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inflorescence

inflorescence

inflorescence Sentence Examples

  • high, which is usually leafless with a terminal branched inflorescence.

  • The Monandreae have been subdivided into twenty-eight tribes, the characters of which are based on the structure of the anther and pollinia, the nature of the inflorescence, whether terminal or lateral, the vernation of the leaf and the presence or absence of a joint between blade and sheath, and the nature of the stem.

  • A characteristic feature is the one-sided (dorsiventral) inflorescence, well illustrated in forget-me-not and other species of Myosotis; the cyme is at first closely coiled, becoming uncoiled as the flowers open.

  • - (I) Inflorescence of Forget-me-not; (2) ripe fruits.

  • A flower dissected and gummed on the sheets will often retain the colour which it is impossible to preserve in a crowded inflorescence.

  • size); of the rubber ex1 ported is still ob2, section of inflorescence (2 nat.

  • The flowers are arranged in racemes without bracts; during the life of the flower its stalk continues to grow so that the open flowers of an inflorescence stand on a level (that is, are corymbose).

  • Anthericum and Chlorophytum, herbs with radical often grass-like leaves and scapes bearing a more or less branched inflorescence of small generally white flowers, are widely spread in the tropics.

  • The plants grow from a bulb or short rhizome; the inflorescence is an apparent umbel formed of several shortened monochasial cymes and subtended by a pair of large bracts.

  • Bulbous plants with a terminal racemose inflorescence; the anthers open introrsely and the capsule is loculicidal.

  • Inflorescence, nat.

  • End of branch of inflorescence slightly enlarged.

  • The small inconspicuous flowers are generally more or less crowded in terminal or lateral clusters, the form of the inflorescence varying widely according to the manner of branching and the length of the pedicels.

  • There are numerous transitional states between the ordinary form of tendril and the inflorescence.

  • Foliage, tendril and inflorescence, reduced.

  • Each podium consists of a portion of the stem bearing one or more leaves, each with an axillary bud or buds, and terminating in a tendril or an inflorescence.

  • The tendril or inflorescence, according to the views above explained, though in reality terminal, is bent to one side; hence it appears to be lateral and opposite to the leaf.

  • This new podium, now in a direct line with its predecessor, produces leaves and ends in its turn in a tendril or inflorescence.

  • Other authorities explain the formation of the tendril and its anomalous position opposite to a leaf by supposing that the end of the stem bifurcates during growth, one division forming the shoot, the other the tendril or inflorescence.

  • The small flowers or spikelets are borne in pairs on the ultimate branches of a much branched feathery plume-like terminal grey inflorescence, 2 ft.

  • The inflorescence is a very simple one, consisting of one or two male flowers each comprising a single stamen, and a female flower comprising a flask-shaped pistil.

  • 3, Inflorescence containing two 4, Wolffia arrhiza.

  • Leaves and inflorescence.

  • These are followed by the inflorescence, a fleshy spadix bearing in the lower part numerous closely crowded simple unisexual flowers and continued above into a purplish or yellowish appendage; the spadix is enveloped by a leafy spathe, constricted in the lower part to form a chamber, in which are the flowers.

  • The flowers, which are generally arranged in a cymose inflorescence, are hermaphrodite, hypogynous, and, except in Pelargoniums, regular.

  • Any sudden decrease of warmth would be very prejudicial to the progress of vegetation through the successive stages of foliation, inflorescence and fructification.

  • Hardy bulbs of the garlic family, some species of which are ornamental; the inflorescence is umbellate.

  • high, above which towards autumn rise the bold dense silvery plumes of the inflorescence.

  • Pretty plants with broad, radical leaves, and a muchbranched inflorescence of numerous small flowers.

  • They do well in light, well-drained soils, and have a close family resemblance, the inflorescence being a panicle of white, drooping, tulip-shaped flowers, and the foliage rosulate, sword-shaped and spear-pointed.

  • Cordaites, a tall plant (20-30 ft.) with yucca-like leaves, was related to the cycads and conifers; the catkin-like inflorescence, which bore yew-like berries, is called Cardiocarpus.

  • Such a branch-system is called an inflorescence.

  • plenissima, in which the brilliant inflorescence is branched, is as brilliant as the type, and keeps long in flower.

  • 2 shows a branch of the terminal male inflorescence.

