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inherent

inherent

inherent Sentence Examples

  • While he wanted to avoid further involvement in Edith Shipton's troubled world, he felt proud of his wife inherent sense of compassion toward anyone in trouble.

  • Equity here is defined to mean "any body of rules existing by the side of the original civil law, founded on distinct principles, and claiming incidentally to supersede the civil law in virtue of a superior sanctity inherent in those principles."

  • If the frequent presence of a kink in the tail be an inherent feature, the breed is evidently related to the other kink-tailed Malay cats which, as already stated, have a cry differing from that of European cats.

  • Chadwick (Studies on AngloSaxon Institutions, 1905) says that "the sense of subordination must have been inherent in the word from the earliest time," but it has no connexion with the German dienen, to serve.

  • Gaine, general manager of the company, stated before the Select Committee that in the view of the directors the bargain was a hard one, because it gave no consideration in respect of the goodwill of the great business, with its gross income of over £ 2,000,000 per annum and its net revenue of over £750,000, which the company had built up. The company had had to pay for all the experiments and mistakes which are inherent in the launching and development of any new industry.

  • The force which brings the atoms together in the forms of objects is inherent in the elements, and all their motions are necessary.

  • Although Spinoza's theory attributes a mental side to all physical events, he rejects all teleological conceptions and explains the order of things as the result of an inherent necessity.

  • It is the following out of an inherent tendency or impulse to a series of changes, all of which were virtually pre-existent, and this process cannot be interfered with from without.

  • All material things are assimilated to one another as organic, the vitalizing principle being inherent in all matter.

  • But the causes and conditions of variation have yet to be thoroughly explored; and the importance of natural selection will not be impaired, even if further inquiries should prove that variability is definite, and is determined in certain directions rather than in others, by conditions inherent in that which varies.

  • 1.), and Nageli, who attributes variation to causes inherent in the idioplasm, and has elaborately worked out the view in his Abstammungslehre.

  • Darwins expression the nature of the organism has been interpreted in the preceding paragraph to mean an inherent tendency towards higher organization; that interpretation may now be completed by adding that the organism is susceptible to, and can respond to, the action of external conditions.

  • AdaptationThe morphological and physiological differentiation of the plant-body has, so far, been attributed to (I) the nature of the organism, that is to its inherent tendency towards higher organization, and (2) to the indefinite results of the external conditions acting as a stimulus which excites the organism to variation, but does not direct the course of variation.

  • In endeavouring to trace the causation of adaptation, it is obvious that it must be due quite as much to properties inherent in the plant as to the action of external conditions; the plant must possess adaptive capacity.

  • They are differences which seem to be inherent in the difference between a republic and a monarchy, but which it would be truer to say are inherent in the difference between a body of men packed close together within the walls of a city and a body of men - if we can call them a body - scattered over a wide territory..

  • In time, notwithstanding a certain inherent individualism and impatience of control, veritable despotisms arose in the Semitic world, although such organizations were invariably liable to sudden collapse as the old forms of life broke down with changing conditions.'

  • Hence the various reconstructions of the earlier history, with all their inherent weaknesses.

  • The emperor is head of the state and the high priest, who sacrifices to Heaven on behalf of his people, but he can be deposed, and no divine right is inherent in certain families as in Japan and Turkey.

  • The doctrine once established remained an inherent part of the Babylonian-Assyrian religion and led to the more or less complete disassociation of the three gods constituting the triad from their original local limitations.

  • The doctrine of the restoration appeared necessary because the spirit, in spite of its inherent freedom, cannot lose its true nature, and because the final purposes of God cannot be foiled.

  • It is more likely that the cleansing power of soap is due to the inherent property of its solution to emulsionize fats.

  • Notwithstanding certain disadvantages inherent in its situation, the trade and manufactures of Athens have considerably increased in recent years.

  • There was always that love of overcoming difficulty inherent in a chivalrous nature; and this also accounts for that desire of surpassing every one else that marked his early days.

  • The linear scale of maps can obviously be used only in the case of maps covering a small area, for in the case of maps of greater extension measurements would be vitiated owing to the distortion or exaggeration inherent in all projections, not to mention the expansion or shrinking of the paper in the process of printing.

  • The manuscript maps intended to be produced by photographic processes upon stone, zinc or aluminium, are drawn on a scale somewhat larger than the scale on which they are to be printed, thus eliminating all those imperfections which are inherent in a pen-drawing.

  • 2 The Kabbalah itself is but an extreme and remarkable development of certain forms of thought which had never been absent from Judaism; it is bound up with earlier tendencies to mysticism, with man's inherent striving to enter into communion with the Deity.

  • It must break down from inherent rottenness."

  • These belong to the new or European school, which, in spite of the bitter opposition of the partisans of the old Oriental system, has succeeded, partly through its own inherent superiority and partly through the talents and courage of its supporters, in expelling its rival from the position of undisputed authority which it had occupied for upwards of five hundred years.

