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isabella

isabella

isabella Sentence Examples

  • In 1281 his first wife died, and on the 5th of February 1284 he married Isabella, daughter of Hugh IV.

  • in the peninsula, he signed the league of Venice in March 1495, and about the same time arranged a marriage between his son Philip and Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, king and queen of Castile and Aragon.

  • He was educated there and at Madrid University, where his Radicalism soon got him into trouble, and he narrowly escaped being expelled for his share in student riots and other demonstrations against the governments of Queen Isabella.

  • He married Isabella, the daughter of Amalric I.

  • The kingdom of Cyprus passed to Hugh, his son by an earlier marriage, while that of Jerusalem passed to Maria, the daughter of Isabella by her previous marriage with Conrad of Montferrat.

  • Difficulties, however, had arisen with Conrad of Montferrat; and when Guy lost his wife Sibylla in 1190, and Conrad married Isabella, her sister, now heiress of the kingdom, these difficulties culminated in Conrad's laying claim to the crown.

  • Hugh de la Marche, whose betrothed wife, Isabella of Angouleme, King John of England seized (thus bringing upon himself the loss of the greater part of his French possessions), was a nephew of Guy of Lusignan.

  • He ultimately married Isabella, after the death of John, and had by her a number of sons, half-brothers of Henry III.

  • return to Guy, but went to Henry of Champagne, who married the widowed Isabella.

  • He left one son, his successor Alexander II., and two daughters, Margaret and Isabella, who were sent to England after the treaty of 1209, and who both married English nobles, Margaret becoming the wife of Hubert de Burgh.He also left some illegitimate children.

  • of France, and in preparing the way for the marriage of his son Ferdinand with Isabella of Castile, which brought about the union of the crowns.

  • He was succeeded by Ferdinand, his son by his second marriage, who was already associated with his wife Isabella as joint sovereign of Castile.

  • Prescott's History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella (1854).

  • The royal family, especially the queen and the infanta Isabella, often stayed at Segovia, and Torquemada became confessor to the infanta, who was then very young.

  • Isabella succeeded to the throne (1474) on the death of Henry IV.

  • He represented to Ferdinand and Isabella that it was essential to their safety to reorganize the Inquisition, which had since the 13th century (1236) been established in Spain.

  • Isabella had been for many years prepared, and she and Ferdinand, now that the proposal for this new tribunal came before them, saw in it a means of overcoming the independence of the nobility and clergy by which the royal power had been obstructed.

  • On the death of Alphonso in 1481, his counsellors and favourites were harshly treated by his successor John, and Abrabanel was compelled to flee to Spain, where he held for eight years (1484-1492) the post of a minister of state under Ferdinand and Isabella.

  • The French court would not accept his overtures, and it was only in the summer of 1401 that a truce was patched up by the restoration of Richard's child-queen, Isabella of Valois.

  • The work was completed in August 1843, the five years' labour having been broken by the composition of reviews of Lockhart's Life of Scott (1838), Kenyon's Poems (1839), Chateaubriand (1839), Bancroft's United States (1841), Mariotti's Italy (1842), and Madame Calderon's Life in Mexico (1843), and by the preparation of an abridgment of his Ferdinand and Isabella in anticipation of its threatened abridgment by another hand.

  • Although during the composition of the Ferdinand and Isabella it had been of very intermittent service to him, it had so far improved that he could read with a certain amount of regularity during the writing of the Conquest of Mexico, and also, though in a less degree, during the years devoted to the Conquest of Peru.

  • of England, and his marriage with the princess Isabella of France.

  • His elder brother had been the husband of the heiress Sibylla; and on the death of Sibylla, who had carried the crown to Guy de Lusignan by her second marriage, Conrad married her younger sister, Isabella, now the heiress of the kingdom, and claimed the crown (1190).

  • Largely owing to his efforts, causes of quarrel between Great Britain and France in Tahiti, over the marriage of Isabella II.

