This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

irish

irish

irish Sentence Examples

  • Irish and French share common ancestors.

    19
    10
  • "I'm actually not Irish," Yully said.

    11
    7
  • The Irish rock blaring from the bar below was loud enough, and cigarette smoke already curled in through the window.

    7
    7
  • Five cups of coffee later and a full Irish breakfast --without the blood pudding --settling in her stomach, she still couldn't shake the throb.

    6
    3
  • He offered an Irish linen handkerchief from his pocket and waited.

    5
    4
  • Darian smiled to himself at his sister-in-law's Irish lilt.

    2
    2
  • In the session of 1907 he introduced an Irish Councils bill, a sort of half-way house to Home Rule; but it was unexpectedly repudiated by a Nationalist convention in Dublin and the bill was promptly withdrawn.

    2
    2
  • He'd hitchhiked between towns and walked cross-country, admiring the Irish landscape as he went and cursing the cold, incessant rain of late autumn.

    2
    4
  • Jule drew a deep breath and faced the small, grandfatherly man with eyes the color of an Irish meadow.

    2
    4
  • She's Irish and they call her Flag, because of her birthmark.

    2
    5
  • She's Irish and they call her Flag, because of her birthmark.

    2
    5
  • I passed the golf course, as green as an Irish post card and envied the couple strolling down the fairway.

    2
    7
  • After the Irish rebellion of 1641 the Protestant interest for a time was ruined.

    1
    1
  • O'Hanlon, Lives of the Irish Saints, vii.

    1
    2
  • His prestige as a minister, already injured by these two blows, suffered further during the autumn and winter from the cattledriving agitation in Ireland, which he at first feebly criticized and finally strongly denounced, but which his refusal to utilize the Crimes Act made him powerless to stop by the processes of the "ordinary law"; and the scandal arising out of the theft of the Dublin crown jewels in the autumn of 1907 was a further blot on the Irish administration.

    1
    2
  • Organizing it like this would be easy, because it would be working with the grain of the encyclopedia itself, and usually, for instance, the county that any British or Irish town is in is listed very early in the article.

    1
    2
  • In 1679 the rising in Scotland which ended in the battle of Bothwell Bridge brought trouble on the Irish Presbyterians in spite of their loyal addresses disowning it.

    1
    2
  • During the 18th century Irish Presbyterianism became infected with Arianism.

    1
    2
  • During the 18th century Irish Presbyterianism became infected with Arianism.

    1
    2
  • "An Irish winter will," she returned.

    1
    3
  • He hadn't visited the Guardians' Irish station in years, mainly because Ireland had no regular vamp population.

    0
    0
  • She sometimes thought his accent sounded Russian, sometimes Irish.

    0
    0
  • It was bronze in the dream, not red, and Freckle's hair was Irish red.

    0
    0
  • Of the foreign-born, 14,924 were French Canadians, 10,616 were English Canadians and 7453 were Irish.

    0
    0
  • By the ancient Irish the district was called Feor-magh-Eanagh, or the "country of the lakes" (lit.

    0
    0
  • In 1689 battles were fought between William III.'s army and the Irish under Macarthy (for James II.), Lisnaskea (26th July) and Newtownbutler (30th July).

    0
    0
  • Irish in a league against the supporters of the parliament, and only a few scattered forts held out for the Commonwealth, while the young king was every day expected to land and complete the conquest of the island.

    0
    0
  • Cromwell, who was as a rule especially scrupulous in protecting non-combatants from violence, justified his severity in this case by the cruelties perpetrated by the Irish in the rebellion of 1641, and as being necessary on military and political grounds in that it "would tend to prevent the effusion of blood for the future, which were the satisfactory grounds of such actions which otherwise cannot but work remorse and regret."

    0
    0
  • The law was ably and justly administered, and Irish trade was admitted to the same privileges as English, enjoying the same rights in foreign and colonial trade; and no attempt was made to subordinate the interests of the former to the latter, which was the policy adopted both before and after Cromwell's time, while the union of Irish and English interests was further recognized by the Irish representation at Westminster in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 16J9.

    0
    0
  • These advantages, however, scarcely benefited at all the Irish Roman Catholics, who were excluded from political life and from the corporate towns; and Cromwell's union meant little more than the union of the English colony in Ireland with England.

    0
    0
  • That he was also capable of strategy of the other type was clear from his conduct of the Irish War.

    0
    0
  • Though entered as a student at Trinity College, Dublin, Tone gave little attention to study, his inclination being for a military career; but after eloping with Matilda Witherington, a girl of sixteen, he took his degree in 1786, and read law in London at the Middle Temple and afterwards in Dublin, being called to the Irish bar in 1789.

    0
    0
  • Chagrined at finding no notice taken of a wild scheme for founding a military colony in the South Seas which he had submitted to Pitt, he turned to Irish politics.

    0
    0
  • Burke and Grattan were anxious that provision should be made for the education of Irish Roman Catholic priests at home, to preserve them from the contagion of Jacobinism in France; Wolfe Tone, "with an incomparably juster forecast," as Lecky observes, "advocated the same measure for exactly opposite reasons."

    0
    0
  • In 17 9 4 the United Irishmen, persuaded that their scheme of universal suffrage and equal electoral districts was not likely to be accepted by any party in the Irish parliament, began to found their hopes on a French invasion.

    0
    0
  • Bonaparte, with whom Tone had several interviews about this time, was much less disposed than Hoche had been to undertake in earnest an Irish expedition; and when the rebellion broke out in Ireland in 17 9 8 he had started for Egypt.

