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isidore

isidore

isidore Sentence Examples

  • In view of this, it is curious that Dante should place him in Paradise at the side of Aquinas and Isidore of Seville.

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  • A Persian king, Artaxerxes, who was murdered by his brother Gosithros at the age of 93 years, is mentioned in a fragment of Isidore of Charax (Lucian, Macrobii, 15).

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  • Jerome's work was continued successively by Gennadius of Marseilles, Isidore of Seville, and Ildefonsus of Toledo; the last-named writer brings the list down to the middle of the 7th century.

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  • it is expressly mentioned by Isidore of Seville as the sixth element in the Eucharistic service, De offic. eccles.

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  • Other copies give the names of Gregory Theologus, Epiphanius, Chrysostom and Isidore.

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  • It received the benefit of Isidore Geoffroy St-Hilaire's assistance.

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  • The points at issue between Cuvier and Etienne Geoffroy St-Hilaire before mentioned naturally attracted the attention of L'Herminier, who in 1836 presented to the French Academy the results of his researches into the mode Isidore of growth of that bone which in the adult bird he had already studied to such good purpose.

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  • The mosaics in the chapel of St Isidore (finished by Andrea Dandolo), giving us the life of the saint, were executed in 1355.

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  • Isidore (Etymol.

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  • The pastoral staff, as its name implies, symbolizes the pastoral office and authority, a symbolism already known to Isidore of Seville (De ecclesiast.

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  • To this list must be added: (I) the Satyricon of Martianus Capella, the greater part of which is a treatise on the seven liberal arts, the fourth book dealing with logic; (2) the De artibus ac disciplinis liberalium literarum of Cassiodorus; (3) the Origines of Isidore of Seville (ob.

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  • He probably made the acquaintance of Lope de Vega at the festivals (1620-1622) held to commemorate the beatification and canonization of St Isidore, the patron saint of Madrid.

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  • AUGUSTE [ISIDORE AUGUSTE MARIE FRANpOIS] COMTE (1798-1857), French Positive philosopher, was born on the 19th of January 1798 at Montpellier, where his father was a receiver-general of taxes for the district.

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  • Thus it came to be acknowledged by Athanasius, Isidore of Pelusium, Gregory of Nyssa, and others.

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  • Thus Isidore Hispalensis, c. 630, in his book of Origins, vi.

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  • Local histories containing more or less ecclesiastical material were written in the 6th and following centuries by Jordanes (History of the Goths), Gregory of Tours (History of the Franks), Isidore of Seville (History of the Goths, Vandals and Suevi), Bede (Ecclesiastical History of England), Paulus Diaconus (History of the Lombards), and others.

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  • Among the compilers of these last were Isidore and Hrabanus, William of Conches and Honorius of'Autun, Bartholomaeus Anglicus (fl.

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  • Two of his countrymen followed him in 1823-1829--Louis Isidore Duperrey and Dumont d'Urville.

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  • It also passed into Italy, but in a smaller multiple of 35 drachmae, or 1/4th of the Greek mina; 12 Italian weights (44) bearing value marks (which cannot therefore be differently attributed) show a libra of 2400 or 1/4th of 9600, which was divided in unciae and sextulae, and the full-sized mina is known as the 24 uncia mina, or talent of 120 librae of Vitruvius and Isidore (18) = 9900.

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  • Paulus used the document called the Origo gentis Langobardorum, the Liber ponticfialis, the lost history of Secundus of Trent, and the lost annals of Benevento; he made a free use of Bede, Gregory of Tours and Isidore of Seville.

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  • The earliest traditions appear to imply that he died a natural death (Eusebius, Jerome, and even Isidore of Seville); but the Martyrologies claim him as a martyr, though they do not agree as to the manner of his martyrdom.

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  • I; Liber pontificalis, " Vita Gregorii Magni"; Isidore of Seville, De vir.

