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irrawaddy

irrawaddy

irrawaddy Sentence Examples

  • The Pegu Yoma range separates it from Toungoo district, and forms the water-parting between the rivers Irrawaddy and Sittang; there are also many small elevations.

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  • MYAUNGMYA, a district in the Irrawaddy division of lower Burma, formed in 1893 out of a portion of Bassein district, and reconstituted in 1903.

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  • MYAUNGMYA, a district in the Irrawaddy division of lower Burma, formed in 1893 out of a portion of Bassein district, and reconstituted in 1903.

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  • snowy to about 27° N., flow the great rivers of the Indo-Chinese peninsula, the Mekong, the Menam, the Salween, and the Irrawaddy, the valleys of which form the main portions of the states of CochinChina (including Tongking and Cambodia), of Siam (including Laos) and of Burma.

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  • Woodthorpe was followed into Burmese fields by many others; and amongst the earliest travellers to those mysterious mountains which hide the sources of the Irrawaddy, the Salween and the Mekong, was Prince Henri d'Orleans Burma was rapidly brought under survey; Siam was already in the 'mapmaking hands of James M'Carthy, whilst Curzon and Warrington Smyth added much to our knowledge of its picturesque coast districts.

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  • We know now for certain that the great Tsanpo of Tibet and the Brahmaputra are one and the same river; that north of the point where the great countermarch of that river from east to west is effected are to be found the sources of the Salween, the Mekong, the Yang-tsze-kiang and the Hwang-ho, or Yellow river, in order, from west to east; and that south of it, thrust in between the extreme eastern edge of the Brahmaputra basin 94 23" 94°48' 94°49' 94° 58' and the Salween, rise the dual sources of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The comparatively restricted area which still remains for close investigation includes the most easterly sources of the Brahmaputra, the most northerly sources of the Irrawaddy, and some 300 m.

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  • system, this boundary is defined by the eastern watershed of the Nmaikha, the eastern of the two great northern affluents of the Irrawaddy.

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  • m., and consists of a series of ranges, for the most part running north and south, and intersected by valleys, all leading towards the Irrawaddy, which drains the country.

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  • of the Kachins or Chingpaw were the Indo-Chinese race who, before the beginnings of history, but after the Mon-Annam wave had covered Indo-China, forsook their home in western China to pour over the region where Tibet, Assam, Burma and China converge, and that the Chingpaw are the residue left round the headquarters of the Irrawaddy and the Chindwin after those branches, destined to become the Tibetans, the Nagas, the Burmans and the Kuki Chins, had gone westwards and southwards.

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  • According to the Kachin Hill Tribes Regulation of 1895, administrative responsibility is accepted by the British government on the left bank of the Irrawaddy for the country south of the Nmaikha, and on the right bank for the country south of a line drawn from the confluence of the Malikha and Nmaikha through the northern limit of the Laban district and including the jade mines.

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  • PAKOKKU, a district in the Minbu division of Upper Burma, lying west of the Irrawaddy river and south of Mandalay, with the line of the Chin hills as a general boundary on the west.

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  • The part of the district along the Irrawaddy and Chindwin rivers is alluvial.

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  • The headquarters town, Pakokku, stands on the right bank of the Irrawaddy, and has grown into importance since the British occupation.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company call here regularly, and it is the starting-point for the vessels plying on the Chindwin.

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  • Up to comparatively recent years it was matter for controversy whether the Tsanpo formed the upper reaches of the Dihong or of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The Irrawaddy is the principal navigable river.

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  • Tharrawaddy was formed in 1878 out of that portion of Henzada lying east of the Irrawaddy.

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  • and the sources of the Irrawaddy as far as Cambodia and 7° N.

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  • The province falls into three natural divisions: Arakan with the Chin hills, the Irrawaddy basin, and the old province of Tenasserim, together with the portion of the Shan and Karen-ni states in the basin of the Salween, and part of Kengtung in the western basin of the Mekong.

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  • To the east of the Arakan division, and separated from it by the Arakan Yomas, lies the main body of Burma in the basin of the Irrawaddy.

