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intercession

intercession

intercession Sentence Examples

  • Hastings was soon released at the intercession of the Dutch resident, and made use of his position at Murshidabad to open negotiations with the English fugitives at Falta, the site of a Dutch factory near the mouth of the Hugli.

  • A scandalous charge against his mistress Aspasia, which he defeated by his personal intercession before the court, was taken very much to heart by Pericles.

  • He thus saved himself, but his intercession on behalf of the other offenders was of no avail.

  • Later on he was at Nuremberg, Ulm and Innsbruck, where he is said to have been condemned to imprisonment for adultery, but released at the intercession of the elector of Saxony.

  • The change is marked in the rituals by the duplication of the liturgical forms. The prayers of intercession and oblation, which in earlier times are found only in connexion with the former offering, are repeated in the course of the same service in connexion with the latter.

  • Again, in regard to Antigone's tragic end Sophocles differs from Euripides, according to whom the calamity was averted by the intercession of Dionysus and was followed by the marriage of Antigone and Haemon.

  • On a painted vase the scene of the intercession of Heracles is represented (Heydermann, ZI ber eine nacheuripideische Antigone, 1868).

  • He was scourged and only escaped with his life at the intercession of Onias the high priest, who had pleaded with him vainly that the treasure included the deposits of widows and orphans and also some belonging to Hyrcanus, " a man in very high position."

  • So he could no more be high priest, and his life was spared only at the intercession of the Parthian Jews, who had a regard for the Asmonean prince.

  • Crete, like several other large islands, enjoys immunity from dangerous serpents - a privilege ascribed by popular belief to the intercession of Titus, the companion of St Paul, who according to tradition was the first bishop of the island, and became in consequence its patron saint.

  • It is worn, too, on the vigils of fasts, Ember Days and days of intercession, on the Feast of Holy Innocents (if on a week-day), at litanies, penitential processions, and at other than solemn benedictions and consecrations.

  • 3); but by the intercession of Parysatis he was pardoned and sent back to his satrapy.

  • 1908-1827-18281828-1830-1830-183418341834-183518 3518 41841-1846-1846-1852 1852-1852-18551855-1858-1858-18591859-1865-1865-18661866-1868 was known to spend six hours at a time in intercession.

  • Violet vestments are also worn on days of intercession, at votive masses of the Passion, at certain other masses of a pronouncedly intercessory and penitential character, at intercessory processions, at the blessing of candles on Candlemas Day, and at the blessing of the baptismal water.

  • 12 the prophet, speaking now for the first time in Yahweh's name, calls the people to a solemn fast at the sanctuary, and invites the intercession of the priests.

  • St Basil, for example, says: "I accept also the holy apostles, prophets and martyrs, and I call upon them for their intercession to God, that by them, that is by their mediation, the good God may be propitious to me, and that I may be granted redemption for my offences" (Epist.

  • James assigns to the 10th or rlth century, deals with the subject of intercession for sinners and Sedrach's unwillingness to die.

  • The Wahhabi leader was soon after sent to Constantinople, where, in spite of Mehemet Ali's intercession, he and the companions who had followed him in his captivity were condemned to death, and after being paraded through the city with ignominy for three days were finally beheaded.

  • The high priest Joshua is accused before Yahweh by Satan, but is acquitted and given rule in Yahweh's house and courts, with the right of access to Yahweh in priestly intercession.

  • He remained in prison until August 1704, and then owed his release to the intercession of Robert Harley, who represented his case to the queen, and obtained for him not only liberty but pecuniary relief and employment, which, of one kind or another, lasted until the termination of Anne's reign.

  • While serving his time he had the misfortune accidentally to shoot a young man who came to visit him; and although through the intercession of his master he escaped prosecution, the untoward event weighed heavily on his mind, and led him at the close of his apprenticeship to quit his native place.

  • Upon the intercession of Teshu Lama, then regent of Tibet, a treaty of peace was concluded in 1774 between the East India Company and the ruler of Bhutan.

  • In the House of Lords, however, Monk's testimony and intercession were effectual, and Lenthall was only declared incapable of holding for the future any public office.

  • Intercession for the living.

  • Intercession for the dead.

  • In 1746 he graduated as M.D., the fees being remitted at Schultens's intercession.