  • From the very first, however, the inherent weakness of the vast army, and the vicious choice of time for the beginning of the advance, began to make itself felt.

  • Perhaps no battle better exemplifies the inherent strength of the emperor's strategy, and in none was his grasp of the battlefield more brilliantly displayed, for, as he fully recognized, " These Prussians have at last learnt something - they are no longer the wooden toys of Frederick the Great," and, on the other hand, the relative inferiority of his own men as compared with his veterans of Austerlitz called for far more individual effort than on any previous day.

  • Nor is it, when newly gathered, heating, - a defect inherent to the preserved fruit everywhere; nor does its richness, however great, bring satiety; in short it is an article of food alike pleasant and healthy."

  • These are the great classic preachers whose discourses continue to be read, and to form an inherent pare of the body of French literature.

  • Owing to the difficulties inherent in determining the position of so faint an object among a great number of stars, the results have taken about ten years to work out.

  • This cosmic theory is a curious combination of materialistic and abstract ideas; the influence of his master Telesio (q.v.), generally predominant, is not strong enough to overcome his inherent disbelief in the adequacy of purely scientific explanation.

  • The Grafschaft became thus merely a bundle of rights inherent in the soil; and, the count's office having become his property, the old counties of Gauen rapidly disappeared as administrative units, being either amalgamated or subdivided.

  • The inherent difficulties of Realism led to a J variety of attempts to reach a more satisfactory formula.

  • The universals are thus forms inherent in things - " native forms," according to the expression by which Gilbert's doctrine is concisely known.

  • Albert and Aquinas both profess the moderate Aristotelian Realism which treats genera and species only as substantiae secundae, yet as really inherent in the individuals, and constituting their form or essence.

  • In the former the ideas of personality and infinite power have vanished, all power being conceived as inherent in God.

  • This work of reconstruction was carried out in face of many difficulties other than those inherent to the undertaking.

  • The complexity and mystery of action inherent in living matter have probably been accountable for much of the vague philosophy of disease in the past, and have furnished one reason at least why pathology has been so long in asserting its independence as a science.

  • The separated cells become intermingled with other tissue elements amongst which they lie dormant with their inherent power of proliferation in abeyance.

  • These, having the full equipment of the vegetative order, will now develop the inherent power of proliferation to a greater or lesser extent.

  • Notwithstanding the inherent difficulties of construction caused by the great variations in the level of the stream, amounting sometimes to 20 ft.

  • Gilds were a natural manifestation of the associative spirit which is inherent in mankind.

  • In the Positive state, inherent volition or external volition and inherent force or abstraction personified have both disappeared from men's minds, and the explanation of a phenomenon means a reference of it, by way of succession or resemblance, to some other phenomenon, - means the establishment of a relation between the given fact and some more general fact.

  • The facts of history must be explained, not by providential interventions, but by referring them to conditions inherent in the successive stages of social existence.

  • This is illustrated by the difficulties inherent in the conception of Cause, Space, Time, Matter, Motion, the Infinite, and the Absolute, and by the" relativity of knowledge,"which precludes knowledge of the Unknowable, since" all thinking is relationing."Yet the Unknowable may exist, and we may even have an" indefinite knowledge "of it, positive, though vague and extralogical.

  • The word will well bear this sense in the two passages in which Sophocles (Electra, 162, 859) applies it to Orestes; and it is likely enough that after the disappearance of the old Eupatridae as a political corporation, the name was adopted in a different sense, but not without a claim to the distinction inherent in the older sense, by one of the oldest of the clans.

  • The inherent weakness of the coalition had, however, become apparent.

  • For most of the period in question Thucydides is the only source; and despite the inherent merits of a great writer, it can hardly be doubted that the tribute of almost unqualified praise that successive generations of scholars have paid to Thucydides must have been in some measure qualified if, for example, a Spartan account of the Peloponnesian War had been preserved to us.

  • It is the first example in Italian literature of a national biography, the first attempt in any literature to trace the vicissitudes of a people's life in their logical sequence, deducing each successive phase from passions or necessities inherent in preceding circumstances, reasoning upon them from general principles, and inferring corollaries for the conduct of the future.

  • It effected a revolution in his mode of thinking; so completely did the Kantian doctrine of the inherent moral worth of man harmonize with his own character, that his life becomes one effort to perfect a true philosophy, and to make its principles practical maxims. At first he seems to have thought that the best method for accomplishing his object would be to expound Kantianism in a popular, intelligible form.

  • To direct attention to the true nature of revolution, to demonstrate how inextricably the right of liberty is interwoven with the very existence of man as an intelligent agent, to point out the inherent progressiveness of state arrangements, and the consequent necessity of reform or amendment, such are the main objects of the Beitrage; and although, as is often the case with Fichte, the arguments are too formal and the distinctions too wiredrawn, yet the general idea is nobly conceived and carried out.