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  • First, there is the highland tract including the hilly country at the sources of the Chindwin and the upper waters of the Irrawaddy, the Upper Chindwin, Katha, Bhamo, Myitkyina and Ruby Mines districts, with the Kachin hills and a great part of the Northern Shan states.

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  • It stretches along both sides of the Irrawaddy from the north of Mandalay to Thayetmyo, and embraces the Lower Chindwin, Shwebo, Sagaing, Mandalay, Kyaukse, Meiktila, Yamethin, Myingyan, Magwe, Pakokku and Minbu districts.

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  • This tract consists mostly of undulating lowlands, but it is broken towards the south by the Pegu Yomas, a considerable range of hills which divides the two remaining tracts of the Irrawaddy basin.

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  • To the east lies a tract of country which, though geographically a part of the Irrawaddy basin, is cut off from it by the Yomas, and forms a separate system draining into the Sittang river.

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  • They then form part of a system of ranges which curve north of the sources of the Chindwin river, and with the Kumon range and the hills of the Jade and Amber mines, make up a highland tract separated from the great Northern Shan plateau by the gorges of the Irrawaddy river.

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  • On the east the Kachin, Shan and Karen hills, extending from the valley of the Irrawaddy into China far beyond the Salween gorge, form a continuous barrier and boundary, and tail off into a narrow range which forms the eastern watershed of the Salween and separates Tenasserim from Siam.

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  • above the sea, and in the eastern Kachin hills, which run northwards from the state of Meng Mit to join the high range dividing the basins of the Irrawaddy and the Salween, are two peaks, Sabu and Worang, which rise to a height of 11,200 ft.

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  • Of the rivers of Burma the Irrawaddy is the most important.

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  • from its junction with the Irrawaddy at Pakokku.

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  • It is a swift clear river, fed in its upper reaches by numerous mountain streams. The Mogaung river, rising in the watershed which divides the Irrawaddy and the Chindwin drainages, flows south and south-east for 180 m.

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  • before it joins the Irrawaddy, and is navigable for steamers as far as Kamaing for about four months in the year.

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  • South of Thayetmyo, where arms of the Arakan Yomas approach the river and almost meet that spur of the Pegu Yomas which formed till 1886 the northern boundary of British Burma, the valley of the Irrawaddy opens out again, and at Yegin Mingyi near Myanaung the influence of the tide is first felt, and the delta may be said to begin.

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  • The so-called rivers of the delta, the Ngawun, Pyamalaw, Panmawaddy, Pyinzalu and Pantanaw, are simply the larger mouths of the Irrawaddy, and the whole country towards the sea is a close network of creeks where there are few or no roads and boats take the place of carts for every purpose.

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  • It is in all probability actually longer than the Irrawaddy, but it is not to be compared to that river in importance.

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  • In the heart of the delta numerous large lakes or marshes abounding in fish are formed by the overflow of the Irrawaddy river during the rainy season, but these either assume very diminutive proportions or disappear altogether in the dry season.

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  • in the Arakan and Tenasserim divisions to an average of 90 in Rangoon and the adjoining portion of the Irrawaddy 'delta.

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  • There is an axial zone of Cretaceous and Lower Eocene, and this is flanked on each side by the Upper Eocene and the Miocene, while the valley of the Irrawaddy is occupied chiefly by the Pliocene.

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  • Whether the mud " volcanoes" of the Irrawaddy valley have any connexion with volcanic activity may be doubted.

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  • Coal is found in the Tertiary deposits in the valley of the Irrawaddy and in Tenasserim.

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  • The Burmese are supposed by modern philologists to have come, as joint members of a vast Indo-Chinese immigration swarm, from western China to the head waters of the Irrawaddy and then separated, some to people Tibet and Assam, the others to press southwards into the 1 See also, for geology, W.

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  • east of the Irrawaddy and 90 m.

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  • Steamers plied on the Irrawaddy as far as Thayetmyo.

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  • The vessels of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company now ply to Bassein and to all points on the Irrawaddy as far north as Bhamo, and in the dry weather to Myitkyina, and also on the Chindwin as far north as Kindat, and to Homalin during the rains.