    0
    0
  • Madden, Lives of the United Irishmen (7 vols., London, 1842); Alfred Webb, Compendium of Irish Biography (Dublin, 1878); W.

    0
    0
  • The English and Irish provinces are treated as self-contained.

    0
    0
  • Ecclesiastical jurisdiction in Ireland was as in England till the Irish Church was disestablished in 1869 by 32 & 33 Vict.

    0
    0
  • JOHN THOMAS ROMNEY ROBINSON (1792-1882), Irish astronomer and physicist, was born in Dublin on the 23rd of April 1792.

    0
    0
  • It is common round the British and Irish coasts, and generally distributed along the shores of the North Sea, extending across the Atlantic to the coast of North America.

    0
    0
  • Besides the university library, there is the Ohio state library occupying a room in the capitol and containing in 1908 126,000 volumes, including a "travelling library" of about 36,000 volumes, from which various organizations in different parts of the state may borrow books; the law library of the supreme court of Ohio, containing complete sets of English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, United States and state reports, statutes and digests; the public school library of about 68,000 volumes, and the public library (of about 55,000), which is housed in a marble and granite building completed in 1906.

    0
    0
  • He published a number of original and scholarly papers on assyriological questions of the highest value, chiefly in the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy.

    0
    0
  • Fiachra), an anchorite of the 7th century, of noble Irish descent.

    0
    0
  • O'Hanlon, Lives of the Irish Saints, viii.

    0
    0
  • C. O'Meagher, "Saint Fiacre de la Brie," in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 3rd series, ii.

    0
    0
  • Elsewhere, as the settlers in Gaul became French, the emigrants from Gaul became English, Irish, Scottish, and whatever we are to call the present inhabitants of Sicily and southern Italy.

    0
    0
  • The town owed its origin and growth to its position on the shores of the Bristol Channel, and its good harbour developed an oversea trade with Bristol, South Wales and the Irish ports.

    0
    0
  • Sigeberht also founded a school in East Anglia, and on the arrival of an Irish missionary named Furseus he built him a monastery at Cnobheresburg, perhaps to be identified with Burgh Castle.

    0
    0
  • Irish Acad., 3, vi., 1902) is valuable faunistically.

    0
    0
  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about Scottish, Irish and Welsh writers.

    0
    0
  • In November 1660 by his father's death he had become Viscount Valentia and Baron Mountnorris in the Irish peerage, and on the 20th April 1661 he was created Baron Annesley of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire and earl of Anglesey in the peerage of Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • He filled the office of vice-treasurer from 1660 till 1667, served on the committee for carrying out the declaration for the settlement of Ireland and on the committee for Irish affairs, while later, in 1671 and 1672, he was a leading member of various commissions appointed to investigate the working of the Acts of Settlement.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of December he protested with three other peers against the measure sent up from the Commons enforcing the disarming of all convicted recusants and taking bail from them to keep the peace; he was the only peer to dissent from the motion declaring the existence of an Irish plot; and though believing in the guilt and voting for the death of Lord Stafford, he interceded, according to his own account, 3 with the king for him as well as for Langhorne and Plunket.

    0
    0
  • In 1681 Anglesey wrote A Letter from a Person of Honour in the Country, as a rejoinder to the earl of Castlehaven, who had published memoirs on the Irish rebellion defending the action of the Irish and the Roman Catholics.

    0
    0
  • He was summoned to the Irish House of Peers as Viscount Valentia, but was denied his writ to the parliament of Great Britain by a majority of one vote.

    0
    0
  • The 1st viscount was also the ancestor of the Earls Annesley in the Irish peerage.

    0
    0
  • THOMAS FRANCIS MEAGHER (1823-1867), Irish nationalist and American soldier, was born in Waterford, Ireland, on the 3rd of August 1823.

    0
    0
  • He became a member of the Young Ireland Party in 1845, and in 1847 was one of the founders of the Irish Confederation.

    0
    0
  • In 1861 he was captain of a company (which he had raised) in the 69th regiment of New York volunteers and fought at the first battle of Bull Run; he then organized an Irish brigade, of whose first regiment he was colonel until the 3rd of February 1862, when he was appointed to the command of this organization with the rank of brigadier-general.

    0
    0
  • O'NEILL, the name of an Irish family tracing descent from Niall, king of Ireland early in the 5th century, and known in Irish history and legend as Niall of the Nine Hostages.

    0
    0
  • Murkertagh was chief of the great north Irish clan, the Cinel Eoghain,' and after becoming king of Ireland about the year 517, he wrested from a neighbouring clan a tract of country in the modern County Derry, which remained till the 17th century in the possession of the Cinel Eoghain.

    0
    0
  • Niall of the black knee), one of the most famous of the early Irish kings, from whom the family surname of the O'Neills was derived.

    0
    0
  • chief of the clan) on the death of his kinsman Domhnall Boy O'Neill; a dignity from which he was deposed in 1455 by his son Henry, who in 1463 was acknowledged as chief of the Irish kings by Henry VII.

    0
    0
  • Conn O'Neill (c. 1480-1559), 1st earl of Tyrone, surnamed Bacach (the Lame), grandson of Henry O'Neill mentioned above, was the first of the O'Neills whom the attempts of the English in the 16th century to subjugate Ireland brought to the front as leaders of the native Irish.

    0
    0
  • She accordingly agreed to recognize his claims to the chieftainship, thus throwing over Brian O'Neill, son of the murdered Matthew, The ceremony of "inauguration" among the ancient Irish clans was an elaborate and important one.