  • 4 is a spike of the female inflorescence, protected by the sheaths of leaves - the blades being also present.

  • 5 is a spikelet of the female inflorescence, consisting of two outer glumes, the lower one ciliated, which enclose two florets - one (a) barren (sometimes fertile), consisting of a flowering glume and pale only, and the other (b) fertile, containing the pistil with elongated style.

  • - Partial inflorescence of Cyperus longus (Galingale), slightly reduced.

  • - Inflorescence of Cotton-grass (Eriophorum polystachion), about a nat.

  • During the development of the inflorescence there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flowerstalk.

  • 2, Branch of inflorescence, 4 nat.

  • The inflorescence is of a cymose character, the terminal branch being represented by the tendril, the side branches by flower-stalks, or the inflorescence may be reduced to a single stalk.

  • Inflorescence.

  • Bracts of a more general character subtending branches C' of the inflorescence are singularly rare in Gramineae, in marked contrast with Cyperaceae, where they are so conspicuous.

  • It is closed except at the apex, and contains the female spikelet, the stalks of the male inflorescence and the long styles emerging through the small apical orifice.

  • Any number of spikelets may compose the inflorescence, and their arrangement is very various.

  • Every variety of racemose and paniculate inflorescence obtains, and the number of spikelets composing those of the large kinds is often immense.

  • Rarely the inflorescence consists of very few flowers; thus Lygeum Spartum, the most anomalous of European grasses, has but two or three large uniflorous spikelets, which are fused together at the base, and have no basal glumes, but are enveloped in a large, hooded, spathe-like bract.

  • Various methods of scattering the: grain have been adopted, in which parts of the spikelet or inflorescence are concerned.

  • Less absolute characters, but generally trustworthy and more easily observed, are the feathery stigmas, the always distichous arrangement of the glumes, the usual absence of more general bracts in the inflorescence, the split leaf-sheaths, and the hollow, cylindrical, jointed culms - some .or all of which are wanting in all Cyperaceae.

  • No characters for main divisions can be obtained from the flower proper or fruit (with the exception of the character of the hilum), and it has therefore been found necessary to trust to characters derived from the usually less important inflorescence and bracts.

  • Spikelets unisexual, male and female in separate inflorescences or on different parts of the same inflorescence.

  • In Setaria and allied genera the spikelet is subtended by an involucre of bristles or spines which represent sterile branches of the inflorescence.

  • Phleum has a cylindrical spike-like inflorescence; P. pratense (timothy) is a valuable fodder grass, as also is Alopecurus pratensis (foxtail).

  • Another view is to regard the cone as an inflorescence, each carpellary scale being a bract bearing in its axil a shoot the axis of which has not been developed; the seminiferous scale is believed to represent either a single leaf or a fused pair of leaves belonging to the partially suppressed axillary shoot.

  • It may be that the interpretation of the female cone of the Abietineae as an inflorescence, which finds favour with many botanists, cannot be applied to the cones of Agathis and Araucaria.

  • The spike of an inflorescence bears whorls of flowers at each node in the axils of concrescent bracts accompanied by numerous sterile hairs (paraphyses); in a male inflorescence numerous flowers occur at each node, while in a female inflorescence the number of flowers at each node is much smaller.

  • structure, are of two types, complete and incomplete; the latter occur in association with male flowers in a male inflorescence.

  • An inflorescence has the form of a dichotomouslybranched cyme bearing small erect cones; those containing the female flowers attain the size of a fir-cone, and are scarlet in colour.

  • They are marshor water-plants with generally a stout stem (rhizome) creeping in the mud, radical leaves and a large, much branched inflorescence.

  • Erysiple graminis, a mildew of grasses, has caused great loss in various countries; Dilophia graminis sometimes causes deformities of the leaves and inflorescence; another somewhat similar fungus, Ophiobolus graminis, attacks the leaves and stalks near the ground, completely destroying the plants.

  • In general as regards their form and appearance they differ from ordinary leaves, the difference being greater in the upper than in the lower branches of an inflorescence.

  • They are sometimes mere scales or threads, and at other times are undeveloped, giving rise to the ebracteate inflorescence of Cruciferae and some Boraginaceae.

  • A series of empty coloured bracts terminates the inflorescence of Salvia Horminum.

  • The smaller bracts or bracteoles, which occur among the subdivisions of a branching inflorescence, often produce no flower-buds, and thus anomalies occur in the floral arrangements.

