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interval

interval

interval Sentence Examples

  • In the interval Chicheley found time to visit his diocese for the first time and be enthroned at St David's on the 11th of May 1411.

  • After an interval the polarization begins to be incomplete in the perpendicular direction, the light which reaches the eye when the nicol is set to minimum transmission being of a beautiful blue, much richer than anything that can be seen in the earlier stages.

  • In the interval, Douglas's rights in Aberbrothock had been transferred to James Beaton, archbishop of Glasgow, and he was now without title or temporality.

  • An interval of three years without rain has been known.

  • But in OS measures index error can be eliminated by bisecting both stars with the same web (or different webs of known interval fixed on the same frame), and not employing the fixed web at all.

  • In one passage he distinctly says the old organ high pitch had been a whole tone above his Cammerton, with which we shall find his tertia minore combines to make the required interval.

  • Men physically unfit are wholly exempted, and men who have not, at the tinie of the examination, attained the required physical standard are put back for re-examination after an interval.

  • Their length is nearly equal to that of the longest pair of the ordinary form hitherto recorded, while the tip-to-tip interval is nearly double that of any other known specimen.

  • During the interval elapsing between Dampier's two voyages, an accident led to the closer examination of the coasts of Western Australia by the Dutch.

  • In 1853 he lost his wife and daughter at a few days' interval.

  • The finished core changes rapidly in its electric qualities at first, and is generally kept for a stated interval of time before being subjected to the specified tests.

  • Dots and dashes are distinguished by the interval between the sounds of the instrument in precisely the same way as they are distinguished when reading from the recorder by sound.

  • Thus for a dash the interval between the positive and the negative current is equal to the time the paper takes to travel over twice the space between two successive holes.

  • Hence for sending both a dot and a dash, reverse currents of short duration are sent through the line, but the interval between the reversal is three times as great for the dash as for the dot.

  • For the dot the armature is deflected by the first current, the ink-wheel being brought into contact with the paper and after a short interval pulled back by the reverse current.

  • In the case of the dash the ink-wheel is brought into contact with the paper by the first current as before and is pulled back by the reverse current after three times the interval.

  • By this method of transmission the battery is always to the line for the same interval of time, and alternately with opposite poles, so that the effect of electrostatic induction is reduced to a minimum.

  • Since each letter is represented by a specific combination of positive and negative currents, it is possible, by means of the combinations, to close a local circuit at any given interval, and so cause the paper to be pressed against the periphery of the type-wheel at the time when the letter required is opposite.

  • After a very short interval of time, the length of which depends on the inductive retardation of the cable, the condensers corresponding to C 1 and C3 at the other end begin to be charged from the cable, and since the charge of C3 passes through the receiving instrument I or G the signal is recorded.

  • During the interval between these peaces, Matthias, in self-defence, again made war on the emperor, reducing Frederick to such extremities that he was glad to accept peace on any terms. By the final arrangement made between the contending princes, Matthias recognized Ladislaus as king of Bohemia proper in return for the surrender of Moravia, Silesia and Upper and Lower Lusatia, hitherto component parts of the Czech monarchy, till he should have redeemed them for 400,000 florins.

  • On the east side in like manner the Monte Gargano (3465 ft.), a detached limestone mass which projects in a bold spur-like promontory into the Adriatic, forming the only break in the otherwise uniform coast-line of Italy on that sea, though separated from the great body of the Apennines by a considerable interval of low country, may be considered as merely an outlier from the central mass.

  • the indigenous inhabitants; and the rapid succession of conquerors, Lombards, Franks and Germans following each other at no long interval, and each endeavouring to weaken the remaining strength of his predecessor, prevented this alien hierarchy from acquiring ixity by permanence of tenure.

  • But, in the interval between his second and third visit, a league was formed against him in north-eastern Lombardy.

  • The railways redeemed in 1875-1876 had been worked in the interval by the government at a heavy loss.

  • Fortunately for Italy, the marquis Visconti Venosta shortly afterwards consented to assume the portfolio of foreign affairs, which had been resigned by Duke Caetani di Sermoneta, and again to place, after an interval of twenty years, his unrivalled experience at the service of his country.

  • There was an interval of uncertainty, with at any rate titular bishops, till 1592.

  • This interval was diligently devoted to the pursuit of classical and historical studies, to preparing himself for ordination, and to searching investigations, under the stimulus of continual discussion with a band of talented and congenial associates, of the profoundest questions in theology, ecclesiastical polity and social philosophy.

  • The end of the first interval of this length (counting from the piece of bunting) is marked by a bit of leather, the second by a cord with two knots, the third by one with three knots, and so on; the middle of each of these lengths (half-knot) is also marked by a cord with one knot.

  • in very difficult country around the south end of Lake Baikal; this was constructed in 1904, communication being maintained in the interval by ferry-boats, which conveyed all the carriages of a train across the lake, more than 40 m., when the ice permitted.

  • For suburban traffic with a service at a few minutes' interval and short distances between the stations electric traction has proved itself to be superior in many respects to the steam locomotive, but for main line traffic and long distance runs it has not yet been demonstrated that it is commercially feasible, though it is known to be practically possible.