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  • St Isidore appears to be their principal authority; they also draw, directly or indirectly, from Orosius, St Jerome, St Augustine, and probably from a lost map of classical antiquity, represented in a measure by the Peutinger Table of the 13th century.

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  • Later on in life he migrated to Athens and continued his studies under Marinus, the mathematician, Zenodotus, and Isidore, the dialectician.

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  • He also drew Spain nearer to the papacy, and it was his decision which established the Roman ritual in place of the old missal of Saint Isidore - the so - called Mozarabic. On the other hand he was very open to Arabic influence.

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  • The first to discuss the matter is Isidore of Seville (Etym.

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  • The possibly contemporary Liber Pontificalis and Isidore of Seville (560-636) hint at the invitation to the Lombards.

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  • It is a place of great antiquity, being probably the Phra mentioned by Isidore of Charax in the 1st century A.D.

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  • Isidore, indeed, enumerates nineteen.; but, of these, Scastene formed no part of the Parthian Empire,, as has been shown by von Gutschmid.

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  • Through it lay the route to Kandahar; and for this reason the district is described by Isidore, though it formed no part of the Parthian Empire.

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  • Augustine, Hilary, Athanasius, Isidore, Gregory the Great and others, and formed part of the library of which the Breviary was the ultimate compendium.

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  • 9 See also the Peregrinatio Sylviae (386), 86, &c., for the use of lights at Jerusalem, and Isidore of Seville (Etym.

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  • See Isidore of Seville, Conc., in Migne, Pat.

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  • 58 sqq.; Isidore, Origines, xvii.

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  • - Numerous fragments of the Greek Version have come down to us in Justin Martyr, Origen, Diodorus of Antioch, Isidore of Alexandria, Epiphanius, John of Malala, Syncellus and others.

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  • Of special Gothic histories, besides that of Jordanes, already so often quoted, there is the Gothic history of Isidore, archbishop of Seville, a special source of the history of the West Gothic kings down to Svinthala (621-631).

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  • He favoured the embassy in every way, and when the body of Santa Justa could not be found, helped the envoys who were also aided by a vision seen by one of them in a dream, to discover the body of Saint Isidore, which was reverently carried away to Leon.

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  • Ferdinand died on the feast of Saint John the Evangelist, the 24th of June 1065, in Leon, with many manifestations of ardent piety - having laid aside his crown and royal mantle, dressed in the frock of a monk and lying on a bier, covered with ashes, which was placed before the altar of the church of Saint Isidore.

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  • But from the 7th century to the 17th - from Isidore of Seville and the English Bede for a thousand years, - mankind was to look back along the line of Jewish priests and kings to the Creation.

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  • Much information may also be gleaned from the writings of St Ambrose, St Gregory of Nazianzus, Isidore of Seville, and the orators Pacatus, Libanius, Themistius.

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  • To this rich collection the author, who assumes the name of Isidore, the saintly bishop of Seville, added a good number of apocryphal documents already existing, as well as a series of letters ascribed to the popes of the earliest centuries, from Clement to Silvester and Damasus inclusive, thus filling up the gap before the decretal of Siricius, which is the first genuine one in the collection.

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  • altare, from altos, high; some ancient etymological guesses are recorded by St Isidore of Seville in Etymologiae xv.

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  • One of the earliest of such collections, , is that of Isidore (q.v.) of Seville (560-636), who, from this and other writings, ranks among the few channels which conveyed ancient learning to the middle ages.

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  • The last-named - though with more continuity of texture than Isidore - quotes largely from the Bible and the Latin Fathers.

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  • Thin and turbid, the stream of classical tradition had flowed on through Cassiodorus or Boetius or Isidore; through progress.

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  • In the middle ages Isidore (at its gateway), then Peter Lombard,.

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  • But a powerful counterpoise to this tendency was continually maintained by the fervid inwardness of Augustine, transmitted through Gregory the Great, Isidore of Seville, Alcuin, Hrabanus Maurus, and other writers of the philosophically barren period between the destruction of the Western empire and the rise of Scholasticism.