  • He was released only through the intercession of Queen Mary of Scotland and some of the principal nobility, and retired with his pupil to Bourges.

  • But this solution, which averted an imminent war, was only arrived at through Queen Victoria's personal intercession.

  • Having been cured of this, as she believed, by the intercession of the Holy Virgin, she changed her name to Marie and vowed to devote her life to her service.

  • On returning to Rome, Felix was accused of having taken advantage of a dispute between the Jews and Syrians of Caesarea to slay and plunder the inhabitants, but through the intercession of his brother, the freedman Pallas, who had great influence with the emperor Nero, he escaped unpunished.

  • It was, however, generally regarded as a mockery, and on the intercession of the British government the sentence was commuted to banishment.

  • The nearest equivalent in the ancient Church was the local and temporary African practice of restoring lapsed Christians to communion at the intercession of confessors and prospective martyrs in prison.

  • His career was soon after interrupted by the triumphant return of Sulla (82 B.C.), who ordered him to divorce his wife, and on his refusal deprived him of his property and priesthood and was induced to spare his life only by the intercession of his aristocratic relatives and the college of vestal virgins.

  • when he placed the republic under interdict, but did not live to see their recall, which took place at the intercession of Louis XIV.

  • This view receives some support from the long liturgical prayer at the close, which almost certainly represents the intercession used in the Roman eucharists.

  • AlMansur, however, pardoned him on the intercession of his fellowtribesman Musayyab ibn Zuhair of Dabba, and appointed him the instructor in literature of his son, afterwards the caliph al-Mandi.

  • So far as the Church of England is concerned it may fairly be said to have started afresh in the year following the first observance of the Day of Intercession for Missions, on the 20th of December 1872.

  • The observance of that first Day of Intercession was followed by an immediate change, and unquestionably there has been progress ever since.

  • This counsel was rejected, and in October 1565 the queen marched an army of i 8,000 men against them from Edinburgh; their forces dispersed in face of superior numbers, and Murray, on seeking shelter in England, was received with contumely by Elizabeth, whose half-hearted help had failed to support his enterprise, and whose intercession for his return found at first no favour with the queen of Scots.

  • It consists principally in the discussion of the miracles (usually two in number) obtained by the intercession of the Blessed since the decree of beatification.

  • Despite the intercession of Brihwald, archbishop of Canterbury, Aldfrith king of Northumbria refused to admit the aged prelate into his kingdom till his last illness (705).

  • Abdullah, their chief, was made prisoner, and with his treasurer and secretary was sent to Constantinople, where, in spite of Ibrahims promise of safety, and of Mehemet Alis intercession in their favor, they were put to death.

  • i f.); (2) on each occasion he makes a formal demand; (3) on Pharaoh's refusal the plague is announced, and takes place at a fixed time without any human intervention; (4) when the plague is sent, Pharaoh sends for Moses and entreats his intercession, promising in most cases to accede in part to his request; when the plague is removed, however, the promise is left unfulfilled, the standing phrase being "and Pharaoh's heart was heavy (7f)," or "and Pharaoh made heavy (-r»n) his heart"; (5) the plagues do not affect the children of Israel in Goshen.

  • we have again two narratives of the sin of the people and of Moses' intercession, while in ch.

  • 6-9 are out of place here: they belong to the story of Moses' intercession in ch.

  • 29 ff.) are (I) the sin of the people, and (2) the intercession of Moses, of both of which a double account has been preserved.

  • 25-29 and of his intercession in ch.

  • (2) Moses' Intercession.

  • The account of Moses' intercession has been preserved in J, though the narrative has undergone considerable dislocation.

  • As the result of negotiations and preparations extending over five years, 250 bishops, together with delegates, clerical and lay, from every diocese in the Anglican communion, met in London, the opening service of intercession being held in Westminster Abbey.

  • Through the intercession of the secretary of state with the king these restrictions were removed.

  • In spite of the intercession of Clement V.

  • They poured balsam on the sepulchre of the saint, washed it with their tears, and covered it with their kisses, in the belief that they were thus assuring themselves of his intercession or testifying their gratitude for his assistance.

  • On the outbreak of the civil war between Pompey and Caesar, Quintus, like Marcus, supported Pompey, but after Pharsalus he deserted and made peace with Caesar, largely owing to the intercession of Marcus.

