International sentence example

international
  • I had more than an hour to wait at Philadelphia International Airport.

    794
    303
  • French became the language of diplomacy and international affairs.

    304
    231
  • In 2010, almost 700,000 international students were studying in America's colleges and universities.

    146
    111
  • Formalized agreements on conventions, measurements, borders, and international conduct.

    178
    150
  • The stock of the Electric and International Company, the return on which had reached 10 per cent.

    95
    76
    Advertisement
  • In international relations, is the will of the people also transferred to their conqueror?

    80
    63
  • A variety of international beers and local microbrews complement the food.

    24
    14
  • Their pizza is enhanced by pizza sauce containing a secret mixture of spices, which has earned their recipes international acclaim.

    20
    14
  • Large powers devolve upon other officers, such as the "Chief of the Staff," the "Foreign Secretary," and the "Chancellor," who direct affairs from the "International Headquarters" in London.

    4
    0
  • Before departing on this international trip, you must sign a notarized attestation that you are in good health.

    15
    11
    Advertisement
  • As an international force Russia had been, of course, all but completely crippled by the outcome of the Japanese War and the subsequent revolution.

    24
    21
  • The Balkan crisis threw this question into the background during the winter; but, with the settlement of the international questions raised by the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, it once more came to the front.

    6
    3
  • His period of office was signalized by the opening of an international exhibition at Lima.

    3
    0
  • See also Transactions of the International Swedenborg Congress (London, 1910), summarized in The New Church Magazine (August, 1910).

    3
    0
  • His special interest in legislation for the working classes led him to be placed upon the Trades Union Commission of 1867-1869; he was secretary to the commission for the digest of the law, 1869-1870; and was from 1877 to 1889 professor of jurisprudence and international law under the council of legal education.

    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • His plans were singularly helped by international developments.

    5
    2
  • In recent years, the city has received many new international residents that match the area's new growth.

    13
    10
  • The field for recruiting its members, as well as its landed estates, became restricted by the Reformation in England and Germany, and the French knights gradually gained a preponderance which upset the international equilibrium of the Order.

    2
    0
  • He was peculiarly adapted for the wise and skilful treatment of difficult problems in the spirit of an international set, playing the great game of diplomacy with grace and honour.

    5
    3
  • He was Canadian delegate at the Paris Monetary Conference of 1881, and to the International Exhibition of Fisheries in 1883.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • A second epoch comparable to that of the " Challenger " and resulting like it in a leap forward in the precision of the methods previously employed was marked by the institution in 1901 of the International Council for the Study of the Sea.

    2
    0
  • A definite terminology for the larger forms of sub-oceanic relief was put forward by the International Geographical Congress at Berlin in 1899 and adopted by that at Washington in 1004.

    2
    0
  • According to the resolutions of the International Geographical Congress the larger individual forms which have been described by generic terms shall have specific names of a purely geographical character; but in the case of the minor forms the names of ships and persons are considered applicable.

    2
    0
  • Although put forward by the highest international authority recognized by geographers the system of nomenclature has not been adopted universally.

    2
    0
  • For the sake of uniformity it is to be hoped that the system of nomenclature recommended by the International Geographical Congress will ultimately be adopted.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • This definition was adopted by the International Council for the Study of the Sea in 1902, and it has since been very widely accepted.

    2
    0
  • Fox, of the Central Laboratory of the International Council at Christiania, has investigated the relation of the atmospheric gases to sea-water by very exact experimental methods and arrived at the following expressions for the absorption of oxygen and nitrogen by sea-water of different degrees of concentration.

    2
    0
  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

    2
    0
  • As a term of International Law, it has been displaced by that of "prisoner of war."

    2
    0
  • See Peace Conference and WAR; also Sir T.Barclay, supplement to Problems of International Practice and Diplomacy, for comparison of texts of 1899 and 1907.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • He next organized an extensive international business in coal, and had 13 steamers trading to and from North Sea, Baltic, Mediterranean and Black Sea ports.

    2
    0
  • In spite of this, the calculation was defeated; for in Europe every true democracy at once becomes national, and hence the national problem infected the working-classes so soon as they won parliamentary power; the " International " split up into national groups, just as the bourgeoisie had done before it.

    2
    0
  • Lastly, there are two agencies which cannot be classed among the foregoing; one is the International Parliamentary Union and the other the Nobel Prize Committee.

    2
    0
  • Technology, electricity, mining, railways, navigation and many other subjects are now dealt with in international congresses.

    2
    0
  • Germany, including Bavaria and Wurttemberg, constitutes with Austria-Hungary a special postal union (Deutsch-Osterreichischer Postverband), besides forming part of the international postal union.

    3
    1
    Advertisement
  • The conception of the diet as a sort of international board of control, responsible in the last resort not to Germany but to Europe, exactly suited Metternichs policy, in which the interests of Germany were subordinate to the wider ambitions of the Habsburg monarchy.

    3
    1
  • Our international relations with North Korea continue to to vex the government officials.

    32
    30
  • The New Englander (1843-1892), the Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review (1825), the Ncitional Quarterly Review (1860) and the New York International Review (1874-1883), may also be mentioned.

    2
    1
  • His devotion, indeed, to the ideal of international socialism caused him, at the outbreak of the World War, to lose touch not only with British public feeling in general, but even with the sentiment of the Labour party which he led.

    1
    0
  • Though he was often on strained terms with Mirabeau, yet his views generally coincided with those of that statesman, who is said on his death-bed (2nd of April 1791) to have communicated to him his opinions on domestic and international affairs, especially advising a close understanding with England.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • His great aim was to bring about peace, both international and internal.

    1
    0
  • Next came two publications in "The International Scientific Series," namely, Mind and Body (1872), and Education as a Science (1879).

    1
    0
  • The first step in clarifying the situation is to come to a full realization that the medieval Church was essentially an international state, and that the character of the Protestant secession from it was largely determined by this fact.

    1
    0
  • The Reformation was thus essentially a stage in the disengaging of the modern state from that medieval, international ecclesiastical state which had its beginning in the ecclesia of the Acts of the Apostles.

    1
    0
  • Individuals, often large groups, and even whole districts, had indeed earlier rejected some portions of the Roman Catholic faith, or refused obedience to the ecclesiastical government; but previously to the burning of the canon law by Luther no prince had openly and permanently cast off his allegiance to the international conceived them is found in his Dictatus.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The existence of this theocratic international state was of course conditioned by the weakness of the civil government.

    1
    0
  • The Persians took over the realm of their predecessors, and Gaza grew in importance as a seat of international commerce.

    1
    0
  • The change thus established de facto owed its first diplomatic consecration to the developments of international politics in the Old World.

    1
    0
  • Though the vast ultimate consequences of this sudden appearance of the great western republic in the arena of international politics were not realized even by those in sympathy with Monroe's action, the weight of the United States thrown into the scale on the side of Great Britain made any effective protest by the European powers impossible; Russia, Austria and Prussia contented themselves with joining in a mild expression of regret that the action of Great Britain "tended to encourage that revolutionary spirit it had been found so difficult to control in Europe."

    1
    0
  • The first international council of Congregationalists held in London in 1891 was partly cause, partly consequence, of his visit, and Mackennal acted as secretary.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was a lifelong advocate of international peace, and made a remarkable declaration as to the Christian standard of national action when the Free Church Federation met at Leeds during the South African War in 1900.

