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innsbruck

innsbruck

innsbruck Sentence Examples

  • It next passes Innsbruck and from Hall, a few miles lower down, begins to be navigable for barges.

  • Its rapid current does not permit of extensive navigation, but timber rafts are floated down from above Innsbruck.

  • He was buried in the church of St George in Vienna Neustadt, and a superb monument, which may still be seen, was raised to his memory at Innsbruck.

  • Later on he was at Nuremberg, Ulm and Innsbruck, where he is said to have been condemned to imprisonment for adultery, but released at the intercession of the elector of Saxony.

  • The worst tumults occurred in November 1904, when Italian students and professors were attacked at Innsbruck without provocation; being outnumbered by a hundred to one the Italians were forced to use their revolvers in self-defence, and several persons were wounded on both sides.

  • (Innsbruck, 1890).

  • Maksymilian Gumplowicz, Zur Geschichte Polens im Mittelalter (Innsbruck, 1898); W.

  • (Innsbruck, 1895); A Zisterer, Gregor X.

  • In 1550 he succeeded his father in the office of secretary of state; in this capacity he attended Charles in the war with Maurice, elector of Saxony, accompanied him in the flight from Innsbruck, and afterwards drew up the treaty of Passau (August 1552).

  • (Innsbruck, 1885); and F.

  • Biihmer, Regesta archiepiscoporum Maguntinensium, edited by C. Will (Innsbruck, 1877-1886).

  • There is a Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzugs (Innsbruck, 1901), a Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (ibid.

  • Ignatio (Rome, 1650, 1659) Genelli wrote Das Leben des heiligen Ignatius von Loyola (Innsbruck, 1848); Nicolas Orlandinus gives a life in the first volume of the Historiae Societatis Jesu (Rome, 1615).

  • Miihlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); and Deutsche Geschichte unter den Karolingern (Stuttgart, 1886); B.

  • von Wieser (Innsbruck, 1903).

  • On the 23rd of May she left Coppet almost secretly, and journeyed by Bern, Innsbruck and Salzburg to Vienna.

  • Meanwhile, however, Jellachich had himself started for Innsbruck, where he succeeded in persuading the emperor of the loyalty of his intentions, and whence, though not as yet formally reinstated, he was allowed to return to Croatia with practically unfettered discretion.

  • 3) which ended in the murder of the minister of war, Latour, and the second flight of the emperor to Innsbruck.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898); J.

  • metrice, &c., Innsbruck, 1882), whose critical services are not to be judged merely by the measure of assent which his metrical theories may command.

  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

  • Hausser, Geschichte der Rheinischen Pfalz (Heidelberg, 18 45); Nebenius, Geschichte der Pfalz (Heidelberg, 1874); Giimbel, Geschichte der protestantischen Kirche der Pfalz (Kaiserslautern, 1885); the Regesten cer Pfalzgrafen am Rhein,' 1214-1508, edited by Koch and Wille (Innsbruck, 1894); and Wild, Bilderatlas zur badischpfalzischen Geschichte (Heidelberg, 1904).

  • Juritsch, Geschichte der Babenberger and ihrer Lander (Innsbruck, 1894); M.

  • Then comes the collection of weapons and armour, including the famous Ambras collection, so called after the castle of Ambras near Innsbruck, where it was for a long time stored.

  • There is no reason to suppose that the architects, Bonanno and William of Innsbruck, intended that the campanile should be built in an oblique position; it would appear to have assumed it while the work was still in progress.

  • Mahlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881).

  • From Innsbruck to the summit of the pass is a distance by rail of 25 m.

  • by rail from Innsbruck to Verona.

  • Munich lies at the centre of an important network of railways connecting it directly with Strassburg (for Paris), Cologne, Leipzig, Berlin, Rosenheim (for Vienna) and Innsbruck (for Italy via the Brenner pass), which converge in a central station.

  • At Innsbruck she openly joined the Catholic Church, and was rechristened Alexandra.

  • Bohmer and C. Will, Regesta archiepiscoporum moguntinensium (Innsbruck, 1877-1886).

  • far die riimische Kirche (Innsbruck, 1883); H.

  • Ficker, Das deutsche Kaiserreich in seinen universalen and nationalen Beziehungen (Innsbruck, 1861); and Deutsches Konigthum and Kaiserthum (Innsbruck, 1862); G.