  • In 1804 were also delivered the noble lectures entitled Grundziige des gegenwdrtigen Zeitalters (Characteristics of the Present Age, 1804), containing a most admirable analysis of the Aufkltirung, tracing the position of such a movement of thought in the natural evolution of the general human consciousness, pointing out its inherent defects, and indicating as the ultimate goal of progress the life of reason in its highest aspect as a belief in the divine order of the universe.

  • How this act of op-positing is possible and necessary, only becomes clear in the practical philosophy, and even there the inherent difficulty leads to a higher view.

  • Its inherent defect - that the products of combustion were invariably heavier than the original substance instead of less as the theory demanded - was ignored, and until late in the 18th century it dominated chemical thought.

  • The essence of his views is contained in the following passage, which he follows up with the conclusion "that one and the same kind of living filaments is and has been the cause of all organic life": "Would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind, - would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which the great First Cause endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!"

  • SACRAMENT, in religion, a property or rite defined in the Anglican catechism as " an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace"; if the grace be allowed to be inherent in the external symbolic thing or act as well as in the faithful who receive or do it, this definition holds good not only for the Latin Church, but for more primitive religions as well.

  • by their own inherent virtue; others that they produce them ex opere operantis, i.e.

  • He therefore inclines to the opinion that there is no inherent virtue in sacramentals, but that God is moved by the prayers uttered in their consecration to produce salutary effects in those who use them.

  • Indeed, he gloried in the inherent and divine unreasonableness of Christianity, and brutally denounced reason as a cunning fool, " a pretty harlot."

  • But catholicity of feeling is inherent in the congregational idea of the church, inasmuch as it knows no valid use of the term intermediate between the local unit of habitual Christian fellowship and the church universal.

  • The typical speeches in Chronicles are of little value for the periods to which they relate, and where they are inconsistent with the evidence from earlier writings or contain inherent improbabilities are scarcely of historical worth.

  • The Siamese alphabet consists of 44 consonants, in each of which the vowel sound" aw "is inherent, and of 32 vowels all marked not by individual letters, but by signs written above, below, before or after the consonant in connexion with which they are to be pronounced.

  • The vowel signs have no sound by themselves, but act upon the vowel sound" aw "inherent in the consonants, converting it into" a," i," o," ee," ow,"&c. Each of the signs has a name, and some of them produce modulations so closely resembling those made by another that at the present day they are scarcely to be distinguished apart.

  • It is true that even by the most thorough-going allegorists the literal sense of Scripture was not openly and entirely disregarded; but the very fact that the study of Hebrew was never more than exceptional, and so early ceased to be cultivated at all, is eloquent of indifference to the original literal sense, and the very principle of the many meanings inherent in the sacred writings was hostile to sound interpretation; greater importance was attached to the " deeper " or " hidden " senses, i.e.

  • Inherent in this view of religious development and the new critical position were far-reaching changes in the literary, historical and religious criticism of the Old Testament: these have been gradually rendered clear as the fundamental positions on which they rest have been secured by the manifold work of two generations of scholars.

  • For instance, at starting, it will not be enough for us simply to tell the story how the Books of the New Testament came to be written, but we shall have to point out what there was about them which fitted them to be what they afterwards became, what inherent qualities they possessed which suggested the estimate ultimately put upon them; in others words, how they came to be not only a collection of Christian books, but a collection of Christian sacred books, or part of a Bible.

  • Even in the case of the two more important epistles, i Peter and James, we have to add the qualification " if genuine," but rather perhaps because of the persistence with which they are challenged than because of inherent defect of attestation.

  • authoritative character which is felt to be inherent in our sense of right and wrong - for what Butler calls the "supremacy of conscience."

  • Every act of every person has not only a moral value producing merit or demerit, but also an inherent power which works out its fitting reward or punishment.

  • He compares it also to the change of Moses' rod into a snake, of the Nile into blood, to the virtue inherent in Elijah's mantle or in the wood of the cross or in the clay mixt of dust and the Lord's spittle, or in Elisha's relics which raised a corpse to life, or in the burning bush.

  • The distinction, however, is one for which survivors alone are responsible and not one inherent in the nature of ghosts.

  • In some places this is because the regions where they occur have net been carefully studied since the subdivision into Archeozoic and Proterozoic was made, and in others because of the inherent difficulty of separation, as where the Proterozoic rocks are highly metamorphosed.

  • The powers of a state are inherent, not delegated, and each retains all such rights and functions of an independent government as it has not, by entering the Union, affirmatively divested itself of in favor of the Federal government.

  • To what the remaining difference was due it is difficult to say with certitude; there are some who argue that the tendency of prices to fall is inherent, and that the constant whittling away of intermediaries' profits is sufficient explanation, while bi-metallists have maintained that the phenomenon is clearly to be traced to the action of the German government in demonetizing silver in 1872.