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  • Martaban from the revolted Peguans; and in the following year he sailed down the Irrawaddy with an army of 50,000 men, and, arriving at Rangoon, put to death the aged monarch of Pegu, along with many of his nobles, who had shared with him in the offence of rebellion.

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  • Abbot, by Robert Gordon's gaugings of the Irrawaddy, and by Allen J.

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  • BASSEIN, a district and town in the Irrawaddy division of Lower Burma, in the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The principal river of the district is the Irrawaddy, which debouches on the sea at its eastern extremity through a delta intersected with salt water creeks, among which the Pyamalaw, Pyinzalu, Kyunton, and Ngawun Shagegyi or Bassein river rank as important arms of the sea.

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  • Irrawaddy and Inyegyi are the only two lakes in the district.

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  • The delta of the Irrawaddy forms, wherever cultivable, a vast sheet of rice, with cotton, sesamum, and tobacco as subsidiary crops.

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  • It is situated on the Irrawaddy on the opposite bank to Sagaing, with which it was amalgamated in 1889.

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  • The town is situated on a river of the same name, one of the numerous mouths of the Irrawaddy, about 12 m.

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  • The district, which was only formed in 1903, lies within the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The Irrawaddy forms the dividing line on the east.

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  • The Minwun range runs down the whole eastern side, skirting the Irrawaddy.

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  • Coal has been worked at Letkokpin, near the Irrawaddy.

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  • The rainfall follows the valleys of the Mu and the Irrawaddy, and leaves the rest of the district comparatively dry.

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  • with 150,000 inhabitants, and lay midway between the Irrawaddy and Chindwin rivers.

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  • It occupies both banks of the Irrawaddy, at its confluence with the river Chindwin.

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  • A steam ferry connects with the Rangoon-Mandalay line, and the steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla.

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  • Pegu has also given its name to the Pegu Yoma, a range of hills running north and south for about 200 m., between the Irrawaddy and Sittang rivers.

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  • HENZADA, a district of Lower Burma, formerly in the Pegu, but now in the Irrawaddy division.

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  • It stretches from north to south in one vast plain, forming the valley of the Irrawaddy, and is divided by that river into two nearly equal portions.

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  • Numerous torrents pour down from the two boundary ranges, and unite in the plains to form large streams, which fall into the chief streams of the district, which are the Irrawaddy, Hlaing and Bassein, all of them branches of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company call at Henzada and Myan-aung.

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  • During the second Burmese war, after Prome had been seized, the Burmese on the right bank of the Irrawaddy crossed the river and offered resistance to the British, but were completely routed.

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  • Meanwhile, in Tharawaddy, or the country east of the Irrawaddy, and in the south of Henzada, much disorder was caused by a revolt, the leaders of which were, however, defeated by the British and their gangs dispersed.

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  • The Bay of Martaban receives the rivers Irrawaddy and Salween.

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  • The bay receives many large rivers, of which the most important are the Ganges and Brahmaputra on the north, the Irrawaddy on the east, and the Mahanadi, Godavari, Kistna and Cauvery on the west.

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  • To the east of the Irrawaddy, which bisects the district, it is low-lying and marshy.

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  • Except in the hills inhabited by the Kachin tribes there are practically no villages off the line of the Irrawaddy.

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  • More than half the total are Kachins, who inhabit the hills on both sides of the Irrawaddy.

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  • It is the limit of navigation on the Irrawaddy, and the terminus of the railway from Rangoon and Sagaing.

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  • Stretching south-eastwards from the delta of the Irrawaddy, a confused succession of little explored ranges separates the Burmese division of Tenasserim from the native kingdom of Siam.

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  • The rainfall in the lower part of the Irrawaddy valley, viz.

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  • One expedition with gunboats proceeded up the Brahmaputra into Assam; another marched by land through Chittagong into Arakan, for the Bengal sepoys refused to go by sea; a third, and the strongest, sailed from Madras direct to the mouth of the Irrawaddy.

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  • He retained all the valley of the Irrawaddy, down to the sea at Rangoon.