  • Ficker, Forschungen zur Reichsand Rechtsgeschichte Italiens (Innsbruck, 1868-1874); F.

  • He was appointed librarian of the Vatican by Innocent X., and was sent to Innsbruck by Alexander VII.

  • Trent was originally the capital of the Tridentini, and is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as a station on the great road from Verona to Veldidena (Innsbruck) over the Brenner.

  • Rohricht's Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898) C. i.-iv.

  • It is divided into two very distinct portions by the Brenner Pass (4495 ft.), connecting the Stubai and the Zillerthal groups; over this pass a splendid railway was built in1864-1867from Innsbruck to Verona, while the highway over the pass has from the earliest times been of immense importance from every point of view.

  • The capital is Innsbruck, while other important towns are Trent, Botzen and Rovereto.

  • Besides the great railway line over the Brenner, there are other lines from Botzen past Meran to Mals, from Franzensfeste up the Pusterthal to Lienz in the Drave valley, and from Innsbruck, by a tunnel beneath the Arlberg Pass to the Vorarlberg and the Rhine valley.

  • A few minerals are found in the district, but in this department the saltworks of Hall, near Innsbruck, take the first place.

  • There is a university at Innsbruck, but primary education, though compulsory, does not attain any very high degree of excellence, as in summer the schools are closed, for all hands are then required in the fields or on the mountain pastures.

  • Locally it is ruled by an Imperial governor (the Statthalter) who resides at Innsbruck, where, too, meets annually the local legislature or Diet (the Landtag), composed (according to the constitution of 1861) of 68 members; the archbishop of Salzburg, the bishops of Trent and Brixen, and the rector of the university of Innsbruck sit in person, while the great ecclesiastical corporations send four deputies, the chambers of commerce of Innsbruck, Trent and Rovereto each one, the nobles ten, the towns 13, and the peasants 34.

  • From that time onwards till 1665 Tirol was generally entrusted to a cadet of the Austrian house, who ruled first at Meran, and from about 1420 at Innsbruck, as a nearly independent prince; but since 1665 the province has been governed from Vienna.

  • His memory is still cherished in the district, for he conferred on it the title of Gefiirstete Grafschaft, spent much time in it, and erected in the chief church of Innsbruck a sumptuous monument as his tomb.

  • In 1703 the Bavarians and French, during the War of the Spanish Succession, took Innsbruck, but were then driven back.

  • 13) did they drive the foe out of Innsbruck.

  • Alton, Die ladinischen Idiomen in Ladinien, Groden, Fassa, Buchenstein, Ampezzo (Innsbruck, 1879); F.

  • Egger, Geschichte Tirols (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1872-1880); J.

  • Hirn, Tirols Erhebung im Jahre 1809 (Innsbruck, 1909); Alfons Huber, Geschichte d.

  • Vereinigung Tirols mit Oesterreich (Innsbruck, 1864); A.

  • landstaindischen Verfassung von Tirol (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1882-1885); W.

  • Oefele, Geschichte der Grafen von Andechs (Innsbruck, 1877); L.

  • Schneller, Landeskunde von Tirol (Innsbruck, 1872); F.

  • Staffler, Tirol and Vorarlberg, (2 vols., Innsbruck, 1839-1846); A.

  • Steinitzer, Geschichtliche and kulturgeschichtliche Wanderungen durch Tirol and Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1905); Th.

  • Vernaleken, Alpensagen (largely Tirolese; Vienna, 1858); Beda Weber, Das Land Tirol (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1837-1838); Martin Wilckens, Die Alpenwirthschaft der Schweiz, des Algau, and der westoesterreichischen Al enleinder (Vienna, 1874); I.

  • Zingerle, Sagen, Mr rchen, and G brc uche aus Tirol (Innsbruck, 1859); I.

  • Muhlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); E.

  • In 1552, suddenly marching against Charles at Innsbruck, he drove him to flight and then extorted from him the religious peace of Passau.

  • and die Griindung der normannischsicilischen Monarchie (Innsbruck, 1904).

  • Augsburg was taken, the pass of Ehrenberg was forced, and in a few days the emperor left Innsbruck as a fugitive.

  • Muhlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); and A.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges (Innsbruck, 1901), and Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), may also be consulted for his history.

  • It consists of three districts, Bregenz, Bludenz and Feldkirch, which are under the administrative authority of the Statthalter (or prefect) at Innsbruck, but possess a governor and a diet of their own (twenty-one members), and send four members to the imperial parliament.

