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irving

irving

irving Sentence Examples

  • The incidents of this undertaking are the theme of Washington Irving's Astoria.

  • "IRVING FISHER (1867-), American economist, was born at Saugerties, N.Y., Feb.

  • He still continued his yearly experimental contributions to the North American Review, elaborating them with a view as much to ultimate historical proficiency as to immediate literary effect, the essays on Scottish Song (1826), Novel-Writing (1827), Moliere (1828), and Irving's Granada (1829)) belonging to this preparatory period.

  • Washington Irving, who had already made preparations to occupy the same field, generously withdrew in his favour.

  • Photos by Henry Irving.

  • Vinet of Lausanne, Edward Irving, Frederick D.

  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

  • The romance of his love affair with Sarah Curran - who afterwards married Robert Henry Sturgeon, an officer distinguished in the Peninsular War - has cast a glamour over the memory of Robert Emmet; and it inspired Thomas Moore's well-known songs, "She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps," and "Oh, breathe not his name"; it is also the subject of Washington Irving's "The Broken Heart."

  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

  • Whether they were the successors, as most of the Fathers believed, of the seven chosen by the church of Jerusalem 1 A partial exception may be made in favour of the " Catholic Apostolic Church " founded by Edward Irving.

  • For critical accounts see Irving's History of Scottish Poetry, Henderson's Vernacular Poetry of Scotland, Gregory Smith's Transition Period, J.

  • Bacon, with bibliography of mathematics of economics by Irving Fisher, 1897) was published in 1838.

  • His Queen Mary, the first of these chronicle-plays was published in 1875, and played by Sir Henry Irving at the Lyceum in 1876.

  • Irving in Lives of Scottish Writers (1839).

  • Irving (for some time the editor), Paulding, and the ornithologist Wilson.

  • In 1897 she first appeared in England in Secret Service, and with Sir Henry Irving's company in The Bells and Peter the Great (1898).

  • The Scottish Churches gave Edward Irving, Thos.

  • Following the suggestion of Cavendish, Irving made observations of deep temperature on Phipps's Spitsbergen voyage of 1773 with a valved water-bottle, insulated by non-conducting material.

  • He was an aggressive opponent of the "Tweed Ring," and was actively allied with the antiTammany organizations, the "Irving Hall Democracy" of 1875-1890, and the "County Democracy" of 1880-1890, but upon the dissolution of the latter he became identified with Tammany.

  • On the banks of the Passaic is a house having as a part of its walls the old walls of Cockloft Hall, in which Washington Irving frequently sojourned, and of which he gave a charming description in Salmagundi.

  • Among his avowed antagonists in literary warfare the most distinguished were Malone and Steevens, the Shakespeare editors; Mathias, the author of the Pursuits of Literature; Dr Jamieson, the Scottish lexicographer; Pinkerton, the historian; Dr Irving, the biographer of the Scottish poets; and Dr Currie of Liverpool.

  • After a brief course at a village school, he removed in 1800 to New York City, where in connexion with his brother-in-law, William Irving, and Washington Irving, he began in January 1807 a series of short lightly humorous articles, under the title of The Salmagundi Papers.

  • See Washington Irving's Astoria; or Anecdotes of an Enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains (Philadelphia, 1836).

  • Scotorum; Irving's Lives of the Scottish Writers; Anderson's Scottish Nation, i.

  • Shapinshay (765) was the birthplace of William Irving, father of Washington Irving.

  • EDWARD IRVING (1792-1834), Scottish church divine, generally regarded as the founder of the "Catholic Apostolic Church", was born at Annan, Dumfriesshire, on the 4th of August 1792.

  • It was Irving who in 1821 introduced Carlyle to her.

  • Although his exceptional method of address seems to have gained him the qualified approval of certain dignitaries of the church, the prospect of his obtaining a settled charge seemed as remote as ever, and he was meditating a missionary tour in Persia when his departure was arrested by steps taken by Dr Chalmers, which, after considerable delay, resulted, in October 1819, in Irving being appointed his assistant and missionary in St John's parish, Glasgow.