  • It is often associated with that form of inflorescence termed the spadix, and may be coloured, as in Anthuriuzn, or white, as in arum lily (Richardia aethiopica).

  • When the spadix is compound or branching, as in palms, there are smaller spathes, surrounding separate parts of the inflorescence.

  • The arrangement of the flowers on the axis, or the ramification of the floral axis, is called the inflorescence.

  • The primary axis of the inflorescence is sometimes called the rachis; its branches, whether terminal or lateral, which form the stalks supporting flowers or clusters of flowers, are peduncles, and if small branches are given off by it, they are called pedicels.

  • In describing a branching inflorescence, it is common to speak of the rachis as the primary floral axis, its branches as the secondary floral axes, their divisions as the tertiary floral axes, and so on; thus avoiding any confusion that might arise from the use of the terms rachis, peduncle and pedicel.

  • There are two distinct types of inflorescence - one in which the flowers arise as lateral shoots from a primary axis, which goes on elongating, and the lateral shoots never exceed in their development the length of the primary axis beyond their point of origin.

  • The inflorescence is simple and indeterminate, and the expansion of the flowers centripetal, those at the circumference opening first.

  • The flowers produced in this inflorescence are thus terminal.

  • The first kind of inflorescence is indeterminate, Here the axis is either elongated, FIG.

  • - Inflorescence of the Lime (Tilia platyphyllos) (nat.

  • The second kind of inflorescence is determinate, definite or terminal.

  • Thus the flowers are arranged in groups, and frequently very complicated forms of inflorescence result.

  • If the primary axis, in place of being elongated, is contracted, it gives rise to other forms of indefinite inflorescence.

  • This inflorescence is seen in hemlock and other allied plants, which are hence called umbelliferous.

  • - Plant of Ranunculus bulbosus, showing determinate inflorescence.

  • This inflorescence has been called a hypanthodium.

  • Again, there may be a raceme of capitula, that is, a group of capitula disposed in a racemose manner, as in Petasites, a raceme of umbels, as in ivy, and so on, all the forms of inflorescence being indefinite in disposition.

  • The simplest form of the definite type of the inflorescence is seen in Anemone nemorosa and in gentianella (Gentiana acaulis), where the axis terminates in a single flower, no other flowers being produced upon the plant.

  • This is a solitary terminal inflorescence.

  • The general name of cyme is applied to the arrangement of a group of flowers in a definite inflorescence.

  • A cymose inflorescence is an inflorescence where the primary floral axis before terminating in a flower gives off one or more lateral unifloral axes which repeat the process - the development being only limited by the vigour of the plant.

  • In the natural order Carophyllaceae (pink family) the dichasial form of inflorescence is very general.

  • carthusianorum, &c., in which the peduncles are short, and the flowers closely approximated, with a centrifugal expansion, the inflorescence has the form of a contracted dichasium, and receives the name of fascicle.

  • When the axes become very much shortened, the arrangement is more complicated in appearance, and the nature of the inflorescence can only be recognized by the order of opening of the flowers.

  • Sometimes, especially towards the summit of a dichasium, owing to the exhaustion of the growing power of the plant, only one of the bracts gives origin to a new axis, the other remaining empty; thus the inflorescence becomes unilateral, and further development is arrested.

  • - Cymose inflorescence (dichasium) of Cerastium collinum; t-t", successive axes.

  • The basal portion of the consecutive axes may become much thickened and arranged more or less in a straight line, ns and thus collectively form an apparent or false axis or sympodium, and the inflorescence thus simulates a raceme.

  • 19), the bracts when developed forming a second double row on the opposite side; the whole inflorescence usually curves on itself like a scorpion's tail, hence its name.

  • The false axis, a b c d, is formed by successive generations of unifloral axes, the flowers being arranged along one side alternately and in a double row; had the bracts been developed they would have formed a similar double row on the opposite side of the false axis; the whole inflorescence is represented as curved on itself.

  • The inflorescence in the family Boraginaceae are usually regarded as true scorpioid cymes.

  • Forms of inflorescence occur, in which both the definite and indefinite types are represented - mixed inflorescences.

  • So also in Labiatae, such as dead-nettle (Lamium), the different whorls of inflorescence are developed centripetally, while the florets of the verticillaster are centrifugal.