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  • The author assumes the name of Isidore, evidently the archbishop of Seville, who was credited with a preponderating part in the compilation of the Hispana; he takes in addition the surname of Mercator, perhaps because he has made use of two passages of Marius Mercator.

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  • In the second place, Isidore wishes to increase the strength and cohesion of the churches; he tries to give absolute stability to the diocese and the ecclesiastical province; he reinforces the rights of the bishop and his comprovincials, while he initiates a determined campaign against the chorepiscopi; finally, as the keystone of the arch he places the papacy.

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  • The name of Isidore usurped by the author at first led to the supposition that the False Decretals originated in Spain; this opinion no longer meets with any support; it is enough Nation= to point out that there is no Spanish manuscript of the ality of collection, at least until the 13th century.

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  • ISIDORE OF SEVILLE, or Isidorus Hispalensis (c. 560-636), Spanish encyclopaedist and historian, was the son of Severianus, a distinguished native of Cartagena, who came to Seville about the time of the birth of Isidore.

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  • Left an orphan while still young, Isidore was educated in a monastery, and soon distinguished himself in controversies with the Arians.

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  • Especially interesting is the De natura rerum ad Sisebutum 1 With Isidore of Alexandria has been confused an Isidore of Gaza, mentioned by Photius.

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  • Suetonius, in his Life of Nero, refers to a Cynic philosopher named Isidore, who is said to have jested publicly at the expense of Nero.

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  • The Regula monachorum of Isidore was adopted by many of the monasteries in Spain during the 7th and 8th centuries.

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  • The edition of all of Isidore's works by F.

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  • Ingunda the Frankish wife of Hermenegild, with the help of Leandro, archbishop of Seville, the brother and predecessor of the more famous Isidore (q.v.), persuaded her husband to renounce Arianism.

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  • The total silence of the contemporary chronicle, called by the name of Isidore of Beja, shows that in the south of Spain, where the writer lived, nothing was known of the resistance made in the north.

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  • The adoption of the Roman instead of the Gothic ritual of Saint Isidore has been lamented, but it marked the assumption by Castile of a place in the community of the western European kingdoms. The Frenchmen, both monks and knights, who accompanied Constance brought to bear on Spain the ecclesiastical, architectural, literary and military influence of France, then the intellectual centre of Europe, as fully as it ever was exercised in later times.

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  • Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • Isidore Charac. I (Muller, Geog.

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  • In view of this, it is curious that Dante should place him in Paradise at the side of Aquinas and Isidore of Seville.

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  • 3 For the influence of that conception in theology, especially through the medium of Isidore of Seville, see successive chapters in A.

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  • A Persian king, Artaxerxes, who was murdered by his brother Gosithros at the age of 93 years, is mentioned in a fragment of Isidore of Charax (Lucian, Macrobii, 15).

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  • Jerome's work was continued successively by Gennadius of Marseilles, Isidore of Seville, and Ildefonsus of Toledo; the last-named writer brings the list down to the middle of the 7th century.

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  • it is expressly mentioned by Isidore of Seville as the sixth element in the Eucharistic service, De offic. eccles.

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  • A careful analysis of the Milhamoth is given in Rabbi Isidore Weil's Philosophic religieuse de Levi-Ben-Gerson (Paris, 1868).

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  • Other copies give the names of Gregory Theologus, Epiphanius, Chrysostom and Isidore.

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  • Mitra, even as late as the 15th century, retained its simple meaning of cap (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.); to Isidore of Seville it is specifically a woman's cap. Infula, which in late ecclesiastical usage was to be confined to mitre (and its dependent bands) and chasuble, meant originally a piece of cloth, or the sacred fillets used in pagan worship, and later on came to be used of any ecclesiastical vestment, and there is no evidence for its specific application to the liturgical head-dress earlier than the 12th century.