  • As a general rule the interval varies from one-quarter to one-half mile; on the express lines of the New York underground railway, the inter-station interval averages about r1 m.

  • - Sacrifices, especially of human beings, are offered immediately after a death or at a longer interval.

  • Allowing for this interval of military service, he applied himself exclusively for twenty-four years to his legal work.

  • The arrested prophetic movement of Jeremiah and Deutero-Isaiah reappears in John the Baptist and Jesus after an interval of more than five centuries.

  • In his ninth year (1746), during a " lucid interval of comparative health," he was sent to a school at Kingston-uponThames; but his former infirmities soon returned, and his progress, by his own confession, was slow and unsatisfactory.

  • The paroxysm is followed by a definite interval in which there is not only no fever, but even a fair degree of bodily comfort and fitness; this is the intermission of the fever.

  • A certain abatement or remission of the fever takes place, with or without sweating, but there is no true intermission or interval of absolute apyrexia.

  • The periodicity shows itself in the form of an exacerbation of the still continuing fever, and that exacerbation may take place twentyfour hours after the first onset, or the interval may be only half that period, or it may be double.

  • Eight months after the battle of the Yellow Ford, the earl of Essex landed in Ireland to find that Tyrone had done nothing in the interval to improve his position.

  • He worked with other dramatists in a long series of plays, with an interval of six years on the National, until the revolution of 1848.

  • Only the second is specifically said to be from Jerusalem (the remaining are of Judaeans), and the last has been plausibly connected with the murder of Gedaliah, an interval of five years being assumed.

  • 8) describes the interval between Alexander and Antiochus thus: " The he-goat (the king of Greece) did very greatly: and when he was strong the great horn (Alexander) was broken; and instead of it came up four other ones - four kingdoms shall stand up out of his nation but not with his power.

  • After an interval of two years they tried to capture him and failed.

  • In the interval Aristobulus provoked him by his display of a certain impatience.

  • In the interval which elapsed before the arrival of Albinus, Ananus son of Annas was made high priest by Agrippa.

  • from Cape Krio in Asia Minor, the interval being partly filled by the islands of Carpathos and Rhodes; its north-western, Cape Grabusa, is within 60 m.

  • It meets in regular session quadrennially, in special sessions in the middle of the interval to pass the appropriation and revenue bills, and in extraordinary session whenever the governor sees fit to call it.

  • allow an interval of no less than five and a half years, and nowhere do the events of these years appear to be recorded.

  • The same arrangement is found in some other Polychaetes; for instance, in Sabellaria there is a single pair of large anterior nephridia, which open by a common pore, followed after an interval by large-funnelled and short nephridia.

  • In the interval the claims of one writer and another were much canvassed, but eventually, in 1896, Mr Austin was appointed.

  • The distance of the plants on one ridge from those on the contiguous one he called an interval; the distance between the rows on the same ridge, a space or partition; the former was stirred repeatedly by the horse-hoe, the latter by the hand-hoe.

  • 4, d, the large branchial vein of Patella bringing blood from the gill-series to the heart is seen; where it crosses the series of lamellae there is a short interval devoid of lamellae.

  • After an interval FIG.

  • Next in order of date, though at a long interval, comes Pliny the Elder, in whose Historia Naturalis Book X.

  • His kinsman, Aegisthus, who in the interval had seduced his wife Clytaemnestra, invited him to a banquet at.

  • After an interval of about eighteen months, however, he definitively betook himself to an academic career, "habilitating" in Heidelberg, where two vacancies had occurred in the theological faculty of the university.

  • The whole interval was devoted to a study of the internal sense of the Scriptures.

  • After a short interval Cambaceres was, by the constitution of December 1799, appointed second consul of France - a position which he owed largely to his vast legal knowledge and to the conviction which Sieyes entertained of his value as a manipulator of public assemblies.

  • This second post he seems also to have left after a short interval, for he appeared again in Constantinople, and narrowly escaped death at the hands of the brothers of Eudoxia.

  • The process by which the position of a planet at any time is determined from its elements may now be conceived as follows The epoch of passage through pericentre being given, let t be the interval of time between this epoch and that for which the position of the body is required.

  • The middle wall, beginning south of the Pnyx near the Melitan Gate, gradually approached the northern wall and, following a parallel course at an interval of 550 ft., diverged to the east near the modern New Phalerum and joined the Peiraeus walls on the height of Munychia where they turn inland from the sea.

  • The period of Cimon's administration, however, especially the interval between his victory on the Eurymedon and his ostracism (468-461 B.C.), was marked by great architectural activity in the lower city as well as on the citadel.

  • Epiphanes, king of Syria, by the Roman architect Cossutius in the interval between 174 B.C. and 164 B.C., the date of the death of Antiochus.

  • The next interval of 1000 ft.

  • The bishops did not obtain possession until the reign of John, who during the interval in 1201 gave Hartlepool a charter granting the burgesses the same privileges that the burgesses of Newcastle enjoyed; in 1230 Bishop Richard Poor granted further liberties, including a gild merchant.

  • At first 20 grains of sodium salicylate should be given every hour: the interval being doubled as soon as the pain disappears, and extended to three hours when the temperature becomes normal.

  • The latter weapon in the interval between Alexander and the time of Polybius had been increased to a length of 21 ft.