  • But she opposed for some time the inclusion in the government of Sunderland, whom she especially disliked, only consenting at Marlborough's intercession in December 1706, when various other offices and rewards were bestowed upon Whigs, and Nottingham with other Tories was removed from the council.

  • The generally recognized principal Avatars do not, however, by any means constitute the only occasions of a direct intercession of the deity in worldly affairs, but - in the same way as to this day the eclipses of the sun and moon are ascribed by the ordinary Hindu to these luminaries being temporarily swallowed by the dragon Rahu (or Graha, " the seizer") - so any uncommon occurrence would be apt to be set down as a special manifestation of divine power; and any man credited with exceptional merit or achievement, or even remarkable for some strange incident connected with his life or death, might ultimately come to be looked upon as a veritable incarnation of the deity, capable of influencing the destinies of man, and might become an object of local adoration or superstitious awe and propitiatory rites to multitudes of people.

  • The victorious Greeks subsequently punished Thebes by depriving it of the presidency of the Boeotian League, and an attempt by the Spartans to expel it from the Delphic amphictyony was only frustrated by the intercession of Athens.

  • He then turned his attention to the Aetolians, who had persuaded Antiochus to declare war against Rome, and was only prevented from crushing them by the intercession of T.

  • In the Boole of Enoch " the four great archangels" are Michael, Uriel, Suriel or Raphael, and Gabriel, who is set over "all the powers" and shares the work of intercession.

  • Equally praiseworthy is the generous pardon that the emperor, after much intercession, granted to the seditious people of Antioch, who, out of anger at the growing imposts, had beaten down the imperial statues of their city (387).

  • Bids them not to swear at all nor to expect any intercession of the departed saints for sinners.

  • Public but general confession of sins and intercession for penitent sinners have from early times formed a normal part of public worship in the Christian church.

  • 14) it likewise appeals to as favouring its views respecting the intercession of the saints.

  • Gades, once Phoenician, gained, by Caesars favor and the intercession of Balbus, a Roman municipal charter as municipium: that is, its citizens were regarded as sufficiently Romanized to be granted both the Roman personal franchise and the Roman city-rights.

  • The latter had engaged the enemy against the orders of Cursor, by whom he was condemned to death, and only the intercession of his father, the senate and the people, saved his life.

  • In his eagerness to restore the simplicity of the primitive church he even assailed Mariolatry, intercession of saints, relics and perhaps infant baptism, to the scandal even of the iconoclast bishops themselves.

  • The excesses of the soldiery were checked, and at his special intercession the statues of Aratus and Philopoemen were preserved (xxxix.

  • The procession will go in the front of the Church, where we will have adoration, prayer, intercession & hymns.

  • It was our prayer that the weekend would be of mutual encouragement and I believe that intercession was answered positively.

  • He is the Advocate, He is the one who maketh intercession for the transgressors.

  • In heaven He is making continual intercession for us.

  • We all know that a person who accepts intercession in worldly life can never expected to deliver justice.

  • Rejoice, for thy children seek thy heavenly intercession!

  • The New Testament continues the tradition of prayer which includes intercession.

  • By your powerful intercession, may I obtain from God grace and mercy.

  • And we've been saying that the Son by His high priestly intercession assures it and the Spirit by His intercession assures it.

  • O Mary, my Mother, by thy intercession, obtain for me fidelity to God.

  • intercession of saints and the Blessed Virgin Mary.

  • intercession of friends led to his emigration to the United States in 1933.

  • intercession for the transgressors.

  • intercession for others, begging God for peace in these desperately troubled times, or petition for himself.

  • intercession group formed.

  • intercession leader, Nash, were burned in the streets.

  • God put it into our hearts to pray for the poor malefactors, passing to execution: and his Spirit made intercession.

  • Hastings was soon released at the intercession of the Dutch resident, and made use of his position at Murshidabad to open negotiations with the English fugitives at Falta, the site of a Dutch factory near the mouth of the Hugli.

  • A scandalous charge against his mistress Aspasia, which he defeated by his personal intercession before the court, was taken very much to heart by Pericles.

  • He thus saved himself, but his intercession on behalf of the other offenders was of no avail.