  • Except in the case of a select few, Irving's preaching awakened little interest among the congregation of Chalmers, Chalmers himself, with no partiality for its bravuras and flourishes, comparing it to "Italian music, appreciated only by connoisseurs"; but as a missionary among the poorer classes he wielded an influence that was altogether unique.

  • This sudden leap into popularity seems to have been occasioned in connexion with a veiled allusion to Irving's striking eloquence made in the House of Commons by Canning, who had been induced to attend his church from admiration of an expression in one of his prayers, quoted to him by Sir James Mackintosh.

  • Though cherishing a strong antipathy to the received ecclesiastical formulas, Irving's great aim was to revive the antique style of thought and sentiment which had hardened into these formulas, and by this means to supplant the new influences, the accidental and temporary moral shortcomings of which he detected with instinctive certainty, but whose profound and real tendencies were utterly beyond the reach of his conjecture.

  • Probably the religious opinions of Irving, originally in some respects more catholic and truer to human nature than generally prevailed in ecclesiastical circles, had gained breadth and comprehensiveness from his intercourse with Coleridge, but gradually his chief interest in Coleridge's philosophy centred round that which was mystical and obscure, and to it in all likelihood may be traced his initiation into the doctrine of millenarianism.

  • The writings of Edward Irving published during his lifetime were For the Oracles of God, Four Orations (1823); For Judgment to come (1823); Babylon and Infidelity foredoomed (1826); Sermons, &c. (3 vols., 1828); Exposition of the Book of Revelation (1831); an introduction to a translation of Ben-Ezra; and an introduction to Horne's Commentary on the Psalms. His collected works were published in 5 volumes, edited by Gavin Carlyle.

  • The Life of Edward Irving, by Mrs Oliphant, appeared in 1862 in 2 vols.

  • Sir Henry Irving >>

  • Carlyle and Edward Irving were teachers in the town, where Irving spent seven years, and where he made the acquaintance of the lady he afterwards married.

  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

  • See also Rafael Contreras, La Alhambra, El Alcdzar, y la gran Mezquita de Occidente (Madrid, 1885); The Alhambra, by Washington Irving, was written in 1832, and rewritten in 1857, when it had already become widely celebrated for its picturesque and humorous descriptions.

  • In 1816 he was appointed, through the recommendation of Leslie, to a school at Kirkcaldy, where Edward Irving, Carlyle's senior by three years, was also master of a school.

  • Irving's severity as a teacher had offended some of the parents, who set up Carlyle to be his rival.

  • A previous meeting with Irving, also a native of Annan, had led to a little passage of arms, but Irving now welcomed Carlyle with a generosity which entirely won his heart, and the rivals soon became the closest of friends.

  • " But for Irving," he says, " I had never known what the communion of man with man means."

  • Irving had a library, in which Carlyle devoured Gibbon and much French literature, and they made various excursions together.

  • A passing admiration for a Miss Gordon is supposed to have suggested the " Blumine " of Sartor Resartus; but he made no new friendships, and when Irving left at the end of 1818 Carlyle also resigned his post.

  • Irving's friendship now became serviceable.

  • In January 1822 Carlyle, through Irving's recommendation, became tutor to Charles and Arthur Buller, who were to be students at Edinburgh.

  • She had shown precocious talent, and was sent to the school at Haddington where Edward Irving (q.v.) was a master.

  • Her old tutor, Irving, was now at Kirkcaldy, where he became engaged to a Miss Martin.

  • They contemplated a marriage, and Irving endeavoured to obtain a release from his previous engagement.

  • The publication of the letters certainly seems to justify Norton's view.] Miss Welsh's previous affair with Irving had far less importance than Froude ascribes to it; and she soon came to regard her past love as a childish fancy.