  • This mixed character presents difficulties in such cases as Labiatae, where the leaves, in place of retaining their ordinary form, become bracts, and thus might lead to the supposition of the whole series of flowers being one inflorescence.

  • In the privet (Ligustrum vulgare) there are numerous racemes of dichasia arranged in a racemose manner along an axis; the whole inflorescence thus has an appearance not unlike a bunch of grapes, and has been called a thyrsus.

  • Indefinite Centripetal Inflorescence.

  • Compound Indefinite Inflorescence.

  • Definite Centrifugal Inflorescence.

  • Compound Definite Inflorescence.

  • C. Mixed Inflorescence.

  • The inflorescence is usually a spike bearing lateral cones or catkins, arranged sometimes distichously, sometimes in a spiral order.

  • The morphology of the female inflorescence of Cordaiteae has not yet been cleared up, but Taxus and Ginkgo among recent plants appear to offer the nearest analogies.

  • Zingiber officinale blooms have a small green inflorescence with white and maroon flowers.

  • Narrow pale green/blue stiff leaves and produces a pale purple/pink inflorescence on terminal spikes, which can be used as cut flower.

  • The male inflorescence terminates on the uppermost spike branched arranged in a loose panicles.

  • inflorescence architecture in other herbaceous species.

  • inflorescence structure is unique in Cyperaceae but difficult to interpret due to its reduced nature.

  • Again, the curious distortions on the stems of nettles attacked by the Aecidium form of the heteroecious Puccina (]aricis (see FUNGf for Heteroecism), or on maize stems and leaves attacked by Ustilago Maydis, or on the inflorescence of crucifers infested with Cystopus, &c., are not individually very destructive; it is the cumulative effects of numerous attacks or of extensive epidemics which eventually tell.

  • high, which is usually leafless with a terminal branched inflorescence.

  • The Monandreae have been subdivided into twenty-eight tribes, the characters of which are based on the structure of the anther and pollinia, the nature of the inflorescence, whether terminal or lateral, the vernation of the leaf and the presence or absence of a joint between blade and sheath, and the nature of the stem.

  • A characteristic feature is the one-sided (dorsiventral) inflorescence, well illustrated in forget-me-not and other species of Myosotis; the cyme is at first closely coiled, becoming uncoiled as the flowers open.

  • - (I) Inflorescence of Forget-me-not; (2) ripe fruits.

  • A flower dissected and gummed on the sheets will often retain the colour which it is impossible to preserve in a crowded inflorescence.

  • size); of the rubber ex1 ported is still ob2, section of inflorescence (2 nat.

  • The flowers are arranged in racemes without bracts; during the life of the flower its stalk continues to grow so that the open flowers of an inflorescence stand on a level (that is, are corymbose).

  • Anthericum and Chlorophytum, herbs with radical often grass-like leaves and scapes bearing a more or less branched inflorescence of small generally white flowers, are widely spread in the tropics.

  • The plants grow from a bulb or short rhizome; the inflorescence is an apparent umbel formed of several shortened monochasial cymes and subtended by a pair of large bracts.

  • It contains 22 genera, the largest of which Allium has about 250 species-7 are British; Agapanthus or African lily is a well-known garden plant; in Gagea, a genus of small bulbous herbs found in most parts of Europe, the inflorescence is reduced to a few flowers or a single flower; G.

  • Bulbous plants with a terminal racemose inflorescence; the anthers open introrsely and the capsule is loculicidal.

  • Inflorescence, nat.

  • End of branch of inflorescence slightly enlarged.

  • The small inconspicuous flowers are generally more or less crowded in terminal or lateral clusters, the form of the inflorescence varying widely according to the manner of branching and the length of the pedicels.

  • There are numerous transitional states between the ordinary form of tendril and the inflorescence.

  • Foliage, tendril and inflorescence, reduced.

  • Each podium consists of a portion of the stem bearing one or more leaves, each with an axillary bud or buds, and terminating in a tendril or an inflorescence.

  • The tendril or inflorescence, according to the views above explained, though in reality terminal, is bent to one side; hence it appears to be lateral and opposite to the leaf.

  • This new podium, now in a direct line with its predecessor, produces leaves and ends in its turn in a tendril or inflorescence.