  • Near Bludenz the Kloster glen parts from the Ill valley; through the latter runs the Arlberg railway (1884) - beneath the pass of that name (5912 ft.) - to Landeck and Innsbruck.

  • Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1868); Max Haushofer, Tirol and Vorarlberg (Bielefeld and Leipzig, 18 99); J.

  • Staffier, Tirol and Vorarlberg (5 vols., Innsbruck, 1839-46); A.

  • Steinitzer, Geschichtliche and Kulturgeschichtliche Wanderungen durch Tirol and Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1905); A.

  • Waltenberger, Algdiu, Vorarlberg and Westtirol (loth edition, Innsbruck, 1906).

  • Wilten, near Innsbruck), from which branched off the road into Noricum, leading by Virunum (Klagenfurt) to Lauricum (Lorch) on the Danube, the road into Pannonia, leading to Emona (Laibach)1 and Sirmium (Mitrowitz), the road to Tarsatica (near Fiume) and Siscia (Sissek), and that to Tergeste (Trieste) and the Istrian coast.

  • He was compelled to escape from the disorders of Vienna to Innsbruck on the 17th of May 1848.

  • No special monograph for the whole reign exists, but there is a good description of Andrew's crusade in Reinhold Roehricht, Geschichte des Konigreiches Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898).

  • The prince has a lieutenant resident at Vaduz, whence there is an appeal to the prince's court at Vienna, with a final appeal (since 1884) to the supreme district court at Innsbruck.

  • 25 and 26) (loth ed., Innsbruck, 1906).

  • Miihlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unto den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881).

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Keinigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898) and Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges (Innsbruck, 1901); H.

  • Hampe, Geschichte Konradins von Hohenstaufen (Innsbruck, 1894).

  • (Innsbruck, 1895).

  • Ficker (Innsbruck, 1881); L.

  • (1904 and 1908); on his Religion, Vorhauser (Innsbruck, 1860); his Cosmology, Friese (Breslau, 1862); his Botany, Brosig (Gaudenz, 1883); Sprengel (Marburg, 1890, and in Rhein.

  • The Alps of Bavaria, the Vorarlberg and Salzburg (north of the Arlberg Pass, Innsbruck, the Pinzgau, and the Enns valley).

  • 6,870 Reschen Scheideck Pass (Landeck to Meran), carriage road 4,902 Brenner Pass (Innsbruck to Verona), railway over.

  • Rohricht describes the reign of Baldwin IV., Geschichte des KOnigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), C. xix.-xxi.

  • (Innsbruck, 1885); ib.

  • invaded Germany as the protector of her liberties, while Maurice seized Augsburg and marched towards Innsbruck, where the emperor was residing, with the intention of making him a prisoner.

  • Innsbruck, XV.

  • Bodies were established for executive, financial and judicial purposes, the Austrian lands constituted one of the imperial circles which were established in 1512, and in 1518 representatives of the various diets (Landtage) met at Innsbruck, a proceeding which marks the beginning of an organic unity in the Austrian lands.

  • He helped in the establishment of the universities of Innsbruck and Olmutz; and under his auspices, after the defeat of the Turks in 1683, Vienna began to develop from a mere frontier fortress into one of the most brilliant capitals of Europe.

  • On the 17th the emperor left Vienna for Innsbruck " for the benefit of his health," and thence, on the loth, issued a proclamation in which he cast himself on the loyalty of his faithful provinces, and, while confirming the concessions of March, ignored those of the 5th of May.

  • Even where, as in the case of the Serbs and Rumans, the government had given no formal sanction to the national claims, the emperor was regarded as the ultimate guarantee of their success; and deputations from the various provinces poured into Innsbruck protesting their loyalty.

  • At Jellachich first, indeed, his activity had been looked at askance at Innsbruck, as but another force making for dis- "Illyr" integration.

  • Jellachich, who had gone to Innsbruck to lay the Slav view before the emperor, was allowed to return to Agram, though not as yet formally reinstated.

  • The feeling was less strong in Tirol, where, except in the city of Trent, they seem chiefly to have wished for separate local institutions, so that they should no longer be governed from Innsbruck.

  • der Osterreichischen Gesamtstaatsidee, 1526-1804, parts I and 2 to 1740 (Innsbruck, 1867, 1887); J.

  • (Innsbruck, 1885).

  • (Innsbruck, 1892).