  • A friend of Irving's, Mrs Basil Montague, wrote to Miss Welsh, to exhort her to suppress her love for Irving, who had married Miss Martin in 1823.

  • They went to London in the summer of 1834, and took a house at 5 (now 24) Cheyne Row, Chelsea, which Carlyle inhabited till his death; the house has since been bought for the public. Irving, who had welcomed him on former occasions, was just dying, - a victim, as Carlyle thought, to fashionable cajoleries.

  • No one was more devoted to such congenial friends as Irving and Sterling.

  • Her plump beauty was often remarked - notably by Washington Irving - in contrast to her husband's delicate and feeble figure and wizened face - for even in his prime Madison was, as Henry Adams says, "a small man, quiet, somewhat precise in manner, pleasant, fond of conversation, with a certain mixture of ease and dignity in his address."

  • The great 1 See Washington Irving, Adventures of Captain Bonneville (New York, 1860).

  • The most important lives are those of John Marshall (Philadelphia, 1804-1807), David Ramsay (New York, 2807), Washington Irving (New York, 1855-1859), E.

  • Irving Fisher >>

  • The same assembly condemned the doctrine put forth by Edward Irving, that Christ took upon Him the sinful nature of man and was not impeccable, and Irving was deposed five years later by the presbytery of Annan, when the outburst of supposed miraculous gifts in his church in London had rendered him still more obnoxious to the strict censures of the period.

  • Astor, the son of Washington Irving's millionaire hero.

  • Boehm von Bawerk; Nature of Capital and Income, by Irving Fisher (1906).

  • In 1832 he went to America with Count Albert Pourtales, and in 1834 crossed the prairies from New Orleans to Mexico with Washington Irving.

  • A translation of this sketch by William Freake, minister, was published at London, 1629; and in 1852 it was reprinted in Glasgow, with an introductory essay by Edward Irving.

  • Edward Irving was a native of the town.

  • Samuel Smiles (1812-1904), author of Character, Self-Help and other works, was also born there, and Edward Irving was for years mathematical master in the grammar school.

  • But with the establishment of prairie commerce to Santa Fe (New Mexico), the waves of emigration to the Mormon land and to California, the growth of traffic to Salt Lake, and the explorations for a transcontinental railway, Kansas became well known, and was taken out of that mythical " Great American Desert," in which, thanks especially to Pike and to Washington Irving, it had been supposed to lie.

  • Foster (London, 18 541855); Washington Irving, The Alhambra (New York, ed.

  • Irving early in the 19th century) holds the Adoptianist theory styled by A.

  • John Irving - A Widow For One Year Some of this is impressively ambitious, detailed, witty and ingenious.

  • MR IRVING: My Lord, I had clearly apprehend exactly what your Lordship intends with that word.

  • Later he formed the short lived band special brunch with Matt Irving.

  • Mr Irving publishes an occasional bulletin called " Action Report " .

  • bungled attempt to burgle the home of historian David Irving.

  • convoy escort commander Captain Jack Broome accused Irving of blaming him for the disaster.

  • David Irving in the USA Lipstadt and Penguin mounted a vigorous defense.

  • When David Irving in 1988 definitely became a denier, it was about money.

  • Never having read a work by Mr Irving, Manne comforts himself repeatedly by calling him a " holocaust denier " .

  • Irving is accused of being a holocaust denier " .

  • Whatever tricks Irving tried, he could not derail Browning ' s calm, precise delivery of facts establishing that the genocide happened.

  • About 75 anti-fascists waited out the lecture and Irving, donning a disguise, tried desperately for half an hour to leave without notice.

  • And despite the libel laws demanding that she prove deliberate distortion by Irving, the final judgment upheld every major aspect of her defense.

  • The key area where there are relevant, missing documents relates to relevant issue 2 - Mr Irving's ideological extremism.

  • Here, in Gray's Inn Road, Irving rallied the faithful.

  • Irving then hijacked the story with the " revelation " of the Eichmann diaries.