    1
    0
  • The subjects to which most importance is attached from the international standpoint are age, sex, civil condition, birthplace, illiteracy and certain infirmities.

    1
    0
  • Congregationalists generally have been to the fore in attempts to apply Christian principles to matters of social, municipal, national and international importance.

    1
    0
  • They have been steady friends of foreign missions in the most catholic form (supporting the London Missionary Society, founded in 1795 on an inter-denominational basis), of temperance, popular education and international peace.

    1
    0
  • The movement in the direction of union has been still further promoted by the International Councils referred to above (section on British Congregationalism ad fin.), in which the American Congregationalists have met the representatives of their brethren in Great Britain and its colonies having the same faith and polity.

    1
    0
  • He also excelled as a speaker, particularly at gatherings of an international character, for in addition to his native German he could speak English, French and Italian with fluency.

    1
    0
  • From 1884 he was the Hamburg delegate for the International Earth Measurement.

    1
    0
  • The Dardanelles, Bosporus, the Sea of Marmora, and the adjoining coastal areas, both in Europe and Asia, were demilitarized, and, to the extent necessary to ensure the freedom of the Straits, were placed under the control of an International Commission.

    1
    0
  • The close of the American Civil War, the Fenian raids across the American border, and the dangers incident to the international situation, gave a decisive impulse to the movement.

    1
    0
  • Tungsten is found as wolframite in Stevens county near Deer Trail and Bissell, in Okanogan county near Loomis, in Whatcom county near the international boundary, and (with some scheelite) at Silver Hill, near Spokane.

    1
    0
  • While the system of counting from the capital of the country is still used for local purposes, the tendency in recent years is to use the meridian of Greenwich for nautical and international purposes.

    1
    0
  • Mr Roosevelt was a pronounced advocate of international peace but also an advocate of law and order.

    1
    0
  • He believed that international controversies would ultimately be settled by judicial procedure, and in the Russo-Japanese War and the establishment of the Hague Court he took an active part in promoting the judicial settlement of disputes between nations.

    1
    0
  • For his efforts leading to the settlement of the Russo-Japanese War he received the Nobel Peace Prize, and in May 1910 he delivered an address on "International Peace" before the Nobel committee in Christiania.

    1
    0
  • But, with this advocacy of international peace, he also advocated the maintenance by the United States of an efficient and thoroughly equipped army and navy.

    1
    0
  • His critics said that his course in this matter was unconstitutional, although the question of constitutionality has never been raised before any national or international tribunal.

    1
    0
  • There are sovereign and non-sovereign states; international law recognizing both.

    1
    0
  • Feudalism had a phraseology to express the varieties of fiefs which existed under it; modern international law has no generally-accepted terminology for the still greater variety of states which now exist.

    1
    0
  • States which have complete independence, complete autonomy, external and internal, and which are recognized in international law as sovereign states.

    1
    0
  • All this, combined with the stringency of the international money-market, meant a heavy burden on Austrian national economy.

    1
    0
  • It endeavours, therefore, to undermine all aspirations of this nature and, its own tendency being essentially international, strives to ensure that national sentiment and national interests shall not find over-zealous champions among the clergy.

    1
    0
  • The International Exhibition of 1851, the creation of the Museum and Science and Art Department at South Kensington, the founding of art schools and picture galleries all over the country, the spread of musical taste and the fostering of technical education may be attributed, more or less directly, to the commission of distinguished men which began its labours under Prince Albert's auspices.

    1
    0
  • The extent of her family connexions, and the correspondence she maintained with foreign sovereigns, together with the confidence inspired by her personal character, often enabled her to smooth the rugged places of international relations; and she gradually became in later years the link between all parts of a democratic empire, the citizens of which felt a passionate loyalty for their venerable queen.

    1
    0
  • To those who, in order to promote the cause of international arbitration, are desirous of acquiring a knowledge of the dangers and difficulties which beset this mode of settling disputes, the account which Palmer has left of his part in this arbitration may be commended.

    1
    0
  • In 1856 he drew up a plan of action, and he prosecuted it with untiring perseverance until he saw it embodied in an international convention seven years later.

    1
    0
  • In 1855 he went as member of the international commission to Egypt to report on the possibility of the proposed Suez canal, and by the articles which he wrote he contributed largely to making the project popular in France.

    1
    0
  • The left wing of the party,-22 deputies and 5 senators - after a somewhat violent quarrel, then broke away and formed an independent organization owing allegiance to the Third (Moscow) International.

    1
    0
  • They pursued a national as opposed to an international social policy, being thus opponents of the Social Democrats and in particular antagonistic to Communism.

    1
    0
  • Prohibitions in respect of night work, the work of women (especially mothers) and young persons have been dealt with in the sense of the resolutions adopted at international conferences.

    1
    0
  • In 1906 an international celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of his invention of mauve was held in London, and in the same year he was made a knight.

    1
    0
  • The city is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Wabash, the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore and the Michigan Central railways, and by the International Electric railway and the Niagara, St Catharines & Toronto (electric) railway.

    1
    0
  • Thus a network of treaties was spread over Europe, leading to much great freedom of trade and opening an era of freer international exchange.

    1
    0
  • But mention must also be made of his founding of Carnegie Hero Fund commissions, in America (1904) and in the United Kingdom (1908), for the recognition of deeds of heroism; his contribution of £500,000 in 1903 for the erection of a Temple of Peace at The Hague, and of £150,000 for a Pan-American Palace in Washington as a home for the International Bureau of American republics.

    1
    0
  • Ten years later considerations of a somewhat similar kind led to his election to succeed Sir William Harcourt as Whewell professor of international law at Cambridge.

    1
    0
  • His all too short performance in this office is represented by a posthumous volume which had not received his own final revision, International Law (1888).

    1
    0
  • Some there were who hoped that so great an opportunity would not be lost, but that the statesmen would initiate such measures of international disarmament as would perpetuate the blessings of that peace which Europe was again enjoying after twenty years of warfare.

    1
    0
  • The principles of international law he reduces to those of the law of nature, and combats, in so doing, many of the positions taken up by Grotius.

    1
    0
  • During this period, while Germany remains the most productive of the nations, scholarship has been more and more international and cosmopolitan in its character.

    1
    0
  • The 19th century in Germany was marked by the organization of the great series of Greek and Latin inscriptions, and by the foundation of the Archaeological Institute in Rome (1829), which was at first international in its character.

    1
    0
  • Acheson, in 1896, patented an application of his, carborundum process to graphite manufacture, and in 1899 the International Acheson Graphite Co.

    1
    0
  • In 1872 he visited Switzerland, and became a member of the International Workingmen's Association at Geneva.

    1
    0
  • Shortly afterwards he was arrested by the French government, and, after a trial at Lyons, sentenced by a police-court magistrate (under a special law passed on the fall of the Commune) to five years' imprisonment, on the ground that he had belonged to the International Workingmen's Association (1883).

    1
    0
  • But the blockade of 3000 miles of coast was a far more formidable task, and international law required it to be effective in order to be respected.

    1
    0
  • In Everett's life and career was a combination of the results of diligent training, unflinching industry, delicate literary tastes and unequalled acquaintance with modern international politics.