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  • The whole valley of the Irrawaddy, from Rangoon to Prome, was occupied in a few months, and, as the king of Ava refused to treat, it was annexed, under the name of Pegu, to the provinces of Arakan and Tenasserim, which had been acquired in 1826.

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  • The town is situated on the right bank of the Irrawaddy, opposite Allanmyo.

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  • The chief river is the Irrawaddy, which traverses Thayetmyo from north to south.

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  • The drainage finds its way to the Irrawaddy by three main streams (the Pwon, Ma-htun and Ma-de) on the west, and by two (the Kye-ni and Hput) on the east.

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  • It was formerly in the Irrawaddy division of Lower Burma, but was transferred to Upper Burma for administrative purposes in 1896.

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  • It lies in the valley of the Irrawaddy, to the south of Mandalay, on the east bank of the river.

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  • The greater part of the district is flat, especially to the north and along the banks of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The headquarters town, Myingyan, stands on the Irrawaddy, and had a population in 1901 of 16,139.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company also call here.

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  • It is thus a much longer river than the Irrawaddy.

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  • BASSEIN, the chief town and port, is the capital of the district and division, and is situated on the eastern bank of the Bassein river, one of the main arteries by which the waters of the Irrawaddy discharge themselves into the sea.

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  • It forms an important seat of the rice trade with several steam rice mills, and has great capabilities both from a mercantile and a military point of view, as it commands the great outlet of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The vessels of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company ply between Rangoon and Bassein, &c., by inland waters, and a railway opened in 1903 runs north eastward through the centre of the district, to Henzada and Letpadan.

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  • All of these, however, limited their explorations to the valley of the Mali-hka, the western branch of the Irrawaddy river.

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  • According to him the Kiutze, the people of the hills between the Irrawaddy and the Salween, call it the kingdom of Moam.

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  • The district may be said to consist of low plain-land towards the Irrawaddy, and of undulating country inland rising higher and higher westwards towards the Arakan hills.

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  • The chief streams besides the Irrawaddy are the Mon, the Maw, and the Salin, which are largely used for irrigation.

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  • At Minbu town the Irrawaddy is 3 miles wide, with many islands and sandbanks.

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  • There are considerable fisheries along the Irrawaddy and on the Paunglin lake, which is a lagoon fed from the Irrawaddy.

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  • It is very considerable on and under the Arakan Yomas, and very slight towards the Irrawaddy.

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  • Minbu, the district headquarters, stands on the Irrawaddy.

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  • It bestrides the Irrawaddy.

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  • Orcella fluminalis, again, appears to be limited to the Irrawaddy; and at least two distinct species of dolphin, belonging to different genera, are found in the Amazon.

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  • MANDALAY, formerly the capital of independent Burma, now the headquarters of the Mandalay division and district, as well as the chief town in Upper Burma, stands on the left bank of the Irrawaddy, in 21 0 59' N.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company also ply in all directions.

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  • along the Irrawaddy river are flat land, nearly all cultivated.

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  • The Irrawaddy, the Myit-nge and the Madaya are the chief rivers.

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  • It consists of a vast plain stretching up from the sea between the To or China Bakir mouth of the Irrawaddy and the Pegu Yomas.

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  • It is the highest station on the Irrawaddy held by British troops, and the nearest point on the river to the Chinese frontier.

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  • along the Irrawaddy bank in a series of small villages, transformed into quarters of the town, but the town proper is confined mainly to the one high ridge of land running at right angles to the river.

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  • When the Irrawaddy is at its height the lower portion of the town is flooded, and the country all round is a sheet of water, but usually for no very long time.

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  • The DISTRICT OF BHAMO lies wholly in the basin of the Irrawaddy, which, as well as its tributaries, runs through the heart of it.

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  • West of the Irrawaddy there is a regular series of ranges, enclosing the basins of the Kaukkwe, Mosit, Indaw and other streams, down which much timber is floated.

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  • It is an offshoot from the latter of these ridges that forms the third defile of the Irrawaddy between Bhamo and Sinbo.

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  • The whole of the country along the banks of the Irrawaddy, the Mole, Taiping and Kaukkwe, is generally in a water-logged condition during the rains.