  • (Innsbruck, 1880).

  • and die Grundung der normannisch-sicilischen Monarchie (Innsbruck, 1904).

  • Returning from Spain, James married Maria Clementina Sobieska, daughter of Prince James Sobieski, a pretty bride whom Charles Wogan rescued from durance in Innsbruck, an adventure of romantic gallantry.

  • Ficker (Innsbruck, 1870); and Regesta archiepiscoporum Maguntinensium, edited by C. Will (Innsbruck, 1877-1886).

  • Meisner, Deutsche Pilgerreisen nach dem heiligen Land (Berlin, 1882, new ed., Innsbruck, 1900); L.

  • Tell (Innsbruck, 1861); Albert Rilliet, Les Origines de la Confe'deration Suisse, histoire et legende (Geneva, 2nd edition, 1869); and S.

  • During the time that he was crown prince Louis resided chiefly at Innsbruck or Salzburg as governor of the circle of the Inn and Salzach.

  • Ephorats (Innsbruck, 1878); H.

  • The tomb of Maximilian I., and the statues round it, at Innsbruck, begun in 1521, are perhaps the most meritorious German work of this class in the 16th century, and show considerable Italian influence.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), C. xiii.-xvi.

  • the emperor Maximilian at Innsbruck.'

  • It has been argued that the runes of the Teutonic peoples have been derived from a form of the Etruscan alphabet, inscriptions in which are spread over a great part of northern Italy, but of which the most characteristic are found in the neighbourhood of Lugano, and in Tirol near Innsbruck, Botzen and Trent.

  • (Innsbruck, 1870); and Fitting, Die Anfange der Rechtsschule zu Bologna (Berlin, 1888).

  • Gundlach, Barbarossalieder (Innsbruck, 1899).

  • Jung, Reimer and Romanen in den Donauldndern (Innsbruck, 1877), Die romanischen Landschaften des reimischen Reiches (1881), and Fasten der Provinz Dacien (1894); W.

  • Rohricht (Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem, Innsbruck, 1898), and has been made the subject of a monograph by G.

  • Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1889 seq.); E.

  • von Pichl, Kritische Abhandlungen 'ether die cilteste Geschichte Salzburgs (Innsbruck, 1889).

  • von Zillner, Geschichte der Stadt Salzburg (Salzburg, 1885-1890); Trautwein, Salzburg (12th ed., Innsbruck, 1901); J.

  • (Innsbruck, 1899), 1027; The Cambridge Modern History, vol.

  • Ludovico travelled to Innsbruck, the better to push his interests (September 1499).

  • (Innsbruck, 1885); Rochini`s edition of the letters (Modena, 1872).

  • Finkal (Cracow, 1899); Maksymilian Gumplowicz, Zur Geschichte Polens im Mittelalter (Innsbruck, 1898).

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), gives practically all that is known about the history of Antioch and Tripoli.

  • 2 Edited by Thaner, Die Summa Magistri Rolandi (Innsbruck, 1874); later by Gietl, Die Sentenzen Rolands (Freiburg im B., 1891).

  • Cordis Jesu, &c. (3rd ed., Innsbruck, 1873); E.

  • Rohricht, Die Deutschen im heiligen Lande, Band ii., and Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges, passim (Innsbruck, BR.) Romances.

  • This victory, which resulted in the temporary reoccupation of Innsbruck by the Austrians, made Hofer the most conspicuous of the insurgent leaders.

  • The rapid advance of Napoleon, indeed, and the defeat of the main Austrian army under the archduke Charles, once more exposed Tirol to the French and Bavarians, who reoccupied Innsbruck.

  • The withdrawal of the bulk of the troops, however, gave the Tirolese their chance again; after two battles fought on the Iselberg (May 25 and 29) the Bavarians were again forced to evacuate the country, and Hofer entered Innsbruck in triumph.

  • The country was now again invaded by 40,000 French and Bavarian troops, and Innsbruck fell; but the Tirolese once more organized resistance to the French "atheists and freemasons," and, after a temporary hesitation, Hofer - on whose head a price had been placed - threw himself into the movement.

  • On the 13th of August, in another battle on the Iselberg, the French under Marshal Lefebvre were routed by the Tirolese peasants, and Hofer once more entered Innsbruck, which he had some difficulty in saving from sack.

  • Hofer was now elected Oberkommandant of Tirol, took up his quarters in the Hofburg at Innsbruck, and for two months ruled the country in the emperor's name.