    1
    0
  • A work on international law, on which he was engaged at his death, was never finished.

    1
    0
  • The International Geodetic Committee have adopted the metre as their unit of measurement.

    1
    0
  • Represented Great Britain at the International Conference on the Metric System, 1901.

    1
    0
  • Scranton is the see of a Roman Catholic bishop, has a good public school system, and is the seat of the International Correspondence Schools (1891), which give instruction by mail in the trades and professions to large numbers of students; Mt.

    1
    0
  • Gregory (Climatic Variations, their Extent and Causes, International Geological Congress, Mexico, 1906), who holds that the extent of climatic changes in past times has been greatly exaggerated.

    1
    0
  • The railway has been built by the Mexican government as a transcontinental route for international commerce.

    1
    0
  • Manufacturing for international trade has not been and may never be reached, but the industry certainly has reached the stage of meeting a great part of the home demand for manufactured goods, where the raw material can be produced in the country.

    1
    0
  • In 1876 he returned to France to become one of the chief French apostles of Marxian collectivism, and was imprisoned for six months in 1878 for taking part in the first Parisian International Congress.

    1
    0
  • During 1920 and 1921 it was Poincare's influence that was mainly dictating the aggressiveness of French feeling in international politics; and during the latter part of Briand's premiership, culminating in Briand's visit to the United States for the Washington Conference at the end of 1921, it was Poincare who was fomenting the criticism that French interests were being undermined.

    1
    0
  • It is served by the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio, the International & Great Northern, the San Antonio & Aransas Pass, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

    1
    0
  • This is a body of international lawyers, consisting of sixty members and sixty associates recruited by election - the members from those who " have rendered services to international law in the domain of theory or practice," and associates from those " whose knowledge may be useful to the Institute."

    1
    0
  • It was in conjunction with Marx and Laf argue that he drew up the programme accepted by the national congress of the Labour party at Havre in 1880, which laid stress on the formation of an international labour party working by revolutionary methods.

    0
    0
  • The permanent building of the International Exhibition of 1865 adjoins the pleasure ground of St Stephen's Green.

    0
    0
  • Thereafter, for fourteen years, he devoted himself chiefly to questions of international law and arbitration, but in 1876, upon the advent of the Left to power, became minister of justice in the Depretis cabinet.

    0
    0
  • From 1847 to 1862 he was advising astronomer to the headquarters of the army and navy; chairman of the International Astronomical Congress from 1867-1878; acting president of the International Metric Commission in 1872; and president of the International Congress for a Photographic Survey of the Stars in 1887, in which year he was also made a privy councillor.

    0
    0
  • Originally organized as an asram, or retreat, by the Maharshi, it was developed by Rabindranath into a school conducted on unconventional lines, and he aimed at enlarging it into an international university which should comprehend the whole range of eastern culture.

    0
    0
  • With the opening of the Karun river, as far as Ahvaz, to international navigation in 1889, Muhamrah acquired greater importance, and its customs, which until then were leased to the governor for 150o per annum, rose considerably, and paid 8000 until taken over by the central customs department under Belgian officials in 1902.

    0
    0
  • The violation of a passport, or safe conduct, is a grave breach of international law.

    0
    0
  • The Cascade Range enters from Canada, trending sotithward across the international boundary through ThePacifk Washington and Oregon to latitude 41; the Sierra Ranges.

    0
    0
  • He was, further, obnoxious to them on account of his revelations as to the origin of the war, and at an international Socialist conference at Berne he had urged the German delegates to make a clean breast of Germany's war guilt.

    0
    0
  • The United States claimed as a matter of right an exclusive jurisdiction over the sealing industry in Bering Sea; they also contended that the protection of the fur seal was, upon grounds both of morality and interest, an international duty, and should be secured by international arrangement.

    0
    0
  • The British government repudiated the claim of right, but were willing to negotiate upon the question of international regulation.

    0
    0
  • C. Carter, therefore, as counsel for the United States, submitted a theory of international jurisprudence which was equally novel.

    0
    0
  • He argued that the determination of the tribunal must be grounded upon "the principles of right," that "by the rule or principle of right was meant a moral rule dictated by the general standard of justice upon which civilized nations are agreed, that this international standard of justice is but another name for international law, that the particular recognized rules were but cases of the application of a more general rule, and that where the particular rules were silent the general rule applied."

    0
    0
  • The practical result of giving effect to this contention would be that an international tribunal could make new law and apply it retrospectively.

    0
    0
  • When its vast area stretching from the international boundary to beyond the Arctic circle is opened up, it may be expected to prove the counterpart of the great mining region of the Cordillera in the United States to the south.

    0
    0
  • During the progress of the Civil War American feeling had been greatly exasperated by the losses inflicted on commerce by the cruiser " Alabama," which, it was claimed, was allowed to leave a British port in violation of international law.

    0
    0
  • This was the first time that a colonist had been called upon to assist in the settlement of international disputes.

    0
    0
  • In 1886 a difference about international rights on the high seas arose on the Pacific coast in connexion with the seal fisheries of Bering Sea.

    0
    0
  • The British government at once protested against this infraction of international right, and through long and troublesome negotiations firmly upheld Canada's claims in the matter.

    0
    0
  • While the power of making treaties must rest ultimately in the hands that can enforce them, the tendency to give the colonies chiefly interested a larger voice in international arrangements had become inevitable.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the chief ministers of Charles V.; he played an important part in the tangled international negotiations of his time; and he was always loyal to his imperial masters.

    0
    0
  • In the same spirit he carried out the immense and unique trust imposed upon him by the allies when they placed him in command of the international army by which France was to be occupied, under the terms of the second peace of Paris, for five years.

    0
    0
  • He was consulted, moreover, in all matters of international importance, notably the affairs of the Spanish colonies, in which he associated himself with Castlereagh in pressing those views which were afterwards carried into effect by George Canning.

    0
    0
  • His work in Paris, however, was now finished, and on the 30th of October, in a final "order of the day," he took leave of the international troops under his command.

    0
    0
  • She was a member of the International Council of Women; the International Suffrage Alliance; the National Society for Broader Education and the League to Enforce Peace.

    0
    0
  • In this lie was helped by the revival of a strong national feeling in France, provoked by the international crisis of 1911.

    0
    0
  • All continental conditioning establishments now formulate their tests for counts on the agreement arrived at by the International Congress of 1900.

    0
    0
  • Its sense in international law is the condition of not being at war.

    0
    0
  • Even Grotius, who reduced the tendencies existing in his time to a sort of orderly expression, addressed himself to the law of war as the positive part of international jurisprudence and dealt only with peace as its negative alternative.

    0
    0
  • It is now customary among writers on international law to give peace at any rate a volume to itself.

    0
    0
  • The rise of arbitration as a method of settling international difficulties has carried it a step further, and now the Hague Peace Conventions have given pacific methods a standing apart from war, and the preservation of peace has become an object of direct political effort.

    0
    0
  • In the final act, the conference went farther in agreeing to the " principle of compulsory arbitration," declaring that " certain disputes, in particular those relating to the interpretation and application of the provisions of international agreements, are suitable (susceptible) to be submitted to compulsory arbitration without any restriction."