  • " Substance," says he (chap. 5), " which is properly, primarily and especially so called, is that which is neither a predicate of a subject nor inherent in a subject; for example, a particular man, or a particular horse.

  • the quality of colour) are inherent in, some individual substance such as a particular man.

  • It is true that the work gives only a negative definition of the inherent, namely, that it does not inhere as a part and cannot exist apart from that in which it inheres (1 a 24-25), and it admits that what is inherent may sometimes also be a predicate (chap. 5, 2 a 27-34).

  • The commentators explain this to mean that an attribute as individual is inherent, as universal is a predicate.

  • But even so the Categories concludes that everything is either a predicate of, or inherent in, a substance; and the view that this colour belongs to this substance only in the sense of being in it, not of it, leaves the impression that, like a Platonic form, it is an entity rather in than of an individual substance, though even in the Categories Aristotle is careful to deny its separability.

  • the Categories earlier than some parts of the Metaphysics, because under the influence of Platonic forms it talks of inherent attributes, and allows secondary substances which are universal; the De Interpretatione earlier than the Analytics, because in it the Platonic analysis of the sentence into noun and verb is retained for the proposition; the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia earlier than the Nicomachean Ethics, because they are rudimentary sketches of it, and the one written rather in the theological spirit, the other rather in the dialectical style, of Plato; and the Rhetoric to Alexander earlier than the Rhetoric, because it contains a rudimentary theory of the rational evidences afterwards developed into a logic of rhetoric in the Rhetoric and Analytics.

  • Although the information which has been brought to bear upon Egyptian life and customs substantiates the general accuracy of the local colouring in some of the biblical narratives, the latter contain several inherent improbabilities, and whatever future research may yield, no definite trace of Egyptian influence has so far been found in Israelite institutions.

  • Thus he came to the conclusion that the malady had been inherent in many successive generations of the silkworm, and that the epidemic condition was only an exaggeration of a normal state brought about by the method of cultivation and production of graine pursued.

  • The " balance of power," which has played in the history of modern Europe such an important part, is inherent in the notion of the independence and stability of states.

  • The differences disappear as the inherent identity of structure predominates in an everincreasing degree, and in the final unity Man is merged in God.

  • Peter's foreign tour had more than ever convinced him of the inherent superiority of the foreigner.

  • 18), and the life or soul inherent in these passed into the stone.

  • Haeckel answers that it has no origin, because sensation is an inherent property of all substance.

  • He believes that mind and soul are inherent attributes of all bodies.

  • The disease was inherent in the body politic. Each pope, confronted by the spectre of Ne p otism.

  • The dual position of the pope, as supreme head of the Church on earth and as a minor Italian prince, was destined to break down through its inherent contradiction; it was the task of Pius IX.

  • The consonants, 30 in number, which are deemed to possess an inherent sound a, are the following: ka, k'a, ga, nga, ea, ca, ja, nya, ta, t'a, da, na, pa, p'a, ba, ma, tsa, ts'a, dza, wa, z'a, za, 'ha, ya, ra, la, s'a, sa, ha, a; the so-called Sanskrit cerebrals are represented by the letters ta, t'a, da, na, s'a, turned the other way.

  • Partial albinism in this case was undoubtedly correlated with some inherent constitutional defect, in virtue of which the individuals characterized by it were injuriously affected by the juices of a plant quite innocuous to their pigmented brethren.

  • We may assume that increased stature and breadth imply some sort of inherent physical superiority, and if such an assumption is valid we have in man evidence that albinism is correlated not with constitutional defectiveness but with greater perfectness.

  • General Arthur refused to resign on the ground that to retire "under fire" would be to acknowledge wrong-doing, and claimed that as the abuses were inherent in a widespread system he should not be made to bear the responsibility alone.

  • He saw clearly the inherent defects of the existing federation, and he wished to remedy a system which was so complicated as to be at times almost unworkable.

  • With Locke, Hume professes to regard this problem as virtually covered or answered by the fundamental psychological theorem; but the superior clearness of his reply enables us to mark with perfect precision the nature of the difficulty inherent in the attempt to regard the two as identical.

  • Beyond all question Hume, in endeavouring to answer this problem, is brought face to face with one of the difficulties inherent in his conception of conscious experience.

  • If the inherent energy of the principle of population (supposed everywhere the same) is measured by the rate at which numbers increase under the most favourable circumstances, surely the force of less favourable circumstances, acting through prudential or altruistic motives,, is measured by the great difference between this maximum rate and those which are observed to prevail in most European countries.

  • The term fetish is commonly understood to mean the worship of or respect for material, inanimate objects, conceived as magically active from a virtue inherent in them, temporarily or permanently, which does not arise from the fact that a god or spirit is believed to reside in them or communicate virtue to them.

