterwards.

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  • In section the isle is seen to possess a threefold character: there is first a basement of tufa, from which rise, secondly, colonnades of basalt in pillars forming the faces and walls of the principal caves, and these in turn are overlaid, thirdly, by a mass of amorphous basalt.

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  • The grotto, situated in the southern face of the isle, is 2 27 ft.

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  • Anglesey, "Angles' Island"; Welsh, Ynys Enlli, " isle of the current"), an island at the northern extremity of Cardigan Bay.

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  • A part of the isle is one great cemetery of about 3 to 4 acres, with rude, rough graves as close to each other as possible, with slabs upon them.

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  • Though Aberdaron rectory does not belong to the isle, the farm "Cwrt" (Court), where the abbot held his court, still goes with Bardsey, which was granted to John Wynn of Bodvel, Carnarvonshire, after the battle and partial sack of Norwich by the Puritans in the Civil War; passing through Mary Bodvel to her husband, the earl of Radnor, who sold it to Dr Wilson of York.

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  • The archaeology and history of the isle are voluminous.

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  • To the Greeks and Romans Sokotra was known as the isle of Dioscorides; this name, and that by which the island is now known, are usually traced back to a Sanskrit form, Dvipa-Sakhadhara, "the island abode of bliss," which again suggests an identification with the vrjvoc ei)Saiµoves of Agatharchides (§ 103).

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  • who made him lord of the Isle of Man, the bishop died at Eltham on the 3rd of March 1311.

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  • Regular passenger communications are maintained with the Isle of Man.

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  • Grant, History of Mauritius, or the Isle of France and Neighbouring Islands (1801); J.

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  • P. Flemyng, Mauritius, or the Isle of France (1862); Ch.

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  • CARISBROOKE, a town in the Isle of Wight, England, i m.

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  • From this date lordship of the Isle of Wight was always associated with ownership of the castle, which thus became the seat of government of the island.

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  • Portsmouth Harbour opens into Spithead, one of the arms of the Channel separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland.

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  • There is a railway station (Portsmouth Harbour) on the Hard, from which passenger steamers serve Ryde in the Isle of Wight.

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  • from Port Dearg, lies the pear-shaped isle of Pladda, which serves as the telegraph station from which the arrival of vessels in the Clyde is notified to Glasgow and Greenock.

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  • 4 In a story from the isle of Lesbos the dragon must receive a human victim twice a day.

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  • Arndt, Fairy Tales from the Isle of Rugen (London, 1896).

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  • The nucleus of the county consisted of the lands of Cromarty in the north of the peninsula of the Black Isle.

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  • In 1651 Lord Derby landed from the Isle of Man and marched through Preston to Wigan on the way to join Charles II.

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  • The engagement made with Charles, then a prisoner in the Isle of Wight in 1647, which promised him support on condition of his sanctioning the Solemn League and Covenant and pledging himself to set up after three years a church according to the Confession of Faith, was protested against by the assembly; and from this came the famous " Act of Classes " by which the Covenanters disqualified for public office and even for military service all who had been parties to the engagement.

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  • Baraey, isle of the ocean), an island of the outer Hebrides, Inverness-shire, Scotland.

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  • VENTNOR, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 122 m.

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  • In Welsh the name is Ynys yr Afallon, usually interpreted "Isle of Apples," but possibly connected with the Celtic tradition of a king over the dead named Avalloc (in Welsh Afallach).

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  • Other forms of the name are Ynysvitrin and Ynysgutrin, "Isle of Glass" - which appear to be identical with Glasberg, the Teutonic kingdom of the dead.

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  • Perhaps owing to a confusion between Glasberg or Ynysvitrin and the Anglo-Saxon Glaestinga-burh, Glastonbury, the name "Isle of Avalon" was given to the low ridge in central Somersetshire which culminates in Glastonbury Tor, while Glastonbury itself came to be called Avalon.

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  • BjdrkS ("the isle of birches"), by foreign authors called Birka, was a kind of capital where the king lived occasionally at least; history speaks of its relations with Dorestad in the Netherlands, and the extensive refuse heaps of the old city, as well as the numerous sepulchral monuments, show that the population must have been large.

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  • It came to be called Stockholm ("the isle of the log," Latin Holmia, German Holm); the true explanation of the name is not known.

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  • The workers were thus distributed between the three kingdoms and the principality in 1905: The total figures given above include (a) 550 and (b) 166 workers in the Isle of Man; and the figures quoted for production include that of the isle.

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  • The most productive counties are Flint, Durham and Derby; the ore obtained in the Isle of Man is increased in value by the silver it contains.

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  • Zinc ore is obtained chiefly from mines in Cumberland, Wales and the Isle of Man.

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  • What she actually got was (1) Upper Pomerania, with the islands of Riigen and Usedom, and a strip of Lower Pomerania on the right side of the Oder, including the towns of Stettin, Garz, Damm and Gollnow, and the isle of Wollin, with the right of succession to the rest of Lower Pomerania in the case of the extinction of the Brandenburg Hohenzollerns; (2) the town of Wismar with the districts of Poel and Neukloster; (3) the secularized bishoprics of Bremen and Verden; and (4) 5,000,000 rix-dollars.