  • Another, Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), who was, with one interval, a member of parliament from 1780 to 1818, and for a few months during 1806 and 1807 president of the board of control and first lord of the admiralty, is perhaps more famous as a book-collector than as a statesman; he bequeathed his large and valuable library to the British Museum.

  • The interval between two parallels thus only amounted to 12' 51".

  • The last is printed in five colours, the ground is shown in contours of io metres interval and grey stippling.

  • The rainy season lasts from June to December, with a short interval in September.

  • It was in connexion with these latter inquiries that he devised his phosphoroscope, an apparatus which enabled the interval between exposure to the source of light and observation of the resulting effects to be varied at will and accurately measured.

  • This system, by diminishing the freeman's mastery over himself and his power to determine his occupation, reduced the interval between him and the slave; and the latter on the one hand, the free domestic servant and workshop labourer on the other, both passed insensibly into the common condition of serfdom.

  • Of the upper incisors the first and second are nearly equal, with short, broad crowns, the third is large and conical, considerably larger than the canine, which is separated from it by an interval.

  • The law created a departmental committee (commission departementale), elected by the conseil general which, in the interval of the sessions of the latter, takes part in matters concerning the administration of the departmental interests, either in virtue of the law, or by a delegation of pOwers from the conseil general.

  • Until the revolution of 1908, with a very short interval at the beginning of the reign (1876) of the deposed sultan Abd-ul-Hamid, the government of Turkey had been essentially a theocratic absolute monarchy.

  • In the interval another effort to carry help to it was made from Toulon.

  • In the interval he had had the general direction of the naval side of the Greek struggle for freedom.

  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

  • Six years elapsed before he again entered the House, and during that interval he had made the acquaintance and imbibed the doctrines of James Mill and the philosophical reformers of the school of Bentham.

  • In Latin literature it was employed for the first time by the poet Ennius, who wrote in the interval between the First and Second Punic Wars (Ann.

  • After an interval of twenty-four years the subject, re-opened by S.

  • This circumstance might, if it stood alone, be explained by placing Joel with Zephaniah in the brief interval between the decline of the empire of Nineveh and the advance of the Babylonians.

  • The latter prince was dethroned, and, being in a state of mental derangement, was during his lifetime confined by Fateh Mahommed, a native of Sind, who continued, with a short interval (in which the party of the legal heir, Bhaiji Bawa, gained the ascendancy), to rule the country until his death in 1813.

  • Few memorials of the Roman era 2 or of the first centuries of Christianity have been preserved (except the legend of St Ansanus), and none at all of the interval preceding the Lombard period.

  • During the interval the supreme magistracy had assumed a more popular form.

  • The first period of Scholasticism being thus at an end, there is an interval of nearly half a century without any noteworthy philosophical productions.

  • The interval between the diet of 1843 and that of 1847 saw a complete disintegration and transformation of the various political parties.

  • (ii.) Simple equations, especially equations in which the unknown quantity is an interval of time, can often only be satisfied by a negative solution (� 33).

  • After an interval of about a century, during which mathematics attained its highest level, there flourished Brahmagupta (b.

  • A period of mathematical stagnation then appears to have possessed the Indian mind for an interval of several centuries, for the works of the next author of any moment stand but little in advance of Brahmagupta.

  • Mathematics was more or less ousted from the academic curricula by the philosophical inquiries of the schoolmen, and it was only after an interval of nearly three centuries that a worthy successor to Leonardo appeared.

  • Let us now consider the distribution of brightness in the image of a double line whose components are of equal strength, and at such an angular interval that the central line in the image of one coincides with the first zero of brightness in the image of the other.

  • If the angular interval between the components of a double line be half as great again as that supposed in the figure, the brightness midway between is 1802 as against 1.0450 at the central lines of each image.

  • If the angular interval between the components of a double star were equal to twice that expressed in equation (15) above, the central disks of the diffraction patterns would be just in contact.

  • When the interval is very small the discrepancy, though mathematically existent, produces no practical effect, and the illumination at B due to P is as important as that due to A, the intensities of the two luminous sources being supposed equal.

  • Observing through a telescope with light perpendicularly incident, he showed that the position of any ray was dependent only upon the grating interval, viz.

  • In different gratings the lengths of the spectra and their distances from the axis were inversely proportional to the grating interval, while with a given grating the distances of the various spectra from the axis were as i, 2, 3, &c. To Fraunhofer we owe the first accurate measurements of wave-lengths, and the method of separating the overlapping spectra by a prism dispersing in the perpendicular direction.

  • From (5) we see that, when the light falls perpendicularly upon a grating (0=o), there is no spectrum formed (the image corresponding to m=o not being counted as a spectrum), if the grating interval a or (a+d) is less than X.

  • nor diminishes the If we define as the " dispersion " in a particular part of the spectrum the ratio of the angular interval dB to the corresponding increment of wave-length dX, we may express it by a very simple formula.

  • According to the principle already laid down it can make but little difference in the principal direction corresponding to the first spectrum, provided each line lie within a quarter of an interval (a+d) from its theoretical position.

  • In this case there is approximate periodicity in the half interval, but complete periodicity only after the whole interval.