    0
    0
  • His career was marked by unceasing duplicity, at one time giving evidence of submission to the English authorities, at another intriguing against them in conjunction with lesser Irish chieftains.

    0
    0
  • Tyrone continued to concert measures with the Irish leaders in Munster, and issued a manifesto to the Catholics of Ireland summoning them to join his standard; protesting that the interests of religion were his first care.

    0
    0
  • "The flight of the earls," one of the most celebrated episodes in Irish history, occurred on the 14th of September 1607, when Tyrone and Tyrconnel embarked at midnight at Rathmullen on Lough Swilly, with their wives, families and retainers, numbering ninety-nine persons, and sailed for Spain.

    0
    0
  • In 1613 Tyrone was outlawed and attainted by the Irish parliament, and he died in Rome on the 20th of July 1616.

    0
    0
  • In that year he was elected member of the Irish parliament for Dungannon, and joined the earl of Antrim and other lords in concerting measures for supporting Charles I.

    0
    0
  • On the 22nd of October 16 4 1 he surprised and captured Charlemont Castle; and having been chosen commander-in-chief of the Irish forces in the north, he forged and issued a pretended commission from Charles I.

    0
    0
  • Owen Roe professed to be acting in the interest of Charles I.; but his real aim was the complete independence of Ireland, while the AngloNorman Catholics represented by the council desired to secure religious liberty and an Irish constitution under the crown of England.

    0
    0
  • Boyne; and afterwards commanded an Irish regiment in the French service, and died in 1704.

    0
    0
  • In the 18th century the commanding importance of the O'Neills in Irish history had come to an end.

    0
    0
  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the delegates in 1789 from the Irish parliament to George, prince of Wales, requesting him to assume the regency as a matter of right.

    0
    0
  • For the history of the ancient Irish kings of the Hy Neill see: The Book of Leinster, edited with introduction by R.

    0
    0
  • Atkinson (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, 1880); The Annals of Ulster, edited by W.

    0
    0
  • Gilbert, History of the Viceroys of Ireland (Dublin, 1865), and, especially for Owen Roe O'Neill, Contemporary History of Affairs in Ireland, 1641-1652 (Irish Archaeol.

    0
    0
  • It is situated at the head of Loch Ryan, an arm of the North Channel (Irish Sea), 59 m.

    0
    0
  • The Irish numbering 25,000, and strongly posted behind marshy ground, at first maintained a vigorous resistance; but Ginkel having penetrated their line of defence, and their general being struck down by a cannon ball at this critical moment, they were at length overcome and routed with terrible slaughter.

    0
    0
  • The loss of the English did not exceed 700 killed and too() wounded; while the Irish, in their disastrous flight, lost about 7000 men, besides the whole material of the army.

    0
    0
  • Can we change English writers and Scottish, Irish and Welsh writers and other categories into this;

    0
    0
  • B, C and D); Florence of Worcester; Fragments of Irish Annals (ed.

    0
    0
  • Having entered the army at an early age, Conway was elected to the Irish parliament in 1741 as member for Antrim, which he continued to represent for twenty years; in the same year he became a member of the English House of Commons, sitting for Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire, and he remained in parliament, representing successively a number of different constituencies, almost without interruption for more than forty years.

    0
    0
  • There were British, Roman and Saxon settlements at Dunster (Torre Dunestorre, Dunester), fortified against the piracies of the Irish Northmen.

    0
    0
  • By the death of his elder brother, killed near Ticonderoga on the 6th of July 1758, he became Viscount Howe - an Irish peerage.

    0
    0
  • His Irish title descended to his brother William, the general, who died childless in 1814.

    0
    0
  • He was also made a member of the Irish privy council and vice-chancellor of the university of Dublin.

    0
    0
  • This, indeed, is the practice in Ireland, and in order to incorporate the Irish figures with those for Great Britain so as to obtain average values for the United Kingdom, the Irish yields are calculated into bushels at the rate of 60 lb to the bushel of wheat, of beans and of peas, 50 lb to the bushel of barley and 39 lb to the bushel of oats.

    0
    0
  • English and Irish, and England possessed more than six times as many pigs as Wales and Scotland together, the number in the last-named country being particularly small.

    0
    0
  • The compulsory slaughter at the place of landing does not extend to animals shipped from Ireland into Great Britain, and this is a matter of the highest importance to Irish stock-breeders, who find their best market close at hand on the east of St George's Channel.

    0
    0
  • Greville, nephew of Sir William Hamilton, who in 1790 laid out a town on this spot, the advantages of which as a convenient port for the Irish traffic he clearly recognized.

    0
    0
  • The growth of the town was further checked twenty years later by the development of Neyland, or New Milford, further east on the Haven, whither the Irish packet service was transferred; but towards the close of the 19th century the town recovered much of its former prosperity.

    0
    0
  • It is highly doubtful whether Carteret could have reconciled his duty to the crown with his private friendships, if government had persisted in endeavouring to force the detested coinage on the Irish people.

    0
    0
  • Carteret was a profuse and popular lord lieutenant who pleased both the "English interest" and the native Irish.

    0
    0
  • Most, if not all, of his wonderful attributes may be ascribed to the Irish predilection for the grotesque.

    0
    0
  • Nutt, Cuchulainn, the Irish Achilles (London, two); E.

    0
    0
  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

    0
    0
  • Irish Acad.

    0
    0
  • In politics he did much to influence Irish and Scotch-Irish Presbyterians to support the Whig party.