  • Irving was formally charged in an Austrian court, November 22, with " denying the holocaust.

  • But McCormack's claim that nobody at St. Martin's was aware of Irving's reputation prompted widespread incredulity.

  • On 4 March, mainly due to his court failure, Irving was declared insolvent.

  • Irving eco-centre.

  • john Irving, trans. from Wamphray, called 17th Feb., and adm.

  • No fan of: Anything kailyard, absentee lairds, David Irving.

  • Lukacs ' book contains so many libels of this nature, that Mr Irving wrote a warning letter to publisher Alfred Knopf.

  • Irving had begun to move further to the right, and as a result he had become increasingly marginalized.

  • I typed in the name ' David Irving, ' and soon found a mother lode of material.

  • Like the Captain Hook of pantomime, Irving brought about his own nemesis.

  • She had a nephew Robert Irving in Sun Valley, CA.

  • Given the prominence of Irving's political and racial beliefs at his trial, this result may appear paradoxical.

  • The judge added that Irving, " is a right wing pro-nazi polemicist " .

  • David Irving comments: 1. I have never written a book or article on the Holocaust; not a very profligate denier.

  • Irving was anxious to prove the superiority of the new radial valved Python engine, and entered an outfit in the 1932 Lands End.

  • If Hitler had known what was going on, Mr. Irving writes, he would have shaped up a " totally ramshackle operation.

  • In visual media, Irving and Terry are still resplendent, but not alive; they are ghosts of ghosts.

  • What do the opponents of David Irving and the other revisionists fear?

  • Irving's supporters claiming to be from Student revisionist Resources passed out revisionist literature and held signs outside the hall supporting Irving.

  • Evans clubs the prostrate Irving with this book; [Mr Irving's] website depicts the Professor as a cartoon skunk.

  • David Irving, leader of the orchestra, will also perform two of Handel's violin sonatas.

  • You have no evidential -- Irving: It included, for example, crushing the testicles of 165 out of 167 witnesses.

  • David Irving, April 22, 1988 (in sworn testimony!

  • typhus victims at Buchenwald camp [from Irving collection] Quick navigation Mr Irving, take me to.. .

  • The incidents of this undertaking are the theme of Washington Irving's Astoria.

  • Weinel, Die Wirkungen des Geistes and der Geister (Freiburg, 1899); Shaftesbury's Letter on Enthusiasm; Mrs Oliphant, Life of Irving, vol.

  • "IRVING FISHER (1867-), American economist, was born at Saugerties, N.Y., Feb.

  • He still continued his yearly experimental contributions to the North American Review, elaborating them with a view as much to ultimate historical proficiency as to immediate literary effect, the essays on Scottish Song (1826), Novel-Writing (1827), Moliere (1828), and Irving's Granada (1829)) belonging to this preparatory period.

  • Washington Irving, who had already made preparations to occupy the same field, generously withdrew in his favour.

  • Photos by Henry Irving.

  • Vinet of Lausanne, Edward Irving, Frederick D.

  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

  • The romance of his love affair with Sarah Curran - who afterwards married Robert Henry Sturgeon, an officer distinguished in the Peninsular War - has cast a glamour over the memory of Robert Emmet; and it inspired Thomas Moore's well-known songs, "She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps," and "Oh, breathe not his name"; it is also the subject of Washington Irving's "The Broken Heart."

  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

  • Whether they were the successors, as most of the Fathers believed, of the seven chosen by the church of Jerusalem 1 A partial exception may be made in favour of the " Catholic Apostolic Church " founded by Edward Irving.

  • For critical accounts see Irving's History of Scottish Poetry, Henderson's Vernacular Poetry of Scotland, Gregory Smith's Transition Period, J.

  • Bacon, with bibliography of mathematics of economics by Irving Fisher, 1897) was published in 1838.

  • His Queen Mary, the first of these chronicle-plays was published in 1875, and played by Sir Henry Irving at the Lyceum in 1876.