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  • The differences between the two states were finally adjusted by the peace of Copenhagen (May 27, 1660), Denmark ceding the three Scanian provinces to Sweden but receiving back the Norwegian province of Trondhjem and the isle of Bornholm which she had surrendered by the peace of Roskilde two years previously.

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  • The act of 1679 expressly applies to Wales, Berwick-on-Tweed, Jersey and Guernsey, and the act of 1816 also extends to the Isle of Man.

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  • The expression "foreign dominion" is meant to apply to places outside the British Islands, and does not include the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands (see re Brown [1864], 33 L.J.Q.B.

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  • KARL SCHWARZ (1812-1885), German Protestant theologian, was born at Wiek on the Isle of Riigen on the 19th of November 1812.

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  • THE SOLENT, a strait of the English Channel, between the mainland (the coast of Hampshire, England), and the northwestern coast of the Isle of Wight, forming the western entrance to Southampton Water, Spithead being the eastern.

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  • How far he really was responsible for the other great castle attributed to him, that of Queenborough Castle in the Isle of Sheppey, cannot be tested, as the building accounts for it are only partially extant.

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  • On the 2nd of April four commissioners were appointed to superintend the construction of the new castle ordered in the Isle of Sheppey, which when finished was called Queenborough, the purchases and payments, not the works, being under the beloved clerk, Wykeham, In this year came the second visitation of the Black Death, the Second Plague, as it was called, and carried off four bishops and several magnates, with many clerics, whose vacated preferments were poured on Wykeham.

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  • Ramsey, Isle of Man >>

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  • The surface of the upper 1 This is the northernmost point of the mainland; the most northerly of the islands north-east of Isle Royal and belonging to Michigan is more than 40' further north.

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  • The north portion of these ranges, together with Isle Royale some distance farther north, which is itself traversed by several less elevated parallel ridges, contains the Michigan copperbearing rocks; while to the south, along the Wisconsin border, is another iron district, the Gogebic. The rivers of the entire state consist of numerous small streams of clear water.

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  • To this tract the name of Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey, was given, as the same name had been given in a patent to Carteret issued in 1650, to " a certain island and adjacent islets" near Virginia, in America, which were never settled - in honour of Carteret, who governed the isle of Jersey in1643-1651and there entertained Prince Charles during his exile from England.

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  • In 1830 he was presented by Bishop Sumner of Winchester to the rectory of Brightstone in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The Isles now lay at Alexander's feet, and in 1266 Haakon's successor concluded a treaty by which the Isle of Man and the Western Isles were ceded to Scotland in return for a money payment, Orkney and Shetland alone being retained.

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  • COWES, a seaport and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • West Cowes is served by the Isle of Wight Central railway.

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  • Before he was four-and-twenty he had stood two contested elections for the university of Cambridge, at which he was defeated, and he entered parliament for a pocketborough, Newtown, Isle of Wight, in June 1807.

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  • In 1841 he was appointed vice-principal of King William's College, Castletown, in the Isle of Man, and this position he held until 1856.

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  • The results were published in a classic volume The Isle of Man; its History, Physical, Ecclesiastical, Civil and Legendary (1848).

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  • The coast-line of Anglesea and the Isle of Wight, but of no other islands, is included.

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  • The east and south coasts show considerable stretches of uniform uninflected coast-line, and except for the Farne Islands and Holy Island in the extreme north, the flat islands formed by ramifications of the estuaries on the Essex and north Kent coasts, and the Isle of Wight in the south, they are without islands.

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  • A flat coast follows as far as Selsey Bill and Spithead, but the south coast 410 [Physical Geography] of the Isle of Wight shows a succession of splendid cliffs.

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  • Again, the Isle of Thanet, in the north-eastern corner of Kent, has practically ceased to be an island.

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  • From the upland of Salisbury Plain, which corresponds to the axis of the anticline marking the centre of the double fold into which the strata of the south of England have been thrown, the great Chalk escarpment runs north-eastward; fingers of Chalk run eastward one each side of the Weald, forming the North and South Downs, while the southern edge of the Chalk sheet appears from beneath the Tertiary strata at several places on the south coast, and especially in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The Hampshire Basin forms a triangle with Dorchester, Salisbury and Worthing near the angles, and the rim of Chalk to the south appears in broken fragments in the Isle of Purbeck, the Isle of Wight, and to the east of Bognor.

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  • Again, in the Hampshire Basin and Isle of Wight, Eocene and Oligocene formations rest upon the Chalk.

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  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

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  • Isle of Ely.

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  • Isle of Wight.

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  • ydk len e nPP ° rth Isle L y e rtune Whitcl an 1 rn P 'e?'i Domtnic ollato k nce l St yoHel anSt.Breoc al el Wrnno ?stle¦gho rranpon 1 B mm ueth Lash olumb d?

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  • Special provision has also been made for the highways in the Isle of Wight and in South Wales, where the roads were formerly regulated by special acts, and not by the ordinary Highway Acts.

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  • The state maintains five normal schools: that at Farmington (established 1864), that at Castine (1866), that at Gorham (1879); that at Presque Isle (the Aroostook state normal school, 1903), and the Madawaska training school at Fort Kent, each of which is under the direction of a board of trustees consisting of the governor, the state superintendent of schools, and five other members appointed by the governor and council for not more than three years.