    0
    0
  • Slight remains are to be seen of an abbey of Canons Regular, founded in the middle of the 6th century by St Comgall, and rebuilt, on a scale of magnificence which astonished the Irish, by St Malachy O'Morgair in the first half of the 12th century.

    0
    0
  • and returned two members to the Irish parliament.

    0
    0
  • Irish, English-Canadian, Russian, Italian, English and German are the leading races.

    0
    0
  • Most remarkable of all, the Roman Catholic churches, in this strong, hold of exiled Puritanism where Catholics were so long under the heavy ban of law, outnumber those of any single Protestant denomination; Irish Catholics dominate the politics of the city, and Protestants and Catholics have been aligned against each other on the question of the control of the public schools.

    0
    0
  • Irish Law: Kelly's Statute Law of Landlord and Tenant in Ireland (Dublin, 1898); Barton and Cherry's Land Act 1896 (Dublin, 1896); Quill, Hamilton and Longworth, Irish Land Acts of 1903 and 1904 (Dublin, 1904).

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 81,298; (1900) 108,027, of whom 30,802 were foreign-born, including 10,491 Irish, 5262 Italians, 4743 Germans, 3 1 93 Russians and 1376 Swedes; (1910 census) 133,605.

    0
    0
  • druida) probably represents a Gaulish druid-s, Irish drui, gen.

    0
    0
  • In Irish literature, however, the Druids are frequently mentioned, and their functions in the island seem to correspond fairly well to those of their Gaulish brethren described by classical writers.

    0
    0
  • The Irish Druids seem to have had a peculiar tonsure.

    0
    0
  • for the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographic. Ranke married, at Windermere, in 1843, Miss Clara Graves, daughter of an Irish barrister.

    0
    0
  • By the Irish Judicature Act of 1877 it was directed that it should be amalgamated with the Irish High Court of Justice upon the next vacancy in the office of judge, and this subsequently took place.

    0
    0
  • The new essays in this volume were mostly critical, but one of them, in which perhaps his guessing talent is seen at its best, "The Divisions of the Irish Family," is an elaborate discussion of a problem which has long puzzled both Celtic scholars and jurists; and in another, "On the Classificatory System of Relationship," he propounded a new explanation of a series of facts which, he thought, might throw light upon the early history of society, at the same time putting to the test of those facts the theories he had set forth in Primitive Marriage.

    0
    0
  • PETER BROWNE (?166 51 735), Irish divine and bishop of Cork and Ross, was born in Co.

    0
    0
  • commissioned him to evangelize Germany and to counteract the influence of the Irish monks there.

    0
    0
  • Then came a theological and disciplinary controversy with Virgil, the Irish bishop of Salzburg, who held, among other heresies, that there were other worlds than ours.

    0
    0
  • The missionary movement which until his day had been almost independent of control, largely carried on by schismatic Irish monks, was brought under the direction of Rome.

    0
    0
  • In Kerry, Ireland, he was a large landowner, and became a member of the Irish privy council (1903), and in 1906 he sat on the Royal Commission dealing with congested districts.

    0
    0
  • MOLLY MAGUIRES, an Irish American secret society which maintained numerous branches in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., from 1854 to 1877, and perhaps later.

    0
    0
  • The Irish society of Molly Maguires seems to have been organized in 1843 in the barony of Farney, Co.

    0
    0
  • To the Ancient Order of Hibernians none might be admitted but persons of Irish birth or descent, who were Roman Catholics, and whose parents were Roman Catholics; but notwithstanding this requirement, the organization - being a secret society - was under the ban of the Catholic Church.

    0
    0
  • Gowen (1836-1889), president of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, sent James McParlan, an Irish Catholic and a Pinkerton detective (who some thirty years later attracted attention in the investigation of the assassination of Governor Steunenberg of Idaho), to the mining region in 1873; he joined the order, lived among the "Molly Maguires" for more than two years, and even became secretary of the Shenandoah division, one of the most notoriously criminal lodges of the order.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890), 163,003; (1900), 206,433, of whom 58,424 were foreign-born (19,314 Irish, 17,375 German, 4642 English, 3832 Italian, 1694 Russian, 1690 Scottish, 1643 Russian Poles, 1445 Austrian) and 3704 were negroes; (1910 census) 267,779.

    0
    0
  • To the north, west and south, a flat coastal belt, bordering the Irish Sea, with its inlets Morecambe Bay and Solway Firth, and broadest in the north, marks off the Lake District, while to the east the valleys of the Eden and the Lune divide it from the Pennine mountain system.

    0
    0
  • The skull is I There are no native names either in Teutonic or Celtic languages; such words as German Kaninchen or English cony are from the Latin cuniculus, while the Irish, Welsh and Gaelic are adaptations from English.

    0
    0
  • Irish Setter.

    0
    0
  • Irish Terrier.

    0
    0
  • Mr Brailsford was the secretary of the show at Birmingham, and he had classes for pointers, English and Irish setters, retrievers and Clumber spaniels.

    0
    0
  • The abolition of the cropping of the ears of Great Danes, bull terriers, black and tan terriers, white English terriers, Irish terriers and toy terriers, in 1889 gained the approval of all humane lovers of dogs, and although attempts have been made to induce the club to modify the rule which prohibits the exhibition of cropped dogs, the practice has not been revived; it is declared, however, that the toy terriers and white English terriers have lost such smartness by the retention of the ears that they are becoming.