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  • Here is concentrated the whole of the rich trade of the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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  • snowy to about 27° N., flow the great rivers of the Indo-Chinese peninsula, the Mekong, the Menam, the Salween, and the Irrawaddy, the valleys of which form the main portions of the states of CochinChina (including Tongking and Cambodia), of Siam (including Laos) and of Burma.

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  • Woodthorpe was followed into Burmese fields by many others; and amongst the earliest travellers to those mysterious mountains which hide the sources of the Irrawaddy, the Salween and the Mekong, was Prince Henri d'Orleans Burma was rapidly brought under survey; Siam was already in the 'mapmaking hands of James M'Carthy, whilst Curzon and Warrington Smyth added much to our knowledge of its picturesque coast districts.

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  • We know now for certain that the great Tsanpo of Tibet and the Brahmaputra are one and the same river; that north of the point where the great countermarch of that river from east to west is effected are to be found the sources of the Salween, the Mekong, the Yang-tsze-kiang and the Hwang-ho, or Yellow river, in order, from west to east; and that south of it, thrust in between the extreme eastern edge of the Brahmaputra basin 94 23" 94°48' 94°49' 94° 58' and the Salween, rise the dual sources of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The comparatively restricted area which still remains for close investigation includes the most easterly sources of the Brahmaputra, the most northerly sources of the Irrawaddy, and some 300 m.

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  • system, this boundary is defined by the eastern watershed of the Nmaikha, the eastern of the two great northern affluents of the Irrawaddy.

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  • m., and consists of a series of ranges, for the most part running north and south, and intersected by valleys, all leading towards the Irrawaddy, which drains the country.

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  • of the Kachins or Chingpaw were the Indo-Chinese race who, before the beginnings of history, but after the Mon-Annam wave had covered Indo-China, forsook their home in western China to pour over the region where Tibet, Assam, Burma and China converge, and that the Chingpaw are the residue left round the headquarters of the Irrawaddy and the Chindwin after those branches, destined to become the Tibetans, the Nagas, the Burmans and the Kuki Chins, had gone westwards and southwards.

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  • According to the Kachin Hill Tribes Regulation of 1895, administrative responsibility is accepted by the British government on the left bank of the Irrawaddy for the country south of the Nmaikha, and on the right bank for the country south of a line drawn from the confluence of the Malikha and Nmaikha through the northern limit of the Laban district and including the jade mines.

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  • PAKOKKU, a district in the Minbu division of Upper Burma, lying west of the Irrawaddy river and south of Mandalay, with the line of the Chin hills as a general boundary on the west.

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  • The part of the district along the Irrawaddy and Chindwin rivers is alluvial.

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  • The headquarters town, Pakokku, stands on the right bank of the Irrawaddy, and has grown into importance since the British occupation.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company call here regularly, and it is the starting-point for the vessels plying on the Chindwin.

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  • Up to comparatively recent years it was matter for controversy whether the Tsanpo formed the upper reaches of the Dihong or of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The Pegu Yoma range separates it from Toungoo district, and forms the water-parting between the rivers Irrawaddy and Sittang; there are also many small elevations.

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  • The Irrawaddy is the principal navigable river.

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  • Tharrawaddy was formed in 1878 out of that portion of Henzada lying east of the Irrawaddy.

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  • and the sources of the Irrawaddy as far as Cambodia and 7° N.

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  • The province falls into three natural divisions: Arakan with the Chin hills, the Irrawaddy basin, and the old province of Tenasserim, together with the portion of the Shan and Karen-ni states in the basin of the Salween, and part of Kengtung in the western basin of the Mekong.

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  • To the east of the Arakan division, and separated from it by the Arakan Yomas, lies the main body of Burma in the basin of the Irrawaddy.

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  • First, there is the highland tract including the hilly country at the sources of the Chindwin and the upper waters of the Irrawaddy, the Upper Chindwin, Katha, Bhamo, Myitkyina and Ruby Mines districts, with the Kachin hills and a great part of the Northern Shan states.

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  • It stretches along both sides of the Irrawaddy from the north of Mandalay to Thayetmyo, and embraces the Lower Chindwin, Shwebo, Sagaing, Mandalay, Kyaukse, Meiktila, Yamethin, Myingyan, Magwe, Pakokku and Minbu districts.