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  • De Costa, Sketches of the Coast of Maine and Isle of Shoals (New York, 1869); H.

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  • Idyll vii., the Harvest Feast (eaXUVla), is the most important of the bucolic poems. The scene is laid in the isle of Cos.

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  • It is quite uncertain whether the bucolic poems were written in the pleasant isle of Cos among a circle of poets and students, or in Alexandria and meant for dwellers in streets.

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  • In the Isle of Man it is styled Mauthe Doog.

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  • Being lord of the Isle of Wight at the time, he was in 1467 appointed one of the ambassadors to treat with the duke of 1 Rivers and Canals, znd ed.

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  • There are not many islands in the lake, the largest being Isle Royal, 44 m.

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  • The boundary between the United States and Canada runs up the middle of the outlet of the lake and follows a median line approximately to about mid-lake; thence it sweeps northwestward, so as to include Isle Royal within the territory of the United States, and continues near the north shore, to the mouth of Pigeon River, which it follows westward, leaving the whole west end of the lake in United States territory.

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  • Native silver as well as silver ores exist around Thunder Bay, native copper was formerly worked on Isle Royal, and rich copper mines are worked on the south shore, while nickel abounds in the country north of the lake.

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  • ISLE OF PORTLAND, properly a peninsula of the coast of Dorsetshire, England, as a prolongation of a narrow ridge of shingle, Chesil Bank, connects it with the mainland.

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  • Wave action is seen in the numerous caverns, and south-east of Portland Bill, the southern extremity of the isle, is a bank called the Shambles, between which and the land there flows a dangerous current called the Race of Portland.

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  • A joint railway of the Great Western and London & South Western companies runs south from Weymouth to Portland (44 m.) and Easton (82 m.) on the isle.

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  • The isle contains a convict prison with accommodation for about 1500 prisoners.

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  • The isle of Portland is not mentioned in the time of the Romans.

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  • He is said to have had a vision, while he was at Amiens, of his wife, with her hair over her shoulders, bearing a dead child in her arms, on the very night that Mrs Donne, in London (or more probably in the Isle of Wight), was delivered of a still-born infant.

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  • By the help of the prime minister he entered parliament for the borough of Newtown in the Isle of Wight in July 1793.

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  • It forms the southern and residential quarter of Portsmouth, and overlooks Spithead, the inlet of the English Channel between the Isle of Wight and the mainland on the north-east.

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  • RYDE, a municipal borough and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 5 m.

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  • The principal buildings are All Saints church, erected in 1870 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, and other churches, the market house and town hall, the Royal Victoria Yacht club-house, the theatre and the Royal Isle of Wight Infirmary.

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  • declared that the islands forming the delta of the Danube, the Isle of Serpents, and the province of Dobrudja, as far as a line starting from the east of Silistria and terminating on the Black Sea south of Mangalia, should be added to Rumania.

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  • Steamers run every week-day to Arran and Belfast, and during summer there is a service also to Douglas in the Isle of Man.

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  • In summer there are frequent excursions to the Bass Rock and the Isle of May, North Berwick, Elie, Aberdour, Alloa and Stirling.

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  • BROADSTAIRS, a watering-place in the Isle of Tha.net parliamentary division of Kent, England, 3 m.

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  • - Section of the Isle of Wight - a Monoclinal Curve.

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  • The most notable instance of this structure in Britain is that of the Isle of Wight, of which a section is given in fig.

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  • On well-guarded strongholds like Thanet or Sheppey in England, Noirmoutier at the Loire mouth, or the Isle of Walcheren, they defied the local magnates to evict them.

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  • The fleet which was coming to carry them off, or to bring them reinforcements, fought an indecisive erigagem~nt with the English ships, and was wrecked immediately after on the cliffs of the Isle of Purbeck, where more than.

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  • He was apparently taken by surprise by an assault at such an unusual time of the year, and was forced to escape with his military household to the isle of Athelney among the marshes of the Parrett.

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  • Edmund was so hard hit by this last disaster that he offered to divide the realm with Canute;they met on the isle of Alney near Gloucester, and agreed that the son of ~lthelred should keep Wessex and all the South, London and East Anglia, while the Dane should have Northumbria, the five boroughs and Eadrics Mercian earldom.

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  • All through the summcr Harold held a fleet concentrated under the lee of the Isle of Wight, waiting to intercept Williams armament, while the fyrd of Wessex was ready to support him if the enemy should succeed in making a landing.

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  • It lies on the picturesque Swanage Bay, on the east coast of the so-called Isle of Purbeck, the district lying south of Poole Harbour.

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  • the island that is reached "before" Cipango), or from the Jezirat al Tennyn, " Dragon's Isle," of the Arabian geographers.

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  • 315) speaks of comparing his own drawing "with Brown's old draught of it, still preserved in the British Museum," and thus identifies the latter's "shearwater" with the "puffin of the Isle of Man."

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  • The abbey founded several offshoot houses, one of the most important being Rushen Abbey in the Isle of Man.