    0
    0
  • These declarations were obviously a concession to the widespread feeling, among civilized nations, that peace is an object in itself, an international political condition requiring its code of methods and laws just as much as the domestic political conditions of nations require their codes of methods and laws.

    0
    0
  • In other words peace among nations has now become, or is fast becoming, a positive subject of international regulation, while war is 1 This has been incorrectly rendered in the English official translation as " the sincere desire to work for the maintenance of general peace."

    0
    0
  • Though the idea of preserving peace by general international regulation has had several exponents in the course of ages, no deliberate plan has ever yet been carried into effect.

    0
    0
  • We have thus the nucleus of that international parliament which idealist peacemakers have dreamt of since the time of Henry IV.'s " grand design."

    0
    0
  • It was due to the initiative of the young tsar Nicolas II., who, in his famous rescript of the 24th of August 1898, stated that he thought that the then moment was " very favourable for seeking, by means of international discussion, the most effectual means of assuring to all peoples the benefits of a real and durable peace."

    0
    0
  • He therefore proposed that there should be an international conference for the purpose of focusing the efforts of all states which were " sincerely seeking to make the great idea of universal peace triumph over the elements of trouble and discord."

    0
    0
  • The conventions drawn up at the second conference were a deliberate codification of many branches of international law.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile a conference of the maritime powers was held in London in1908-1909for the elaboration of a code of international maritime law in time of war, to be applied in the international Court of Prize, which had been proposed in a convention signed ad referendum at the Hague Conference of 1907.

    0
    0
  • A further development in the common efforts which have been made by different powers to assure the reign of justice and judicial methods among the states of the world was the proposal of Secretary Knox of the United States to insert in the instrument of ratification of the International Prize Court Convention (adopted at the Hague in 1897) a clause stating that the International Prize Court shall be invested with the duties and functions of a court of arbitral justice, such as recommended by the first Voeu of the Final Act of the conference.

    0
    0
  • The hardship inflicted on those who have to learn a second language is very easily exaggerated, though it is to be regretted that in the case of Hungary the second language is not one more useful for international purposes.

    0
    0
  • At the second International Conference of American States, which sat in the city of Mexico from the 22nd of October 1901 to the 31st of January 1902, the same subject was again discussed, and a scheme was finally adopted as a compromise which conferred authority on the government of Mexico to ascertain the views of the different governments.

    0
    0
  • Different states had adjusted their frontiers, Great Britain in British Guiana had settled an outstanding question with Venezuela, France in French Guiana another with Brazil, Great Britain in Newfoundland had removed time-honoured grievances with France, Great Britain in Canada others with the United States of America, and now the most difficult kind of international questions which can arise,.

    0
    0
  • These efforts in the two hemispheres are based on the idea that international differences can be adjusted without war, where the parties are honestly aggrieved.

    0
    0
  • The Hague Peace Convention of 1907, which re-enacts the essential parts of the earlier one of 1899, sets out five ways of adjusting international conflicts without recourse to war.

    0
    0
  • Firstly, the signatory powers have undertaken to use their best efforts to ensure the pacific settlement of international difficulties.

    0
    0
  • Fourthly, the convention recommends that in disputes of an international nature, involving neither national honour nor vital interests, and arising from a difference of opinion on points of fact, the parties who have not been able to come to an agreement by means of diplomacy should institute an international commission of inquiry to facilitate a solution of these disputes by an investigation of the facts.

    0
    0
  • Secretary Knox's idea, as expressed in the identical circular note addressed by him on the 18th of October 1909 to the powers, was to invest the International Prize Court, proposed to be established by the convention of the 18th of October 1907, with the functions of a " court of arbitral justice."

    0
    0
  • The United States government therefore proposed that the signatories should insert in the act of ratification a reservation to the effect that resort to the International Prize Court, in respect of decisions of their national tribunals, should take the form of a direct claim for compensation.

    0
    0
  • Secretary Knox also proposed that a further enabling clause be inserted providing that the International Court of Prize be competent to accept jurisdiction in all matters, arising between signatories, submitted to it, the Court to sit at fixed periods every year and to be composed according to the panel which was drawn up at the Hague.

    0
    0
  • It thought that danger of international irritation might be removed by each power making a declaration respecting the " sphere of interest " in China to which it laid claim.

    0
    0
  • From the point of view of diminishing the possible causes of conflict among nations, the adoption of this principle as one of international contractual obligation would be of great utility.

    0
    0
  • Of waterways, international rivers have been the chief subject of neutralization.

    0
    0
  • See Nys, Droit International (Brussels, 1904), i.

    0
    0
  • See Barclay, Problems of International Practice and Diplomacy (1907).

    0
    0
  • Foremost among standing peace agreements are, of course, the International Hague Conventions relating directly to peace, agreements which have not only created a special peace jurisdiction for the settlement of international difficulties by judicial methods but also a written law to apply within the scope of this jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • It has now been followed by over a hundred others forming a network of international relationships which shows that, at any rate, the wish for peace is universal among mankind.'

    0
    0
  • In most cases such conventions have created international unions of states for all matters which lend themselves to international co-operation.

    0
    0
  • The international bureau of weights and measures at Paris was created by a convention signed there in 1875, for the purpose of comparing and verifying weights and measures on the metric system, and preserving their identity for the contracting states.

    0
    0
  • The copyright union was created by an international convention signed in 1874.

    0
    0
  • It shows how deep and widespread the sense of the utility of international state co-operation has become.

    0
    0
  • It seems to have been the first great popular effort ever made deliberately by a representative body of the middle class of a nation for the promotion of international friendship without the aid of diplomacy and without official assistance or even countenance of any kind.

    0
    0
  • International exhibitions are always used as an occasion for holding many such meetings.

    0
    0
  • A society, numbering many thousands of working men among its members, which has set itself the more special task of promoting the interchange of visits between working men of different nations, is called the " International Brotherhood Alliance," or, after the initials of its motto, Fraternitas inter genies, the F.I.G.

    0
    0
  • Another agency, called the " American Association for International Conciliation," seeks by the publication of essays on the different aspects of international friendship to promote the same cause.

    0
    0
  • These congresses have been supplemented by national congresses in ' See Annuaire du mouvement pacifaste pour l'anne'e 1910, published by the Bureau International de la Paix, at Bern.

    0
    0
  • First among the bodies which try to remove the causes of international friction is the Institute of International Law.

    0
    0
  • Its mode of operation is to work out the matters it deals with during the intervals between the sessions, in permanent commissions, among which the whole domain of international law is divided up. The commissions, under the direction of their rapporteurs or conveners, prepare reports and proposals, which are printed and distributed among the members some time before the plenary sittings at which they are to be discussed.

    0
    0
  • Thus the resolutions of the Institute have the authority attaching to a mature expression of the views of the leading international jurists of Europe.

    0
    0
  • Another body having a more or less similar purpose is the International Law Association, which was founded in 1873 as the " Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations," with practically the same objects as those which led to the constitution of the Institute of International Law.

    0
    0
  • There are now numerous volumes of such reports, many of them containing most valuable materials for international jurists.

    0
    0
  • In 1895 the name was changed to International Law Association.

    0
    0
  • A new society was recently (1906) formed in America called the American Society of International Law, " to foster the study of international law and promote the establishment of international relations on the basis of law and justice."

    0
    0
  • The publications of this society have already taken an important place among the literature of international law.