  • Irving in Lives of Scottish Writers (1839).

  • Irving (for some time the editor), Paulding, and the ornithologist Wilson.

  • In 1897 she first appeared in England in Secret Service, and with Sir Henry Irving's company in The Bells and Peter the Great (1898).

  • The Scottish Churches gave Edward Irving, Thos.

  • Following the suggestion of Cavendish, Irving made observations of deep temperature on Phipps's Spitsbergen voyage of 1773 with a valved water-bottle, insulated by non-conducting material.

  • He was an aggressive opponent of the "Tweed Ring," and was actively allied with the antiTammany organizations, the "Irving Hall Democracy" of 1875-1890, and the "County Democracy" of 1880-1890, but upon the dissolution of the latter he became identified with Tammany.

  • On the banks of the Passaic is a house having as a part of its walls the old walls of Cockloft Hall, in which Washington Irving frequently sojourned, and of which he gave a charming description in Salmagundi.

  • Among his avowed antagonists in literary warfare the most distinguished were Malone and Steevens, the Shakespeare editors; Mathias, the author of the Pursuits of Literature; Dr Jamieson, the Scottish lexicographer; Pinkerton, the historian; Dr Irving, the biographer of the Scottish poets; and Dr Currie of Liverpool.

  • After a brief course at a village school, he removed in 1800 to New York City, where in connexion with his brother-in-law, William Irving, and Washington Irving, he began in January 1807 a series of short lightly humorous articles, under the title of The Salmagundi Papers.

  • See Washington Irving's Astoria; or Anecdotes of an Enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains (Philadelphia, 1836).

  • Scotorum; Irving's Lives of the Scottish Writers; Anderson's Scottish Nation, i.

  • Shapinshay (765) was the birthplace of William Irving, father of Washington Irving.

  • See Lockhart, Life of Scott; Washington Irving, Abbotsford and Newstead Abbey; W.

  • EDWARD IRVING (1792-1834), Scottish church divine, generally regarded as the founder of the "Catholic Apostolic Church", was born at Annan, Dumfriesshire, on the 4th of August 1792.

  • It was Irving who in 1821 introduced Carlyle to her.

  • Although his exceptional method of address seems to have gained him the qualified approval of certain dignitaries of the church, the prospect of his obtaining a settled charge seemed as remote as ever, and he was meditating a missionary tour in Persia when his departure was arrested by steps taken by Dr Chalmers, which, after considerable delay, resulted, in October 1819, in Irving being appointed his assistant and missionary in St John's parish, Glasgow.

  • Except in the case of a select few, Irving's preaching awakened little interest among the congregation of Chalmers, Chalmers himself, with no partiality for its bravuras and flourishes, comparing it to "Italian music, appreciated only by connoisseurs"; but as a missionary among the poorer classes he wielded an influence that was altogether unique.

  • This sudden leap into popularity seems to have been occasioned in connexion with a veiled allusion to Irving's striking eloquence made in the House of Commons by Canning, who had been induced to attend his church from admiration of an expression in one of his prayers, quoted to him by Sir James Mackintosh.

  • Though cherishing a strong antipathy to the received ecclesiastical formulas, Irving's great aim was to revive the antique style of thought and sentiment which had hardened into these formulas, and by this means to supplant the new influences, the accidental and temporary moral shortcomings of which he detected with instinctive certainty, but whose profound and real tendencies were utterly beyond the reach of his conjecture.

  • Probably the religious opinions of Irving, originally in some respects more catholic and truer to human nature than generally prevailed in ecclesiastical circles, had gained breadth and comprehensiveness from his intercourse with Coleridge, but gradually his chief interest in Coleridge's philosophy centred round that which was mystical and obscure, and to it in all likelihood may be traced his initiation into the doctrine of millenarianism.