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  • After this the chief matters worth notice in Dom Henry's life are, first, the progress of discovery and colonization in the Azores - where Terceira was discovered before 1450, perhaps in 1445, and apparently by a Fleming, called "Jacques de Bruges" in the prince's charter of the 2nd of March 1450 (by this charter Jacques receives the captaincy of this isle as its intending colonizer); secondly, the rapid progress of civilization in Madeira, evidenced by its timber trade to Portugal, by its sugar, corn and honey, and above all by its wine, produced from the Malvoisie or Malmsey grape, introduced from Crete; and thirdly, the explorations o Cadamosto and Diogo Gomez.

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  • Newport, Isle Of Wight, England >>

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  • He accepted the charge of a corvette, the "Anacreon," placed at his disposal by the French government, in which, accompanied by a few leading United Irishmen, and supplied with a small force of men and a considerable quantity of arms and ammunition for distribution in Ireland, he sailed from Dunkirk and arrived at the isle of Aran, off the coast of Donegal, on the 16th of September 1798.

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  • in the Isle of Wight, assisting him in the abortive negotiations with parliament on the question of episcopacy.

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  • The principal towns in the isle are Crowle (pop. 2769) and Epworth.

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  • The Axholme joint light railway runs north and south through the isle, connecting Goole with Haxey junction; and the Great Northern, Great Eastern and Great Central lines also afford communications.

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  • Literary evidence of the colonization of south Wales is preserved both in Welsh and Irish sources, and some idea of the extent of Irish oversea activity may be gathered from the distribution of the Ogam inscriptions in Wales, south-west England and the Isle of Man.

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  • Prominent among them were Manannan mac Lir, who is connected with the sea and the Isle of Man, and the Dagda, the father of a numerous progeny.

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  • That day being the feast of St Lawrence, Madagascar was named the " Isle of St Lawrence," and retained that name on all maps and charts for a hundred years.

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  • General: Etienne de Flacourt, Histoire de la grande isle Madagascar (Paris, 1658); Madagascar, or Robert Drury's Journal during Fifteen Years' Captivity on that Island (London, 1729; new ed., 1890); Voyages et memoires de Maurice Auguste, Comte de Benyowski (Paris, 1791); Froberville, Histoire de Madagascar (Isle de France, 1809); Ellis, History of Madagascar (London, 1838); Guillain, Documents sur.

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  • being common at McCarthy's Isle.

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  • St Mary's Isle was acquired in 1806; McCarthy's Isle was bought in 1823; the Ceded Mile was granted by the king of Barra in 1826; and British Kommbo between 1840 and 1855.

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  • The beginning of a return to prosperity came in 1816 when some British traders, obliged to leave Senegal on the restoration of that country to France after the Napoleonic wars, founded a settlement on St Mary's Isle.

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  • This would have been a comprehensive and intelligible arrangement, but so strong a feeling in opposition to any cession of British territory was manifested in parliament, and by various mercantile bodies, that the government of the day was unable to press the scheme."' Nothing was done, however, to secure for the Gambia a suitable hinterland, and in 1877 the 4th earl of Carnarvon (then colonial secretary) warned British traders that they proceeded beyond McCarthy's Isle at their own risk.

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  • Qat was born in the isle of Vanua Levu; his mother was either a stone at the time of his birth, or was turned into a stone afterwards, like Niobe.

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  • Douglas, Isle of Man >>

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  • (the 21st of March to the 4th of April 1795), the Thermidorians decreed the accusation of Barere and his colleagues of the Terror, Collot d'Herbois and Billaud-Varenne, and he was sent to the Isle of Oleron.

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  • 23 a of the boundary with Nottinghamshire, divides the Isle of Axholme from the district of Lindsey, and falls into the Humber about 30 m.

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  • The Fens (q.v.), the soil of which has been formed partly by tidal action and partly by the decay of forests, occupy the Isle of Axholme on the north-west, the vale of Ancholme on the north, and most of the country south-east of Lincoln.

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  • The lowest is the Triassic Keuper found in the Isle of Axholme and the valley of the Trent in the form of marls, sandstone and gypsum.

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  • Gypsum is dug in the Isle of Axholme, whiting is made from the chalk near the shores of the Humber, and lime is made on the Wolds.

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  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

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  • In the baronial outbreak of 1173 Roger Mowbray, who had inherited the Isle of Axholme from Nigel d'Albini, garrisoned Ferry East, or Kinnard's Ferry, and Axholme against the king, and, after the destruction of their more northern fortresses in this campaign, Epworth in Axholme became the principal seat of the Mowbrays.

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  • Lord Willoughby of Parham was a prominent Parliamentary leader, and the Isle of Axholme and the Puritan yeomanry of Holland declared for the parliament.

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  • Towards the west end is Eilean Gorm (the green isle), and near the north-western shore are the falls of Ledard.

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  • In the Isle of Wight a serious epidemic broke out in 1906 which caused great destruction to bee-life in the following year.

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  • Henry asked for permission to invade and subjugate Ireland, in order to gain absolute ownership of that isle.

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  • By far the most attractive is Belle Isle, an island in the river at the E.

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  • They settled in Kent and the Isle of Wight together with the adjacent parts of Hampshire.

