International law sentence example

international law
  • Locke had spent some years in Holland, the country of Grotius, who, with help from other great lawyers, and under a misapprehension as to the meaning of the Roman jus gentium, shaped modern concepts of international law by an appeal to law of nature.
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  • He brought out in 1865 an edition of Wheaton's International Law, his notes constituting a most learned and valuable authority on international law and its bearings on American history and diplomacy; but immediately after its publication Dana was charged by the editor of two earlier editions, William Beach Lawrence, with infringing his copyright, and was involved in litigation which was continued for thirteen years.
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  • His son, GEORGE JELLINEK, was appointed professor of international law at Heidelberg in 1891.
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  • This would, however, be highly inconvenient since international law has never been codified.
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  • His special interest in legislation for the working classes led him to be placed upon the Trades Union Commission of 1867-1869; he was secretary to the commission for the digest of the law, 1869-1870; and was from 1877 to 1889 professor of jurisprudence and international law under the council of legal education.
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  • There are sovereign and non-sovereign states; international law recognizing both.
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  • Feudalism had a phraseology to express the varieties of fiefs which existed under it; modern international law has no generally-accepted terminology for the still greater variety of states which now exist.
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  • States which have complete independence, complete autonomy, external and internal, and which are recognized in international law as sovereign states.
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  • Ten years later considerations of a somewhat similar kind led to his election to succeed Sir William Harcourt as Whewell professor of international law at Cambridge.
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  • His all too short performance in this office is represented by a posthumous volume which had not received his own final revision, International Law (1888).
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  • The principles of international law he reduces to those of the law of nature, and combats, in so doing, many of the positions taken up by Grotius.
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  • But the blockade of 3000 miles of coast was a far more formidable task, and international law required it to be effective in order to be respected.
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  • Thereafter, for fourteen years, he devoted himself chiefly to questions of international law and arbitration, but in 1876, upon the advent of the Left to power, became minister of justice in the Depretis cabinet.
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  • The violation of a passport, or safe conduct, is a grave breach of international law.
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  • During the progress of the Civil War American feeling had been greatly exasperated by the losses inflicted on commerce by the cruiser " Alabama," which, it was claimed, was allowed to leave a British port in violation of international law.
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  • Its sense in international law is the condition of not being at war.
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  • It is now customary among writers on international law to give peace at any rate a volume to itself.
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  • The conventions drawn up at the second conference were a deliberate codification of many branches of international law.
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  • (I) those which, without having peace for their direct object, promote friendship among men of different races and nationalities; (2) those which directly address themselves to the promoting of friendship and goodwill among peoples; (3) those which regarding peace as the immediate object of their efforts, endeavour to educate democracy in this sense; (4) those which endeavour to remove the causes of international friction by the codification of international law and the promotion of the international regulation of common interests.
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  • First among the bodies which try to remove the causes of international friction is the Institute of International Law.
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  • This is a body of international lawyers, consisting of sixty members and sixty associates recruited by election - the members from those who " have rendered services to international law in the domain of theory or practice," and associates from those " whose knowledge may be useful to the Institute."
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  • Its mode of operation is to work out the matters it deals with during the intervals between the sessions, in permanent commissions, among which the whole domain of international law is divided up. The commissions, under the direction of their rapporteurs or conveners, prepare reports and proposals, which are printed and distributed among the members some time before the plenary sittings at which they are to be discussed.
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  • Another body having a more or less similar purpose is the International Law Association, which was founded in 1873 as the " Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations," with practically the same objects as those which led to the constitution of the Institute of International Law.
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  • In 1895 the name was changed to International Law Association.
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  • A new society was recently (1906) formed in America called the American Society of International Law, " to foster the study of international law and promote the establishment of international relations on the basis of law and justice."
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  • The publications of this society have already taken an important place among the literature of international law.
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  • Still more recently yet another society came into being in Switzerland with objects which seem to be similar to those of the Institute of International Law.
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  • His statements every two years on the progress of arbitration at the International Law Association meetings also form an excellent source of materials for reference.
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  • The Saxon ministers, after protesting against the new arrangement, arrested Patkul and shut him up in the fortress of Sonnenstein (Dec. 19, 1705), altogether disregarding the remonstrances of Peter against such a gross violation of international law.
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  • See further, Allegiance, International Law (Private); also Bar, Private International Law (Gillespie's translation); Hansard, Law relating to Aliens; Cutler, Law of Naturalization; Cockburn, Nationality; Cogordan, Nationalit y; Heffter, Europaisches Volker- :recht; Hall, Foreign Jurisdiction of the British Crown; Westlake, International Law - Peace, and Private International Law (4th ed.).
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  • The cession of Alsace-Lorraine to Germany by France, although brought about by the war of i r870, was for the purposes of international law a voluntary cession.
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  • "It is no answer," said Lord Halsbury, "to say that by the ordinary principles of international law private property is respected by the sovereign which accepts the cession and assumes the duties and legal obligations of the former sovereign with respect to such private property within the ceded territory.