    0
    0
  • Still more recently yet another society came into being in Switzerland with objects which seem to be similar to those of the Institute of International Law.

    0
    0
  • It is composed of groups of the different parliaments of the world, who meet periodically to " bring about the acceptance in their respective countries, by votes in parliament and by means of arbitration treaties, of the principle that differences between nations should be submitted to arbitration and to consider other questions of international importance."

    0
    0
  • In this connexion we may mention that the secretary of the London Peace Society, Dr Evans Darby, has edited an exhaustive collection of materials called International Tribunals.

    0
    0
  • His statements every two years on the progress of arbitration at the International Law Association meetings also form an excellent source of materials for reference.

    0
    0
  • Even war has no other avowed purpose than that of placing specific international relations on a definite footing.

    0
    0
  • Driver and Francis Brown he prepared a revised Hebrew and English Lexicon (1891-1905), and with Driver edited the " International Commentary Series."

    0
    0
  • All western trade in Canada of the vast provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, must pass through the narrow belt of loo m., lying between the international boundary line and Lake Winnipeg.

    0
    0
  • The railways were built between 1856 and 1862, while the opening of the Simplon tunnel (1906) greatly increased the commercial importance of Lausanne, which is now on the great international highway from Paris to Milan.

    0
    0
  • Mistress of the entire Christian organism, Rome thus gained control of international education, and the mendicant monks who formed her devoted militia lost no time in monopolizing the professorial chairs.

    0
    0
  • The international situation was the most difficult imaginable, and altogether beyond the powers of the timorous, vacillating and irresolute Medician pope.

    0
    0
  • The pope sacrificed the national aspirations of his subjects to his international relations as head of the Church; and he sacrificed their craving for liberty to the alliance with autocracy on which rested the continued existence of the temporal power.

    0
    0
  • By the Achaemenian period Aramaic had become the international language, and was adopted officially.

    0
    0
  • What may be described as "national systems" of law are dealt with historically and generally under English Law, American Law, Roman Law, Greek Law, Mahommedan Law, Indian Law, &c. Certain broad divisions of law are treated under Constitution And Constitutional Law, Canon Law, Civil Law, Common Law, Criminal Law, Ecclesiastical Law, Equity, International Law, Military Law, &C. And the particular laws of different countries on special subjects are stated under the headings for those subjects (Bankruptcy, &c.).

    0
    0
  • He was a member of the Allied Conference (1917), of the Supreme War Council (1918), and of the International Peace Conference (1918-9).

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf, the Fort Worth & Denver City, the Fort Worth & Rio Grande, and the St Louis, San Francisco & Texas of the "Frisco" system, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the International & Great Northern, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the St Louis SouthWestern, the Texas & Pacific, and the Trinity & Brazos Valley (Colorado & Southern) railways.

    0
    0
  • The Saxon ministers, after protesting against the new arrangement, arrested Patkul and shut him up in the fortress of Sonnenstein (Dec. 19, 1705), altogether disregarding the remonstrances of Peter against such a gross violation of international law.

    0
    0
  • International Missionary Alliance (1887), which has sent many missionaries to India and China.

    0
    0
  • Mott succeeded in forming students' associations in universities and colleges in several European countries, as well as in Turkey in Asia, Syria, India, Ceylon, China, Japan and Australia; and all these associations, over 150 in number, are now linked together in a great International Student Federation.

    0
    0
  • The municipal schools of Milan are as well organized as any in Italy, and the exhibit in connexion with them at the great international exhibition of 1906 was of interest.

    0
    0
  • The international exhibition of 1906 held in Milan was of considerable importance, all the leading states of the world taking part in it.

    0
    0
  • The British government was forced to interfere, more especially as the country, by international agreement, had been included in the British sphere of influence.

    0
    0
  • One of Auber's latest compositions was a march, written for the opening of the International Exhibition in London in 1862.

    0
    0
  • From the internal, as distinct from the international, aspect, the absolute quantity of money, supposed as of fixed amount, in a country, is of no consequence, while a quantity larger than is required for the interchange of commodities is injurious, as tending to raise prices and to drive foreigners from the home markets.

    0
    0
  • Stanley a rudimentary state was created, and through the efforts of King Leopold in Europe the International Association was recognized during 1884-1885 by the powers as an independent state.

    0
    0
  • He held a unique position among foreign residents in Japan, alike as a profound student of its history and art, and as a powerful factor in international politics.

    0
    0
  • At the outbreak of the Revolution he turned to journalism, becoming editor of the Mercure international.

    0
    0
  • The naturalization treaties which he negotiated successively with Prussia and the other north German states were the first international recognition of the right of expatriation, a principle since incorporated in the law of nations.

    0
    0
  • He nevertheless found time to organize the meteorological service in France and to promote the present system of international weather-warnings.

    0
    0
  • If in this matter Louis Philippe had seemed to sacrifice the international position of France to dynastic interests, his attempt to re-establish it by allying himself with the reactionary monarchies against the Liberals of Switzerland finally alienated from him the French Liberal opinion on which his authority was based.

    0
    0
  • Evarts; and in 1881 was a delegate to the International Sanitary Conference, which met in Washington, D.C., and of which he was chosen president.

    0
    0
  • This office has done much in the matter of unifying the systems of various railways and of regulating their relations to the military, postal and telegraph organizations; it also took a leading part in the framing of the international laws regarding goods traffic; but the imperial code of railway law which it drafted has never been laid before the Reichstag.

    0
    0
  • In one addressed to the chancellor he declared his intention, as emperor, of bettering the lot of the working classes; for this purpose he proposed to call an international congress to consider the possibility of meeting the requirements and wishes of the working men; in the other, which he issued as king of Prussia, he declared that the regulation of the time and conditions of labor was the duty of the state, and the council of state was to be summoned to discuss this and kindred questions.

    0
    0
  • These were not accepted by the Bundesrat, but after the International Congress of 1890 an important amendment and addition to the Gewerbeordnung was carried to this effect.

    0
    0
  • In the elections of 1907, indeed, the Social Democratic party, owing to the unparalleled exertion of the government, had a set-back, its representation in parliament sinking to 43; but at the International Socialist Congress, which met at Stuttgart on the 18th of August, Herr Bebel was able to point oui that, in spite of its defeat at the polls, the Socialist cause had actually gained strength in the country, their total poll having increased from 3,010,771.

    0
    0
  • In the work of pressing on the national and international expansion of Germany the interests and views of the lesser constituent states of the Empire were apt to be overlooked or overridden; and in the southern states there was considerable resentment at the unitarian tendency of the north, which seemed to aim at imposing the Prussian model on the whole nation.

    0
    0
  • The minister of foreign affairs conducts the international relations of the Dual Monarchy, and can conclude international treaties.

    0
    0
  • But his interest was in the fascinating game of diplomacy; he was ambitious of playing the leading part on the great stage of international politics; and he was too consummate a courtier to risk the loss of the imperial favour by any insistence on unpalatable reforms, which, after all, would perhaps only reveal the necessity for the complete revolution which he feared.

    0
    0
  • The disputes which resulted in the Crimean War revealed the fact that " gratitude " plays but a small part in international affairs.