  • In 1823 Hofer's remains were removed from Mantua to Innsbruck, where they were interred in the Franciscan church, and in 1834 a marble statue was erected over his tomb.

  • Weber, Das Thal Passeyr and seine Bewohner mit besonderer Riicksicht auf Andreas Hofer and das Jahr 180p (Innsbruck, 1851); Rapp, Tirol im Jahr 1809 (Innsbruck, 1852); Weidinger, Andreas Hofer and seine Kampfgenossen (3rd ed., Leipzig, 1861); Heigel, Andreas Hofer (Munich, 1874); Stampfer, Sandwirt Andreas Hofer (Freiburg, 1874); Schmolze, Andreas Hofer and seine Kampfgenossen (Innsbruck, 1900).

  • Auerbach and Immermann, and for numerous ballads, of which some remain very popular in Germany (see Franke, Andreas Hofer im Liede, Innsbruck, 1884).

  • Barach at Innsbruck, 1876).

  • from Innsbruck, at an altitude of 5840 ft.

  • A Croatian deputation was received at Innsbruck by Ferdinand V., but before its arrival the Hungarians had obtained a royal manifesto hostile to Illyrism.

  • Ficker (Innsbruck, 1870); Acta imperii inedita seculi XIII.

  • Winkelmann (Innsbruck, 1880); Epistolae saeculi XIII.

  • autobahn system and Innsbruck, then over the Brenner Pass.

  • At Innsbruck the Bavarians had already donned the red cockade, and on the Brenner rebellion had broken out.

  • headquarters of the 14th corps at Innsbruck.

  • Key attractions Innsbruck's historic center is stunningly picturesque, with several exquisite examples of architecture from the 14th through 17th centuries.

  • Continuing his study of the humanities, he became in 1628 professor of rhetoric at Innsbruck, and in 1635 at Ingolstadt, whither he had been transferred by his superiors in order to study theology.

  • It next passes Innsbruck and from Hall, a few miles lower down, begins to be navigable for barges.

  • Its rapid current does not permit of extensive navigation, but timber rafts are floated down from above Innsbruck.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), C. vii.-x., is the chief modern authority.

  • Biihmer (Innsbruck, 1870); Acta imperii inedita seculi XIII et XIV, Urkunden and Briefe zur Geschichte des Kaiserreichs, edited by E.

  • Winkelmann (Innsbruck, 1885); Aktenstiicke zur Geschichte des deutschen Reiches unter den Konigen Rudolf I.

  • Redlich, Rudolf von Habsburg (Innsbruck, 1903).

  • Only Innsbruck and Mattsee give a mean value of q less than unity.

  • Also, as later observations at Innsbruck give more normal values for q, some doubt [[Table Vi]].-Dissipation.

  • Thus in 1902 (51) the percentage of cases in which q fell short of I was 30 at Trieste, 33 at Vienna, and 35 at Kremsmunster; at Innsbruck q was less than I on 58 days out of 98.

  • Thus at Innsbruck Defant (45) found the mean dissipation on days of Fain fully thrice that on days without Fan.

  • In August 1493 the death of the emperor left Maximilian sole ruler of Germany and head of the house of Habsburg; and on the, 6th of March 1494 he married at Innsbruck Bianca Maria Sforza, daughter of Galeazzo Sforza, duke of Milan (d.

  • He was buried in the church of St George in Vienna Neustadt, and a superb monument, which may still be seen, was raised to his memory at Innsbruck.

  • von Kraus (Innsbruck, 1875); J.

  • At the meeting of the Naturforscherversammlung at Innsbruck in 1869, he was one of the founders of the German Anthropological Society, of which he became president in the following year; and from 1869 onwards he presided over the Berlin Anthropological Society, also acting as editor of its proceedings in the Zeitschrift fiir Ethnologic. In ethnology he published a volume of essays on the physical anthropology of the Germans, with special reference to the Frisians; and at his instance a census, which yielded remarkable results, was carried out among school children throughout Germany, to determine the relative distribution of blondes and brunettes.

  • Later on he was at Nuremberg, Ulm and Innsbruck, where he is said to have been condemned to imprisonment for adultery, but released at the intercession of the elector of Saxony.

  • An attempt at compromise resulted in the institution of an Italian law faculty at Innsbruck, but this aroused the violent hostility of the German students and populace, who gave proof of their superior civilization by an unprovoked attack on the Italians in October 1902.