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  • Fossil wood of the Pinites type (Pityoxylon) has been described from England, France, Germany, Sweden, Spitsbergen, North America and elsewhere; some of the best British examples have been obtained from the so-called Pine-raft, the remains of water-logged and petrified wood of Lower Greensand age, seen at low water near Brook Point in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Among the fruits Ettingshausen records Quercus, Liquidambar, Laurus, Nyssa, Diospyros, Symplocos, Magnolia, Victoria, Hightea, Sapindus, Cupania, Eugenia, Eucalyptus, Amygdalus; he suggests that the fruits of the London Clay of Sheppey may belong to the same plants as the leaves found at Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Gardner, Flora of Alum Bay, in " Geology of the Isle of Wight," Mem.

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  • At the same time he conquered the Isle of Wight, which he gave to Æthelwalh, king of Sussex.

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  • 46, 2).6 In considering the whole question, one must beware of the 1 For these see Brough Smith with Howitt, Native Tribes of Southeast Australia, Aborigines of Victoria; Kuhn, on bird fire-bringer in Isle of Man, Die Herabkunft des Feuers, p. 109; Van Gennep, Mythes et legendes d'Australie.

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  • About 1200 the see of Argyll was separated from Dunkeld by Bishop John, "the Englishman," and Lismore soon afterwards became the seat of the bishop of Argyll, sometimes called "Episcopus Lismoriensis," quite distinct from the bishop of the Isles (Sudreys and Isle of Man), called "Episcopus Sodoriensis" or "Insularum," whose see was divided in the 14th century into the English bishopric of Sodor and Man and the Scottish bishopric of the Isles.

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  • She offered to switch with Alex, but he declined and took the isle seat, with Destiny between them.

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  • Mr. Reynolds will walk me up the isle and give me to Alex.

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  • It seemed like only a few minutes before they were at church, making the last minute checks before she walked down the isle.

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  • The music began and they walked down the long isle with everyone watching.

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  • It would have been intimidating if not for Alex at the end of the isle, standing next to Bill.

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  • As his eyes adjusted to the light, he started down the side isle.

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  • The woman picked up a basket and started down an isle.

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  • The Diocese has three archdeacons, one of whom serves the Isle of Wight.

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  • bewitched people from the entry gates at the Isle of Wight and Bath.

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  • terrestrial biodiversity is enhanced throughout the isle because of the influence of the sea.

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  • He established a bishopric at Lindisfarne (Holy Isle) opposite the royal center of Bamburgh.

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  • bottlenose dolphin who adopted the Isle of Man for three years.

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  • bottlenose male named Donald became trapped on a sand bank on the Isle of Man.

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  • Along with chicken casserole for tea, this was the end of a great day on Fair Isle.

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  • Glengorm castle Choose this fairytale castle on the Isle of Mull for your very special day.

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  • Market's gallic charms Channel isle airport plans fail to.. .

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  • chugged out to Lady Isle at the behest of the Northern Lighthouse Board, whom he charged £ 160 each time.

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  • The Isle of Man also issue gold bullion coins called Angels.

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  • Q. Can I use coinage from the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man?

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  • commando raid on the Isle of Wight.

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  • There are several confectioners in Isle Of Man where you can go shopping, and popular bargains include local fudge.

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  • Fair Isle is also a popular destination for cruise ships and cruising yachts.

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  • On 11th December she was laid up at Kames Bay, Isle of Bute pending disposal.

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  • Jo also had a brief affair with Donald, a bottlenose dolphin who adopted the Isle of Man for three years.

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  • The two exceptions, Risso's dolphin and white-beaked dolphin, were observed over the continental shelf, northwest of the Isle of Lewis.

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  • C: Isle Abbots Friable sandy loam on gravel on Oxford Clay, poor subsoil drainage.

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  • dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • Here it lies, in the council yard down at Belle Isle, like a carved effigy on a packing case sarcophagus.

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  • emerald isle.

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  • enchanted isle of Arran.

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  • NCC - Leamouth Leamouth marks the eastern extremity of the Isle of Dogs Enterprise Zone.

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  • Growing up on the traveling fairgrounds he went on to become a wealthy nightclub owner on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Moving to the Isle of Wight The Town of Cowes is internationally famed for the Cowes Week sailing regatta held annually in August.

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  • Ascog Hall fernery and Garden Isle of Bute Award-winning restored Victorian fernery and gardens... .

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  • I also conduct occasional fieldwork foraging for more Scottish dinosaur material from the Isle of Skye.

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  • Andrew Goddard's oil paintings are of the tidal mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • flotilla of yachts to sail around the Isle of Wight?

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  • gallantry displayed by the Marines in the capture of Belle Isle in 1761.

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  • Recent films include The governess, with Minnie Driver as a young 19th century Sephardi woman on the Isle of Skye.

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  • St Clement's Isle - a small rocky islet once the home to an ancient hermit lies just offshore of the harbor wall.

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  • Ferries, including the hovercraft - to Hayling Island, the Isle of Wight and Gosport.

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  • The designs use a wide range of techniques, including intarsia, embroidery, crochet, Fair Isle and entrelac.

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  • isle of wight has some well established f.. .

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  • isle of dogs, Millwall, London in 1854.

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  • isle OF man The Easter Bunny must have devoured half our members.