  • Later on he was at Nuremberg, Ulm and Innsbruck, where he is said to have been condemned to imprisonment for adultery, but released at the intercession of the elector of Saxony.

  • The change is marked in the rituals by the duplication of the liturgical forms. The prayers of intercession and oblation, which in earlier times are found only in connexion with the former offering, are repeated in the course of the same service in connexion with the latter.

  • Again, in regard to Antigone's tragic end Sophocles differs from Euripides, according to whom the calamity was averted by the intercession of Dionysus and was followed by the marriage of Antigone and Haemon.

  • On a painted vase the scene of the intercession of Heracles is represented (Heydermann, ZI ber eine nacheuripideische Antigone, 1868).

  • He was scourged and only escaped with his life at the intercession of Onias the high priest, who had pleaded with him vainly that the treasure included the deposits of widows and orphans and also some belonging to Hyrcanus, " a man in very high position."

  • So he could no more be high priest, and his life was spared only at the intercession of the Parthian Jews, who had a regard for the Asmonean prince.

  • Crete, like several other large islands, enjoys immunity from dangerous serpents - a privilege ascribed by popular belief to the intercession of Titus, the companion of St Paul, who according to tradition was the first bishop of the island, and became in consequence its patron saint.

  • It is worn, too, on the vigils of fasts, Ember Days and days of intercession, on the Feast of Holy Innocents (if on a week-day), at litanies, penitential processions, and at other than solemn benedictions and consecrations.

  • 3); but by the intercession of Parysatis he was pardoned and sent back to his satrapy.

  • 1908-1827-18281828-1830-1830-183418341834-183518 3518 41841-1846-1846-1852 1852-1852-18551855-1858-1858-18591859-1865-1865-18661866-1868 was known to spend six hours at a time in intercession.

  • Violet vestments are also worn on days of intercession, at votive masses of the Passion, at certain other masses of a pronouncedly intercessory and penitential character, at intercessory processions, at the blessing of candles on Candlemas Day, and at the blessing of the baptismal water.

  • 12 the prophet, speaking now for the first time in Yahweh's name, calls the people to a solemn fast at the sanctuary, and invites the intercession of the priests.

  • St Basil, for example, says: "I accept also the holy apostles, prophets and martyrs, and I call upon them for their intercession to God, that by them, that is by their mediation, the good God may be propitious to me, and that I may be granted redemption for my offences" (Epist.

  • James assigns to the 10th or rlth century, deals with the subject of intercession for sinners and Sedrach's unwillingness to die.

  • The Wahhabi leader was soon after sent to Constantinople, where, in spite of Mehemet Ali's intercession, he and the companions who had followed him in his captivity were condemned to death, and after being paraded through the city with ignominy for three days were finally beheaded.

  • The high priest Joshua is accused before Yahweh by Satan, but is acquitted and given rule in Yahweh's house and courts, with the right of access to Yahweh in priestly intercession.

  • He remained in prison until August 1704, and then owed his release to the intercession of Robert Harley, who represented his case to the queen, and obtained for him not only liberty but pecuniary relief and employment, which, of one kind or another, lasted until the termination of Anne's reign.

  • While serving his time he had the misfortune accidentally to shoot a young man who came to visit him; and although through the intercession of his master he escaped prosecution, the untoward event weighed heavily on his mind, and led him at the close of his apprenticeship to quit his native place.

  • Upon the intercession of Teshu Lama, then regent of Tibet, a treaty of peace was concluded in 1774 between the East India Company and the ruler of Bhutan.

  • In the House of Lords, however, Monk's testimony and intercession were effectual, and Lenthall was only declared incapable of holding for the future any public office.

  • Intercession for the living.

  • Intercession for the dead.

  • In 1136, while the count was in Normandy, Robert of Sable put himself at the head of the movement, to which Geoffrey responded by destroying Briollay and occupying La Suze, and Robert of Sable himself was forced to beg humbly for pardon through the intercession of the bishop of Angers.

  • In 1746 he graduated as M.D., the fees being remitted at Schultens's intercession.

  • He was released only through the intercession of Queen Mary of Scotland and some of the principal nobility, and retired with his pupil to Bourges.

  • But this solution, which averted an imminent war, was only arrived at through Queen Victoria's personal intercession.

  • Having been cured of this, as she believed, by the intercession of the Holy Virgin, she changed her name to Marie and vowed to devote her life to her service.

  • On returning to Rome, Felix was accused of having taken advantage of a dispute between the Jews and Syrians of Caesarea to slay and plunder the inhabitants, but through the intercession of his brother, the freedman Pallas, who had great influence with the emperor Nero, he escaped unpunished.

  • It was, however, generally regarded as a mockery, and on the intercession of the British government the sentence was commuted to banishment.

  • The nearest equivalent in the ancient Church was the local and temporary African practice of restoring lapsed Christians to communion at the intercession of confessors and prospective martyrs in prison.

  • His career was soon after interrupted by the triumphant return of Sulla (82 B.C.), who ordered him to divorce his wife, and on his refusal deprived him of his property and priesthood and was induced to spare his life only by the intercession of his aristocratic relatives and the college of vestal virgins.

  • when he placed the republic under interdict, but did not live to see their recall, which took place at the intercession of Louis XIV.

  • This view receives some support from the long liturgical prayer at the close, which almost certainly represents the intercession used in the Roman eucharists.

  • AlMansur, however, pardoned him on the intercession of his fellowtribesman Musayyab ibn Zuhair of Dabba, and appointed him the instructor in literature of his son, afterwards the caliph al-Mandi.

  • The practice oflsetting apart a special day for intercession for certain of the faithful departed is of great antiquity; but the establishment of a feast of general intercession was in the first instance due to Odilo, abbot of Cluny (d.

  • From him he learned that amid the rocks was a chasm communicating with purgatory, from which rose perpetually the groans of tortured souls, the hermit asserting that he had also heard the demons complaining of the efficacy of the prayers of the faithful, and especially of the monks of Cluny, in rescuing their victims. On returning home the pilgrim hastened to inform the abbot of Cluny, who forthwith set apart the 2nd of November as a day of intercession on the part of his community for all the souls in purgatory.

  • Timotheus, again pronouncing sentence of death, was struck with blindness, but immediately healed by the powerful intercession of the saint, a miracle which converted nearly five thousand men on the spot.

  • So far as the Church of England is concerned it may fairly be said to have started afresh in the year following the first observance of the Day of Intercession for Missions, on the 20th of December 1872.

  • The observance of that first Day of Intercession was followed by an immediate change, and unquestionably there has been progress ever since.

  • This counsel was rejected, and in October 1565 the queen marched an army of i 8,000 men against them from Edinburgh; their forces dispersed in face of superior numbers, and Murray, on seeking shelter in England, was received with contumely by Elizabeth, whose half-hearted help had failed to support his enterprise, and whose intercession for his return found at first no favour with the queen of Scots.

  • She rejected with resolute dignity the intercession of French envoys for the life of the queen-dowager of France; she allowed the sentence of death to be proclaimed and welcomed with bonfires and bellringing throughout the length of England; she yielded a respite of twelve days to the pleading of the French ambassador, and had a charge trumped up against him of participation in a conspiracy against her life; at length, on the 1st of February 1587, she signed the death-warrant, and then made her secretaries write word to Paulet of her displeasure that in all this time he should not of himself have found out some way to shorten the life of his prisoner, as in duty bound by his oath, and thus relieve her singularly tender conscience from the guilt of bloodshed.

  • It consists principally in the discussion of the miracles (usually two in number) obtained by the intercession of the Blessed since the decree of beatification.

  • Despite the intercession of Brihwald, archbishop of Canterbury, Aldfrith king of Northumbria refused to admit the aged prelate into his kingdom till his last illness (705).

  • Abdullah, their chief, was made prisoner, and with his treasurer and secretary was sent to Constantinople, where, in spite of Ibrahims promise of safety, and of Mehemet Alis intercession in their favor, they were put to death.

  • i f.); (2) on each occasion he makes a formal demand; (3) on Pharaoh's refusal the plague is announced, and takes place at a fixed time without any human intervention; (4) when the plague is sent, Pharaoh sends for Moses and entreats his intercession, promising in most cases to accede in part to his request; when the plague is removed, however, the promise is left unfulfilled, the standing phrase being "and Pharaoh's heart was heavy (7f)," or "and Pharaoh made heavy (-r»n) his heart"; (5) the plagues do not affect the children of Israel in Goshen.