  • - Whilst in the East Hellenism had been sustained by the political supremacy of the Greeks, in Italy Graecia capta had only the inherent power and charm of her culture wherewith to win her way.

  • God is to him an absolute despot, who declares a thing right or wrong from no inherent necessity but by his arbitrary fiat.

  • In the first instance, as following upon conquest or potential conquest, the Fulani emirs who were appointed by government to each of the great native states were installed under a letter of appointment in which (in addition to rights of legislation, taxation and other powers inherent in suzerainty) the ultimate title to all land was transferred from the Fulani dynasty and vested in the British.

  • The existing assessment, made before the British occupation, had long been condemned by all competent authorities, but the inherent intricacies and difficulties of the problem had hitherto postponed a solution.

  • The mere recitation of such similar cases with their happy issue was supposed to be magically effective; for almost unlimited power was supposed to be inherent in mere words.

  • The wave of change (nervous impulse) induced in a neuron by advent of a stimulus is after all only a sudden augmentation of an activity continuous within the neuron - a transient accentuation of one (the disintegrative) phase of the metabolism inherent in and inseparable from its life.

  • They may roughly be summed up under two heads: the inherent weakness of an elective monarchy, and the absence of that public spirit which is based on the intimate alliance of ruler and ruled.

  • The high temperature necessary to fuse cement clinker makes this process difficult to accomplish commercially, but it has many inherent merits and may be the process of the future, displacing the rotatory method.

  • Failure from inherent vice in the cement has been already touched on; it can always be traced to want of skill and care in manufacture.

  • Thus he allowed the necessity of good works to salvation, but not in the old sense; proposed to allow the seven sacraments, but only as rites which had no inherent efficacy to salvation, and so on.

  • Robert Chambers, in the once famous Vestiges of Creation, interested and shocked his contemporaries by his denial of the fixity of species and his insistence on creation by progressive evolution, but had no better theory of the cause of variation than to suppose that organisms - "from the simplest and oldest to the highest and most recent" were possessed of "an inherent impulse, imparted by the Almighty both to advance them from the several grades and modify their structure as circumstances required."

  • Later on, the right of creating patricians came to be regarded as inherent in the principate, and was exercised by Claudius and Vespasian without any legal enactment, apparently in their capacity as censor (Tac. Ann.

  • A candidate who obtains only 50% of the marks in performing such operations cannot be regarded as being able to perform them; and, if the examination is to be treated as a test of his capacity to perform them, he should be rejected unless he obtains full marks, less a certain allowance (say 10, or at most 20%) in view of the more or less artificial conditions inherent in all examinations.

  • These errors are not peculiar to the examination system, they are inherent in all human judgments.

  • Thus Greek words are transliterated, as " chedrio " from KEBp6 w, " heremus "from €pmios; Greek idioms are reproduced, as " usque nos duci captivos," _ fws rou npas aixuaXwrw05vac, and retranslation into Greek is frequently necessary in order to correct the misrenderings of the translator or the corruptions already inherent in the Greek.

  • There appears to be no inherent reason F why this should be so.

  • This Lowering Of The Minimum Was Probably Due To Some Constant Errors Inherent In Their Method Of Experiment.

  • In both cases no extraneous cause can be assigned; the period seems to be inherent in the star itself and not to be determined by the revolution of a satellite (no variability of the line-of-sight motion of Mira has been found, so that it is probably not accompanied by any large companion).

  • Even so the inference to the a priori ground of its necessity is, it has been often pointed out, subject to the limitation inherent in any process of reduction, in any regress, that is, from conditionate to condition, viz.

  • Modern scientific research has vividly illustrated the stereotyped nature of the human mind; there is a general similarity in the effect of similar phenomena upon people at a similar stage of mental growth; there is an almost inherent or unconscious belief which has been transmitted through the countless ages of man's history.

  • The inherent viciousness of these expedients had, however, not as yet been revealed by their inevitable results, and Mehemet Ali in the eyes of the world was at once the most enlightened and the most powerful of the sultan's valis.

  • Missions in Asia too have achieved sufficient success to prove that there exists no inherent obstacle either in the gospel or in the Asiatic mind.

  • In the most perfect form of federation the states agree to delegate to a supreme federal government certain powers or functions inherent in themselves in their sovereign or separate capacity, and the federal government, in turn, in the exercise of those specific powers acts directly, not only on the communities making up the federation, but on each individual citizen.

  • Its almost complete absence in some of these works makes for monotony and produces a sense of dullness, which may not be inherent in all the details of the music, but is none the less distinctly present.

  • inherent power, or nature), beyond that there was nothing whatever.

  • The sweetness of the sweet sherries is partly due to an inherent property of the wine (apart from any sugar they may contain) and partly to natural or added sugar.

  • It is the note of every great religious reformer, Moses, Buddha, Paul, Mani, Mahomet, St Francis, Luther, to enlighten and direct it to higher aims, substituting a true personal holiness for a ritual purity or taboo, which at the best was viewed as a kind of physical condition and contagion, inherent as well in things and animals as in man.