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  • All that can be meant by such a proposition is that according to the well-understood rules of international law a change of sovereignty by cession ought not to affect private property, but no municipal tribunal has authority to enforce such an obligation.
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  • During the anxious months that followed the Austrian coup, the efforts of diplomacy were directed to calming the excitement of Servians, Montenegrins and the Young Turks, and to considering a European conference in which the fait accompli should be regularized in accordance with the accepted canons of international law.
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  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.
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  • During the eight years that he held the portfolio of state, he had con s tinually to defend the neutral rights of the United States against the encroachments of European belligerents; in 1806 he published An Examination of the British Doctrine which subjects to Capture a Neutral Trade not open in Time of Peace, a careful argument - with a minute examination of authorities on international law - against the rule of war of 1756 extended by Great Britain in 1 793 and 1803.
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  • Before the end of the war Mexican laws not incompatible with United States laws were by international law supposed to be in force; but nobody knew what they were, and the uncertainties of vague and variable alcalde jurisdictions were increased when Americans began to be alcaldes and grafted English common-law principles, like the jury, on Californian practices.
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  • The making and the observance of treaties is necessarily a very early phenomenon in the history of civilization, and the theory of treaties was one of the first departments of international law to attract attention.
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  • He was professor of civil and international law in McGill University for several years before entering the Government.
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  • Jurists at one time contended that according to international law a right of " ex-territoriality " attached to consuls, their persons and dwellings being sacred, and themselves amenable to local authority only in cases of strong suspicion on political grounds.
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  • Article 6 provided that the arbitrators should be governed by the three rules quoted above, and by such principles of international law not inconsistent therewith as the arbitrators should determine to be applicable to the case.
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  • The British agent then applied for an adjournment of eight months, ostensibly in order that the two governments might conclude a supplemental convention, it having been meanwhile privately arranged between the arbitrators that an extra-judicial declaration should be obtained from the arbitrators on the subject of the direct claims. On the 19th of June Count Sclopis intimated on behalf of all his colleagues that, without intending to express any opinion upon the interpretation of the treaty, they had arrived at the conclusion that "the indirect claims did not constitute upon the principles of international law applicable to such cases a good foundation for an award or computation of damages between nations."
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  • In one view, for the purpose of municipal law, the territory of a protectorate is not, but for the purposes of international law is, within the territory of the protecting state.
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  • The older view of the position of a protectorate according to international law is contained in the decision of Dr Lushington in the case of the " Leucade " (8 S.T., N.s., 432), to the effect that, the declaration of war by Great Britain against Russia notwithstanding, the Ionian Islands, which were then under the protectorate of Great Britain, remained neutral.
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  • The probability is that in such cases governments and courts applying international law would probably be guided not by technical facts - such, to take the case of British possessions, as the fact that an order in council permitted appeals to the Judicial Committee - but would look to the facts of the case.
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  • The fact is that in the case of protectorates over uncivilized or semi-civilized countries a development is inevitable: control quickly hardens into conquest, and international law more and more takes note of this fact.
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  • One of the most important matters with which he was called upon to deal was the "Koszta Affair "; 1 his " Hi lsemann letter " (1853), is an important 1 The " Koszta Affair " involved an interesting question of international law - i.e.
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  • To Chevalier Hiilsemann, then representing Austria at Washington, who had demanded from the United States the disavowal of the acts of its agents, the complete surrender of Koszta, and " satisfaction proportionate to the magnitude of the outrage," Marcy wrote on the 26th of September 1853, that Koszta " when seized and imprisoned was invested with the nationality of the United States " and had a right to the protection of the United States government, and added: " Whenever by the law of nations an individual becomes clothed with our national state paper, and the principles it enunciates have been approved by leading authorities on international law.
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  • Pufendorf powerfully defends the idea that international law is not restricted to Christendom, but constitutes a common bond between all nations because all nations form part of humanity.
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  • I will not support any UK military action which has not been approved by the United Nations under international law.
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  • It demonstrates that the need for international law enforcement cooperation has never been greater.
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  • Prime Minister Tony Blair said Britain had intervened in the case to uphold international law and the principle of state immunity.
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  • To be sure, international law contains a doctrine of " anticipatory self-defense.
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  • Under international law a transfrontier shipment of waste has to be underwritten with a financial guarantee to cover any eventualities.
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  • He was also editor of the British yearbook of International Law.
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  • Without going back to the wellknown reply of Count Moltke to Professor Bluntschli respecting the Manual of the Laws of War drawn up by the Institute of International Law in 1880, 1 we need only quote that highly up-to-date philosopher, Nietsche: " It is mere illusion and pretty sentiment," he observes, " to expect much (even anything at all) from mankind if it forgets how to make war.
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  • When, however, the Southern envoys were taken by force from the " Trent," a British packet, Palmerston did not hesitate a moment to insist upon a full and complete reparation for so gross an infraction of international law.
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  • To be sure, international law contains a doctrine of anticipatory self-defense.
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  • The threat was not from Islam, he said, but from the subversion of international law by powerful nations.
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  • He was also editor of the British Yearbook of International Law.
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  • Only international law could regulate the problem with any real effect.
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