  • The advantage of approximate bisection lies in the superior brilliancy of the surviving spectra; but in any case the compound grating may be considered to be perfect in the longer interval, and the definition is as good as if the bisection were accurate.

  • The effect of a gradual increase in the interval (fig.

  • Let us suppose that the light is incident perpendicularly, and that the grating interval increases from the centre towards that edge which lies nearest to the spectrum under observation, and decreases towards the hinder edge.

  • wards, as com pared with the phase they would possess were the central value of the grating interval maintained throughout.

  • The explanation of the difference of focus upon the two sides as due to unequal spacing was verified by Cornu upon gratings purposely constructed with an increasing interval.

  • In the present application 4' is not necessarily equal to; but if P correspond to a line upon the grating, the difference of retardations for consecutive positions of P, so far as expressed by the term of the first order, will be equal to mX (m integral), and therefore without influence, provided v (sin 0-sin0') = nzX (11), where a denotes the constant interval between the planes containing the lines.

  • Mag., 1887) that the angular measurements present less difficulty than the comparison of the grating interval with the standard metre.

  • The original investigation of Stokes, here briefly sketched, extends also to the case where the streams are of unequal width h, k, and are separated by an interval 2g.

  • The secondary pulses diverted by the ruling fall upon an object-glass as usual, and on arrival at the focus constitute a procession equally spaced in time, the interval between consecutive members depending upon the obliquity.

  • Both include psalms which are most naturally understood as referring to the persecution of Antiochus Epiphanes and to the Maccabaean victories, and cannot therefore be separated by a long interval of time.

  • Whatever their internal dissensions the Boers were united in regard to what they considered their territorial rights, and in the interval between the signing of the Sand River Convention and the death of Pretorius an incident occurred significant alike of their claims to jurisdiction over enormous areas and of their manner of treating the natives.

  • His translation, which was edited by Bickell with an introduction by Benfey, must be distinguished from the much later Syriac translation made from the secondary Arabic version and edited by Wright in 1884.2 Ilannana of I.Iedhaiyabh, who nearly produced a disruption of the Nestorian Church by his attempt to bridge over the interval which separated the Nestorians from Catholic orthodoxy, was the author of many commentaries and other writings, in some of which he attacked the teaching of Theodore of Mopsuestia.

  • Living in the interval between Ennius and Lucilius, whose original force and genius survive only in rude and inartistic fragments, he produced six plays, which have not only reached our time in the form in which they were given to the world, but have been read in the most critical and exacting literary epochs, and still may be read without any feeling of the need of making allowance for the rudeness of a new and undeveloped art.

  • The mart still occupies by custom the interval between Lynn mart, of which it is probably an offshoot, and Stamford fair in mid-Lent.

  • But Moltke, wishing to preserve full freedom for manoeuvre for each army, determined to preserve the interval between them, and began his dispositions to manoeuvre the Austrians out of the position he had selected as the best for them to take up, on the left or farther bank of the Elbe.

  • This will be evident if we consider that, since radii vectores of the hodograph represent velocities in the orbit, the elementary arc between two consecutive radii vectores of the hodograph represents the velocity which must be compounded with the velocity of the moving point at the beginning of any short interval of time to get the velocity at the end of that interval, that is to say, represents the change of velocity for that interval.

  • In the interval of twenty years between the death of Timoleon and the rise of Agathocles to power another revolution at Syracuse transferred the government to an oligarchy of 600 leading citizens.

  • With their approval a bishop was again consecrated, after six years' interval (1881-1887), for the Anglican congregations in Jerusalem and the East; and the features which had made the plan objectionable to many English churchmen were now abolished.

  • Bishop Stubbs in his Introduction to the Historical Works of Ralph de Diceto writes: " St Paul's stood at the head of the religious life of London, and by its side, at some considerable interval, however, St Martin's le Grand (1056), St Bartholomew's, Smithfield (1123) and the great and ancient foundation of Trinity, Aldgate " (1 r08).

  • In 1377 it was ordered that aldermen could be elected annually, but in 1384 the rule was modified so as to allow an alderman to be reelected for his ward at the expiration of his year of office without any interval.

  • Vertical interval British front /ine before authorities, an almost indispensable preliminary to the undertaking of warlike operations against Constantinople and the Bosporus by fighting forces coming from the west.

  • In the interval he had been elected deputy for the Seine (August 1815) and both as deputy and as minister he led the moderate Royalists.

  • At a long interval after these beautiful objects come those vessels which were ornamented either by means of coarse threads trailed over their surfaces and forming rude patterns, or by coloured enamels merely placed on them in lumps; and these, doubtless, were cheap and common wares.

  • All that can be said is that both archaeological and epigraphic evidence indicates that no very long interval separated the empire of the Semitic kings of Agade from that of the kings of Sumer and Akkad, whose rule was inaugurated by the founding of the Dynasty of Ur.1 To use caution in accepting the chronological notices of the later kings is very far removed from suggesting emendations of their figures.

  • The fourth is pagan, the fifth Christian, Aeizanes having in the interval embraced Christianity.

  • The historical interval that separated these two events is treated as naturally dividing itself into three great periods, - those of Moses, David and Ezra.

  • Furthermore, the relations between the Philippians and himself presuppose, on any fair estimate, an interval of time which cannot be crushed into a few months.