  • Hence the rule not to eat meats strangled, except in sacramental meals when the god inherent in the animal was partaken of.

  • Lastly, the true form is such that it deduces the given nature from some source of being which is inherent in more natures, and which is better known in the natural order of things than the form itself."

  • 1 From this it would appear that, since by a nature is meant some sensible quality, superinduced upon, or possessed by, a body, so by a form we are to understand the cause of that nature, which cause is itself a determinate case or manifestation of some general or abstract quality inherent in a greater number of objects.

  • No remonstrances on the part of the queen, of Pole or the English clergy could induce the pope to withdraw his sentence except to declare that the cardinal still held the position of legatus natus inherent in the primatial see.

  • Jevons (in An Introduction to the History of Religion, vii.) distinguishes between " things taboo," which have the mystic contagion inherent in them, and " things tabooed," to which the taboo-infection has been transmitted.

  • Although we have here nothing to do with mixed races, yet the want of fertility in these has been often taken to be a fact inherent in the mongrel race, and has been also sometimes held to prove that neither the European nor his half-bred offspring can maintain themselves in the tropics.

  • Plainly it might, time being given; for one cannot doubt that the inherent adaptability is the same in both, or (if not) that the white man possesses it in a higher degree.

  • Hence the terms Utopia and Utopian are also used to denote any visionary scheme of reform or social theory, especially those which fail to recognize defects inherent in human nature.

  • His Atland (or Atlantika) appeared in four folio volumes, in Latin and Swedish, in 1675-1698; it was an attempt to summon all the authority of the past, all the sages of Greece and the bards of Iceland, to prove the inherent and indisputable greatness of the Swedish nation, in which the fabulous Atlantis had been at last discovered.

  • Merriman, of " the inherent rottenness " of the Kruger regime.

  • The convention parliament had been dissolved on the 2 9 th of December 1660, and Charles's first parliament, the Long Parliament of the Restoration, which met on the 8th of May 1661 and continued till January 1679, declared the command of the forces inherent in the crown, repudiated the taking up of arms against the king, and repealed in 1664 the Triennial Act, adding only a provision that there should not be intermission of parliaments for more than three years.

  • Religion is, therefore, not political in origin; it is an inherent part of existence.

  • The most real realities to Plato and Aristotle had been thought and the objects of thought, vows and vomit, whether abstracted from sensibles or inherent in " matter," as the incognizable basis of all concrete existence.

  • The relation of the soul of the universe to God is quite clear: it is an inherent property, a mode of His activity, an effluence or emanation from the fiery ether which surrounds the universe, penetrating and permeating it.

  • We have no distinct proof that there occurs in active immunity any education of the phagocytes, in Metchnikoff's sense, that is, any increase of the inherent ingestive or digestive activity of these cells.

  • The inherent weakness of the government, the vigour and eloquence of his opposition, and a series of military disasters abroad combined to rouse a public feeling of indignation which could not be withstood, and in December 1756 Pitt, who now sat for Okehampton, became secretary of state, and leader of the Commons under the premiership of the duke of Devonshire.

  • Their number varies from ten to a hundred; and it is uncertain whether the honour is inherent in the abbacy of certain of the greatest cloisters, or whether the Dalai Lama exercises the right of choosing them.

  • 652) to Liutprand (712-744) the Lombard kings, succeeding one another in the irregular fashion of the time, sometimes by descent, sometimes by election, sometimes by conspiracy and violence, strove fitfully to enlarge their boundaries, and contended with the aristocracy of dukes inherent in the original organization of the nation, an element which, though much weakened, always embarrassed the power of the crown, and checked the unity of the nation.

  • It was tacitly assumed that the townsmen had no inherent rights, but only such privileges as might be granted them by their sovereign with the consent of the nobles and knights.

  • The loss in quicksilver is small, as there is no chemical loss inherent in the process; the yield is relatively high, but the bullion is liable to be low-grade, on account of copper being precipitated and amalgamated.

  • It is now certain that there has ever been an inherent tendency in man, allowing for difference of climate and material surroundings, to develop culture by the :same stages and in the same way.

  • The immaterial in man is the expansive force inherent in him.

  • The inherent difficulties of this task were immensely enhanced by the fact that Euler was virtually blind, and had to carry all the elaborate computations it involved in his memory.

  • Decay is inherent in all component things.

  • They next took advantage of the decay of the kingdom of Gujarat to occupy Chaul (1531), Bassein with its dependencies, including Bombay (1534), Diu (1535) and Daman (1559) But the inherent vices of their intolerant system undermined their power, even before their Dutch and English rivals appeared on the scene.

  • The decisions of the law were executed by the persons concerned, supported by a highly organized and disciplined public opinion springing from honour and interest and inherent in the solidarity of the clan.