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  • A little further south, meet the regular ferry to the enchanted isle of Arran.

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  • After seeing the beacon, the ships return and they leave the isle of Byde far behind.

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  • The Heritage Trail - " One of his sceptred isle 's greatest assets is her incredible wealth of heritage.

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  • There is no where quite like the emerald isle.

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  • isle airport plans fail to.. .

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  • Instant desert isle for the cost of an inch of sticky tape!

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  • St Clement's Isle - a small rocky islet once the home to an ancient hermit lies just offshore of the harbor wall.

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  • leaden cross was genuine it proved it anyway, because it said " here in the Isle of Avalon " .

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  • The entrance was quite lumpy with poor visibility across to the Isle of Wight.

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  • At the time of which we write, the vegetation of the isle was not very luxuriant.

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  • Education activities focus on Fair Isle's rich environment and cultural heritage, including the marine.

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  • To the east lay the flat marshlands of the Isle of Grain.

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  • None of our stegosaur metacarpals are from the Isle of Wight, but we have some from Dorset.

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  • meth labs within London and a number of small domestic labs on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Jerry, driving a minibus, entered the picture around 3am, on his way home to north London from the Isle of Wight.

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  • read more LAMM 2005 Location Revealed The 2005 LAMM is based on the Isle of Mull with parking on the mainland in Oban.

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  • mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Andrew Goddard's oil paintings are of the tidal mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • neck sweater has another Fair isle design knitted in 5 shades of Forsell Shamal.

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  • The nearby remains of the 13th century nunnery are the idyllic location to experience the tranquility of this sacred isle.

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  • oystercatcher on the shoreline near Stein, Waternish on the Isle of Skye.

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  • It is an excellent vantage point with spectacular views across the sea to the Isle of Wight.

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  • A couple from the Isle of Wight recently spent a weekend in North Devon to receive some help with their miniature poodle.

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  • Based in Kyleakin Alasdair Ross offers private guided tours by car of the Isle of Skye and West Highlands.

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  • A major beach recharge project was completed in 1987, using shingle dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • Moving to the Isle of Wight The Town of Cowes is internationally famed for the Cowes Week sailing regatta held annually in August.

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  • Arthur pursued him and they met in battle on the Isle of Man, where Arthur killed the young renegade, his worthiest foe.

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  • Later in the same year she was transferred to Calm Isle Shipping Ltd of Hong Kong and her name reverted to Oriental Merchant.

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  • Mary Ann was dispatched to Osborn House on the Isle of Wight, where a small sanatorium was set up for the estate workers.

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  • scarce resource for the Isle of Wight.

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  • Corfu, Greek Isle Corfu boasts some of the most stunning scenery in the Greek Isles.

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  • seaport town on the Isle of Wight, an island due south of the major southern English port of Southampton.

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  • secluded location on the Isle of Wight makes any holiday here feel almost like you're abroad.

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  • The delightfully secluded location on the Isle of Wight makes any holiday here feel almost like you're abroad.

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  • Currently promoting their latest album ' Supernature ', Goldfrapp are set to bring a sprinkling of glamor to the Isle Of Wight Festival.

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  • Isle of Capri, a paddle steamer gambling den moored on the river, is a fake with slot machines inside.

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  • Children and under Melbourne Sydney and enchanted isle operated onboard meals and.

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  • terminus for the passenger ferry to Fair Isle.

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  • There are also shorter waymarked trails which run from coast to coast across the Isle of Man.

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  • Sue Corlett from the Isle of Man went home triumphant despite yielding first place in both dressage and marathon to Angela Flanagan.

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  • trundled up to the Black Isle for more views of red kite.

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  • A totally trustworthy gentleman called Johnny Quinn offered us a residency at the Ryde Castle Hotel on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Our costa victoria isle du journo used the least menu includes eight.

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  • It is an excellent vantage point with spectacular views across the sea to the Isle of Wight.

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  • Mrs Chaplin Year 8 Visit to Little Canada, Isle of Wight This year 70 students enjoyed this residential activity weekend.

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  • The Isle of Wight has a more imposing wench, clothed with a little drapery.

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  • In 1978, The Prince took time off from the Regatta to go windsurfing off the Isle of Wight.

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  • When the aircraft failed to return an intensive search finally found the wreckage on the Isle of Grain, Kent the next day.

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  • Elephanta Isle >>

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  • He then retired to Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, and took an active interest in the affairs of the Royal Astronomical Society, of which he became honorary secretary in 1862 and president in 1866.

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  • SHEERNESS, a garrison town and naval seaport in the Faversham parliamentary division of Kent, England, in the Isle of Sheppey, on the right bank of the Medway estuary at its junction with the Thames, 51 m.

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  • He speedily secured the admission of the secluded members, having meanwhile been in continual communication with Monk, was again one of the fresh council of state, consisting entirely of friends of the Restoration, and accepted from Monk a commission to be governor of the Isle of Wight and captain of a company of foot.

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  • at the Isle of Wight.

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  • It has a river-frontage of 4.1 m., the Thames making two deep bends, enclosing the Isle of Dogs on the north and a similar peninsula on the Greenwich side.