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  • It received the benefit of Isidore Geoffroy St-Hilaire's assistance.

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  • The points at issue between Cuvier and Etienne Geoffroy St-Hilaire before mentioned naturally attracted the attention of L'Herminier, who in 1836 presented to the French Academy the results of his researches into the mode Isidore of growth of that bone which in the adult bird he had already studied to such good purpose.

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  • pp. 107-115), and from the report upon them by Isidore Geoffroy 1 He says from Oken's Naturgeschichte far Schulen, published in 1821, but the division is to be found in that author's earlier Lehrbuch der Zoologie (ii.

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  • The mosaics in the chapel of St Isidore (finished by Andrea Dandolo), giving us the life of the saint, were executed in 1355.

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  • On a diagram illustrating the origines of Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • Isidore (Etymol.

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  • on papyrus in book form are still extant in different libraries of Europe, viz.: the Homilies of St Avitus, of the 6th century, at Paris; Sermons and Epistles of St Augustine, of the 6th or 7th century, at Paris and Geneva; works of Hilary, of the 6th century, at Vienna; fragments of the Digests, of the 6th century, at Pommersfeld; the Antiquities of Josephus, of the 7th century, at Milan; Isidore, De contemptu mundi, of the 7th century, at St Gall; and the Register of the Church of Ravenna, of the 10th century, at Munich.

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  • The pastoral staff, as its name implies, symbolizes the pastoral office and authority, a symbolism already known to Isidore of Seville (De ecclesiast.

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  • To this list must be added: (I) the Satyricon of Martianus Capella, the greater part of which is a treatise on the seven liberal arts, the fourth book dealing with logic; (2) the De artibus ac disciplinis liberalium literarum of Cassiodorus; (3) the Origines of Isidore of Seville (ob.

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  • He probably made the acquaintance of Lope de Vega at the festivals (1620-1622) held to commemorate the beatification and canonization of St Isidore, the patron saint of Madrid.

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  • AUGUSTE [ISIDORE AUGUSTE MARIE FRANpOIS] COMTE (1798-1857), French Positive philosopher, was born on the 19th of January 1798 at Montpellier, where his father was a receiver-general of taxes for the district.

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  • Thus it came to be acknowledged by Athanasius, Isidore of Pelusium, Gregory of Nyssa, and others.

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  • Thus Isidore Hispalensis, c. 630, in his book of Origins, vi.

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  • Dicuil's reading was wide; he quotes from, or refers to, thirty Greek and Latin writers, including the classical Homer, Hecataeus, Herodotus, Thucydides, Virgil, Pliny and King Juba, the sub-classical Solinus, the patristic St Isidore and Orosius, and his contemporary the Irish poet Sedulius;-in particular, he professes to utilize the alleged surveys of the Roman world executed by order of Julius Caesar, Augustus and Theodosius (whether Theodosius the Great or Theodosius II.

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  • Local histories containing more or less ecclesiastical material were written in the 6th and following centuries by Jordanes (History of the Goths), Gregory of Tours (History of the Franks), Isidore of Seville (History of the Goths, Vandals and Suevi), Bede (Ecclesiastical History of England), Paulus Diaconus (History of the Lombards), and others.

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  • One of his lost works is the principal source of the erudition of Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • During the next twenty-five years Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • Among the compilers of these last were Isidore and Hrabanus, William of Conches and Honorius of'Autun, Bartholomaeus Anglicus (fl.

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  • Two of his countrymen followed him in 1823-1829--Louis Isidore Duperrey and Dumont d'Urville.

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  • It also passed into Italy, but in a smaller multiple of 35 drachmae, or 1/4th of the Greek mina; 12 Italian weights (44) bearing value marks (which cannot therefore be differently attributed) show a libra of 2400 or 1/4th of 9600, which was divided in unciae and sextulae, and the full-sized mina is known as the 24 uncia mina, or talent of 120 librae of Vitruvius and Isidore (18) = 9900.