  • 1 is to suppose that Paul started afresh to complete or supplement what he had already written, possibly because some fresh tidings from Philippi had reached him in the interval.

  • In the interval between the decline of the Mahommedan empire and the rise of Russia the Khazars reached the zenith of their power.

  • In this interval the use of the lens was discovered and clearly described by Daniello Barbaro, a Venetian noble, patriarch of Aquileia, in his work La Pratica della perspettiva (p. 192), published in 1568, or twenty-one years before Porta's mention of it.

  • (6) Padua passed under Venetian rule in 1405, and so remained, with a brief interval during the wars of the League of Cambray, till the fall of the republic in 1797.

  • The latter structures are only employed for an interval before the final host is entered.

  • While a comparison of his expositions of the Pauline and Johannine Christologies with the earlier Unitarian exegesis in which he had been trained shows how wide is the interval, the work does not represent a mind that had throughout its history lived and worked in the delicate and judicial investigations he here tried to conduct.

  • From this harbour to Osaka Japans waist measures onl 77 m., and as the great lake of Biwa and some minor sheets of wate break the interval, a canal may be dug to join the Pacific and th Sea of Japan.

  • A little farther south enclosing the fertile plain of Aizu (Aizu-taira, as it is called) several important peaks are found, among them being lide-san (6332 ft.) Azuma-yama (7733 ft.), which, after a long interval of quiescence, has given many evidences of volcanic activity during recent years; Nasu-dake (6296 ft.), an active volcano; and Bandai-san (6037 ft.), A terrible interest attaches to the last-named mountain, for, after having remained quiet so long as to lull the inhabitants of the neigh.

  • Summer sees the lotus (renge) convert wide expanses of lake and river into sheets of white and red blossoms; a comparatively flowerless interval ensues until, in October and November, the chrysanthemum arrives to furnish an excuse for fashionable gatherings.

  • There had, indeed, been five periods of declining population in that interval of 124 years, namely, the periods 1738 1744, 1759-1762, 1773-1774, 1791-1792, and I 8441846.

  • In the second section there is a well-developed nasal, and a small frontal horn separated by an interval.

  • The interval of secession was perhaps the happiest in his life.

  • But the interval between the death of Ennius (169) and the beginning of Cicero's career, while one of progressive advance in the appreciation of literary form and style, was much less distinguished by original force than the time immediately before and after the end of the second Punic war.

  • of 8th-century Ionians describing 12th-century events) with that of historic Greece, by explaining discrepancies (due to Homeric ignorance) as the result of " migrations " in the interval.

  • 2, and cool it at constant volume to E, through an interval of temperature (o' - o"), the amount of heat abstracted may be written h = s (o' - 0"), where s is the specific heat at constant volume.

  • In the interval Dragut was mortally wounded, the attack on Notabile was neglected, valuable time lost, and the main objective (the Borgo) and St Angelo left intact.

  • By the early constitutions of the Church of England a bishop was allowed a space of two months to inquire and inform himself of the sufficiency of every presentee, but by the ninety-fifth of the canons of 1604 that interval has been abridged to twenty-eight days, within which the bishop must admit or reject the clerk.

  • Nettled by the form in which the order was conveyed to him, Bredow drew his sword and ordered his trumpeter to sound the "trot," the brigade moving off in line of squadron columns at close interval in the direction in which they happened at the moment to be facing.

  • The explanation is found, so the Assyriologist assures us, in the fact that both Hebrew and Greek historians, writing at a considerable interval after the events, and apparently lacking authentic sources, confused the peaceful occupation of Babylon by Cyrus with its siege and capture by a successor to that monarch, Darius Hystaspes.

  • After a considerable interval, during which the island probably remained uninhabited, the Carthaginians took possession of it (no doubt owing to its importance as a station on the way to Sicily) probably about the beginning of the 7th century B.C., occupying as their acropolis the twin hill of San Marco and Sta Teresa, 1 m.

  • He was succeeded, possibly after an interval, by Ooemokadphises (Himakapisa or Yen-kao-tsin-tai), who completed the annexation of N.

  • For a brief interval, in 1673-1674, the Dutch were again in control, but in the latter year, by the treaty of Westminster, the " three counties on the Delaware " again became part of the English possessions in America held by the duke of York, later James II.

  • (b) An interval of fifty-eight years is passed over in silence, and the rest of the book of Ezra comprises his account of his mission to Jerusalem (vii.

  • - The chronicler's account of the destruction of Jerusalem, the seventy years' interval (2 Chron.

  • 3), and the obscure interval of twelve years in his work corresponds very closely to that which now separates the records of Ezra's labours.

  • The small interval between the adjacent limbs was then measured with a wire micrometer.

  • It enables the observer to compare any division-interval on one half of either scale with any corresponding interval on the other scale.

  • His father, John of Gaunt, had died in the interval, and the king, troubled with a rebellion in Ireland, and sorely in want of money, had seized the duchy of Lancaster as forfeited property.

  • The time of touching bottom i studied by the Norwegian expedition on board the " VOringen " was judged by timing each loo-fathom mark and noting the in 1876-1878, and the north polar basin by Nansen and Sverdrup sudden increase in the time interval when the shot reached the in the " Fram " in 1893-1896, the Mediterranean by the Italians bottom.