  • After the death of Margaret, the "maid of Norway," in 1290, Bruce's grandfather, the 6th Robert de Bruce, lord of Annandale, claimed the crown of Scotland as the son of Isabella, the second daughter of David, earl of Huntingdon, and greatgranddaughter of King David I.; but John de Baliol, grandson of Margaret, the eldest daughter of Earl David, was preferred by the commissioners of Edward I.

  • Two days later Isabella, countess of Buchan, claimed the right of her family, the Macduffs, earls of Fife, to place the Scottish king on his throne, and the ceremony was repeated with an addition flattering to the Celtic race.

  • Marjorie, an only child by his first wife, Isabella, daughter of Donald, earl of Mar, had predeceased him.

  • He was mixed up with the sordid intrigues which preceded the deposition of Edward II., and supplied Queen Isabella and Mortimer in Paris with money in 1325 from the revenues of Guienne, of which province he was treasurer.

  • He seconded the Progressist and revolutionary campaign of Prim and the Progressists against the throne of Queen Isabella, conspiring and going into exile with them.

  • It was indeed time; the privations of the besiegers during the previous winter had been terrible; and the position of affairs had only been made worse by the dissensions between Guy de Lusignan and Conrad of Montferrat, who had begun to claim the crown in return for his services, and had, on the death of Sibylla, the wife of Guy, reinforced his claim by a marriage with her younger sister, Isabella.

  • Meanwhile Conrad of Montferrat, at the very instant when his superior ability had finally forced Richard to recognize him as king, had been assassinated (April 1192): Guy de Lusignan had bought Cyprus from Richard, and had sailed away to establish himself there; I and Henry of Champagne, Richard's nephew, had been called to the throne of Jerusalem, and had given himself a title by marrying Conrad's widow, Isabella.

  • The original leader of the Crusade was John of Brienne, king of Jerusalem (who had succeeded Amalric II., marrying Maria, the daughter of Amalric's wife Isabella by her former husband, Conrad of Montferrat); but after the end of 1218 the cardinal legate Pelagius, fortified by papal letters, claimed the command.

  • had attempted to bind him more intimately to the Holy Land by arranging a marriage with Isabella, the daughter of John of Brienne, and the heiress of the kingdom of Jerusalem.

  • In 1225 Frederick married Isabella, and immediately after the marriage he assumed the title of king in right of his wife, and exacted homage from the vassals of the kingdom.'

  • Isabella = Frederick II., emperor of the West and king of Jerusalem 1225-1250.

  • Isabella = John de Lusignan.

  • As soon as he had learnt the elements of reading and writing, he was sent as a page to the court of Ferdinand and Isabella; afterwards, until his twenty-sixth year, he took service with Antonio Maurique, duke of Nagera, and followed the career of arms. He was free in his relations with women, gambled and fought; but he also gave indications of that courage, constancy and prudence which marked his after life.

  • Here he consulted Isabella Roser, a lady of high rank and piety, and also the master of a grammar school.

  • When Ignatius arrived in Paris, he lodged at first with some fellow-countrymen; and for two years attended the lectures on humanities at the college de Montaigu, supporting himself at first by the charity of Isabella Roser; but, a fellowlodger defrauding him of his stock, he found himself destitute and compelled to beg his bread.

  • His other children - Girolamo, Isabella and Pier Luigi - were of uncertain parentage.

  • He was entirely under the influence of his favourite, Alvaro de Luna, till his second wife, Isabella of Portugal, obtained control of his feeble will.

  • By his second marriage he was the father of Isabella "the Catholic."

  • But, after a royal order had been issued for their sale, Queen Isabella, interested by what she had heard of the gentle and hospitable character of the natives and of their docility, procured a letter to be written to Bishop Fonseca, the superintendent of Indian affairs, suspending the order until inquiry should be made into the causes for which they had been made prisoners, and into the lawfulness of their sale.

  • Theologians differed on the latter question, and Isabella directed that these Indians should be sent back to their native country.