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  • This tract consists mostly of undulating lowlands, but it is broken towards the south by the Pegu Yomas, a considerable range of hills which divides the two remaining tracts of the Irrawaddy basin.

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  • On the west, between the Pegu and the Arakan Yomas, stretches the Irrawaddy delta, a vast expanse of level plain 12,000 sq.

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  • To the east lies a tract of country which, though geographically a part of the Irrawaddy basin, is cut off from it by the Yomas, and forms a separate system draining into the Sittang river.

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  • They then form part of a system of ranges which curve north of the sources of the Chindwin river, and with the Kumon range and the hills of the Jade and Amber mines, make up a highland tract separated from the great Northern Shan plateau by the gorges of the Irrawaddy river.

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  • On the east the Kachin, Shan and Karen hills, extending from the valley of the Irrawaddy into China far beyond the Salween gorge, form a continuous barrier and boundary, and tail off into a narrow range which forms the eastern watershed of the Salween and separates Tenasserim from Siam.

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  • above the sea, and in the eastern Kachin hills, which run northwards from the state of Meng Mit to join the high range dividing the basins of the Irrawaddy and the Salween, are two peaks, Sabu and Worang, which rise to a height of 11,200 ft.

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  • Of the rivers of Burma the Irrawaddy is the most important.

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  • from its junction with the Irrawaddy at Pakokku.

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  • It is a swift clear river, fed in its upper reaches by numerous mountain streams. The Mogaung river, rising in the watershed which divides the Irrawaddy and the Chindwin drainages, flows south and south-east for 180 m.

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  • before it joins the Irrawaddy, and is navigable for steamers as far as Kamaing for about four months in the year.

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  • South of Thayetmyo, where arms of the Arakan Yomas approach the river and almost meet that spur of the Pegu Yomas which formed till 1886 the northern boundary of British Burma, the valley of the Irrawaddy opens out again, and at Yegin Mingyi near Myanaung the influence of the tide is first felt, and the delta may be said to begin.

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  • The so-called rivers of the delta, the Ngawun, Pyamalaw, Panmawaddy, Pyinzalu and Pantanaw, are simply the larger mouths of the Irrawaddy, and the whole country towards the sea is a close network of creeks where there are few or no roads and boats take the place of carts for every purpose.

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  • It is in all probability actually longer than the Irrawaddy, but it is not to be compared to that river in importance.

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  • In the heart of the delta numerous large lakes or marshes abounding in fish are formed by the overflow of the Irrawaddy river during the rainy season, but these either assume very diminutive proportions or disappear altogether in the dry season.

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  • in the Arakan and Tenasserim divisions to an average of 90 in Rangoon and the adjoining portion of the Irrawaddy 'delta.

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  • There is an axial zone of Cretaceous and Lower Eocene, and this is flanked on each side by the Upper Eocene and the Miocene, while the valley of the Irrawaddy is occupied chiefly by the Pliocene.

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  • Whether the mud " volcanoes" of the Irrawaddy valley have any connexion with volcanic activity may be doubted.

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  • Coal is found in the Tertiary deposits in the valley of the Irrawaddy and in Tenasserim.

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  • The Burmese are supposed by modern philologists to have come, as joint members of a vast Indo-Chinese immigration swarm, from western China to the head waters of the Irrawaddy and then separated, some to people Tibet and Assam, the others to press southwards into the 1 See also, for geology, W.

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  • east of the Irrawaddy and 90 m.

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  • Steamers plied on the Irrawaddy as far as Thayetmyo.

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  • The vessels of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company now ply to Bassein and to all points on the Irrawaddy as far north as Bhamo, and in the dry weather to Myitkyina, and also on the Chindwin as far north as Kindat, and to Homalin during the rains.

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  • Martaban from the revolted Peguans; and in the following year he sailed down the Irrawaddy with an army of 50,000 men, and, arriving at Rangoon, put to death the aged monarch of Pegu, along with many of his nobles, who had shared with him in the offence of rebellion.