  • We do not know how far the imaginations about Prester John retained their vitality in 1221, forty-four years after the letter of Pope Alexander, for we know of no mention of Prester John in the interval.

  • The interval between the back of the tubbing and the sides of the borehole is then filled up with concrete, which on setting fixes the tubbing firmly in position.

  • If now, after a few moments' interval to allow some air to diffuse into the cylinder, a taper again be applied, an explosion takes place, due to a mixture of carbon monoxide and air.

  • Apparatus is added to some dynamometers by means of which a curve showing the variations of P on a distance base is drawn automatically, the area of the diagram representing the work done; with others, integrating apparatus is combined, from which the work done during a given interval may be read off directly.

  • If so, it is clear that their mean distance apart, averaged through a sufficiently long interval of their motion, will be greater than a.

  • Thus after a time dt the values of the coordinates and momenta of the small group of systems under consideration will lie within a range such that pi is between pi +pidt and pi +dp,+(pi+ap?dpi) dt „ qi +gidt „ qi+dqi+ (qi +agLdgi) dt, Thus the extension of the range after the interval dt is dp i (i +aidt) dq i (I +?gidt).

  • Then the result proves that the values of the coordinates and momenta remain distributed in this way throughout the whole motion of the systems. Thus, if there is any characteristic which is common to all the systems after the motion has been in progress for any interval of time, this same characteristic must equally have been common to all the systems initially.

  • Thus each of these molecules which is initially inside the cylinder, will impinge on the area dS within an interval dt.

  • The cylinder is of volume u dt dS, so that the product of this and expression (9) must give the number of impacts between the area dS and molecules of the kind under consideration within the interval dt.

  • Compelled by the papal authority to release him after a short interval and to restore the countship to him, he soon renewed the struggle, beat Geoffrey near Brissac and shut him up in the castle of Chinon (1068).

  • The selectmen have the general management of a " town's " affairs during the interval between town-meetings.

  • During the interval till the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Massachusetts held a distinguished place in national life and politics.

  • However adequate these identifications may seem, the persistence of an independent clan or tribe of Cherethites-Cretans to the close of the 7th century would imply an unbroken chain of nearly six hundred years, unless, as is inherently more probable, later immigrations had occurred within the interval.

  • The Lives of the Seven Bishops followed in 1866 - after a longer interval, part of which was employed in producing an abridged version of her Queens of England.

  • In the interval between the death of Ennius (169) and the advent of Accius, the youngest and most productive of the tragic poets, he alone maintained the continuity of the serious drama, and perpetuated the character first imparted to it by Ennius.

  • in diameter set parallel to one another with a small interval between, and revolved by electric or steam power.

  • The story of the many attempts made in the interval by " forward " or advanced Puritans to secure vital religious fellowship within the queen's Church, and of the few cases in which these shaded off into practical Separatism, is still wrapped in some obscurity.

  • The amplitude of the phase is 1�1 magnitude; and the absence of any stationary interval at minimum proves the eclipse to be partial, not annular.

  • During the interval between the citation and the appearance of the accused, the professorial members of the synod was instructed to prepare themselves to be able to confute the Arminian errors, and the synod occupied itself with deliberations as to a new translation of the Bible, for which a commission was named, made arrangements for teaching the Heidelberg catechism, and granted permission to the missionaries of the East Indies to baptize such children of heathen parents as were admitted into their families.

  • We see lightning before we hear the thunder which spreads out from the flash, and the more distant the flash the longer the interval between the two.

  • Experiments, which will be described most conveniently when we discuss methods of determining the frequencies of sources, prove conclusively that for a given note the frequency is the same whatever the source of that note, and that the ratio of the frequencies of two notes forming a given musical interval is the same in whatever part of the musical range the two notes are situated.

  • When the measurement of a time interval depends on an.

  • This is the interval between the arrival of an event and his perception that it has arrived, or it may be the interval between arrival and his record of the arrival.

  • When the interval between a flash and a report is measured, the personal equations for the two arrivals are, in all probability, different, that for the flash being most likely less than that for the sound.

  • To eliminate wind as far as possible reciprocal firing was adopted, the interval between the two firings being only a few seconds.

  • An observer with his ear to the tube noted the interval between the arrival of flash and sound.

  • In large halls the words of a speaker are echoed or reflected from flat walls or roof or floor; and these reflected sounds follow the direct sounds at such an interval that syllables and words overlap, to the confusion of the speech and the annoyance of the audience.

  • or in ratio 4: 5, the note produced is a compound one, such as would be obtained by striking on the piano two notes separated by the interval of a major third (i).

  • For this purpose the axis is furnished at its upper part with a screw working into a toothed wheel, and driving it round, during each revolution of the plate, through a space equal to the interval between two teeth.

  • If the fork makes exactly 32 vibrations and the wheel 8 revolutions in one pendulum beat, then the positions will be fixed, and every two seconds, the time of a complete pendulum vibration, he will see the two positions looked at flash out in succession at an interval of a second.

  • All experiments in frequency show that two notes, forming a definite musical interval, have their frequencies always in the same ratio wherever in the musical scale the two notes are situated.