  • Other authorities explain the formation of the tendril and its anomalous position opposite to a leaf by supposing that the end of the stem bifurcates during growth, one division forming the shoot, the other the tendril or inflorescence.

  • The small flowers or spikelets are borne in pairs on the ultimate branches of a much branched feathery plume-like terminal grey inflorescence, 2 ft.

  • The inflorescence is a very simple one, consisting of one or two male flowers each comprising a single stamen, and a female flower comprising a flask-shaped pistil.

  • 3, Inflorescence containing two 4, Wolffia arrhiza.

  • Leaves and inflorescence.

  • These are followed by the inflorescence, a fleshy spadix bearing in the lower part numerous closely crowded simple unisexual flowers and continued above into a purplish or yellowish appendage; the spadix is enveloped by a leafy spathe, constricted in the lower part to form a chamber, in which are the flowers.

  • The male inflorescence is often a pendulous catkin, as in hazel and many native English trees (fig.

  • The flowers, which are generally arranged in a cymose inflorescence, are hermaphrodite, hypogynous, and, except in Pelargoniums, regular.

  • Any sudden decrease of warmth would be very prejudicial to the progress of vegetation through the successive stages of foliation, inflorescence and fructification.

  • Hardy bulbs of the garlic family, some species of which are ornamental; the inflorescence is umbellate.

  • high, above which towards autumn rise the bold dense silvery plumes of the inflorescence.

  • Pretty plants with broad, radical leaves, and a muchbranched inflorescence of numerous small flowers.

  • They do well in light, well-drained soils, and have a close family resemblance, the inflorescence being a panicle of white, drooping, tulip-shaped flowers, and the foliage rosulate, sword-shaped and spear-pointed.

  • Cordaites, a tall plant (20-30 ft.) with yucca-like leaves, was related to the cycads and conifers; the catkin-like inflorescence, which bore yew-like berries, is called Cardiocarpus.

  • Such a branch-system is called an inflorescence.

  • The methods in which these are provided are of infinite variety, and any and every part of the flower and of the inflorescence may be called into requisition to supply the adaptation (see Fruit).

  • plenissima, in which the brilliant inflorescence is branched, is as brilliant as the type, and keeps long in flower.

  • 2 shows a branch of the terminal male inflorescence.

  • 4 is a spike of the female inflorescence, protected by the sheaths of leaves - the blades being also present.

  • 5 is a spikelet of the female inflorescence, consisting of two outer glumes, the lower one ciliated, which enclose two florets - one (a) barren (sometimes fertile), consisting of a flowering glume and pale only, and the other (b) fertile, containing the pistil with elongated style.

  • - Partial inflorescence of Cyperus longus (Galingale), slightly reduced.

  • - Inflorescence of Cotton-grass (Eriophorum polystachion), about a nat.

  • During the development of the inflorescence there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flowerstalk.

  • 2, Branch of inflorescence, 4 nat.

  • The inflorescence is of a cymose character, the terminal branch being represented by the tendril, the side branches by flower-stalks, or the inflorescence may be reduced to a single stalk.

  • io), Pennisetum, &c., the one or more circles of simple or feathery hairs represent abortive branches of the inflorescence; in Cenchrus (fig.

  • Bracts of a more general character subtending branches C' of the inflorescence are singularly rare in Gramineae, in marked contrast with Cyperaceae, where they are so conspicuous.

  • It is closed except at the apex, and contains the female spikelet, the stalks of the male inflorescence and the long styles emerging through the small apical orifice.

  • Any number of spikelets may compose the inflorescence, and their arrangement is very various.

  • Every variety of racemose and paniculate inflorescence obtains, and the number of spikelets composing those of the large kinds is often immense.

  • Rarely the inflorescence consists of very few flowers; thus Lygeum Spartum, the most anomalous of European grasses, has but two or three large uniflorous spikelets, which are fused together at the base, and have no basal glumes, but are enveloped in a large, hooded, spathe-like bract.

  • Various methods of scattering the: grain have been adopted, in which parts of the spikelet or inflorescence are concerned.

  • Less absolute characters, but generally trustworthy and more easily observed, are the feathery stigmas, the always distichous arrangement of the glumes, the usual absence of more general bracts in the inflorescence, the split leaf-sheaths, and the hollow, cylindrical, jointed culms - some .or all of which are wanting in all Cyperaceae.