    0
    0
  • Most of the leading breeds have clubs or societies, which have been founded by admirers with a view to furthering the interests of their favourites; and such combinations as the Bulldog Club (incorporated), the London Bulldog Society, the British Bulldog Club, the Fox Terrier Club, the Association of Bloodhound Breeders - under whose management the first man-hunting trials were held, - the Bloodhound Hunt Club, the Collie Club, the Dachshund Club, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club, the English Setter Club, the Gamekeepers' Association of the United Kingdom, the International Gun Dog League, the Irish Terrier Club, the Irish Wolfhound Club, the St Bernard Club, the National Terrier Club, the Pomeranian Club, the Spaniel Club, the Scottish Terrier Club and the Toy Bulldog Club have done good work in keeping the claims of the breeds they represent before the dogowning public and encouraging the breeding of dogs to type.

    0
    0
  • The Irish wolfhound is now extinct, but appears to have been a powerful race heavier than the deerhound but similar to it in general characters.

    0
    0
  • Of the water spaniels the Irish breeds are best known.

    0
    0
  • The Irish setter is red without trace of black, but occasionally flecked with white.

    0
    0
  • BURGH [[[Bourke|BOURKE]], ], the name of an historic Irish house, associated with Connaught for more than seven centuries.

    0
    0
  • On the murder of the 3rd earl (1333), his male kinsmen, who had a better right, by native Irish ideas, to the succession than his daughter, adopted Irish names and customs, and becoming virtually native chieftains succeeded in holding the bulk of the de Burgh territories.

    0
    0
  • The 4th earl (1601-1635) distinguished himself on the English side in O'Neill's rebellion and afterwards, and obtained the English earldom of St Albans in 1628, his son Ulick receiving further the Irish marquessate of Clanricarde (1646).

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890), 24,963; (1900), 34,159, of whom 4654 were foreign-born (1 9 40 Germans, 11(36 Irish and 499 English) and 2227 negroes; (19 1 0 census) 51,678.

    0
    0
  • The Irish and American bishops he summoned to Rome to confer with him on the subjects of Home Rule and of "Americanism" respectively.

    0
    0
  • In 1730 William Morgan, an Irish student, visited the gaol and reported that there was a great opening for work among the prisoners.

    0
    0
  • In August 1747 Wesley paid his first visit to Ireland, where he had such success that he gave more than six years of his life to the country and crossed the Irish Channel forty-two times.

    0
    0
  • ROBERT EMMET (1778-1803), Irish rebel, youngest son of Robert Emmet, physician to the lord-lieutenant of Ireland, was born in Dublin in 1778, and entered Trinity College in October 1793, where he had a distinguished academic career, showing special aptitude for mathematics and chemistry, and acquiring a reputation as an orator.

    0
    0
  • Maxwell, History of the Irish Rebellion in 1798; with Memoirs of the Union and Emmet's Insurrection in 1803 (London, 1845); W.

    0
    0
  • OLIVER PLUNKET (1629-1681), Irish Roman Catholic divine, was born at Loughcrew, Co.

    0
    0
  • From 1657 to 1669 he was professor of theology at the College of the Propaganda, enjoyed the friendship of the historian, Pallavicini, and acted as representative of Irish ecclesiastical affairs at Rome.

    0
    0
  • The islanders were converted to Christianity in the 6th and 7th centuries by Irish missionaries, in commemoration of whose zeal several isles bear the name of Papa or "priest."

    0
    0
  • Of the 124,631, who in 1900 were foreign-born, Germans were greatly predominant (40,648, or 32-6%), with the Bohemians (13,599, or 10.9%) and Irish (13,120, or 10.6%) next in importance, the Bohemians being later comers than the Irish.

    0
    0
  • His active life, however, was mainly spent in Ireland, whither he took some troops to assist Oliver early in 1650, and he was one of the Irish representatives in the Little, or Nominated, Parliament of 1653.

    0
    0
  • In 1654 he was again in Ireland, and after making certain recommendations to his father, now lord prctector, with regard to the government of that country, hi became major-general of the forces in Ireland and a member of the Irish council of state, taking up his new duties in July 1655.

    0
    0
  • He moderated the lord-deputy's policy of deporting the Irish, and unlike him he paid some attention to the interests of the English settlers; moreover, again unlike Fleetwood, he appears to have held the scales evenly between the different Protestant sects, and his undoubted popularity in Ireland is attested by Clarendon.

    0
    0
  • Irish cast, Lat.

    0
    0
  • When about sixteen years of age he was carried off by a band of Irish marauders.

    0
    0
  • The latter were possibly taking part in the raid of the Irish king Niall Noigiallach, who met with his end in.

    0
    0
  • Irish tradition represents the future apostle as tending the herds of a chieftain of the name of Miliucc (Milchu), near the mountain called Slemish in county Antrim, but Bury tries to show that the scene of his captivity was Connaught, perhaps in the neighbourhood of Croagh Patrick.

    0
    0
  • He fled, in all probability to the coast of Wicklow, and encountered a vessel which was engaged in the export of Irish wolf-dogs.

    0
    0
  • In a dream he saw a man named Victorious bearing innumerable epistles, one of which he received and read; the beginning of it contained the words "The Voice of the Irish"; whilst repeating these words he says, "I imagined that I heard in my mind the voice of those who were near the wood of Foclut (Fochlad), which is near the western sea, and thus they cried: ` We pray thee, holy youth, to come and walk again amongst us as before.'" The forest of Fochlad was in the neighbourhood of Killala Bay, but it is possible that it extended considerably to the south.

    0
    0
  • This piece, called in Irish the Faed Fiada or "Cry of the Deer," contains a number of remarkable grammatical forms, and the latest editors are of opinion that it may very well be genuine.