  • But the inherent difficulties of the kings position were not thereby overcome.

  • This theory makes a fundamental distinction between the supreme jurisdiction in ecclesiastical matters (Kirchenhoheit or jus circa sacra), which it conceives as inherent in the power of the state in respect of every religious communion, and the ecclesiastical power (Kirchengewalt or jus in sacra) inherent in the church, but in some cases vested in the state by tacit or expressed consent of the ecclesiastical body.

  • This, the "insular" theory, in spite of its inherent probability, has hitherto been at a disadvantage through lack of positive evidence, but in a recently acquired MS. of the British Museum, Add.

  • Is His mercy not as inherent as His justice?

  • St Augustine was, perhaps, the first thinker to face, though not to solve, the true theological and moral difficulty inherent in Christian thought.

  • Nevertheless there is a sense in which moral philosophy may be said to originate out of difficulties inherent in the nature of morality itself, although it remains true that the questions which ethics attempts to answer are never questions with which the moral consciousness as such is confronted.

  • Anselm further softens the statement of Augustinian predestinationism by explaining that the freedom to will is not strictly lost even by fallen man; it is inherent in a rational nature, though since Adam's sin it only exists potentially in humanity, except where it is made actual by grace.

  • For the difficulty all men meet with in realizing goodness, or in being moral, is not in itself evidence of an inherent contradiction in the nature of goodness as such.

  • The likeness of the sun to the stars has been shown by the spectroscope to be profound and inherent.

  • His labours on Epicurus have a certain historical value, but the want of consistency inherent in the philosophical system raised on Epicureanism is such as to deprive it of genuine worth.

  • The gods are not always even credited with inherent immortality.

  • When the missionaries of other Roman Catholic orders made their way into China, twenty years later, they found great fault with the manner in which certain Chinese practices had been dealt with by the Jesuits, a matter in which Ricci's action and policy had given the tone to the mission in China - though in fact that tone was rather inherent in the Jesuit system than the outcome of individual character, for controversies of an exactly parallel nature arose two generations later in southern India, between the Jesuits and Capuchins, regarding what were called "Malabar rites."

  • But undermining forces were already at work: the faults inherent in his unwieldy achievement.

  • In crystals the rotary property appears to be sometimes inherent in the crystalline arrangement of the molecules, as it is lost on fusion or solution, and in several cases belongs to enantiomorphous crystals, the two correlated forms of which are the one right-handed and the other left-handed optically as well as crystallographically, this being necessarily the case if the property be retained when the crystal is fused or dissolved.

  • was indeed ferocious, but such actions as the murder of his greatuncle, Don Juan El Tuertothe distorted in body and mind did not seem to his subjects more than the exercise by the prince of that right to act for the good of the state legibus solutus which is inherent in sovereignty.

  • The latter are thus no mere representations, but as it were emanations from the archetype, vehicles of the supernatural personality represented, and possessed of an inherent sacramental value and power, such as the name of Jesus had for the earliest believers.

  • Apart from causes inherent in the particular case of each company, which necessitates their being examined separately, recent experience leads us to lay down certain general principles regarding them.

  • During the two critical years which followed the withdrawal of Leicester, it was the statesmanship of the advocate which kept the United Provinces from falling asunder through their own inherent separatist tendencies, and prevented them from becoming an easy conquest to the formidable army of Alexander of Parma.

  • While I was dumbfounded, inherent pragmatism caused me to further prompt.

  • While he wanted to avoid further involvement in Edith Shipton's troubled world, he felt proud of his wife inherent sense of compassion toward anyone in trouble.

  • Few can discern the meanings inherent within a dream world.

  • The NGOs may well prove invaluable in overcoming the limitations inherent in international organizations that are comprised of sovereign states.

  • The many questions that arose from the initial study, together with the assessments required, illustrates the complexities inherent in identifying appropriate projects.

  • There are inherent contradictions in the new labor policy in relation to the real experiences of young people.

  • It was his inherent jurisdiction.

  • There was an inherent weakness in the design.

  • There was an inherent limitation, to the extent of reliance on the work of others from the start.

  • That is the inherent danger of trying to tap into talents or strengths where none exist.

  • There are inherent flaws in the present system of county taxes.

  • What the British lack is a joie de vivre, or a sense of humor that is so inherent among Zimbabweans living there.

  • That is inherent in capitalism.

  • That problem is inherent in nature.

  • That issue is inherent in concepts of special education.

  • That problem is inherent in the discipline and process of creating of fresh expressions of loyalty.

  • It is inherent in every human being.

  • Those kinds of but it isn't Derek barch Aaron inherent within professional.

  • But there is an inherent absurdity when you try to take a compliant approach.

  • affirms the inherent goodness of the world and its people as creations of G-d.

  • However, potatoes also contain a number of other inherent toxicants such as tropane alkaloids, terpenoids, saponins, protease inhibitors and lectins.