  • In the scale of C the intervals from the key-note, the frequency ratios with the key-note, the successive frequency ratios and the successive intervals are as follows: - If we pass through two intervals in succession, as, for instance, if we ascend through a fourth from C to F and then through a third from F to A, the frequency ratio of A to C is a, which is the product of the ratios for a fourth 4, and a third I That is, if we add intervals we must multiply frequency ratios to obtain the frequency ratio for the interval which is the sum of the two.

  • The third 4= 5 X Z X z or ascent through an interval 4, which has no special name, and a descent through two octaves, and so on.

  • The interval between and 44 = 44 - -- 8 01 is termed a " comma," and is so small that the same note on an instrument may serve for both.

  • But the interval between 4 and -4-`56 4-14 is quite perceptible, and on the piano, for instance, a separate string must be provided above f.

  • This note is f sharp, and the interval t is termed a sharp.

  • If we start with F as key-note, besides a small difference at we have as the fourth from it 3 X 4 = y, making with B = I R 5 an interval and requiring a new note, B flat.

  • It makes with it an interval = 1 w 6 - j 2 rather less than a comma; so that the same string in the piano may serve for both.

  • E flat as key-note introduces another flat, and so on, each flat not quite coinciding with a sharp but at a very small interval from it.

  • His remarkable result that two waves give some sense of pitch, in fact a tone with wavelength equal to the interval between the waves, has been confirmed by other observers.

  • According to this theory, then, when a pure tone is received the auditory apparatus corresponding to that tone is most excited, but the apparatus on each side of it is also excited, though by a rapidly diminishing amount, as the interval increases.

  • Thus, an interval of one-third of a second elapses between two successive maxima or beats, and there are produced three beats per second.

  • Thus, two low notes of 32 and 30 vibrations respectively, whose interval is therefore la or 12-, i.e.

  • As the interval between two tones, and consequently the number of beats, increases the effect on the ear becomes more and more unpleasant.

  • Thus the interval b'c" with frequencies 495 and 528, giving 33 beats in a second, is very dissonant.

  • But the interval b bc" gives nearly twice as many beats and is not nearly so dissonant.

  • Again b'c" and CG have each 33 beats per second, yet the latter interval is practically smooth and consonant.

  • If the pitch is raised still further the dissonance lessens, and when there are about 130 beats per second the interval is consonant.

  • If all tones were pure, dissonance at this part of the scale would not occur if the interval were more than a third.

  • Thus, if a note of frequency 64 is sounded, and if all the successive overtones are present, the difference of frequency will be 64, and this is an unpleasant interval when we get to the middle of the scale, say to overtones 256 and 320 or to 512 and 576.

  • But the interval is still dissonant, and this is to be explained by the fact that the two tones unite to give a third tone of the frequency of the beats, easily heard when the two primary tones are loud.

  • But probably in practice there is not a sufficient interval between source and hearer for these tones to grow into any importance, and they can at most be only a small addition to those formed in the source or the ear.

  • Thus the further pursuit of the Russians could only be undertaken after an interval of re-organization by the northernmost troops of the 5th and 3rd Armies.

  • Thus, the reformation of Josiah has been thrust back from his eighteenth to his twelfth year (when he was nineteen years old) apparently because it was felt that so good a king would not:have tolerated the abuses of the land for so long a period,' but the result of this is to leave an interval of ten years between his conversion and the subsequent act of repentance (2 Chron.

  • of span, consider a small interval Fk =Am on which the load is wLm.

  • At the beginning and end of each chapter occur puzzle-canons, wherein the primary part or parts alone are given, and the reader has to discover the canon that fixes the period and the interval at which the response is to enter.

  • Returning to England in 1829, after an interval of two years' travel, Elphinstone retained in his retirement and enfeebled health an important influence on public affairs.

  • The shunted voltameter was then inserted in series with the electric supply mains leading to the house or building taking electric energy, and the current which passed dissolved the zinc from one plate and deposited it upon the other, so that after a certain interval of time had elapsed the altered weight of the plates enabled the quantity of electricity to be determined from the known fact that an electric current of one ampere, flowing for one hour, removes 1.2533 grammes of zinc from a solution of sulphate of zinc. Hence the quantity in amperehours passing through the electrolytic cell being known and the fraction of the whole quantity taken by the cell being known, the quantity supplied to the house was determined.

  • The interval corresponding to the octave being divided into seven equal parts, each about 14 semitone, it follows that Siamese music sounds strange in Western ears.

  • In the interval between these visits he fought for his country during the war of the second partition, and would subsequently have served under Kosciuszko also had he not been arrested on his way to Poland at Brussels by the Austrian government.

  • In a quiet interval, the Lower Eocene plant-beds of Glenarm and Ballypalady were formed in lakes, where iron-ores also accumulated.

  • He was delayed, and used the interval to spend two or three months at Oxford, where he found John Colet lecturing on the Epistle to the Romans.

  • The acquaintance then formed lasted to the end of Harris's life - an interval of ten years excepted.

  • This arbitrary act, though adopted by the chamber, was at once construed as a fresh attempt to maintain the judgment of the first court-martial; but in the interval President Faure (an anti-Dreyfusard) died, and the accession of M.