    0
    0
  • His importance in the history of Ireland and the Irish Church consists in the fact that he brought Ireland into touch with western Europe and more particularly with Rome, and that he introduced Latin into Ireland as the language of the Church.

    0
    0
  • Bury has shown that both Tirechan and Muirchu drew from written material which existed in part at any rate in Irish.

    0
    0
  • Three anonymous Latin lives were published by Colgan in his Trias Thaumaturga (Louvain, 1645), and there exists an 1 ith-century Irish life in three parts published by Whitley Stokes for the Rolls series (1887).

    0
    0
  • Lastly a life by an otherwise unknown Irish writer named Probus occurs in the Basel edition of Bede's works (1563) and was reprinted by Colgan.

    0
    0
  • White, "The Writings of St Patrick" (critical edition) in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (1904).

    0
    0
  • of the embouchure of the Ribble into the Irish Sea, 182 m.

    0
    0
  • The Welsh mines are chiefly in Flint, Cardigan and Montgomery shires; the Scottish in Dumfries, Lanark and Argyll; and the Irish in Wicklow, Waterford and Down.

    0
    0
  • About 2000 disciplined Irish soldiers had crossed the sea to assist him.

    0
    0
  • The basis of his work was a chronicle compiled by Marianus Scotus, an Irish recluse, who lived first at Fulda, afterwards at Mainz.

    0
    0
  • His speech in 1835 in support of the motion for inquiry into the Irish Church temporalities with a view to their partial appropriation for national purposes (for disestablishment was not then dreamed of as possible) contains much terse argument, and no doubt contributed to the fall of Peel and the formation of the Melbourne cabinet.

    0
    0
  • 2 In 1842 he published the Speeches of Lord Campbell at the Bar and in the House of Commons, with an Address to the Irish Bar as Lord Chancellor of Ireland (Edin., Black).

    0
    0
  • He protests against Peel's Income Tax Bill of 1842; against the Aberdeen Act 1843, as conferring undue power on church courts; against the perpetuation of diocesan courts for probate and administration; against Lord Stanley's absurd bill providing compensation for the destruction of fences to dispossessed Irish tenants; and against the Parliamentary Proceedings Bill, which proposed that all bills, except money bills, having reached a certain stage or having passed one House, should be continued to next session.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 44,654, (1900) 62,559, of whom 28,577 were foreign-born (7058 being Irish, 6999 French Canadians, 5131 English, 2465 German, 1683 English Canadian), and (1910 census) 85,892.

    0
    0
  • Irish Trans., 5840.

    0
    0
  • Mr Arch nevertheless retained sufficient popularity to be returned to parliament for north-west Norfolk in 1885; and although defeated next year owing to his advocacy of Irish Home Rule, he regained his seat in 1892, and held it in 1895, retiring in 1900.

    0
    0
  • After many years of labour and at a great expenditure of money the Great Western railway has constructed a fine breakwater and railway pier at Goodwick across the lower end of the bay, and an important passenger and goods traffic with Rosslare on the opposite Irish coast was inaugurated in 1906.

    0
    0
  • Short as it was, Chesterfield's Irish administration was of great service to his country, and is unquestionably that part of his political life which does him most honour.

    0
    0
  • The earldom of Dysart must not be confounded with that of Desart (Irish), created (barony 1733) in 1793, and held in the Cuffe family, who were originally of Creech St Michael, Somerset, the Irish branch dating from Queen Elizabeth's time.

    0
    0
  • He was made an Irish peer for his share in the defeat of the comte de Grasse on the 9th and 12th of April near Dominica.

    0
    0
  • It is caught on all parts of the British and Irish coasts, but the Dogger Bank, and Rockall, off the Outer Hebrides, have been specially noted for their codfisheries.

    0
    0
  • It appears to have been used by James Bradley, but for its practical development we are mainly indebted to Sir William Rowan Hamilton, who published an account of it in the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 1846.

    0
    0
  • LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD (1763-1798), Irish conspirator, fifth son of James, 1st duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond, was born at Carton House, near Dublin, on the 15th of October 1763.

    0
    0
  • In 1783 Fitzgerald returned to Ireland, where his brother, the duke of Leinster, had procured his election to the Irish parliament as member for Athy.

    0
    0
  • French revolutionary doctrines had become ominously popular, and no one sympathized with them more warmly than Lord Edward Fitzgerald, who, fresh from the gallery of the Convention in Paris, returned to his seat in the Irish parliament and threw himself actively into the work of opposition.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1794 the government had information that placed Lord Edward under suspicion; but it was not till 1796 that he joined the United Irishmen, whose aim after the recall of Lord Fitzwilliam in 1795 was avowedly the establishment of an independent Irish republic. In May 1796 Theobald Wolfe Tone was in Paris endeavouring to obtain French assist ance for an insurrection in Ireland.

    0
    0
  • He was on intimate terms with apologists for assassination; there is some evidence that he favoured a project for the massacre of the Irish peers while in procession to the House of Lords for the trial of Lord Kingston in May 1798.

    0
    0
  • Teeling, Personal Narrative of the Irish Rebellion of 1798 (Belfast, 1832); W.

    0
    0
  • Sir Henry's actual words,which undoubtedly influenced the Irish vote, were that he "desired to see the effective management of Irish affairs in the hands of a representative Irish assembly.

    0
    0
  • Reid (Lord Loreburn) as lord chancellor, Mr Augustine Birrell as education minister (afterwards Irish secretary), Mr Lloyd-George as president of the Board of Trade, Mr Herbert Gladstone as home secretary, and Mr John Burns - a notable rise for a Labour leader - as president of the Local Government Board.

