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inhospitable

inhospitable

inhospitable Sentence Examples

  • It was an inhospitable way to treat a guest – especially one who had volunteered so much help.

  • The elevated plateaus between these ranges are semiarid and inhospitable, and are covered with extensive saline basins, which become lagoons in the wet season and morasses or dry saltpans in the dry season.

  • In the end of the 9th century Iceland was colonized from Norway; and about 985 the intrepid viking, Eric the Red, discovered Greenland, and induced some of his Icelandic countrymen to settle on its inhospitable shores.

  • The inhabitants of this region are wild and inhospitable and utterly beyond the control of the Turkish authorities, and navigation of the river between Korna and Suk-esh-Sheiukh is unsafe owing to the attacks of armed pirates.

  • On account, probably, of the inhospitable nature of the shore the northern portion of the protectorate appears to have been little subject to hostile invasion.

  • q Y imam of Sana, necessitated the despatch of large and costly expeditions to Arabia, in which thousands of Turkish .troops have fallen in guerrilla warfare or through the inhospitable climate; in Albania disturbance became almost endemic, owing to the resistance offered by the intractable population to successive attempts of the central authorities to subject the country to regular taxation and the operation of the laws.

  • Their railway communication ended abruptly at the Austrian frontier; the roads were few and bad, the country sparsely cultivated and inhospitable, and the troops suffered severely.

  • The father appears to have been somewhat peremptory in temper, but neither inhospitable nor tyrannical.

  • Anti-Lebanon is the barest and most inhospitable part of the system.

  • They own a chief sheikh, resident at Jeba`a, and have the reputation, like most heretical communities in the Sunni part of the Moslem world, of being exceedingly fanatical and inhospitable.

  • Undeterred by this inhospitable reception, Parkman took up at the beginning his great work on France and England in the New World, to which the book just mentioned was in reality the sequel.

  • Hymenoptera are probably less widely distributed than Aptera, Coleoptera or Diptera, but they are to be found in all except the most inhospitable regions of the globe.

  • - Hemiptera are widely distributed, and are plentiful in most quarters of the globe, though they probably have not penetrated as far into remote and inhospitable regions as have the Coleoptera, Diptera and Aptera.

  • probably among the poorest peasantry in the world, support existence in this inhospitable region.

  • The character of the Algerian coast is severe and inhospitable.

  • The terrors of this " savage sea and inhospitable shore," once described by Sallust, have, however, been greatly mitigated by the introduction of steam, the improvement of the harbours, and the establishment by the French government of an excellent system of lighthouses.

  • each, and are arid, barren and inhospitable, except at the dividing ridges where the clouds from the sea are deprived of some of their moisture.

  • It was chiefly the mineral wealth of the Cordilleran region, first developed on the far Pacific slope, and later in many parts of the inner mountain ranges, that urged pioneers across the dry plains into the apparently inhospitable mountain region; there the adventurous new-corners rapidly worked out one mining district after another, exhausting and abandoning the smaller camps to early decay and rushing in feverish excitement to new-found river fields, but establishing important centres of varied industries in the more important mining districts.

  • In eastern Canada Ungava and Labrador are very chill and inhospitable, owing largely to the iceberg-laden current sweeping down the coast from Davis Strait, bringing fogs and long snowy winters and a temperature for the year much below the freezing-point.

  • They owe their capacity to live under the most inhospitable conditions to the dual nature of the organism, and to their capacity to withstand extremes of heat, cold and drought without destruction.

  • The supply of some of the most valuable, such as sable, silver and natural black fox, sea otter and ermine, which are all taken from animals of a more or less shy nature, does very gradually decrease with persistent hunting and the encroachment of man upon the districts where they live, but the climate of these vast regions is so cold and inhospitable that the probabilities of man ever permanently inhabiting them in numbers sufficient to scare away or exterminate the fur-bearing wild animals is unlikely.

  • During some time Johnson continued to call on his patron, but, after being repeatedly told by the porter that his lordship was not at home, took the hint, and ceased to present himself at the inhospitable door.

  • On the western side the coast is bolder and less inhospitable; there are several excellent havens, especially on the islands.