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  • Greenwich is connected with Poplar on the north shore by the Greenwich tunnel (1902), for foot-passengers, to the Isle of Dogs (Cubitt Town), and by the Blackwall Tunnel (1897) for street traffic, crossing to a point between the East and West India Docks (see Poplar).

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  • It is found also in the Isle of Pines, and in the New Hebrides.

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  • Burton-upon-Trent (Burhton) is first mentioned towards the close of the 9th century, when St Modwen, an Irish virgin, is said to have established a convent on the Isle of Andressey opposite Burton.

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  • Stralsund entertains passengerboat communications with Barth, Stettin, Rostock and Lubeck as well as with various small ports on the isle of Riigen.

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  • 43) which speak of Chryse, or the Golden Isle, as lying off Cape Tamus - supposed to be the most easterly point in Asia - and over against the estuary of the Ganges.

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  • and on Grand Isle, North Hero Island, and Isle La Motte in Lake Champlain.

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  • On Isle La Motte, Grand Isle county, there are marble quarries, the characteristic colours of the marble being "Fisk black" and "Fisk grey."

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  • In 1908 the output of limestone was valued at $20,731; there are limestone quarries in Washington and Orange counties and on Isle La Motte.

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  • In 1665 the French built a fort on Isle la Motte.

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  • In July 1643 Cromwell had been appointed governor of the Isle of Ely; on the 22nd of January 1644 he became second in command under the earl of Manchester as lieutenant-general of the Eastern Association, and on the 16th of February 1644 a member of the Committee of Both Kingdoms with greatly increased influence.

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  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.

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  • A further X100,000 was paid for the Jersey, Guernsey, Isle of Man and other undertakings, and about £2,000,000 was.

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  • Following on this he made an interesting experiment, using Morse's method, to connect the Isle of Wight telegraphically with the mainland, by conduction across the Solent in two places, during a temporary failure of the submarine cable in 1882 in that channel.

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  • P. Granville put into practice between Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight and the Needles lighthouse a method which depends upon conduction through sea water.

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  • Later the Bournemouth station was removed to Poole Harbour, and the Alum Bay station to Niton in the Isle of Wight, the distance being thus increased to 30 m.

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  • In January 1901 he established communication by his system between the Lizard in Cornwall and Niton in the Isle of Wight, a distance of 200 m.

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  • With this apparatus some of Marconi's earliest successes, such as telegraphing across the English Channel, were achieved, and telegraphic communication at the rate of fifteen words or so a minute established between the East Goodwin lightship and the South Foreland lighthouse, also between the Isle of Wight and the Lizard in Cornwall.

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  • In January 1901 he telegraphed without difficulty by electric waves from the Isle of Wight to the Lizard, viz.

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  • Of the nominally independent states the chief were the kingdom of Sardinia, ruled over by the house of Savoy, and comprising Piedmont, the isle of Sardinia and nominally Savoy and Nice, though the two provinces last named had virtually been lost to the monarchy since the campaign of 1793.

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  • In the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands courts Christian have now jurisdiction substantially as in England.

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  • THOMAS ARNOLD (1795-1842), English clergyman and headmaster of Rugby school, was born at West Cowes, in the Isle of Wight, on the 13th of June 1795.

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  • Sulphur containing selenium, such as occurs in the isle of Vulcano in the Lipari Isles, may be orange-red; and a similar colour is seen in sulphur which contains arsenic sulphide, such as that from La Solfatara near Naples.

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  • at the narrows to the north of the Isle of the Vow; its area is 27 sq.

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  • Among other islands are Inch Cailliach (the "Island of Women," from the fact that a nunnery once stood there), Inchfad ("Long Island"), Inchcruin ("Round Island"), Inchtavannach ("Monks' Isle"), Inchconnachan ("Colquhoun's Isle"), Inchlonaig ("Isle of the Yews," where Robert Bruce caused yews to be planted to provide arms for his bowmen), Creinch, Torrinch and Clairinch (which gave the Buchanans their war-cry).

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  • the country between the Blue Nile and the Atbara, and the land between the Blue Nile and its most eastern tributary the Rahad, this latter district being known as the "Isle of Isles."

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  • The forest vegetation, largely confined to the "Isle of Isles" and the southern uplands, includes the Adansonia (baobab), which in the Fazogli district attains gigantic proportions, the tamarind, of which bread is made, the deleb palm, several valuable gum trees (whence the term Sennari often applied in Egypt to gumarabic), some dyewoods, ebony, ironwood and many varieties of acacia.

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  • Isolated mutinies in the army followed, and terrorist outrages here and there - notably, in August, the dastardly bomb outrage in the Isle of Apothecaries at St Petersburg, which seriously injured one of M.

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  • He sent a missionary to the isle of Manaar, and himself visited Ceylon and Mailapur (Meliapur), the traditional tomb of St Thomas the apostle, which he reached in April 1544, remaining there four months.

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  • The connecting link between the western and the eastern Baltic was the isle of Gotland, where German merchants from Lubeck had established a depot (the later Visby)_ The fur-trade with the Esthonians and Livonians proved so lucrative that a German colony was planted in Livonia itself at what was afterwards Riga, and in 1201 for its better security the colony was converted into a bishopric. A still firmer footing was gained by the Germans on Livonian soil when Abbot Theoderick of Riga founded the order of the Sword (a foundation confirmed by the pope in 1204), whose duty it was to convert the heathen Esths and Livs and appropriate as much of their land in the process as possible.