  • At the end of August he appeared before Budapest, the siege of which had already been raised by the defeat of the Austrians; the infant John Sigismund was carried into the sultan's camp, and the queen-mother, Isabella, was peremptorily ordered to evacuate the royal palace, though the sultan gave her a diploma in which he swore only to retain Budapest during the minority of her son.

  • John Sigismund was recognized as independent prince of Transylvania and of sixteen adjacent Hungarian counties, Queen Isabella to act as regent during his minority.

  • ROBERT LEWIS BALFOUR STEVENSON (1850-1894), British essayist, novelist and poet, was the only child of Thomas Stevenson, civil engineer, and his wife, Margaret Isabella Balfour.

  • In 1864 the princess Isabella, the eldest daughter of the emperor and empress, had married the Comte d'Eu, a member of the Orleans family.

  • Princess Isabella was charitable in many ways, always ready to take her full share of the duties falling upon her as the future empress, and thoroughly realizing the responsibilities of her position; but she was greatly influenced by the clerical party and the priesthood, and she thereby incurred the hostility of the Progressives.

  • When Dom Pedro left Brazil for the purpose of making a tour through Europe and the United States he appointed Princess Isabella to act as regent, and she showed herself so swayed in political questions by Church influence that Liberal feeling became more and more anti-dynastic. Another incident which gave strength to the opposition was the sudden abolition of slavery without any compensation to slave-owners.

  • His private possessions were respected, and were afterwards still held by Princess Isabella.

  • In 1419 Louis of Bar, brother of the last-named, a cardinal and bishop of Chalons, gave the duchy of Bar to Rene of Anjou, the grandson of his sister Yolande, who married Isabella, duchess of Lorraine.

  • Isabella, Charles's sister and the wife of Edward II., was sent to France to negotiate, and with her brother's help arranged the final conspiracy against her husband.

  • The proclamation of the king's daughter Isabella as heiress was almost the occasion of an armed conflict between him and the naval authorities at Ferrol, who were partisans of the constitutional cause.

  • It was bestowed in 1180 on Philip Augustus of France by Philip of Alsace, as the dowry of his niece Isabella of Hainaut.

  • The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent.

  • (1857-1885), king of modern Spain, son of Isabella II.

  • When Queen Isabella and her husband were forced to leave Spain by the revolution of 1868 he accompanied them to Paris, and from thence he was sent to the Theresianum at Vienna to continue his studies.

  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.

  • The king parted with him reluctantly, and only under the pressure of a strong court intrigue headed by Queen Isabella.

  • It contains the Gothic tomb of Isabella of Aragon, wife of Philip III.

  • When Amadeus succeeded to the throne these were divided into the county of Savoy (his own territory), the princi pality of Piedmont ruled by his nephew Philip, prince of Achaea (a title acquired through his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin, heiress of Achaea and the Morea), and Vaud ruled by his brother Louis.

  • ISABELLA, ISABEAU, or Elizabeth Of Bavaria (1370-1435), wife of Charles VI.

  • Louis de Bosredon, the captain of her guards, was executed for complicity in her excesses; and Isabella herself was imprisoned at Blois and afterwards at Tours (1417).

  • Isabella Of Hainaut >>

  • and Isabella of France, was born at Windsor on the 13th of November 1312.

  • For the next four years Isabella and Mortimer governed in his name, though nominally his guardian was Henry, earl of Lancaster.

  • Of his daughters, three died unmarried; the others were Isabella, who married into the family of Coucy,.

  • He was the son of the emperor Charles V., and of his wife Isabella of Portugal, who were first cousins.

  • Espartero became in 1832, on the death of King Ferdinand VII., one of the most ardent defenders of the rights of his daughter, Isabella II.

  • of France, of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain, of Henry VII.

  • Henry's elder brother Arthur, a notoriously sickly youth of scarce fifteen, had been married to Catherine, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, but had died less than five VIII.

  • The Catholic sovereigns, Ferdinand and Isabella, adapted an existing hermandad to the purpose of a general police acting under officials appointed by themselves, and endowed with large powers of summary jurisdiction even in capital cases.