  • The French deemed the Scots shabby, poor and avaricious: their grooms werekilled by the peasantry when they went foraging: the nobles were churlish and inhospitable.

  • This region is rainless, barren and inhospitable, absolutely destitute of vegetation except in some small river valleys where irrigation is possible, and on the slopes of some of the snow-covered peaks where the water from the melting snows nourishes a scanty and coarse vege tation before it disappears in the thirsty sands.

  • the country is mountainous, heavily-forested and inhospitable.

  • There are some comparatively level stretches of country immediately north of the Straits, partly forested and partly grassy plains, where sheep farming has been established with some degree of success, but the greater part of this extreme southern territory is mountainous, cold, wet and inhospitable.

  • Admirable descriptions of this inhospitable region, the farthest south of the inhabited parts of the globe, may be found in the Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships "Adventure" and " Beagle" between the years 1826 and 1836 (3 vols., 1839).

  • of the Chilean coast contain numerous bays and inlets affording safe harbours, but the mainland and islands are uninhabited and the climate inhospitable.

  • After six months' stay in Algiers he once again, on the 21st of June 1809, set sail for Marseilles, where he had to undergo a monotonous and inhospitable quarantine in the lazaretto, before his difficulties were over.

  • Ships stopped at different ports, or rather at such few natural harbours as the inhospitable coast offered, from time to time, but no attempt was made by the Portuguese to colonize the southern end of the continent.

  • Their inhuman disposition, and inhospitable treatment of foreigners, especially impressed him.

  • The plateau is bleak and inhospitable in the north, barren and arid toward the south, containing great saline depressions covered with water in the rainy season, and broken by ridges and peaks, the highest being the Cerro de Tahua, 17,454 ft.

  • up to the snow limit (about 17,500 ft.), and covers a bleak, inhospitable territory, inhabited only by shepherds and miners.

  • The region was inhospitable, the domain a prey to lawless exaction, the house itself savage and disorderly.

  • elevation, which include some of the most fertile and productive areas in Colombia; the temperate districts between 7500 and 10,000 ft., the cold, bleak and inhospitable paramos between 10,000 and 15,000 ft., and above these the arctic wastes of ice and snow.

  • Solinus speaks of the luxurious pastures, but the natives he terms an inhospitable and warlike nation.

  • Many authorities such as Keating and MacFirbis admit that descendants of the Firbolgs were still to be found in parts of Ireland in their own day, though they are characterized as " tattling, guileful, tale-bearing, noisy, contemptible, mean, wretched, unsteady, harsh and inhospitable."

  • On the side of Portugal a tract of inhospitable country sled originally to the separation between the two kingdoms, inasmuch as it caused the reconquest of the comparatively populous maritime tracts from the Moors to be carried out independently of that of the eastern kingdoms, which were also well peopled.

  • Their general character is that of wild, lawless and inhospitable beings, the slaves of their animal passions, with the exception of Pholus and Chiron.

  • It was an inhospitable way to treat a guest – especially one who had volunteered so much help.

  • From the beginning of recorded history, the River Nile has been a blessing in an otherwise barren, inhospitable world.

  • Either of these conditions would make a planet very inhospitable for life.

  • inhospitable terrain, thick with thorn trees.

  • inhospitable desert, no give just take.

  • inhospitable climate.

  • inhospitable landscape, the bikes will have to be man handled across Siberia's network of rivers.

  • inhospitable planet.

  • inhospitable environment.

  • It starts with the need for shelter in the often inhospitable climate.

  • That such a large animal is able to survive in so inhospitable an environment is testament to its evolutionary perfection.

  • The garden demonstrated the wide variety of plant material that can become established in the seemingly inhospitable habitat of a disused railroad line.

  • Both are extremely inhospitable areas with very severe climate conditions.

  • There are also likely to be some benefits, where some species and societies are able to exploit land that was previously inhospitable.

  • If the world does become inhospitable in the next few thousand or million years, then it will probably be our own fault.

  • It is made inhospitable by extreme cold, a massive permanent ice sheet and floating ice shelves.

