How to use Inured in a sentence

inured
  • The Afghans, inured to bloodshed from childhood, are familiar with death, and audacious in attack, but easily discouraged by failure; excessively turbulent and unsubmissive to law or discipline; apparently frank and affable in manner, especially when they hope to gain some object, but capable of the grossest brutality when that hope ceases.

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  • He inured himself to the vicissitudes of heat and cold, and voluntarily suffered the pains or inconveniences of hunger and thirst, fatigue and sleeplessness.

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  • The horses and cattle are of a degenerate type, small, ungainly and inured to neglect and hard usage.

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  • I am now inured to humiliation; and it would be strange if I refused you this, after having granted you so much.

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  • We were all of us well inured to the way they were apt to quarrel.

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  • When required for use they are removed to cool sheds to thaw, and are then gradually inured to higher temperatures.

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  • Intoxication (but this apparently only applies to those not inured to the use of the liquor) follows in about twenty minutes.

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  • Both alike are hardy, though rarely tall; both, when of the peasant class, frugal and inured to toil amid the rigours of their native climate.

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  • Nature is shortsighted, so inured to present things that we receive no light concerning things to come.

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  • Stephen Pumfrey and Dee's Niall is now three years old and already inured to his father's biking habit.

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  • But the South African cricketer is not only inured to hardship, he is imbued with missionary zeal and will let nobody down.

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  • Moreover, they were essentially a wartrained army, for even in peace time their long marches to and fro within the empire had most thoroughly inured them to hardship and privation.

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  • On the other hand, the Russians, once their fatherland was invaded, became dominated by an ever-growing spirit of fanaticism, and they were by nature too obedient to their natural leaders, and too well inured to the hardships of campaigning, to lose their courage in a retreat.

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