    0
    0
  • He had no previous experience of Austrian affairs, and was only anxious at once to bring about a settlement which would enable the empire to take a strong position in international politics.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 the influence of the international " scramble for Africa " made itself felt by the establishment under the recognized protection of the French government of two French firms which opened upwards of thirty trading stations on the Lower Niger.

    0
    0
  • The movements of Germany from the south-east, and of France from the west and north, were thus held in check, and by securing international agreements the mutual limits of the three European powers concerned were definitely fixed.

    0
    0
  • On the south side of the Ezbekia are the post office, the courts of the International Tribunals,and the opera house.

    0
    0
  • For several years before 1904 the administration of the railways was carried on by an international or, mixed board for the security of foreign creditors.

    0
    0
  • The grave abuse to which the consular system was subject led to the establishment, in February 1876, at the instance of Nubar Pasha and after eight years of negotiation, of International or Mixed Tribunals to supersede consular jurisdiction to the extent indicated.

    0
    0
  • The convention left the permanent rate of interest on the debt, as fixed by the Law of Liquidation, unchanged, but to afford temporary relief to the Egyptian exchequer a reduction of 5% on the interest of the debt was granted for two years, on condition that if at the end of that period payment, including the arrears of the two years, was not resumed in full, another international commission was to be appointed to examine into the whole financial situation.

    0
    0
  • In this way the heroic remedy failed, and to the internal difficulties were added international complications.

    0
    0
  • The British position in Egypt was anomalous, and might easily give rise to international complications.

    0
    0
  • The first-named put an end to an anomalous situation and gave a practically valid sanction to the presence of Britain in Egypt, removing all ground for the reproach that Great Britain was not respecting its international obligations.

    0
    0
  • The power of the Caisse de la Dette, which had virtually controlled the execution of the international agreements concerning the finances, was swept away, together with almost all the other financial fetters binding Egypt.

    0
    0
  • He left the country in a state of unexampled material prosperity, free from the majority of the international fetters with which it was bound when he took up his task in 1883, and with the legitimate expectation that the work he had done would endure.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile international politics had developed in a way that necessitated a change in Ali's attitude.

    0
    0
  • Then, if ever, Denmark had the chance of playing once more a leading part in international politics.

    0
    0
  • To the last he endeavoured to avoid a rupture with France even if he broke with Sweden; but he could not restrain for ever the foolish impetuosity of his own sovereign, Christian V., and his fall in the beginning of 1676 not only, as he had foreseen, involved Denmark in an unprofitable war, but, as his friend and disciple, Jens Juel, well observed, relegated her henceforth to the humiliating position of an international catspaw.

    0
    0
  • Yet the document is of great interest, as in it we find formulated for the first time in an official despatch those exalted ideals of international policy which were to play so conspicuous a part in the affairs of the world at the close of the revolutionary epoch, and issued at the end of the 10th century in the Rescript of Nicholas II.'

    0
    0
  • The town, which witnessed much of the international strife and Border lawlessness, was taken by Edward I.

    0
    0
  • The growth and development of the Balkan nations have, to a great extent, been retarded by the international jealousies arising from the Eastern Question.

    0
    0
  • After the gift of $500,000 by Andrew Carnegie there were established in 1909 the Andrew Carnegie School of Engineering, the James Madison School of Law, the James Monroe School of International Law, the James Wilson School of Political Economy, the Edgar Allan Poe School of English and the Walter Reed School of Pathology.

    0
    0
  • Border homicides added their element of international irritation, and James renewed the ancient league with France.

    0
    0
  • The crowning point of his railway policy was the regulation of the Danube at the hitherto impassable Iron-Gates Rapids by the construction of canals, which opened up the eastern trade to Hungary and was an event of international importance.

    0
    0
  • Further steps were taken after Goluchowski's interview with the tsar at Miirzsteg in 1903, and two civil agents representing the countries were appointed for two years to ensure the execution of the promised reforms. This period was extended in 1905, when Goluchowski was the chief mover in forcing the Porte, by an international naval demonstration at Mitylene, to accept financial control by the powers in Macedonia.

    0
    0
  • Reference should also be made to separate works of the director of that institution, Dr Joseph de Korosy, known in England for his discovery of the law of marital fertility, published by the Royal Society, and by his labours in the development of comparative international statistics.

    0
    0
  • The government of Chile arranged the sale of the Esmeralda, but wished to be free from all danger of international complications in the affair.

    0
    0
  • The Department, which also controls the principal international lines in Persia, is amply self-supporting.

    0
    0
  • Students of international politics are familiar with the claims of nations to a position of preference in certain regions, based upon historic, economic or geographical considerations.

    0
    0
  • He was a member of the Imperial War Cabinet and Imperial War Conference, 1918; Canadian Government representative at the International Labour Conference at Washington, 1919; and a Canadian delegate to the first assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva, 1920.

    0
    0
  • He also published a book on international law, which has gone through several editions.

    0
    0
  • The town is known in the history of international treaties as the place at which the famous peace of Passarowitz between Austria and Turkey was concluded in 1718.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 an international commission that met at Shanghai passed resolutions inviting all the states there represented to take measures for the gradual suppression of the manufacture, sale and distribution of opium, except for medicinal purposes.

    0
    0
  • These instruments have done admirable work in connexion with the great international undertaking, the Carte du Ciel.

    0
    0
  • Its original use was the determination of geographical latitudes in the field work of geodetic operations; more recently it has been extensively employed for the determination S of variation of latitude, at fixed stations, under the auspices of the International Geodetic Bureau, and for the astronomical determination of the constant of aberration.

    0
    0
  • Lunda is part of the old Bantu kingdom of Muata Yanvo, divided by international agreement between Portugal and the Congo Free State.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 Professor Waldstein expounded both in Europe and in America an international scheme for thorough investigation of the site.

    0
    0
  • All that can be meant by such a proposition is that according to the well-understood rules of international law a change of sovereignty by cession ought not to affect private property, but no municipal tribunal has authority to enforce such an obligation.

    0
    0
  • The international position of the Ottoman empire was strengthened by the able, if Machiavellian, statecraft of the sultan; while the danger of disruption from within was lessened by the more effective central control made possible by railways, telegraphs, and the other mechanical improvements borrowed from western civilization.

    0
    0
  • The result on the international situation was profound.

    0
    0
  • The international concert defined in the treaty of Berlin had been rudely shaken, if not destroyed; the denunciation by Austria, without consulting her co-signatories, of the clauses of the treaty affecting herself seemed to invalidate all the rest; and in the absence of the restraining force of a united concert of the great powers, free play seemed likely once more to be given to the rival ambitions of the Balkan nationalities, the situation being complicated by the necessity for the dominant party in the renovated Turkish state to maintain its prestige.

    0
    0
  • During the anxious months that followed the Austrian coup, the efforts of diplomacy were directed to calming the excitement of Servians, Montenegrins and the Young Turks, and to considering a European conference in which the fait accompli should be regularized in accordance with the accepted canons of international law.

    0
    0
  • On account of its practical convenience, and its close relation to the international electrical units, the joule has been recommended by the British Association for adoption as the absolute unit of heat.

    0
    0
  • The Value Of The International Electrical Units Has By This Time Been So Accurately Determined In Absolute Measure That They Afford A Very Good, Though Indirect, Method Of Determining The Mechanical Equivalent Of Heat.