  • The transits to and from Canada were particularly testing for the pilots, given that they were flying over some extremely inhospitable terrain.

  • The elevated plateaus between these ranges are semiarid and inhospitable, and are covered with extensive saline basins, which become lagoons in the wet season and morasses or dry saltpans in the dry season.

  • In the end of the 9th century Iceland was colonized from Norway; and about 985 the intrepid viking, Eric the Red, discovered Greenland, and induced some of his Icelandic countrymen to settle on its inhospitable shores.

  • The inhabitants of this region are wild and inhospitable and utterly beyond the control of the Turkish authorities, and navigation of the river between Korna and Suk-esh-Sheiukh is unsafe owing to the attacks of armed pirates.

  • On account, probably, of the inhospitable nature of the shore the northern portion of the protectorate appears to have been little subject to hostile invasion.

  • q Y imam of Sana, necessitated the despatch of large and costly expeditions to Arabia, in which thousands of Turkish .troops have fallen in guerrilla warfare or through the inhospitable climate; in Albania disturbance became almost endemic, owing to the resistance offered by the intractable population to successive attempts of the central authorities to subject the country to regular taxation and the operation of the laws.

  • Their railway communication ended abruptly at the Austrian frontier; the roads were few and bad, the country sparsely cultivated and inhospitable, and the troops suffered severely.

  • The father appears to have been somewhat peremptory in temper, but neither inhospitable nor tyrannical.

  • Anti-Lebanon is the barest and most inhospitable part of the system.

  • They own a chief sheikh, resident at Jeba`a, and have the reputation, like most heretical communities in the Sunni part of the Moslem world, of being exceedingly fanatical and inhospitable.

  • Undeterred by this inhospitable reception, Parkman took up at the beginning his great work on France and England in the New World, to which the book just mentioned was in reality the sequel.

  • iii.), and if this explains part of the story, the physical configuration of the Dead Sea may have led to the legend of the destruction of inhospitable and vicious cities (see Sodom And Gomorrah) .

  • Hymenoptera are probably less widely distributed than Aptera, Coleoptera or Diptera, but they are to be found in all except the most inhospitable regions of the globe.

  • - Hemiptera are widely distributed, and are plentiful in most quarters of the globe, though they probably have not penetrated as far into remote and inhospitable regions as have the Coleoptera, Diptera and Aptera.

  • probably among the poorest peasantry in the world, support existence in this inhospitable region.

  • The character of the Algerian coast is severe and inhospitable.

  • The terrors of this " savage sea and inhospitable shore," once described by Sallust, have, however, been greatly mitigated by the introduction of steam, the improvement of the harbours, and the establishment by the French government of an excellent system of lighthouses.

  • each, and are arid, barren and inhospitable, except at the dividing ridges where the clouds from the sea are deprived of some of their moisture.

  • It was chiefly the mineral wealth of the Cordilleran region, first developed on the far Pacific slope, and later in many parts of the inner mountain ranges, that urged pioneers across the dry plains into the apparently inhospitable mountain region; there the adventurous new-corners rapidly worked out one mining district after another, exhausting and abandoning the smaller camps to early decay and rushing in feverish excitement to new-found river fields, but establishing important centres of varied industries in the more important mining districts.

  • In eastern Canada Ungava and Labrador are very chill and inhospitable, owing largely to the iceberg-laden current sweeping down the coast from Davis Strait, bringing fogs and long snowy winters and a temperature for the year much below the freezing-point.

  • They owe their capacity to live under the most inhospitable conditions to the dual nature of the organism, and to their capacity to withstand extremes of heat, cold and drought without destruction.

  • The supply of some of the most valuable, such as sable, silver and natural black fox, sea otter and ermine, which are all taken from animals of a more or less shy nature, does very gradually decrease with persistent hunting and the encroachment of man upon the districts where they live, but the climate of these vast regions is so cold and inhospitable that the probabilities of man ever permanently inhabiting them in numbers sufficient to scare away or exterminate the fur-bearing wild animals is unlikely.

  • During some time Johnson continued to call on his patron, but, after being repeatedly told by the porter that his lordship was not at home, took the hint, and ceased to present himself at the inhospitable door.