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  • Two years later Valdemar, urged by Archbishop Anders Suneson, also appeared off the Esthonian coast and occupied the isle of Oesel.

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  • In May 1223 he was seized at midnight in his tent on the isle of Lyo, whither he had come to hunt, by his vassal and guest.

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  • SODOR AND MAN, the name of the bishopric of the Church of England which includes the Isle of Man and adjacent islets.

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  • (Norse Sudr-eyjar, Sudreys, or southern isles, in distinction from Nordr-eyjar, the northern isles of Orkney and Shetland) and the Isle of Man.

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  • (The connexion of the Isle of Man with Norway is considered s.v.

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  • MAN, Isle Of.) A Norwegian diocese of Sodor had been in existence previously, but its history is obscure, and the first union of Man with it in 1098 by Magnus Barefoot is only traditional.

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  • The cathedral of Sodor was on St Patrick's Isle at Peel, and it is possible that the name Sodor being lost, its meaning was applied to the isle as the seat of the bishop. The termination "and Man" seems to have been added in the 17th century by a legal draughtsman ignorant of the proper application of the name of Sodor to the bishopric of Man.

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  • Moore, History of the Isle of Man (London, 1900).

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  • Regular passenger steamers serve Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight.

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  • In the German poem this is a veritable "Isle of Maidens," where no man ever enters, and where it is perpetual spring.

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  • He attended the queen in her flight to France in 1646, but disapproved of the prince's journey thither, and retired to Jersey, subsequently aiding in the king's escape to the Isle of Wight.

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  • Belle Isle (the site of a Confederate prison camp during the Civil War), about a m.

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  • With reference to the Celtic race, P. cordata, it is interesting to note its connexion with Arthurian legend and the Isle of Avalon or Isle of Apples.

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  • Table XIII., in which the totals for the United Kingdom include those for the Channel Islands and Isle of Man, illustrates the preponderance of the sheep-breeding industry in the drier climate of Great Britain, and of the cattle-breeding industry in the more humid atmosphere of Ireland.

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  • 1 Including Channel Islands and Isle of Man.

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  • In May Bruce was again in England, and though he failed to take Carlisle, he subdued the Isle of Man.

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  • MARGATE, a municipal borough and seaside resort in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 74 m.

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  • For this service he was promoted in rank, and received a gift of the castle and isle of Indre, near Nantes.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • In 78 Agricola went to Britain, and both extended and consolidated the Roman dominion in that province, pushing his arms into North Wales and the Isle of Anglesey.

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  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

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  • Besides Mainland, the principal member of the group, the more important are Yell, Unst and Fetlar in the north, Whalsay and Bressay in the east, Trondra, East and West Burra, Papa Stour, Muckle Roe and Foula in the west, and Fair Isle in the south.

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  • Fair Isle (147) lies '24 m.

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  • broad and usually visited from Sandwick, lies the uninhabited island of Mousa (correctly spelled Moosa, the moory isle, from the:: Norse mO-r, moor), famous for the most perfect specimen of a Pictish broch, or tower of defence, in the British Isles.

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  • The broch, which stands on a rocky promontory at the south-west of the isle, now measures about 45 ft.

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  • of Scalloway, and Papa (priest's isle, 16), to the E.

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  • Holm of Papal, "isle of the priest" (2), belonging to Bressay parish, and Linga, "heather isle" (8), to the parish of Tingwall, lie S.E.

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  • Gruay, "green isle" (10), Housay (68), Bruray (44), Bound (2) are members of the group of Out Skerries, about 4 m.

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  • Fetlar (347) lies off the east coast of Yell, from which it is divided by Colgrave Sound and the isle of Hascosay and is 5 m.

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  • Uyea, "the isle," from the Old Norse oy (3), to the south of Unst, from which it is divided by the narrow sounds of Uyea and Skuda, yields a beautiful green serpentine.

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  • ALFRED MILNER MILNER, VISCOUNT (1854-), British statesman and colonial administrator, was born at Bonn on the 23rd of March 1854, the only son of Charles Milner, M.D., whose wife was a daughter of Major-General Ready, sometime governor of the Isle of Man.

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  • Long bar-like " islands " (conspicuous high land rising above the marsh and prairie) - Orange, Petite Anse, Grand Cote, Cote Blanche and Belle Isle - offer very interesting topographical and geological problems. " Trembling prairies "- land that trembles under the tread of men or cattle - are common near the coast.

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  • thick), on Week's Island, on Belle Isle and probably beneath the intervening marshes.

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  • without the surrounding keys and the Isle of Pines (area about i180 sq.

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  • The Isle of Pines in its northern part is hilly and wooded; in its southern part, very low, level and rather barren; a tidal swamp almost cuts the island in two.

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  • There are extensive and valuable deposits of beautiful marbles in the Isle of Pines, and lesser ones near Santiago.

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  • Mineral waters, though not yet important in trade, are extremely abundant, and a score of places in Cuba and the Isle of Pines are already known as health resorts.

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