    0
    0
  • But in spite of the fiasco of the Irish Councils Bill (1907), the struggles over education (Mr Birrell's bill of 1906 being dropped on account of the Lords' amendments), the rejection by the peers of the Plural Voting Abolition Bill (1906), and the failure (again due to the Lords) of the Scottish Small Holdings Bill and Valuation Bill (1907), which at the time made his premiership appear to be a period of bitter and unproductive debate, a good many reforming measures of some moment were carried.

    0
    0
  • Residents of Irish birth have decreased since 1851; those of Scottish birth have increased steadily, and roughly as the population.

    0
    0
  • Before the union in 1800 it returned two members to the Irish Parliament.

    0
    0
  • Irish mein, ore), but the New Eng.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1880) 90,758; (1890) 94,923; (1900) 94,151, of whom 17,718 were foreign-born (6612 being Irish, 5903 German, 1361 English and 740 Russian) and 1178 were negroes; (1910) 100,253.

    0
    0
  • Owing to their gay and lively disposition the Burmese have been called " the Irish of the East," and like the Irish they are somewhat inclined to laziness.

    0
    0
  • By 1850 the Irish glass industry had been practically destroyed.

    0
    0
  • The Scottish chaplains in ordinary are on the same basis as those in England, but the Irish chaplains are attached to the household of the lord-lieutenant.

    0
    0
  • During a part at least of these long journeys the companion of Odoric was Friar James, an Irishman, as appears from a record in the public books of Udine, showing that shortly after Odoric's death a present of two marks was made to this Irish friar, Socio beati Fratris Odorici, amore Dei et Odorici.

    0
    0
  • As the proper form of address "my lord" is used not only to those members of the nobility to whom the title "Lord" is applicable, and to bishops, but also to all judges of the High Court in England, and of the Scottish and Irish Superior Courts, and to lord mayors and lord provosts.

    0
    0
  • His ardent zeal was sorely tried by Philip's cautious temperament; and Sir Thomas Stukeley's projected Irish expedition, which Sanders was to have accompanied with the blessings and assistance of the pope, was diverted to Morocco where Stukeley was killed at the battle of Al Kasr al Kebir in 1578.

    0
    0
  • Sanders, however, found his opportunity in the following year, when a force of Spaniards and Italians was despatched to Smerwick to assist James Fitzmaurice and his Geraldines in stirring up an Irish rebellion.

    0
    0
  • The Spaniards were, however, annihilated by Lord Grey in 1580, and after nearly two years of wandering in Irish woods and bogs Sanders died of cold and starvation in the spring of 1581.

    0
    0
  • See Lewis's Introduction (1877); Calendars of Irish, Foreign and Spanish State Papers, and of the Carew MSS.; Knox's Letters of Cardinal Allen; T.

    0
    0
  • These are the Schottenhof (once belonging to the "Scoti," or Irish Benedictines) and the Mölkerhof, adjoining the open space called the Freiung, each forming a little town of itself.

    0
    0
  • The legend reads that in the year 600 Dymphna, an Irish princess, was executed here by her father, and in consequence of certain miracles she had effected she was canonized and made the patron saint of the insane.

    0
    0
  • The Celtic heroic saga in the British islands may be divided into the two principal groups of Gaelic (Irish) and Brython (Welsh), the first, excluding the purely mythological, into the Ultonian (connected with Ulster) and the Ossianic. The Ultonianis grouped round the names of King Conchobar and the heroCuchulainn, " the Irish Achilles," the defender of Ulster against all Ireland, regarded by some as a solar hero.

    0
    0
  • Best, The Irish Mythological Cycle and Celtic Mythology (1903); L.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 44,007; (I goo) 56,383, of whom 13,470 were foreign-born, including 3696 Germans, 2458 Irish, 1661 Italians and 1165 Welsh; (1910, census) 74,419.

    0
    0
  • Of the foreign-born, 35,501 were Irish, 31,533 were French-Canadians and 22,832 were English.

    0
    0
  • either one or both parents were foreign-bornand 81,232 were of Irish parentage, both on the father's and mother's side, and, in the same sense, 49,427 were of FrenchCanadian and 32,007 of English parentage.

    0
    0
  • A considerable proportion of the Irish and the French Canadians send their children to the Roman Catholic parochial schools.

    0
    0
  • From about 1845 to 1880 most of the immigrants were Irish, but since 1880 the French-Canadians have constituted the chief element.

    0
    0
  • In the same session Gladstone spoke on the question of bribery and corruption at Liverpool, and on the temporalities of the Irish Church.

    0
    0
  • On the 30th of March Lord John Russell moved a resolution in favour of an inquiry into the temporalities of the Irish Church, with the intention of applying the surplus to general education without distinction of religious creed.

    0
    0
  • At the opening of the session of 1845 the government, in pursuance of a promise made to Irish members that they would deal with the question of academical education in Ireland, proposed to establish non-sectarian colleges in that country and to make a large addition to the grant to the Roman Catholic College of Maynooth.

    0
    0
  • The Corn Bill passed the House of Lords on the 28th of June 1846, and on the same day the government were beaten in the House of Commons on an Irish Coercion Bill.

    0
    0
  • On the 16th of March, in a debate raised by an Irish member, he declared that in his judgment the Irish Church, as a State Church, must cease to exist.

    0
    0
  • Immediately afterwards he embodied this opinion in a series of resolutions concerning the Irish Church Establishment, and carried them against the government.