  • The worst tumults occurred in November 1904, when Italian students and professors were attacked at Innsbruck without provocation; being outnumbered by a hundred to one the Italians were forced to use their revolvers in self-defence, and several persons were wounded on both sides.

  • (Innsbruck, 1890).

  • Maksymilian Gumplowicz, Zur Geschichte Polens im Mittelalter (Innsbruck, 1898); W.

  • (Innsbruck, 1895); A Zisterer, Gregor X.

  • In 1550 he succeeded his father in the office of secretary of state; in this capacity he attended Charles in the war with Maurice, elector of Saxony, accompanied him in the flight from Innsbruck, and afterwards drew up the treaty of Passau (August 1552).

  • (Innsbruck, 1885); and F.

  • Biihmer, Regesta archiepiscoporum Maguntinensium, edited by C. Will (Innsbruck, 1877-1886).

  • Finally, to contemporary writers we may add contemporary letters, especially those written by Stephen of Blois and Anselm of Ribemont, and the three letters sent to the West by the crusading princes during the First Crusade (see Hagenmeyer, Epistulae et Chartae, &c., Innsbruck, 1901).2 (b) The later compilations are chiefly based on the Gesta, whose uncouth style many writers set themselves to mend.

  • Under the head of charters come the Regesta regni Hierosolymitani, published by Rohricht, Innsbruck, 1893 (with an Additamentum in 1904); the Cartulaire generate des Hospitaliers, by Delaville Leroulx (Paris, 1894 onwards); and the Cartulaire de l'eglise du St Sepulcre, by de Roziere (Paris, 1849).

  • There is a Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzugs (Innsbruck, 1901), a Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (ibid.

  • Ignatio (Rome, 1650, 1659) Genelli wrote Das Leben des heiligen Ignatius von Loyola (Innsbruck, 1848); Nicolas Orlandinus gives a life in the first volume of the Historiae Societatis Jesu (Rome, 1615).

  • Miihlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); and Deutsche Geschichte unter den Karolingern (Stuttgart, 1886); B.

  • von Wieser (Innsbruck, 1903).

  • On the 23rd of May she left Coppet almost secretly, and journeyed by Bern, Innsbruck and Salzburg to Vienna.

  • Meanwhile, however, Jellachich had himself started for Innsbruck, where he succeeded in persuading the emperor of the loyalty of his intentions, and whence, though not as yet formally reinstated, he was allowed to return to Croatia with practically unfettered discretion.

  • 3) which ended in the murder of the minister of war, Latour, and the second flight of the emperor to Innsbruck.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898); J.

  • metrice, &c., Innsbruck, 1882), whose critical services are not to be judged merely by the measure of assent which his metrical theories may command.

  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

  • Hausser, Geschichte der Rheinischen Pfalz (Heidelberg, 18 45); Nebenius, Geschichte der Pfalz (Heidelberg, 1874); Giimbel, Geschichte der protestantischen Kirche der Pfalz (Kaiserslautern, 1885); the Regesten cer Pfalzgrafen am Rhein,' 1214-1508, edited by Koch and Wille (Innsbruck, 1894); and Wild, Bilderatlas zur badischpfalzischen Geschichte (Heidelberg, 1904).

  • Juritsch, Geschichte der Babenberger and ihrer Lander (Innsbruck, 1894); M.

  • Then comes the collection of weapons and armour, including the famous Ambras collection, so called after the castle of Ambras near Innsbruck, where it was for a long time stored.

  • There is no reason to suppose that the architects, Bonanno and William of Innsbruck, intended that the campanile should be built in an oblique position; it would appear to have assumed it while the work was still in progress.

  • Mahlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881).

  • From Innsbruck to the summit of the pass is a distance by rail of 25 m.

  • by rail from Innsbruck to Verona.

  • Munich lies at the centre of an important network of railways connecting it directly with Strassburg (for Paris), Cologne, Leipzig, Berlin, Rosenheim (for Vienna) and Innsbruck (for Italy via the Brenner pass), which converge in a central station.

  • At Innsbruck she openly joined the Catholic Church, and was rechristened Alexandra.

  • Bohmer and C. Will, Regesta archiepiscoporum moguntinensium (Innsbruck, 1877-1886).

  • far die riimische Kirche (Innsbruck, 1883); H.