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  • Paulus used the document called the Origo gentis Langobardorum, the Liber ponticfialis, the lost history of Secundus of Trent, and the lost annals of Benevento; he made a free use of Bede, Gregory of Tours and Isidore of Seville.

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  • The earliest traditions appear to imply that he died a natural death (Eusebius, Jerome, and even Isidore of Seville); but the Martyrologies claim him as a martyr, though they do not agree as to the manner of his martyrdom.

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  • I; Liber pontificalis, " Vita Gregorii Magni"; Isidore of Seville, De vir.

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  • St Isidore appears to be their principal authority; they also draw, directly or indirectly, from Orosius, St Jerome, St Augustine, and probably from a lost map of classical antiquity, represented in a measure by the Peutinger Table of the 13th century.

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  • Later on in life he migrated to Athens and continued his studies under Marinus, the mathematician, Zenodotus, and Isidore, the dialectician.

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  • He became a close friend of Isidore, succeeded him as head of the school in Athens, and wrote his biography, part of which is preserved in the Bibliotheca of Photius (see appendix to the Didot edition of Diogenes Laertius).

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  • He also drew Spain nearer to the papacy, and it was his decision which established the Roman ritual in place of the old missal of Saint Isidore - the so - called Mozarabic. On the other hand he was very open to Arabic influence.

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  • The first to discuss the matter is Isidore of Seville (Etym.

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  • The possibly contemporary Liber Pontificalis and Isidore of Seville (560-636) hint at the invitation to the Lombards.

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  • It is a place of great antiquity, being probably the Phra mentioned by Isidore of Charax in the 1st century A.D.

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  • We still possess a description of this route by Isidore of Charax, probably dating from the Augustan period (in C. MUller, Geographi graeci minores, vol.

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  • Isidore, indeed, enumerates nineteen.; but, of these, Scastene formed no part of the Parthian Empire,, as has been shown by von Gutschmid.

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  • Through it lay the route to Kandahar; and for this reason the district is described by Isidore, though it formed no part of the Parthian Empire.

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  • Augustine, Hilary, Athanasius, Isidore, Gregory the Great and others, and formed part of the library of which the Breviary was the ultimate compendium.

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  • 9 See also the Peregrinatio Sylviae (386), 86, &c., for the use of lights at Jerusalem, and Isidore of Seville (Etym.

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  • See Isidore of Seville, Conc., in Migne, Pat.

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  • 58 sqq.; Isidore, Origines, xvii.

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  • - Numerous fragments of the Greek Version have come down to us in Justin Martyr, Origen, Diodorus of Antioch, Isidore of Alexandria, Epiphanius, John of Malala, Syncellus and others.

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  • Of special Gothic histories, besides that of Jordanes, already so often quoted, there is the Gothic history of Isidore, archbishop of Seville, a special source of the history of the West Gothic kings down to Svinthala (621-631).

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  • He favoured the embassy in every way, and when the body of Santa Justa could not be found, helped the envoys who were also aided by a vision seen by one of them in a dream, to discover the body of Saint Isidore, which was reverently carried away to Leon.

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  • Ferdinand died on the feast of Saint John the Evangelist, the 24th of June 1065, in Leon, with many manifestations of ardent piety - having laid aside his crown and royal mantle, dressed in the frock of a monk and lying on a bier, covered with ashes, which was placed before the altar of the church of Saint Isidore.

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  • But from the 7th century to the 17th - from Isidore of Seville and the English Bede for a thousand years, - mankind was to look back along the line of Jewish priests and kings to the Creation.

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  • Much information may also be gleaned from the writings of St Ambrose, St Gregory of Nazianzus, Isidore of Seville, and the orators Pacatus, Libanius, Themistius.

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  • To this rich collection the author, who assumes the name of Isidore, the saintly bishop of Seville, added a good number of apocryphal documents already existing, as well as a series of letters ascribed to the popes of the earliest centuries, from Clement to Silvester and Damasus inclusive, thus filling up the gap before the decretal of Siricius, which is the first genuine one in the collection.