    0
    0
  • Encouraged by this triumph, he brought in a Bill to prevent any fresh appointments in the Irish Church, and this also passed the Commons, though it was defeated in the Lords.

    0
    0
  • A single issue was placed before the country - Was the Irish Church to be, or not to be, disestablished?

    0
    0
  • He chose this moment for publishing a Chapter of Autobiography, in which lie explained and justified his change of opinion with regard to the Irish Church.

    0
    0
  • The great task to which the new prime minister immediately addressed himself was the disestablishment of the Irish Church.

    0
    0
  • The queen wrote to Archbishop Tait that the subject of the Irish Church " made her very anxious," but that Mr Gladstone " showed the most conciliatory disposition."

    0
    0
  • " The government can do nothing that would tend to raise a suspicion of their sincerity in proposing to disestablish the Irish Church, and to withdraw all state endowments from all religious communions in Ireland; but, were these conditions accepted, all other matters connected with the question might, the queen thinks, become the subject of discussion and negotiation."

    0
    0
  • In the session of 1870 Gladstone's principal work was the Irish Land Act, of which the object was to protect the tenant against eviction as long as he paid his rent, and to secure to him the value of any improvements which his own industry had made.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 Gladstone set his hand to the third of three great Irish reforms to which he had pledged himself.

    0
    0
  • In 1865, in a debate on the condition of the Irish Church Establishment, he declared that the Irish Church, as it then stood, was in a false position, inasmuch as it ministered only to one-eighth or oneninth of the whole community.

    0
    0
  • Prime Minister: Irish Church disestablishment.

    0
    0
  • Gladstone alienated considerable masses of English opinion by his efforts to reform the tenure of Irish land, and provoked the Irish people by his attempts to establish social order and to repress crime.

    0
    0
  • A new Crimes Act, courageously administered by Lord Spencer and Sir George Trevelyan, abolished exceptional crime in Ireland, but completed the breach between the British government and the Irish party in parliament.

    0
    0
  • Gladstone had for some time been convinced of the expediency of conceding Home Rule to Ireland in the event of the Irish constituencies giving unequivocal proof that they desired it.

    0
    0
  • On the 8th of April Gladstone brought in his bill for establishing Home Rule, and eight days later the bill for buying out the Irish landlords.

    0
    0
  • Gladstone was implored to withdraw them, or substitute a resolution in favour of Irish autonomy; but he resolved to press at least the Home Rule Bill to a second reading.

    0
    0
  • The general election resulted o in a majority of forty for Home Rule, heterogeneously composed of Liberals, Labour members and Irish.

    0
    0
  • Down, Ireland, in the north parliamentary division, near the south of Belfast Lough, on the Irish Channel, 25 m.

    0
    0
  • Previous to the Union Ballyshannon returned two members to the Irish parliament and it was incorporated by James I.

    0
    0
  • Nineteen of these, comprising 22,180 acres, were to have been allotted to the church, and forty-two, amounting to 55,620 acres, to English and Scottish colonists, servitors, native Irish and four corporate towns - the swordsmen to be dispersed throughout Connaught and Munster.

    0
    0
  • Armagh, nor were the Irish swordsmen or soldiers transplanted into Connaught and Munster from this and some other counties.

    0
    0
  • Of military antiquities the most remarkable are Tyrone's ditches, near Poyntzpass; and the pass of Moyry, the entry into the county from the south, which was fiercely contested by the Irish in 1595 and 1600, is defended by a castle.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 there were 10,053 foreign-born and 3387 negroes; of the foreign-born 6820 were Germans and 1253 Irish.

    0
    0
  • Ardglass was a royal burgh and sent a representative to the Irish parliament.

    0
    0
  • Other monthlies are the Indian Magazine (1871); the Irish Monthly (Dublin, 1873); the Gaelic Journal (Dublin, 1882); the African Review (1892) and the Empire Review (1900).

    0
    0
  • of Irish Period.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 27,601; (1900) 42,728, of whom 7127 were foreign-born (3227 being German, 1104 English, and b41 Irish); (1910) 69,067.

    0
    0
  • In spite of strong personal opinions to the contrary, he accepted the Triennial Act (1694), the vote reducing the army to io,000 men (1697), the vote disbanding his favourite Dutch Guards (1699) and even (November 1699) a bill re- scinding the grants of forfeited Irish estates, which he had made to his favourites.

    0
    0
  • GEORGE TIERNEY (1761-1830), English Whig politician, was born at Gibraltar on the 10th of March 1761, being the son of a wealthy Irish merchant of London, who was living there as prize agent.

    0
    0
  • But his counsel was neglected for that of ignorant refugees and Irish priests.

    0
    0
  • He accompanied the prince of Orange to England in 1688, and during the Irish campaign he took part in the siege of Carrickfergus and the battle of the Boyne, and was wounded at the battle of Limerick.

    0
    0
  • The river Derwent enters the lake from the south and leaves it on the north, draining it through Bassenthwaite lake, to the Irish Sea.

    0
    0
  • The shipping traffic is chiefly in the coasting and Irish trade.

    0
    0
  • ENNIS (Gaelic, Innis, an island; Irish, Ennis and Inish), the county town of Co.

    0
    0
  • Ennis was incorporated in 1612, and returned two members to the Irish parliament until the Union, and thereafter one to the Imperial parliament until 1885.

    0
    0
  • The famous head-cutting challenge, so admirably told in Syr Gawayne and the Grene Knighte, was originally connected with the Irish champion.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →