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insolence

insolence

insolence Sentence Examples

  • personally unpopular, and the rapacity and insolence of her family was well known.

    55
    37
  • Their crude productions, for the most part, were conspicuous rather for insolence and abusiveness than for logic or learning.

    50
    29
  • He achieved little success, but made himself detested by his insolence and profligacy, and was in turn replaced by Chares.

    38
    24
  • In spite of the incapacity which he displayed in this war, John was sent a little later 'to govern Ireland (1185); but he returned in a few months covered with disgrace, having alienated the loyal chiefs by his childish insolence and entirely failed to defend the settlers from the hostile septs.

    19
    14
  • On the outbreak of the war of the Spanish Succession in 1700 the duke was again on the French side, but the insolence of Louis and of Philip V.

    18
    12
  • In the war of the Spanish Succession (1700) we find Victor at first on the French side, until, dissatisfied with the continued insolence of Louis XIV.

    17
    12
  • Jeffreys spoke with his accustomed insolence to the vicechancellor, silenced the other deputies when they offered to speak, and ordered them out of court.

    15
    10
  • His patrons had been taken away by death, or estranged by the riotous profusion with which he squandered their bounty, and the ungrateful insolence with which he rejected their advice.

    14
    10
  • The king good-naturedly overlooked his outrageous insolence on this occasion, but the inevitable rupture was only postponed.

    14
    12
  • He disliked his immediate chief Grenville, one of the Whigs who joined Pitt, and a man of thoroughly Whiggish aristocratic insolence, In 1799 he left the foreign office and was named one of the twelve commissioners for India, and in 1800 joint paymaster of the forces, a post which he held till the retirement of Pitt in 1801.

    13
    11
  • He also engaged in a keen controversy with Robert Lowth, afterwards bishop of London, on the book of Job, in which Lowth brought home charges of lack of scholarship and of insolence that admitted of no denial.

    12
    7
  • This was due in the main to the outrageous insolence of her allpowerful favourite Biren, who hated the Russian nobility and trampled upon them mercilessly.

    12
    12
  • While the prisoner defended himself with the calmest dignity and self-possession, Coke burst into the bitterest invective, brutally addressing the great courtier as if he had been a servant, in the phrase, long remembered for its insolence and its utter injustice - "Thou hast an English face, but a 'Spanish heart!"

    11
    8
  • The advance of morality is shown in the more frequent use of terms such as " just " (&LLKacos), " piety " (&ih), " insolence " (15 1 3pcs), " god-fearing" (0eou&7) s), " pure " (&yvos); and also in the plot of the story, which is distinctly a contest between right and wrong.

    10
    6
  • A new magistrate, the gonfalonier of justice, appears in some of the Guelph cities, with the special duty of keeping the insolence of the nobility in check.

    10
    10
  • But the obduracy of King Pagan, who had succeeded his father in 1846, led to the refusal alike of atonement for past wrongs, of any expression of regret for the display of gratuitous insolence, and of any indication of a desire to maintain friendship for the future.

    9
    5
  • Bold, overbearing and unscrupulous, Sinan recoiled from no baseness to put a rival out of the way; while his insolence was not confined to foreign ambassadors, but was exercised towards his opponents in the sultan's presence.

    9
    5
  • On the 15th of November he was assassinated, and as no one was punished for this crime the insolence of the disorderly elements increased, and shots were exchanged with the Swiss Guard.

    9
    6
  • A weak, giddy woman of no stability of character, her success turned her head and caused her to behave with insolence and impropriety, in strong contrast with Catherine's quiet dignity under her misfortunes.

    9
    6
  • The stipulations regarding Herat were much as before; but there were to be apologies made to the mission for past insolence and rudeness, and the slave trade was to be suppressed in the Persian Gulf.

    9
    6
  • In 1726 Defoe published a curious and amusing little pamphlet entitled Everybody's Business is Nobody's Business, or Private Abuses Public Grievances, exemplified in the Pride, Insolence, and Exorbitant Wages of our Women-Servants, Footmen, &c. This subject was a favourite one with him, and in the pamphlet he showed the immaturity of his political views by advocating legislative interference in these matters.

    8
    4
  • Defeated both by land and sea, the French prince renounced his pretensions and evacuated England, leaving the regency to deal with the more difficult questions raised by the lawless insolence of the royal partisans.

    8
    6
  • This was far less than the prince meant to obtain, but he would probably have been forced to accept the offer for want of a better if the insolence of one of Yusef's messengers, a Spanish renegade, had not outraged a chief partisan of the Omayyad cause.

    8
    7
  • He emigrated about 1790, and raised a legion which was to bear his name; but his insolence alienated the German princes, and his command was taken from him.

    7
    2
  • He was driven from his post by the kings resolve no longer to submit to his insolence, and a new ministry was formed under the marquess of Rockingham, composed of some of those leaders of the Whig aristocracy who had not followed the Grenville ministry.

    7
    3
  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

    7
    6
  • Thenceforward, while never possessing or abusing the insolence of health, he could say " few persons have been more exempt from real or imaginary ills."

    6
    3
  • In Sicily, however, Charles's government soon made itself odious by its exactions, the insolence and cruelty of the king's French officials and favourites, the depreciation of the currency, and the oppressive personal services, while the nobles were incensed at the violation of their feudal constitution.

    6
    5
  • Soon enough, she'd pay for her insolence.

    0
    0
  • The dean of faculty at this time, Lockhart, afterwards Lord Covington, a lawyer notorious for his harsh demeanour, in the autumn of 1757 assailed Wedderburn with more than ordinary insolence.

    0
    0
  • King Ecgbert died long ere the invaders had reached this stage of insolence.

    0
    0
  • In 1771 he was sent as first Russian plenipotentiary to the peace-congress of Focshani; but he failed in his mission, owing partly to the obstinacy of the Turks, and partly (according to Panin) to his own outrageous insolence.

    0
    0
  • At last a dispute in regard to the officering of the artillery gave the king an honorable excuse for resigning a throne on which both he and his wife had been treated with the utmost insolence.

    0
    0
  • Soon enough, she'd pay for her insolence.

    0
    0
  • absent-minded insolence which they have all seen in their patrons.

    0
    0
  • dumb insolence ' .

    0
    0
  • The hulking brutes fingered their weapons and showed long fangs at such insolence from a female; but they did not detain her.

    0
    0
  • We are not speaking of the insolence of open and avowed infidelity, but of the heartless indifference of respectable orthodoxy.

    0
    0
  • petulant display of insolence?

    0
    0
  • For his insolence, he was imprisoned here, where he learned of Earth ways from the blind sculptress Alicia Masters.

    0
    0
  • One is lucky when the insolence of a wretch like this only shews itself in the guise of jesting.

    0
    0
  • She remained mistress of her maid and might degrade her to slavery again for insolence, but could not sell her if she had borne her husband children.

    0
    0
  • A new magistrate, the gonfalonier of justice, appears in some of the Guelph cities, with the special duty of keeping the insolence of the nobility in check.

    0
    0
  • On the 15th of November he was assassinated, and as no one was punished for this crime the insolence of the disorderly elements increased, and shots were exchanged with the Swiss Guard.

    0
    0
  • A weak, giddy woman of no stability of character, her success turned her head and caused her to behave with insolence and impropriety, in strong contrast with Catherine's quiet dignity under her misfortunes.

    0
    0
  • The sordid incidents of her rise, and the insolence with which she used her triumph, had alienated all hearts from the unhappy woman.

    0
    0
  • Thenceforward, while never possessing or abusing the insolence of health, he could say " few persons have been more exempt from real or imaginary ills."

    0
    0
  • Their crude productions, for the most part, were conspicuous rather for insolence and abusiveness than for logic or learning.

    0
    0
  • His greed and ostentation were equalled by his incapacity, and he behaved with characteristic insolence to the foreign ambassadors, from whom he extorted large bribes.

    0
    0
  • The regent-mother Ogul Gaimish (the "Camus" of Rubruquis) seems to have received and dismissed him with presents and a letter for Louis IX., the latter a fine specimen of Mongol insolence.

    0
    0
  • But the obduracy of King Pagan, who had succeeded his father in 1846, led to the refusal alike of atonement for past wrongs, of any expression of regret for the display of gratuitous insolence, and of any indication of a desire to maintain friendship for the future.

    0
    0
  • In 1726 Defoe published a curious and amusing little pamphlet entitled Everybody's Business is Nobody's Business, or Private Abuses Public Grievances, exemplified in the Pride, Insolence, and Exorbitant Wages of our Women-Servants, Footmen, &c. This subject was a favourite one with him, and in the pamphlet he showed the immaturity of his political views by advocating legislative interference in these matters.

    0
    0
  • In the war of the Spanish Succession (1700) we find Victor at first on the French side, until, dissatisfied with the continued insolence of Louis XIV.

    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the war of the Spanish Succession in 1700 the duke was again on the French side, but the insolence of Louis and of Philip V.

    0
    0
  • Bold, overbearing and unscrupulous, Sinan recoiled from no baseness to put a rival out of the way; while his insolence was not confined to foreign ambassadors, but was exercised towards his opponents in the sultan's presence.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the incapacity which he displayed in this war, John was sent a little later 'to govern Ireland (1185); but he returned in a few months covered with disgrace, having alienated the loyal chiefs by his childish insolence and entirely failed to defend the settlers from the hostile septs.

    0
    0
  • This was far less than the prince meant to obtain, but he would probably have been forced to accept the offer for want of a better if the insolence of one of Yusef's messengers, a Spanish renegade, had not outraged a chief partisan of the Omayyad cause.

    0
    0
  • The dean of faculty at this time, Lockhart, afterwards Lord Covington, a lawyer notorious for his harsh demeanour, in the autumn of 1757 assailed Wedderburn with more than ordinary insolence.

    0
    0
  • Defeated both by land and sea, the French prince renounced his pretensions and evacuated England, leaving the regency to deal with the more difficult questions raised by the lawless insolence of the royal partisans.

    0
    0
  • The king good-naturedly overlooked his outrageous insolence on this occasion, but the inevitable rupture was only postponed.

    0
    0
  • The favour shown to Bothwell had not yet given occasion for scandal, though his character as an adventurous libertine was as notable as his reputation for military hardihood; but as the summer advanced his insolence increased with his influence at court and the general aversion of his rivals.

    0
    0
  • While the prisoner defended himself with the calmest dignity and self-possession, Coke burst into the bitterest invective, brutally addressing the great courtier as if he had been a servant, in the phrase, long remembered for its insolence and its utter injustice - "Thou hast an English face, but a 'Spanish heart!"

    0
    0
  • Unhappily the insolence which, while it was defensive, was pardonable, and in some sense respectable, accompanied him into societies where he was treated with courtesy and kindness.

    0
    0
  • His patrons had been taken away by death, or estranged by the riotous profusion with which he squandered their bounty, and the ungrateful insolence with which he rejected their advice.

    0
    0
  • A national policy of "growling before fighting" - later practised successfully enough by the United States - was not then possible; and one writer has very justly said that what chiefly affects one in the whole matter is the pathos of it - "a philosopher and a friend of peace struggling with a despot of superhuman genius, and a Tory cabinet of superhuman insolence and stolidity" (Trent).

    0
    0
  • (See Punjab.) The second Burmese war of 1852 was caused by the ill-treatment of European merchants at Rangoon, and the insolence offered to the captain of a frigate who had been sent to remonstrate.

    0
    0
  • In Sicily, however, Charles's government soon made itself odious by its exactions, the insolence and cruelty of the king's French officials and favourites, the depreciation of the currency, and the oppressive personal services, while the nobles were incensed at the violation of their feudal constitution.

    0
    0
  • The advance of morality is shown in the more frequent use of terms such as " just " (&LLKacos), " piety " (&ih), " insolence " (15 1 3pcs), " god-fearing" (0eou&7) s), " pure " (&yvos); and also in the plot of the story, which is distinctly a contest between right and wrong.

    0
    0
  • The stipulations regarding Herat were much as before; but there were to be apologies made to the mission for past insolence and rudeness, and the slave trade was to be suppressed in the Persian Gulf.

    0
    0
  • He also engaged in a keen controversy with Robert Lowth, afterwards bishop of London, on the book of Job, in which Lowth brought home charges of lack of scholarship and of insolence that admitted of no denial.

    0
    0
  • He achieved little success, but made himself detested by his insolence and profligacy, and was in turn replaced by Chares.

    0
    0
  • He disliked his immediate chief Grenville, one of the Whigs who joined Pitt, and a man of thoroughly Whiggish aristocratic insolence, In 1799 he left the foreign office and was named one of the twelve commissioners for India, and in 1800 joint paymaster of the forces, a post which he held till the retirement of Pitt in 1801.

    0
    0
  • Jeffreys spoke with his accustomed insolence to the vicechancellor, silenced the other deputies when they offered to speak, and ordered them out of court.

    0
    0
  • King Ecgbert died long ere the invaders had reached this stage of insolence.

    0
    0
  • personally unpopular, and the rapacity and insolence of her family was well known.

    0
    0
  • He was driven from his post by the kings resolve no longer to submit to his insolence, and a new ministry was formed under the marquess of Rockingham, composed of some of those leaders of the Whig aristocracy who had not followed the Grenville ministry.

    0
    0
  • There was a slight collision between them as early as the diet of 1778; but at the diet of 1786 Fersen boldly led the opposition against the king's financial measures (see GUSTAVUS III.) which were consequently rejected; while in private interviews, if his own account of them is to be trusted, he addressed his sovereign with outrageous insolence.

    0
    0
  • In 1771 he was sent as first Russian plenipotentiary to the peace-congress of Focshani; but he failed in his mission, owing partly to the obstinacy of the Turks, and partly (according to Panin) to his own outrageous insolence.

    0
    0
  • This was due in the main to the outrageous insolence of her allpowerful favourite Biren, who hated the Russian nobility and trampled upon them mercilessly.

    0
    0
  • At last a dispute in regard to the officering of the artillery gave the king an honorable excuse for resigning a throne on which both he and his wife had been treated with the utmost insolence.

    0
    0
  • He emigrated about 1790, and raised a legion which was to bear his name; but his insolence alienated the German princes, and his command was taken from him.

    0
    0
  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

    0
    0
  • For his insolence, he was imprisoned here, where he learned of Earth ways from the blind sculptress Alicia Masters.

    0
    0
  • One is lucky when the insolence of a wretch like this only shews itself in the guise of jesting.

    0
    0
  • Too bad there wasn't a 'Discharge from Service' option so I can leave him in the Middle East to stew in his own insolence.

    0
    0
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