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  • altare, from altos, high; some ancient etymological guesses are recorded by St Isidore of Seville in Etymologiae xv.

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  • One of the earliest of such collections, , is that of Isidore (q.v.) of Seville (560-636), who, from this and other writings, ranks among the few channels which conveyed ancient learning to the middle ages.

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    0
  • The last-named - though with more continuity of texture than Isidore - quotes largely from the Bible and the Latin Fathers.

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    0
  • Thin and turbid, the stream of classical tradition had flowed on through Cassiodorus or Boetius or Isidore; through progress.

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    0
  • In the middle ages Isidore (at its gateway), then Peter Lombard,.

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  • But a powerful counterpoise to this tendency was continually maintained by the fervid inwardness of Augustine, transmitted through Gregory the Great, Isidore of Seville, Alcuin, Hrabanus Maurus, and other writers of the philosophically barren period between the destruction of the Western empire and the rise of Scholasticism.

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  • The author assumes the name of Isidore, evidently the archbishop of Seville, who was credited with a preponderating part in the compilation of the Hispana; he takes in addition the surname of Mercator, perhaps because he has made use of two passages of Marius Mercator.

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  • In the second place, Isidore wishes to increase the strength and cohesion of the churches; he tries to give absolute stability to the diocese and the ecclesiastical province; he reinforces the rights of the bishop and his comprovincials, while he initiates a determined campaign against the chorepiscopi; finally, as the keystone of the arch he places the papacy.

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    0
  • The name of Isidore usurped by the author at first led to the supposition that the False Decretals originated in Spain; this opinion no longer meets with any support; it is enough Nation= to point out that there is no Spanish manuscript of the ality of collection, at least until the 13th century.

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  • Within these limits, three different theories have successively arisen: "At first it was thought that Isidore's domicile could be fixed in the province of Mainz, it is now about fifty years ago that the balance of opinion was turned in favour of the province of Reims; and now, after the lapse of about twenty years, several authors have suggested the province of Tours" (P. Fournier, Etude sur les Fausses Decretales).

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  • ISIDORE OF SEVILLE, or Isidorus Hispalensis (c. 560-636), Spanish encyclopaedist and historian, was the son of Severianus, a distinguished native of Cartagena, who came to Seville about the time of the birth of Isidore.

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  • Left an orphan while still young, Isidore was educated in a monastery, and soon distinguished himself in controversies with the Arians.

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  • Especially interesting is the De natura rerum ad Sisebutum 1 With Isidore of Alexandria has been confused an Isidore of Gaza, mentioned by Photius.

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  • Suidas, in speaking of Isidore of Alexandria, says that Hypatia was his wife, but there is no means of approximating the dates (see 11YPATIA).

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  • Suetonius, in his Life of Nero, refers to a Cynic philosopher named Isidore, who is said to have jested publicly at the expense of Nero.

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  • The Regula monachorum of Isidore was adopted by many of the monasteries in Spain during the 7th and 8th centuries.

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  • The edition of all of Isidore's works by F.

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  • Ingunda the Frankish wife of Hermenegild, with the help of Leandro, archbishop of Seville, the brother and predecessor of the more famous Isidore (q.v.), persuaded her husband to renounce Arianism.

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  • The total silence of the contemporary chronicle, called by the name of Isidore of Beja, shows that in the south of Spain, where the writer lived, nothing was known of the resistance made in the north.

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  • The adoption of the Roman instead of the Gothic ritual of Saint Isidore has been lamented, but it marked the assumption by Castile of a place in the community of the western European kingdoms. The Frenchmen, both monks and knights, who accompanied Constance brought to bear on Spain the ecclesiastical, architectural, literary and military influence of France, then the intellectual centre of Europe, as fully as it ever was exercised in later times.

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  • Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • Isidore Charac. I (Muller, Geog.

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