  • On the western side the coast is bolder and less inhospitable; there are several excellent havens, especially on the islands.

  • The French deemed the Scots shabby, poor and avaricious: their grooms werekilled by the peasantry when they went foraging: the nobles were churlish and inhospitable.

  • This region is rainless, barren and inhospitable, absolutely destitute of vegetation except in some small river valleys where irrigation is possible, and on the slopes of some of the snow-covered peaks where the water from the melting snows nourishes a scanty and coarse vege tation before it disappears in the thirsty sands.

  • the country is mountainous, heavily-forested and inhospitable.

  • There are some comparatively level stretches of country immediately north of the Straits, partly forested and partly grassy plains, where sheep farming has been established with some degree of success, but the greater part of this extreme southern territory is mountainous, cold, wet and inhospitable.

  • Admirable descriptions of this inhospitable region, the farthest south of the inhabited parts of the globe, may be found in the Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships "Adventure" and " Beagle" between the years 1826 and 1836 (3 vols., 1839).

  • of the Chilean coast contain numerous bays and inlets affording safe harbours, but the mainland and islands are uninhabited and the climate inhospitable.

  • After six months' stay in Algiers he once again, on the 21st of June 1809, set sail for Marseilles, where he had to undergo a monotonous and inhospitable quarantine in the lazaretto, before his difficulties were over.

  • Ships stopped at different ports, or rather at such few natural harbours as the inhospitable coast offered, from time to time, but no attempt was made by the Portuguese to colonize the southern end of the continent.

  • Their inhuman disposition, and inhospitable treatment of foreigners, especially impressed him.

  • The plateau is bleak and inhospitable in the north, barren and arid toward the south, containing great saline depressions covered with water in the rainy season, and broken by ridges and peaks, the highest being the Cerro de Tahua, 17,454 ft.

  • up to the snow limit (about 17,500 ft.), and covers a bleak, inhospitable territory, inhabited only by shepherds and miners.

  • The region was inhospitable, the domain a prey to lawless exaction, the house itself savage and disorderly.

  • elevation, which include some of the most fertile and productive areas in Colombia; the temperate districts between 7500 and 10,000 ft., the cold, bleak and inhospitable paramos between 10,000 and 15,000 ft., and above these the arctic wastes of ice and snow.

  • Solinus speaks of the luxurious pastures, but the natives he terms an inhospitable and warlike nation.

  • Many authorities such as Keating and MacFirbis admit that descendants of the Firbolgs were still to be found in parts of Ireland in their own day, though they are characterized as " tattling, guileful, tale-bearing, noisy, contemptible, mean, wretched, unsteady, harsh and inhospitable."

  • On the side of Portugal a tract of inhospitable country sled originally to the separation between the two kingdoms, inasmuch as it caused the reconquest of the comparatively populous maritime tracts from the Moors to be carried out independently of that of the eastern kingdoms, which were also well peopled.

  • Their general character is that of wild, lawless and inhospitable beings, the slaves of their animal passions, with the exception of Pholus and Chiron.

  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.

  • The transits to and from Canada were particularly testing for the pilots, given that they were flying over some extremely inhospitable terrain.

  • Additionally, infectious diseases like malaria and dengue fever are being spread to new areas that were once inhospitable to mosquitoes, putting the health of millions of human beings at risk.

  • If you can make your pet's environment inhospitable to fleas, you stand a better chance of keeping them from setting up a home on your pet.

  • Be sure to check your dog for ticks periodically, and if you live in an area known to have high tick traffic, take precautions to make your landscape inhospitable for the little buggers.

  • By removing the host, you make the environment inhospitable to the pest.

  • Named for the golden color of the bacteria grown under laboratory conditions, Staphylococcus aureus is a hardy organism that can survive in extreme temperatures or other inhospitable circumstances.

  • There are many types of pills and manufacturers and most work by preventing monthly ovulation or by making the female reproductive tract inhospitable to sperm.

  • Based in 2154, the moon planet is inhospitable to humans.

  • They can be found virtually everywhere, even in the planet's most uninhabited, inhospitable places such as Mount Everest.

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