    0
    0
  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.

    0
    0
  • During the eight years that he held the portfolio of state, he had con s tinually to defend the neutral rights of the United States against the encroachments of European belligerents; in 1806 he published An Examination of the British Doctrine which subjects to Capture a Neutral Trade not open in Time of Peace, a careful argument - with a minute examination of authorities on international law - against the rule of war of 1756 extended by Great Britain in 1 793 and 1803.

    0
    0
  • The "commercial weapons" with which he wished to prevent armed conflict proved less useful in his day than they have since been in international disputes.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 Alexander Macfarlane published a Bibliography of Quaternions and allied systems of Mathematics for the International Association for promoting the study of Quaternions and allied systems of Mathematics (Dublin University Press); the pamphlet contains 86 pages.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 the Spanish government agreed with France to carry another line to the mouth of an international tunnel through the Pyrenees.

    0
    0
  • In violation therefore of international amities, and practically in disobedience of orders, he broke the peace, caused a band of Mexican cavalry mounts to be seized, and prompted some American settlers to occupy Sonoma (14th June 1846).

    0
    0
  • Before the end of the war Mexican laws not incompatible with United States laws were by international law supposed to be in force; but nobody knew what they were, and the uncertainties of vague and variable alcalde jurisdictions were increased when Americans began to be alcaldes and grafted English common-law principles, like the jury, on Californian practices.

    0
    0
  • In the language of modern diplomacy the term " treaty " is restricted to the more important international agreements, especially to those which are the work of a congress; while agreements dealing with subordinate questions are described by the more general term " convention."

    0
    0
  • The making and the observance of treaties is necessarily a very early phenomenon in the history of civilization, and the theory of treaties was one of the first departments of international law to attract attention.

    0
    0
  • With reference to their objects, treaties may perhaps be conveniently classified as (r) political, including treaties of peace, of alliance, of cession, of boundary, for creation of international servitudes, of neutralization, of guarantee, for the submission of a controversy to arbitration; (2) commercial, including consular and fishery conventions, and slave trade and navigation treaties; (3) confederations for special social objects, such as the Zollverein, the Latin monetary union, and the still wider unions with reference to posts, telegraphs, submarine cables and weights and measures; (4) relating to criminal justice, e.g.

    0
    0
  • French is, however, exclusively used in the treaties constituting the great " international unions "; and bilingual treaties are sometimes accompanied by a third version in French, to be decisive in case of alleged variances between the other two.

    0
    0
  • Useful lists of national collections of treaties will be found in the Revue de droit international for 1886, pp. 169-187, and in the Marquis Olivart's Catalogue de ma bibliotheque (1899-1910).

    0
    0
  • The social intercourse of the world is facilitated by conventions, such as those establishing the Latin monetary union, 1865; the international telegraphic union, 1865; the universal postal union, 1874; the international bureau of weights and measures, 1875; providing for the protection of submarine cables in time of peace, 1884; the railway traffic union, 1890.

    0
    0
  • Quasi-legislation by treaty has been directed mainly to encouraging the settlement of international disputes by peaceful methods, and to regulating the conduct of warfare.

    0
    0
  • The first peace conference, held at the Hague in 1899, devoted much time to producing the generally accepted " Convention for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes."

    0
    0
  • An important achievement of this convention was the establishment at the Hague of an international tribunal, always ready to arbitrate upon cases submitted to it; and the convention recommended recourse not only to arbitration, but also to good offices and mediation, and to international commissions of inquiry.

    0
    0
  • The second Hague conference, of 1907, besides revising the convention made by the first conference, of 18 99, as to the laws of war on land, produced new conventions, dealing respectively with the opening of hostilities; neutral rights and duties in land warfare; the status of enemy merchant ships at the outbreak of war; the conversion of merchant ships into ships of war; submarine mines; bombardment by naval forces; the application of the Geneva principles to naval warfare; the rights of maritime capture; the establishment of an international prize court; and neutral rights and duties in maritime warfare.

    0
    0
  • This body has power to legislate for the whole empire in reference to all matters connected with the army, navy, postal service, customs, coinage, &c., all political laws affecting citizens, and all general questions of commerce, navigation, passports, &c. The emperor represents the federation in all international relations, with the chancellor as first minister of the empire, and has power, with consent of the Bundesrath, to declare war in name of the empire.

    0
    0
  • The founding and the growth of such communities furnish matter for an interesting chapter in the history as well of ancient as of modern civilization; and the regulation of the relations between the parent state and its dependencies abroad gives rise to important problems alike in national policy and in international economics.

    0
    0
  • The important international conference on Moroccan affairs, which resulted in an agreement between France and Germany, was held at Algeciras from the 16th of January to the 7th of April 1906.

    0
    0
  • At the international conference, which met at Paris in 1896 for the purpose of elaborating a common system of constants and fundamental stars to be employed in the various national ephemerides, Newcomb took a leading part, and at its suggestion undertook the task of determining a definite value of the constant of precession, and of 1 Lionville, t.

    0
    0
  • The Renaissance closed the middle ages and opened the modern era, - not merely because the mental and moral ideas which then sprang into activity and owed their force in large measure to the revival of classical learning were opposed to medieval modes of thinking and feeling, but also because the political and international relations specific to it as an age were at variance with fundamental theories of the past.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, Hungary produces at least one class of wine which may be considered of international importance, namely, the famous Tokay.

    0
    0
  • The exhaustion, or alleged exhaustion, by irrigation in Colorado of the waters of the Rio Grande has raised international questions of much interest between Mexico and the United States, which were settled in 1907 by a convention pledging the United States to deliver 60,000 acre-feet of water annually in the bed of the Rio Grande at the Acequia Madre, just above Juarez, in case of drought this supply being diminished proportionately to the diminution in the United States.

    0
    0
  • In addition to his work for the Labour and Socialist movement at home he was one of the most ardent pioneers of international socialism, and visited many countries in his endeavour to bring together the workers of different lands.

    0
    0
  • The collapse of the International on the outbreak of the World War was a great sorrow to him, and is thought to have hastened his death, which took place in 1915 when he had only just completed his fifty-ninth year.

    0
    0
  • In a paper contributed to the International Flax Congress at Vienna in 1873 he entered into details regarding an experimental rettery he had formed, with the view of imitating by artificial means the best results obtained by the ordinary methods.

    0
    0
  • With Liebknecht he belonged to the branch of the socialists which was in close correspondence with Karl Marx and the International, and refused to accept the leadership of Schweitzer, who had attempted to carry on the work after Lassalle's death.

    0
    0
  • With regard to international commerce Colbert was equally unfortunate in not being in advance of his age; the tariffs he published were protective to an extreme.

    0
    0
  • In 1852 he produced "Girls Sewing," "Man Spreading Manure"; 1853, "The Reapers"; 1854, "Church at Greville"; 1855 - the year of the International Exhibition, at which he received a medal of second class - "Peasant Grafting a Tree"; 1857, "The Gleaners"; 1859, "The Angelus," "The Woodcutter and Death"; 1860, "Sheep Shearing"; 1861, "Woman Shearing Sheep," "Woman Feeding Child"; 1862, "Potato Planters," "Winter and the Crows"; 1863, "Man with Hoe," "Woman Carding"; 1864, "Shepherds and Flock, Peasants Bringing Home a Calf Born in the Fields"; 1869, "Knitting Lesson"; 1870, "Buttermaking"; 1871, "November - recollection of Gruchy."