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  • Abbot, by Robert Gordon's gaugings of the Irrawaddy, and by Allen J.

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  • BASSEIN, a district and town in the Irrawaddy division of Lower Burma, in the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The principal river of the district is the Irrawaddy, which debouches on the sea at its eastern extremity through a delta intersected with salt water creeks, among which the Pyamalaw, Pyinzalu, Kyunton, and Ngawun Shagegyi or Bassein river rank as important arms of the sea.

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  • Irrawaddy and Inyegyi are the only two lakes in the district.

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  • The delta of the Irrawaddy forms, wherever cultivable, a vast sheet of rice, with cotton, sesamum, and tobacco as subsidiary crops.

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  • It is situated on the Irrawaddy on the opposite bank to Sagaing, with which it was amalgamated in 1889.

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  • The town is situated on a river of the same name, one of the numerous mouths of the Irrawaddy, about 12 m.

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  • The district, which was only formed in 1903, lies within the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The Irrawaddy forms the dividing line on the east.

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  • The Minwun range runs down the whole eastern side, skirting the Irrawaddy.

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  • Coal has been worked at Letkokpin, near the Irrawaddy.

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  • The rainfall follows the valleys of the Mu and the Irrawaddy, and leaves the rest of the district comparatively dry.

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  • with 150,000 inhabitants, and lay midway between the Irrawaddy and Chindwin rivers.

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  • It occupies both banks of the Irrawaddy, at its confluence with the river Chindwin.

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  • A steam ferry connects with the Rangoon-Mandalay line, and the steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla.

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  • The division of Pegu comprises the five districts of Rangoon city, Hanthawaddy, Tharrawaddy, Pegu and Prome, lying east of the Irrawaddy: area 13,084 sq.

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  • Pegu has also given its name to the Pegu Yoma, a range of hills running north and south for about 200 m., between the Irrawaddy and Sittang rivers.

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  • HENZADA, a district of Lower Burma, formerly in the Pegu, but now in the Irrawaddy division.

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  • It stretches from north to south in one vast plain, forming the valley of the Irrawaddy, and is divided by that river into two nearly equal portions.

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  • Numerous torrents pour down from the two boundary ranges, and unite in the plains to form large streams, which fall into the chief streams of the district, which are the Irrawaddy, Hlaing and Bassein, all of them branches of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company call at Henzada and Myan-aung.

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  • During the second Burmese war, after Prome had been seized, the Burmese on the right bank of the Irrawaddy crossed the river and offered resistance to the British, but were completely routed.

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  • Meanwhile, in Tharawaddy, or the country east of the Irrawaddy, and in the south of Henzada, much disorder was caused by a revolt, the leaders of which were, however, defeated by the British and their gangs dispersed.

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  • The Bay of Martaban receives the rivers Irrawaddy and Salween.

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  • The bay receives many large rivers, of which the most important are the Ganges and Brahmaputra on the north, the Irrawaddy on the east, and the Mahanadi, Godavari, Kistna and Cauvery on the west.

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  • To the east of the Irrawaddy, which bisects the district, it is low-lying and marshy.

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  • Except in the hills inhabited by the Kachin tribes there are practically no villages off the line of the Irrawaddy.

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  • More than half the total are Kachins, who inhabit the hills on both sides of the Irrawaddy.

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  • It is the limit of navigation on the Irrawaddy, and the terminus of the railway from Rangoon and Sagaing.

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  • Stretching south-eastwards from the delta of the Irrawaddy, a confused succession of little explored ranges separates the Burmese division of Tenasserim from the native kingdom of Siam.

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  • The rainfall in the lower part of the Irrawaddy valley, viz.

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  • One expedition with gunboats proceeded up the Brahmaputra into Assam; another marched by land through Chittagong into Arakan, for the Bengal sepoys refused to go by sea; a third, and the strongest, sailed from Madras direct to the mouth of the Irrawaddy.

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  • He retained all the valley of the Irrawaddy, down to the sea at Rangoon.

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  • The whole valley of the Irrawaddy, from Rangoon to Prome, was occupied in a few months, and, as the king of Ava refused to treat, it was annexed, under the name of Pegu, to the provinces of Arakan and Tenasserim, which had been acquired in 1826.

