Introspective sentence example

introspective
  • No man can exhaust by introspective analysis the hidden elements in his personality.
    63
    40
  • No'man was ever less introspective,.
    12
    6
  • Although he is usually not quite as deep as the average Scorpio, the typical Pisces is extremely introspective.
    3
    1
  • To capture the blind mourner 's introspective point-of-view visually, Wong employs a number of cinematic techniques.
    3
    2
  • The mind is complicated and introspective, which makes it a unique organ since it is self-observing.
    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • The yin is quieter, introspective and enduring.
    5
    4
  • Subsequent psycho-physical investigations have all been in the spirit of his work; and although he consistently advocated the introspective method in psychological investigation, he was among the first to appreciate the help that may be given to it by animal and social and infant psychology.
    28
    29
  • Within the domain of consciousness introspective analysis is unable to discover those chains of necessary sequences which it is the province of science to investigate in the physical world.
    19
    19
  • Oasis turns in a relatively introspective second record, filled with big, gorgeous ballads instead of ripping rockers.
    7
    7
  • Where the sounds are stratospheric and almost celestial, then the intimate introspective fragility roots them earthbound.
    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • Taurus thrives on stability, but the introspective nature of a Scorpio serves to bring some excitement into the mix.
    1
    1
  • Early morning driving might invite acoustic, delicate music while darker and more introspective songs might better compliment late night driving when the moon is full.
    1
    1
  • In this introspective tune, Troy takes a look at himself in the metaphorical mirror and vows to learn from his mistakes to achieve his goals.
    1
    1
  • With the generation of moralists that followed, the consideration of abstract rational principles falls into the background, and its place is taken by introspective study of the human mind, observation of the actual play of its various impulses and sentiments.
    23
    25
  • Other designs may include the guardian angel alone with her wings at her side while holding a harp, an angel with her arms outstretched to you or an angel that is introspective and withdrawn.
    13
    17
    Advertisement
  • Quiet and introspective water signs are often wooed by the zeal and passion of the fire signs, just as earth-heavy signs are wooed by the ebullient nature of air-people.
    20
    25
  • This was possible in any complete sense only after the introspective movement represented by the middle ages had done its work, and the thought of the individual mind and will as possessed of relative independence had worked itself out into some degree of clearness.
    16
    22
  • Excluding from his enquiry " the physical consideration of the mind," he sought to make a faithful report, based on an introspective study of consciousness, as to how far a human understanding of the universe can reach.
    15
    21
  • One may say that this is another mark of the Prophet's want of mental training, and incapacity for introspective criticism.
    15
    22
  • The results of this introspective mysticism were collected by him in a series of fifty-four (originally forty-eight) treatises, arranged in six "Enneads," which constitute the most authoritative exposition of Neoplatonism.
    12
    21
    Advertisement
  • Its chief ideas are - (1) That, owing partly to the want of ability in historians, and partly to the complexity of social phenomena, extremely little had as yet been done towards discovering the principles which govern the character and destiny of nations, or, in other words, towards establishing a science of history; (2) That, while the theological dogma of predestination is a barren hypothesis beyond the province of knowledge, and the metaphysical dogma of free will rests on an erroneous belief in the infallibility of consciousness, it is proved by science, and especially by statistics, that human actions are governed by laws as fixed and regular as those which rule in the physical world; (3) That climate, soil, food, and the aspects of nature are the primary causes of intellectual progress, - the first three indirectly, through determining the accumulation and distribution of wealth, and the last by directly influencing the accumulation and distribution of thought, the imagination being stimulated and the understanding subdued when the phenomena of the external world are sublime and terrible, the understanding being emboldened and the imagination curbed when they are small and feeble; (4) That the great division between European and non-European civilization turns on the fact that in Europe man is stronger than nature, and that elsewhere nature is stronger than man, the consequence of which is that in Europe alone has man subdued nature to his service; (5) That the advance of European civilization is characterized by a continually diminishing influence of physical laws, and a continually increasing influence of mental laws; (6) That the mental laws which regulate the progress of society cannot be discovered by the metaphysical method, that is, by the introspective study of the individual mind, but only by such a comprehensive survey of facts as will enable us to eliminate disturbances, that is, by the method of averages; (7) That human progress has been due, not to moral agencies, which are stationary, and which balance one another in such a manner that their influence is unfelt over any long period, but to intellectual activity, which has been constantly varying and advancing: - "The actions of individuals are greatly affected by their moral feelings and passions; but these being antagonistic to the passions and feelings of other individuals, are balanced by them, so that their effect is, in the great average of human affairs, nowhere to be seen, and the total actions of mankind, considered as a whole, are left to be regulated by the total knowledge of which mankind is possessed"; (8) That individual efforts are insignificant in the great mass of human affairs, and that great men, although they exist, and must "at present" be looked upon as disturbing forces, are merely the creatures of the age to which they belong; (9) That religion, literature and government are, at the best, the products and not the causes of civilization; (10) That the progress of civilization varies directly as "scepticism," the disposition to doubt and to investigate, and inversely as "credulity" or "the protective spirit," a disposition to maintain, without examination, established beliefs and practices.
    7
    19