    0
    0
  • His most memorable work, however, was the inauguration of international operations for charting the heavens.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 a statue was erected to Spinoza at the Hague by international subscription among his admirers, and more recently the cottage in which he lived at Rhijnsburg has been restored and furnished with all the discoverable Spinoza relics.

    0
    0
  • Its most important conclusions were for reciprocity in trade, a continental railway and compulsory arbitration in international complications.

    0
    0
  • One of these, running from Antofagasta to the Caracoles district, was afterwards extended to Oruro, Bolivia, and has become a commercial route of international importance, with a total length of 574 m., 224 of which are in Chile.

    0
    0
  • Chile is a member of the International Postal Union, and has arrangements with the principal commercial nations for the exchange of postal money values.

    0
    0
  • It is true that the chances of success for the Central Powers in an international struggle were better in the years 1909 and 1911 than in 1914.

    0
    0
  • In 1884 the natives of Boma granted a protectorate of their country to the International Association of the Congo.

    0
    0
  • His fame as a lawyer rests on his authoritative exposition of the Code Napoleon in his Principes de droit civil (Brussels, 33 vols., 1869-1878), and his Droit civil international (Brussels, 8 vols., 1880-1881).

    0
    0
  • After the surrender of Cronje at Paardeberg (February 1900) to Lord Roberts, Presidents Kruger and Steyn offered to make peace, but on terms which should include the acknowledgment of " the incontestable independence of both republics as sovereign international states "; the Boers also sought, unavailingly, the intervention of foreign powers.

    0
    0
  • He was professor of civil and international law in McGill University for several years before entering the Government.

    0
    0
  • In the winter of 1894 the California Midwinter International Exposition was held in Golden Gate Park.

    0
    0
  • Bolivia is a member of the International Postal Union, and has parcel and money order conventions with some foreign countries.

    0
    0
  • The title of consul, in the sense in which it is used in international law, is derived from that of certain magistrates, in the cities of medieval Italy, Provence and Languedoc, charged with the settlement of trade disputes whether by sea or land (consules mercatorum, consules artis maxis, &c.).

    0
    0
  • Jurists at one time contended that according to international law a right of " ex-territoriality " attached to consuls, their persons and dwellings being sacred, and themselves amenable to local authority only in cases of strong suspicion on political grounds.

    0
    0
  • From the Gila to the southern boundary the parched land gives no water to the sea, and the international boundary runs in part through a true desert.

    0
    0
  • It would appear that in the time of Gamaliel 1 International Critical Commentary, " Psalms," Intro.

    0
    0
  • Numerous banks of world-wide reputation, doing an extensive international business, have their seats in Berlin, chief among them, in addition to the Reichs-bank, being the B erliner Kassen-Verein,theDiskon toGesellschaft, the Deutsche Bank, and the Boden-Kredit Bank.

    0
    0
  • Article 6 provided that the arbitrators should be governed by the three rules quoted above, and by such principles of international law not inconsistent therewith as the arbitrators should determine to be applicable to the case.

    0
    0
  • The British agent then applied for an adjournment of eight months, ostensibly in order that the two governments might conclude a supplemental convention, it having been meanwhile privately arranged between the arbitrators that an extra-judicial declaration should be obtained from the arbitrators on the subject of the direct claims. On the 19th of June Count Sclopis intimated on behalf of all his colleagues that, without intending to express any opinion upon the interpretation of the treaty, they had arrived at the conclusion that "the indirect claims did not constitute upon the principles of international law applicable to such cases a good foundation for an award or computation of damages between nations."

    0
    0
  • Despagnet the term suzerain is applicable to a case in which a state concedes a fief, in virtue of its sovereignty (Essai sur le protectorat international, p. 46), reserving to itself certain rights as the author of this concession.

    0
    0
  • Their position differs from that of the foregoing varieties of states (protectorates, &c.), in that a presumption exists against the possession by them of any given international capacity (International Law, 4th ed., p. 31).

    0
    0
  • Mr Taylor (A Treatise of International Public Law, p. 174) treats the Transvaal after the convention of 1884 as a " neutralized state only part sovereign."

    0
    0
  • Westlake, Revue de droit international, 1896, p. 268 seq.; International Law, pt.

    0
    0
  • He was subsequently one of the pioneer organizers of the General Federation of Trades, National Transport Workers' Federation, National Federation of General Workers, International Transport Federation, and the Labour party.

    0
    0
  • C. Allen (in the series of International Critical Commentaries, 1907); also books on the Four Gospels or the Synoptic Gospels cited at the end of GOSPEL.

    0
    0
  • Railway communications are provided by the Mexican National with the United States, with the national capital and southern Mexico, and with Matamoros, and by the Belgian line with Tampico on the Gulf coast, and with Trevino, or Venadito, on the Mexican International line, which gives access to the iron deposits of Durango.

    0
    0
  • As he discharged these duties for 13 years, he had a full opportunity of acquiring a unique knowledge of the international relations of the Church throughout the world.

    0
    0
  • Public grounds are few, but on the outskirts of the city are a park and race-course, with the fashionable Marina promenade; while the Mardyke walk, on the west of the island, is pleasantly shaded by a fine avenue, and was the site of the International exhibition held in 1902.

    0
    0
  • Lord Augustus Loftus became governor in 1879, in time to inaugurate the first International Exhibition ever held in Australia.

    0
    0
  • Isolated workers or groups of workers grew into national or international associations, producing from archives vast collections of material to be worked up into the artistic form of history.

    0
    0
  • The international disputes connected with this description are referred to below.

    0
    0
  • On the Yukon at the international boundary the mean of the warmest month is higher than that of the warmest month at Sitka, 500 m.

    0
    0
  • The relation may be one of international law, two states having entered into obligations Inter- by treaty.

    0
    0
  • In one view, for the purpose of municipal law, the territory of a protectorate is not, but for the purposes of international law is, within the territory of the protecting state.

    0
    0
  • The older view of the position of a protectorate according to international law is contained in the decision of Dr Lushington in the case of the " Leucade " (8 S.T., N.s., 432), to the effect that, the declaration of war by Great Britain against Russia notwithstanding, the Ionian Islands, which were then under the protectorate of Great Britain, remained neutral.

    0
    0
  • The distinct tendency, especially as to protectorates over uncivilized countries, is to treat, for purposes of international law, the territory of a protectorate as if it belonged to the protecting state.

    0
    0
  • The probability is that in such cases governments and courts applying international law would probably be guided not by technical facts - such, to take the case of British possessions, as the fact that an order in council permitted appeals to the Judicial Committee - but would look to the facts of the case.

    0
    0
  • Mr Hall remarks (International Law, 6th ed., p. 126 n.) that " all the states represented at the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, with the exception of Great Britain, maintained that the normal jurisdiction of a protectorate includes the right of administering justice over the subjects of other civilized states."

    0
    0
  • It is served by two lines of the International & Great Northern railway, and by the Texas State.

    0
    0
  • In 1876 King Leopold summoned a conference at Brussels of the leading geographical experts in Europe, which resulted in the creation of "The International Association for the Exploration and Civilization of Africa."

    0
    0