  • Since p is determined experimentally and tabulated as a function of v, the velocity is taken as the argument of the ballistic table; and taking Av =10, the average value of p in the interval is used to determine AT.

  • Now taking equation (72), and replacing tan B, as a variable final tangent of an angle, by tan i or dyldx, (75) tan 4) - dam= C sec n [I(U) - I(u)], and integrating with respect to x over the arc considered, (76) x tan 4, - y = C sec n (U) - f :I(u)dx] 0 But f (u)dx= f 1(u) du = C cos n f x I (u) u du g f() =C cos n [A(U) - A(u)] in Siacci's notation; so that the altitude-function A must be calculated by summation from the finite difference AA, where (78) AA = I (u) 9 = I (u) or else by an integration when it is legitimate to assume that f(v) =v m lk in an interval of velocity in which m may be supposed constant.

  • the interval between May 1415 and November 1417, during which he was left at leisure by the vacancy in the apostolic see.

  • In 1809-1810 Humboldt was at the head of the educational section of the Prussian Home School Office, and, in the brief interval of a year and a half, reorganiza- tton gave to the general system of education the direction which it followed (with slight exceptions) throughout the whole century.

  • In the interval he was restlessly active in parliament in denouncing naval abuses, and was also, most disastrously for himself, led into speculations on the Stock Exchange, by which he was brought at the beginning of 1814 into pressing danger of total ruin.

  • A parcel of dried mud, coming for example from Palestine or Queensland, and after an indefinite interval of time put into water in England or elsewhere, may yield him living forms, both new and old, in the most agreeable variety.

  • It is probable that the present text became fixed as early as the 2nd century A.D., but even this earlier date leaves a long interval between the original autographs of the Old Testament writers and our present text.

  • That the interval which elapsed before the Prophets and the Hagiographa were also translated was no great one is shown by the prologue to Sirach which speaks of " the Law, the Prophets and the rest of the books," as already current in a translation by 132 B.C. The date at which the various books were combined into a single work is not known, but the existence of the Septuagint as a whole may be assumed for the 1st century A.D., at which period the Greek version was universally accepted by the Jews of the Dispersion as Scripture, and from them passed on to the Christian Church.

  • This interval does not depend upon a mere list of Eponym years; we have in the annals of Sargon and Sennacherib full particulars of the events in all the intervening years.

  • Nearest in character to the Thessalonian Epistles are the two to Corinth, which have perhaps an interval of a year and a half between them.

  • How was this interval to be filled ?

  • The interval between the Baptism and the Crucifixion, or, in other words, the duration of the public ministry of Christ.

  • - The Resurrection on " the first day of the week " (Sunday) was " on the third day " after the Crucifixion; and that "the third day" implies an interval of only two days hardly needed to be shown, but has been shown to demonstration in Field's Notes on the Translation of the New Testament (on Matt.

  • In 1824, after an interval of fourteen years, the third volume appeared, giving, under the same headings, a description of the seven south-western counties - Dumfries, Kirkcudbright, Wigtown, Ayr, Lanark, Renfrew and Dumbarton.

  • The interval was in part devoted to the study of the religion of the Druses, which was the subject of his last and unfinished work, the Expose de la religion des Druzes (2 vols., 1838).

  • The interval of the arguments is io", and the results are given to 8 places; in Napier's canon the interval is 1', and the number of places is 7.

  • A third, known as the "pie" system enables the grower to bridge over the interval, and to keep his hands employed, between the end of the "head" and the beginning of the "pit" strippings.

  • P. Leroux discovered that iodine vapour refracted the red rays more than the violet, the intermediate colours not being transmitted; and in 1870 Christiansen found that an alcoholic solution of fuchsine refracted the violet less than the red, the order of the successive colours being violet, red, orange, yellow; the green being absorbed and a dark interval occurring between the violet and red.

  • The light corresponding to the D lines and the space between them is absorbed, as evidenced by the dark interval.

  • Paul adds that this rite commemorated the Lord's death and was to be continued until he should come again, as in that age they expected him to do after no long interval: " As often as ye eat this bread and drink the cup, ye do (or ye shall) proclaim the Lord's death till he come."

  • The Fractio Panis probably began, as the drinking of the cup certainly ended, the supper; the interval being occupied with the common consumption by the faithful of the provisions they brought.

  • The extent of the unconformity is usually significant of the geographic changes of the interval unrecorded by known Proterozoic rocks.

  • The membership of the Protestant bodies increased in the interval 44-8%, while that of the Roman Catholic Church increased 93-5%.

  • The gross value of manufactures rose in the same interval from $1,019,106,616 to $13,010,036,514; of farm products, from $2,212,540,927 in 1880 to $6,309,000,000 in 1900.

  • The total output of the country rose from a value of $215,000 ifl 1882 to one of $54,640,374 ifl 1908, with several fluctuations up and down in that interval.

  • According to the census data for 1889 and 1902 there was an in Zinc crease in value of product of 184.1% in the interval, and of 109.5% in the quantity of ore produced.

  • In Alabama the legislature meets regularly once only in four years, though it may be convoked in the interval.

  • The teeth of the molar series gradually increase in size and complexity from first to last, and are arranged in contiguous series, except that the first lower premolar is separated by an interval from the second.

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