  • After many disappointments he persuaded the Catholic sovereigns Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain to furnish him with a squadron of three smalljvessels.

  • The history of this period, which was terminated by the union of Castile and Aragon under Ferdinand and Isabella in 1479, is given, along with a full account of the very interesting constitution of Aragon, under Spain.

  • His first wife was his cousin, Miss Isabella Clark, who died in 1858, leaving one surviving son, the Hon.

  • Louis Philippe and Guizot had planned the marriage of the duke of Montpensier with the infanta Louisa of Spain, younger sister of Queen Isabella, who, it was thought at the time, was not likely ever to have children.

  • After the execution of Badlesmere in 1322 Burghersh's lands were seized by Edward II., and the pope was urged to deprive him; about 1326, however, his possessions were restored, a proceeding which did not prevent him from joining Edward's queen, Isabella, and taking part in the movement which led to the deposition and murder of the king.

  • Enjoying the favour of the new king, Edward III., the bishop became chancellor of England in 1328; but he failed to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury which became vacant about the same time, and was deprived of his office of chancellor and imprisoned when Isabella lost her power in 1330.

  • MARY (1457-1482), duchess of Burgundy, only child of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, and his wife Isabella of Bourbon, was born on the 13th of February 1457.

  • ADAM GEORGE, PRINCE CZARTORYSKI (1770-1861), Polish statesman, was the son of Prince Adam Casimir Czartoryski and Isabella Fleming.

  • He left two sons, Witold (1824-1865), and Wladyslaus (1828-1894), and a daughter Isabella, who married Jan Dzialynski in 1857.

  • ISABELLA (1451-1504), surnamed la Catolica, " the Catholic," queen of Castile, was the second child and only daughter of John II.

  • of Castile by his second wife Isabella, granddaughter of John I.

  • Thence forward the fortunes of Ferdinand and Isabella were inseparably blended.

  • Spain undoubtedly owed to Isabella's clear intellect, resolute energy and unselfish patriotism much of that greatness which for the first time it acquired under "the Catholic sovereigns."

  • Prescott, History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella (1837), where the original authorities are exhaustively enumerated; and for later researches, Baron de Nervo, Isabella the Catholic, translated by Lieut.-Col.

  • Isabella II >>

  • But his fall was assured when Philip, who in 1271 lost his first wife, Isabella, daughter of James I., king of Aragon, married in 1274 Marie, daughter of Henry III., duke of Brabant.

  • On the 28th of May 1262 he married Isabella, daughter of James I., king of Aragon, who died in 1271.

  • and Isabella of Brienne, was born at Andri a in Apulia on the 26th of April 1228.

  • In 1327 the bishop joined Queen Isabella's partisans; he drew up the six articles against Edward II., and was one of those who visited the captive king at Kenilworth to urge him to abdicate in favour of his son.

  • In 1489, after a stubborn defence lasting seven months, it was captured by the Spaniards under Isabella of Castile, whose cannon still adorn the Alameda or public promenade.

  • His wife was Isabella de Chilham, through whom he obtained lands in Kent.

  • CHARLES (1270-1325), count of Valois, of Maine, and of Anjou, third son of Philip III., king of France, surnamed the Bold, and of Isabella of Aragon, was born on the 12th of March 1270.

  • On the expulsion of Queen Isabella, he returned to Spain, represented Manresa in the Cortes, and in1871-1872was successively minister of the colonies and of finance.

  • The Sweetness And Maturity Of Isabella Valency Crawford'S (1851-1887) Verse Are Also Very Worthy Of Remembrance.

  • P. Mowbray, Critic, 41, P. 308; " Isabella Valency Crawford," In Poet Lore (Boston), Xiii.

  • The king's second wife, Isabella of Portugal, was offended at the immense influence of the constable, and urged her husband to free himself from slavery to his favourite.

  • It was a favourite residence of the emperor Frederick II., whose second and third wives, lolanthe and Isabella of England,'`were buried in the cathedral dedicated to St Richard, who is believed to have come from England in 492; their tombs, however, no longer exist.

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