  • we have again two narratives of the sin of the people and of Moses' intercession, while in ch.

  • 6-9 are out of place here: they belong to the story of Moses' intercession in ch.

  • 29 ff.) are (I) the sin of the people, and (2) the intercession of Moses, of both of which a double account has been preserved.

  • 25-29 and of his intercession in ch.

  • (2) Moses' Intercession.

  • The account of Moses' intercession has been preserved in J, though the narrative has undergone considerable dislocation.

  • E's account of Moses' intercession seems to have been retained, in part, in xxxii.

  • As the result of negotiations and preparations extending over five years, 250 bishops, together with delegates, clerical and lay, from every diocese in the Anglican communion, met in London, the opening service of intercession being held in Westminster Abbey.

  • Through the intercession of the secretary of state with the king these restrictions were removed.

  • In spite of the intercession of Clement V.

  • They poured balsam on the sepulchre of the saint, washed it with their tears, and covered it with their kisses, in the belief that they were thus assuring themselves of his intercession or testifying their gratitude for his assistance.

  • On the outbreak of the civil war between Pompey and Caesar, Quintus, like Marcus, supported Pompey, but after Pharsalus he deserted and made peace with Caesar, largely owing to the intercession of Marcus.

  • But she opposed for some time the inclusion in the government of Sunderland, whom she especially disliked, only consenting at Marlborough's intercession in December 1706, when various other offices and rewards were bestowed upon Whigs, and Nottingham with other Tories was removed from the council.

  • The generally recognized principal Avatars do not, however, by any means constitute the only occasions of a direct intercession of the deity in worldly affairs, but - in the same way as to this day the eclipses of the sun and moon are ascribed by the ordinary Hindu to these luminaries being temporarily swallowed by the dragon Rahu (or Graha, " the seizer") - so any uncommon occurrence would be apt to be set down as a special manifestation of divine power; and any man credited with exceptional merit or achievement, or even remarkable for some strange incident connected with his life or death, might ultimately come to be looked upon as a veritable incarnation of the deity, capable of influencing the destinies of man, and might become an object of local adoration or superstitious awe and propitiatory rites to multitudes of people.

  • The victorious Greeks subsequently punished Thebes by depriving it of the presidency of the Boeotian League, and an attempt by the Spartans to expel it from the Delphic amphictyony was only frustrated by the intercession of Athens.

  • He then turned his attention to the Aetolians, who had persuaded Antiochus to declare war against Rome, and was only prevented from crushing them by the intercession of T.

  • In the Boole of Enoch " the four great archangels" are Michael, Uriel, Suriel or Raphael, and Gabriel, who is set over "all the powers" and shares the work of intercession.

  • Equally praiseworthy is the generous pardon that the emperor, after much intercession, granted to the seditious people of Antioch, who, out of anger at the growing imposts, had beaten down the imperial statues of their city (387).

  • Bids them not to swear at all nor to expect any intercession of the departed saints for sinners.

  • Public but general confession of sins and intercession for penitent sinners have from early times formed a normal part of public worship in the Christian church.

  • James was deaf to all intercession in her favour, and is reported to have answered the queen when pleading for her that "she had eaten of the forbidden fruit."

  • An extremely fine passage then describes the patriarch's intercession for Sodom and Gomorrah, and the narrative passes on to the catastrophe which explains the Dead Sea and its desert region and has parallels elsewhere (e.g.

  • 14) it likewise appeals to as favouring its views respecting the intercession of the saints.

  • Gades, once Phoenician, gained, by Caesars favor and the intercession of Balbus, a Roman municipal charter as municipium: that is, its citizens were regarded as sufficiently Romanized to be granted both the Roman personal franchise and the Roman city-rights.

  • The latter had engaged the enemy against the orders of Cursor, by whom he was condemned to death, and only the intercession of his father, the senate and the people, saved his life.

  • In his eagerness to restore the simplicity of the primitive church he even assailed Mariolatry, intercession of saints, relics and perhaps infant baptism, to the scandal even of the iconoclast bishops themselves.

  • The excesses of the soldiery were checked, and at his special intercession the statues of Aratus and Philopoemen were preserved (xxxix.

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