  • The system always allows the user to cater for the inherent ambiguity in its Level 1 sources.

  • Two mutually antagonistic philosophies were always inherent in the creation of the internal market.

  • antithetical position to Roche, Austen assumes the critical stance inherent in Radcliffean Gothic, emphasizing the chimerical nature of sensibility.

  • Augustine quot the the inherent synergies.

  • avoid the lengthy delivery times inherent in buying an import.

  • Black Spots Usually cosmetic blemishes in the image which are inherent in the production process.

  • caller convenience against wireless subscribers ' inherent concerns over privacy.

  • Composition was assumed to be of a neat natural cement with an inherent brown mineral coloration.

  • The risk inherent in any notion of war in space of a " tragedy of the commons " is utterly compelling.

  • The use of viewpoints is widely advocated for managing the inherent complexity in enterprise architecture.

  • These barriers include: the inherent conservatism of the pharmaceutical profession.

  • The research explored the inherent contradictions of New Labor policy in relation to the real experiences of young people.

  • convenience against wireless subscribers ' inherent concerns over privacy.

  • The Cellular Telephone and Internet Association (CTIA) must balance caller convenience against wireless subscribers ' inherent concerns over privacy.

  • cope with the inherent uncertainty involved with innovation.

  • currency overlay is the management of the foreign exchange risk inherent in a portfolio of foreign assets.

  • The young people recognized the inherent danger of being overlooked, bullied or not achieving their potential.

  • Derek barch Aaron inherent within professional.

  • Let us continue to strive to act in ways that reaffirm the inherent dignity of every person regardless of faith.

  • Behavior blockers have another inherent disadvantage; they are unable to combat conceptually new malicious programs.

  • Historically, the court has authorized disclosure beyond these restrictions and/or imposed additional restrictions in the exercise of its inherent jurisdiction.

  • However the inherent drawback with single candles is that pause between each shot.

  • Do you think that film therefore goes some way to diluting an intellectual elitism that is inherent in the reading of literature?

  • elucidateaff will present a slide show elucidating the problems inherent in the global food system and the benefits of rebuilding local food links.

  • epigenetic instability inherent to embryonic stem cells lines may also be a factor in the failure of cloning from such cells.

  • So you are back to using estradiol itself with all of the inherent problems there.

  • However Reverse Therapy has never set out to find scientific evidence of the chemical problems inherent in the conditions.

  • examine the tensions inherent in community care as it was delivered in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

  • This honest mistake, however, resulted from the inherent failings of Wales ' own creation.

  • In his opinion the UK Government's means-tested benefits provided an appropriate solution to the inherent flaws in the present system of Council Tax.

  • give flawed advice inherent within professional.

  • Judaism affirms the inherent goodness of the world and its people as creations of G-d.

  • hijacked by every dissident group who wishes to prove the injustices inherent in the past government of the Highlands.

  • hindered by the difficulties inherent in acquiring the means and the skills to create a nuclear weapon.

  • illusory security which may be inherent with a protected subsystem.

  • Likewise, the inherent ' cover ' for an illicit program in legitimate activity makes differentiation much more imprecise.

  • inaccuracy there are inherent inaccuracies in this calculation.

  • In fact, although the AfH approach uses sustainable material and renewable energy, its inherent ' greenness ' is largely incidental.

  • In essence, using inductors is not an issue apart from the inherent characteristic - the current flowing through them lags the voltage injected.

  • Furthermore, violence and retribution are shown as inherent in the illness itself and thus inescapable.

  • It has, however, highlighted the difficulties inherent in this process.

  • It is high time that studies should be undertaken to explore the intricacies inherent in such contingencies.

  • We'd be tempted to pay a little extra and avoid the lengthy delivery times inherent in buying an import.

  • A forbearing of events to come reflects parental anxiety inherent in the circumstances of birth, providing an apt background for what follows.

  • I think the most important ideas in that song were already inherent in it before we recorded it.

  • Points of interest 1. Amendment of pleadings; Registrar's inherent jurisdiction.

  • The proletariat cannot become the liberator of society without grasping and fighting for the positive resolution of all contradictions inherent in it.

  • Despite the inherent limitations of concert films, Sign o ' the Times is conceptually strong and visually riveting.

  • United Kingdom courts possess an inherent jurisdiction to assist foreign liquidators / trustees, which remains unaffected by section 426.

  • The co-operative way runs counter to the merger mania inherent in global capitalism.

  • Features on topics are hidden from the inherent synergies already onboard lineup.

  • overcomeOs may well prove invaluable in overcoming the limitations inherent in international organizations that are comprised of sovereign states.

  • Another important advantage of direct mapped cache is its inherent parallelism.

  • Minimum raw material usage is inherent in single ply.

  • He should look upon his accomplished tasks as of inherent dignity independent of the monetary recompense to be received.

  • reconcile the inherent tensions therein.

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