  • Ficker, Das deutsche Kaiserreich in seinen universalen and nationalen Beziehungen (Innsbruck, 1861); and Deutsches Konigthum and Kaiserthum (Innsbruck, 1862); G.

  • Ficker, Forschungen zur Reichsand Rechtsgeschichte Italiens (Innsbruck, 1868-1874); F.

  • He was appointed librarian of the Vatican by Innocent X., and was sent to Innsbruck by Alexander VII.

  • Trent was originally the capital of the Tridentini, and is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as a station on the great road from Verona to Veldidena (Innsbruck) over the Brenner.

  • Rohricht's Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898) C. i.-iv.

  • It is divided into two very distinct portions by the Brenner Pass (4495 ft.), connecting the Stubai and the Zillerthal groups; over this pass a splendid railway was built in1864-1867from Innsbruck to Verona, while the highway over the pass has from the earliest times been of immense importance from every point of view.

  • The capital is Innsbruck, while other important towns are Trent, Botzen and Rovereto.

  • Besides the great railway line over the Brenner, there are other lines from Botzen past Meran to Mals, from Franzensfeste up the Pusterthal to Lienz in the Drave valley, and from Innsbruck, by a tunnel beneath the Arlberg Pass to the Vorarlberg and the Rhine valley.

  • A few minerals are found in the district, but in this department the saltworks of Hall, near Innsbruck, take the first place.

  • There is a university at Innsbruck, but primary education, though compulsory, does not attain any very high degree of excellence, as in summer the schools are closed, for all hands are then required in the fields or on the mountain pastures.

  • Locally it is ruled by an Imperial governor (the Statthalter) who resides at Innsbruck, where, too, meets annually the local legislature or Diet (the Landtag), composed (according to the constitution of 1861) of 68 members; the archbishop of Salzburg, the bishops of Trent and Brixen, and the rector of the university of Innsbruck sit in person, while the great ecclesiastical corporations send four deputies, the chambers of commerce of Innsbruck, Trent and Rovereto each one, the nobles ten, the towns 13, and the peasants 34.

  • From that time onwards till 1665 Tirol was generally entrusted to a cadet of the Austrian house, who ruled first at Meran, and from about 1420 at Innsbruck, as a nearly independent prince; but since 1665 the province has been governed from Vienna.

  • His memory is still cherished in the district, for he conferred on it the title of Gefiirstete Grafschaft, spent much time in it, and erected in the chief church of Innsbruck a sumptuous monument as his tomb.

  • In 1703 the Bavarians and French, during the War of the Spanish Succession, took Innsbruck, but were then driven back.

  • 13) did they drive the foe out of Innsbruck.

  • His bones now lie in the great church at Innsbruck, side by side with those of his two chief supporters, the Capuchin friar and army chaplain, Joachim Haspinger (d.

  • Alton, Die ladinischen Idiomen in Ladinien, Groden, Fassa, Buchenstein, Ampezzo (Innsbruck, 1879); F.

  • Egger, Geschichte Tirols (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1872-1880); J.

  • Hirn, Tirols Erhebung im Jahre 1809 (Innsbruck, 1909); Alfons Huber, Geschichte d.

  • Vereinigung Tirols mit Oesterreich (Innsbruck, 1864); A.

  • landstaindischen Verfassung von Tirol (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1882-1885); W.

  • Oefele, Geschichte der Grafen von Andechs (Innsbruck, 1877); L.

  • Schneller, Landeskunde von Tirol (Innsbruck, 1872); F.

  • Staffler, Tirol and Vorarlberg, (2 vols., Innsbruck, 1839-1846); A.

  • Steinitzer, Geschichtliche and kulturgeschichtliche Wanderungen durch Tirol and Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1905); Th.

  • Vernaleken, Alpensagen (largely Tirolese; Vienna, 1858); Beda Weber, Das Land Tirol (3 vols., Innsbruck, 1837-1838); Martin Wilckens, Die Alpenwirthschaft der Schweiz, des Algau, and der westoesterreichischen Al enleinder (Vienna, 1874); I.

  • Zingerle, Sagen, Mr rchen, and G brc uche aus Tirol (Innsbruck, 1859); I.

  • He rapidly grew extremely unpopular, and in 1 55 2 Maurice of Saxony turned upon him and attempted to capture him at Innsbruck.

  • Muhlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); E.

  • In 1552, suddenly marching against Charles at Innsbruck, he drove him to flight and then extorted from him the religious peace of Passau.