  • The writings of Edward Irving published during his lifetime were For the Oracles of God, Four Orations (1823); For Judgment to come (1823); Babylon and Infidelity foredoomed (1826); Sermons, &c. (3 vols., 1828); Exposition of the Book of Revelation (1831); an introduction to a translation of Ben-Ezra; and an introduction to Horne's Commentary on the Psalms. His collected works were published in 5 volumes, edited by Gavin Carlyle.

  • The Life of Edward Irving, by Mrs Oliphant, appeared in 1862 in 2 vols.

  • Sir Henry Irving >>

  • Carlyle and Edward Irving were teachers in the town, where Irving spent seven years, and where he made the acquaintance of the lady he afterwards married.

  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

  • See also Rafael Contreras, La Alhambra, El Alcdzar, y la gran Mezquita de Occidente (Madrid, 1885); The Alhambra, by Washington Irving, was written in 1832, and rewritten in 1857, when it had already become widely celebrated for its picturesque and humorous descriptions.

  • In 1816 he was appointed, through the recommendation of Leslie, to a school at Kirkcaldy, where Edward Irving, Carlyle's senior by three years, was also master of a school.

  • Irving's severity as a teacher had offended some of the parents, who set up Carlyle to be his rival.

  • A previous meeting with Irving, also a native of Annan, had led to a little passage of arms, but Irving now welcomed Carlyle with a generosity which entirely won his heart, and the rivals soon became the closest of friends.

  • " But for Irving," he says, " I had never known what the communion of man with man means."

  • Irving had a library, in which Carlyle devoured Gibbon and much French literature, and they made various excursions together.

  • A passing admiration for a Miss Gordon is supposed to have suggested the " Blumine " of Sartor Resartus; but he made no new friendships, and when Irving left at the end of 1818 Carlyle also resigned his post.

  • Irving's friendship now became serviceable.

  • In January 1822 Carlyle, through Irving's recommendation, became tutor to Charles and Arthur Buller, who were to be students at Edinburgh.

  • She had shown precocious talent, and was sent to the school at Haddington where Edward Irving (q.v.) was a master.

  • Her old tutor, Irving, was now at Kirkcaldy, where he became engaged to a Miss Martin.

  • They contemplated a marriage, and Irving endeavoured to obtain a release from his previous engagement.

  • The publication of the letters certainly seems to justify Norton's view.] Miss Welsh's previous affair with Irving had far less importance than Froude ascribes to it; and she soon came to regard her past love as a childish fancy.

  • A friend of Irving's, Mrs Basil Montague, wrote to Miss Welsh, to exhort her to suppress her love for Irving, who had married Miss Martin in 1823.

  • They went to London in the summer of 1834, and took a house at 5 (now 24) Cheyne Row, Chelsea, which Carlyle inhabited till his death; the house has since been bought for the public. Irving, who had welcomed him on former occasions, was just dying, - a victim, as Carlyle thought, to fashionable cajoleries.

  • No one was more devoted to such congenial friends as Irving and Sterling.

  • Her plump beauty was often remarked - notably by Washington Irving - in contrast to her husband's delicate and feeble figure and wizened face - for even in his prime Madison was, as Henry Adams says, "a small man, quiet, somewhat precise in manner, pleasant, fond of conversation, with a certain mixture of ease and dignity in his address."

  • The great 1 See Washington Irving, Adventures of Captain Bonneville (New York, 1860).

  • The most important lives are those of John Marshall (Philadelphia, 1804-1807), David Ramsay (New York, 2807), Washington Irving (New York, 1855-1859), E.

  • Irving Fisher >>

  • The same assembly condemned the doctrine put forth by Edward Irving, that Christ took upon Him the sinful nature of man and was not impeccable, and Irving was deposed five years later by the presbytery of Annan, when the outburst of supposed miraculous gifts in his church in London had rendered him still more obnoxious to the strict censures of the period.

  • Astor, the son of Washington Irving's millionaire hero.

  • Boehm von Bawerk; Nature of Capital and Income, by Irving Fisher (1906).

  • In 1832 he went to America with Count Albert Pourtales, and in 1834 crossed the prairies from New Orleans to Mexico with Washington Irving.