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  • The town is situated on the right bank of the Irrawaddy, opposite Allanmyo.

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  • The chief river is the Irrawaddy, which traverses Thayetmyo from north to south.

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  • The drainage finds its way to the Irrawaddy by three main streams (the Pwon, Ma-htun and Ma-de) on the west, and by two (the Kye-ni and Hput) on the east.

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  • It was formerly in the Irrawaddy division of Lower Burma, but was transferred to Upper Burma for administrative purposes in 1896.

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  • It lies in the valley of the Irrawaddy, to the south of Mandalay, on the east bank of the river.

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  • The greater part of the district is flat, especially to the north and along the banks of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The headquarters town, Myingyan, stands on the Irrawaddy, and had a population in 1901 of 16,139.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company also call here.

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  • It is thus a much longer river than the Irrawaddy.

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  • BASSEIN, the chief town and port, is the capital of the district and division, and is situated on the eastern bank of the Bassein river, one of the main arteries by which the waters of the Irrawaddy discharge themselves into the sea.

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  • It forms an important seat of the rice trade with several steam rice mills, and has great capabilities both from a mercantile and a military point of view, as it commands the great outlet of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The vessels of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company ply between Rangoon and Bassein, &c., by inland waters, and a railway opened in 1903 runs north eastward through the centre of the district, to Henzada and Letpadan.

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  • All of these, however, limited their explorations to the valley of the Mali-hka, the western branch of the Irrawaddy river.

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  • According to him the Kiutze, the people of the hills between the Irrawaddy and the Salween, call it the kingdom of Moam.

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  • The district may be said to consist of low plain-land towards the Irrawaddy, and of undulating country inland rising higher and higher westwards towards the Arakan hills.

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  • The chief streams besides the Irrawaddy are the Mon, the Maw, and the Salin, which are largely used for irrigation.

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  • At Minbu town the Irrawaddy is 3 miles wide, with many islands and sandbanks.

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  • There are considerable fisheries along the Irrawaddy and on the Paunglin lake, which is a lagoon fed from the Irrawaddy.

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  • It is very considerable on and under the Arakan Yomas, and very slight towards the Irrawaddy.

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  • Minbu, the district headquarters, stands on the Irrawaddy.

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  • It bestrides the Irrawaddy.

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  • Orcella fluminalis, again, appears to be limited to the Irrawaddy; and at least two distinct species of dolphin, belonging to different genera, are found in the Amazon.

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  • MANDALAY, formerly the capital of independent Burma, now the headquarters of the Mandalay division and district, as well as the chief town in Upper Burma, stands on the left bank of the Irrawaddy, in 21 0 59' N.

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  • The steamers of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company also ply in all directions.

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  • along the Irrawaddy river are flat land, nearly all cultivated.

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  • The Irrawaddy, the Myit-nge and the Madaya are the chief rivers.

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  • It consists of a vast plain stretching up from the sea between the To or China Bakir mouth of the Irrawaddy and the Pegu Yomas.

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  • It is the highest station on the Irrawaddy held by British troops, and the nearest point on the river to the Chinese frontier.

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  • along the Irrawaddy bank in a series of small villages, transformed into quarters of the town, but the town proper is confined mainly to the one high ridge of land running at right angles to the river.

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  • When the Irrawaddy is at its height the lower portion of the town is flooded, and the country all round is a sheet of water, but usually for no very long time.

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  • The DISTRICT OF BHAMO lies wholly in the basin of the Irrawaddy, which, as well as its tributaries, runs through the heart of it.

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  • West of the Irrawaddy there is a regular series of ranges, enclosing the basins of the Kaukkwe, Mosit, Indaw and other streams, down which much timber is floated.

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  • It is an offshoot from the latter of these ridges that forms the third defile of the Irrawaddy between Bhamo and Sinbo.

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  • The whole of the country along the banks of the Irrawaddy, the Mole, Taiping and Kaukkwe, is generally in a water-logged condition during the rains.

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  • Here is concentrated the whole of the rich trade of the delta of the Irrawaddy.

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