  • The Clericals started an agitation because Wahrmund, the professor of canon law at the university of Innsbruck, subjected the dogma of the Immaculate Conception to critical examination.

  • and die Griindung der normannischsicilischen Monarchie (Innsbruck, 1904).

  • Augsburg was taken, the pass of Ehrenberg was forced, and in a few days the emperor left Innsbruck as a fugitive.

  • Muhlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881); and A.

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges (Innsbruck, 1901), and Geschichte des Konigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), may also be consulted for his history.

  • It consists of three districts, Bregenz, Bludenz and Feldkirch, which are under the administrative authority of the Statthalter (or prefect) at Innsbruck, but possess a governor and a diet of their own (twenty-one members), and send four members to the imperial parliament.

  • Near Bludenz the Kloster glen parts from the Ill valley; through the latter runs the Arlberg railway (1884) - beneath the pass of that name (5912 ft.) - to Landeck and Innsbruck.

  • Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1868); Max Haushofer, Tirol and Vorarlberg (Bielefeld and Leipzig, 18 99); J.

  • Staffier, Tirol and Vorarlberg (5 vols., Innsbruck, 1839-46); A.

  • Steinitzer, Geschichtliche and Kulturgeschichtliche Wanderungen durch Tirol and Vorarlberg (Innsbruck, 1905); A.

  • Waltenberger, Algdiu, Vorarlberg and Westtirol (loth edition, Innsbruck, 1906).

  • Wilten, near Innsbruck), from which branched off the road into Noricum, leading by Virunum (Klagenfurt) to Lauricum (Lorch) on the Danube, the road into Pannonia, leading to Emona (Laibach)1 and Sirmium (Mitrowitz), the road to Tarsatica (near Fiume) and Siscia (Sissek), and that to Tergeste (Trieste) and the Istrian coast.

  • He was compelled to escape from the disorders of Vienna to Innsbruck on the 17th of May 1848.

  • No special monograph for the whole reign exists, but there is a good description of Andrew's crusade in Reinhold Roehricht, Geschichte des Konigreiches Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898).

  • The prince has a lieutenant resident at Vaduz, whence there is an appeal to the prince's court at Vienna, with a final appeal (since 1884) to the supreme district court at Innsbruck.

  • 25 and 26) (loth ed., Innsbruck, 1906).

  • Miihlbacher, Die Regesten des Kaiserreichs unto den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881).

  • Rohricht, Geschichte des Keinigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898) and Geschichte des ersten Kreuzzuges (Innsbruck, 1901); H.

  • Hampe, Geschichte Konradins von Hohenstaufen (Innsbruck, 1894).

  • (Innsbruck, 1895).

  • Ficker (Innsbruck, 1881); L.

  • (1904 and 1908); on his Religion, Vorhauser (Innsbruck, 1860); his Cosmology, Friese (Breslau, 1862); his Botany, Brosig (Gaudenz, 1883); Sprengel (Marburg, 1890, and in Rhein.

  • The Alps of Bavaria, the Vorarlberg and Salzburg (north of the Arlberg Pass, Innsbruck, the Pinzgau, and the Enns valley).

  • 6,870 Reschen Scheideck Pass (Landeck to Meran), carriage road 4,902 Brenner Pass (Innsbruck to Verona), railway over.

  • Rohricht describes the reign of Baldwin IV., Geschichte des KOnigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), C. xix.-xxi.

  • (Innsbruck, 1885); ib.

  • invaded Germany as the protector of her liberties, while Maurice seized Augsburg and marched towards Innsbruck, where the emperor was residing, with the intention of making him a prisoner.

  • Innsbruck, XV.

  • Bodies were established for executive, financial and judicial purposes, the Austrian lands constituted one of the imperial circles which were established in 1512, and in 1518 representatives of the various diets (Landtage) met at Innsbruck, a proceeding which marks the beginning of an organic unity in the Austrian lands.

  • He helped in the establishment of the universities of Innsbruck and Olmutz; and under his auspices, after the defeat of the Turks in 1683, Vienna began to develop from a mere frontier fortress into one of the most brilliant capitals of Europe.

  • On the 17th the emperor left Vienna for Innsbruck " for the benefit of his health," and thence, on the loth, issued a proclamation in which he cast himself on the loyalty of his faithful provinces, and, while confirming the concessions of March, ignored those of the 5th of May.

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