  • A translation of this sketch by William Freake, minister, was published at London, 1629; and in 1852 it was reprinted in Glasgow, with an introductory essay by Edward Irving.

  • Edward Irving was a native of the town.

  • Samuel Smiles (1812-1904), author of Character, Self-Help and other works, was also born there, and Edward Irving was for years mathematical master in the grammar school.

  • But with the establishment of prairie commerce to Santa Fe (New Mexico), the waves of emigration to the Mormon land and to California, the growth of traffic to Salt Lake, and the explorations for a transcontinental railway, Kansas became well known, and was taken out of that mythical " Great American Desert," in which, thanks especially to Pike and to Washington Irving, it had been supposed to lie.

  • Foster (London, 18 541855); Washington Irving, The Alhambra (New York, ed.

  • Irving early in the 19th century) holds the Adoptianist theory styled by A.

  • Among the places I visited were West Point, Tarrytown, the home of Washington Irving, where I walked through "Sleepy Hollow."

  • Irving was anxious to prove the superiority of the new radial valved Python engine, and entered an outfit in the 1932 Lands End.

  • If Hitler had known what was going on, Mr. Irving writes, he would have shaped up a totally ramshackle operation.

  • In visual media, Irving and Terry are still resplendent, but not alive; they are ghosts of ghosts.

  • What do the opponents of David Irving and the other revisionists fear?

  • Irving 's supporters claiming to be from Student Revisionist Resources passed out revisionist literature and held signs outside the hall supporting Irving.

  • Evans clubs the prostrate Irving with this book; [ Mr Irving 's] website depicts the Professor as a cartoon skunk.

  • David Irving, leader of the orchestra, will also perform two of Handel 's violin sonatas.

  • Return to Index: Notes on some of the lies: David Irving was never sued for libel over his book Accident.

  • You have no evidential -- Irving: It included, for example, crushing the testicles of 165 out of 167 witnesses.

  • David Irving, April 22, 1988 (in sworn testimony !

  • The implication is that the young Irving drifted through the city unaware of the political turmoil of the times.

  • Photo: American dignitaries inspect typhus victims at Buchenwald camp [from Irving collection] Quick navigation Mr Irving, take me to...

  • Cattaraugus Indian Reservation (New York): A family from this tribe operates a store at Tax Free Cigarettes, but feel free to swing by at 12663 Route 438, Irving, NY 14081.

  • Amy Irving, who co-starred with Bale in Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna recommended him to her husband at the time, Steven Spielberg.

  • The ceremony and reception took place in Bel Air, at the estate of music mogul Irving Azoff.

  • American College of Emergency Physicians. 1125 Executive Circle, Irving, TX 75038-2522.

  • American College of Emergency Physicians. 1125 Executive Circle, Irving, TX 75038-2522. (800) 798-1822.

  • American College of Emergency Physicians. 1125 Executive Circle, Irving, TX 75038-2522.

  • Corporate: Corporate jobs at Verizon wireless are generally based in major cities, such as Philidelphia and Irving, Texas.

  • This consultant, Irving Morrow, is actually responsible for many of the most iconic features of the Golden Gate Bridge.

  • Although Joseph Strauss is credited as being the Chief Engineer, he received notable help from Irving Morrow, Charles Alton Ellis, and many other engineers and technicians who helped create this beautiful national landmark.

  • She worked with actors like Amy Irving, John Wayne and Kirk Douglas.

  • The premier Texas spa is the 400-acre Four Seasons Resort and Club at Las Colinas (a planned community in Irving, Texas).

  • Irving, Texas 75038; phone 972-717-0700; web site: www.fourseasons.com; for Spa Reservations, phone 972-717-2555.

  • Prior to his literary career, he was probably best known for his involvement with the actor Henry Irving, who was then the equivalent of a 'superstar' - Stoker was Irving's business manager and travelled with him on his world tours.

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