  • No characters for main divisions can be obtained from the flower proper or fruit (with the exception of the character of the hilum), and it has therefore been found necessary to trust to characters derived from the usually less important inflorescence and bracts.

  • Spikelets unisexual, male and female in separate inflorescences or on different parts of the same inflorescence.

  • In Setaria and allied genera the spikelet is subtended by an involucre of bristles or spines which represent sterile branches of the inflorescence.

  • Phleum has a cylindrical spike-like inflorescence; P. pratense (timothy) is a valuable fodder grass, as also is Alopecurus pratensis (foxtail).

  • Another view is to regard the cone as an inflorescence, each carpellary scale being a bract bearing in its axil a shoot the axis of which has not been developed; the seminiferous scale is believed to represent either a single leaf or a fused pair of leaves belonging to the partially suppressed axillary shoot.

  • It may be that the interpretation of the female cone of the Abietineae as an inflorescence, which finds favour with many botanists, cannot be applied to the cones of Agathis and Araucaria.

  • The spike of an inflorescence bears whorls of flowers at each node in the axils of concrescent bracts accompanied by numerous sterile hairs (paraphyses); in a male inflorescence numerous flowers occur at each node, while in a female inflorescence the number of flowers at each node is much smaller.

  • structure, are of two types, complete and incomplete; the latter occur in association with male flowers in a male inflorescence.

  • An inflorescence has the form of a dichotomouslybranched cyme bearing small erect cones; those containing the female flowers attain the size of a fir-cone, and are scarlet in colour.

  • They are marshor water-plants with generally a stout stem (rhizome) creeping in the mud, radical leaves and a large, much branched inflorescence.

  • The inflorescence or ear consists of a central stalk bent zigzag, forming a series of notches (see fig.

  • Erysiple graminis, a mildew of grasses, has caused great loss in various countries; Dilophia graminis sometimes causes deformities of the leaves and inflorescence; another somewhat similar fungus, Ophiobolus graminis, attacks the leaves and stalks near the ground, completely destroying the plants.

  • In general as regards their form and appearance they differ from ordinary leaves, the difference being greater in the upper than in the lower branches of an inflorescence.

  • They are sometimes mere scales or threads, and at other times are undeveloped, giving rise to the ebracteate inflorescence of Cruciferae and some Boraginaceae.

  • A series of empty coloured bracts terminates the inflorescence of Salvia Horminum.

  • The smaller bracts or bracteoles, which occur among the subdivisions of a branching inflorescence, often produce no flower-buds, and thus anomalies occur in the floral arrangements.

  • It is often associated with that form of inflorescence termed the spadix, and may be coloured, as in Anthuriuzn, or white, as in arum lily (Richardia aethiopica).

  • When the spadix is compound or branching, as in palms, there are smaller spathes, surrounding separate parts of the inflorescence.

  • The arrangement of the flowers on the axis, or the ramification of the floral axis, is called the inflorescence.

  • The primary axis of the inflorescence is sometimes called the rachis; its branches, whether terminal or lateral, which form the stalks supporting flowers or clusters of flowers, are peduncles, and if small branches are given off by it, they are called pedicels.

  • In describing a branching inflorescence, it is common to speak of the rachis as the primary floral axis, its branches as the secondary floral axes, their divisions as the tertiary floral axes, and so on; thus avoiding any confusion that might arise from the use of the terms rachis, peduncle and pedicel.

  • There are two distinct types of inflorescence - one in which the flowers arise as lateral shoots from a primary axis, which goes on elongating, and the lateral shoots never exceed in their development the length of the primary axis beyond their point of origin.

  • The inflorescence is simple and indeterminate, and the expansion of the flowers centripetal, those at the circumference opening first.

  • The flowers produced in this inflorescence are thus terminal.

  • The first kind of inflorescence is indeterminate, Here the axis is either elongated, FIG.

  • - Inflorescence of the Lime (Tilia platyphyllos) (nat.

  • The second kind of inflorescence is determinate, definite or terminal.

  • Thus the flowers are arranged in groups, and frequently very complicated forms of inflorescence result.

  • If the primary axis, in place of being elongated, is contracted, it gives rise to other forms of indefinite inflorescence.

  • This inflorescence is seen in hemlock and other allied plants, which are hence called umbelliferous.

  • - Plant of Ranunculus bulbosus, showing determinate inflorescence.

  • This gives rise to the peculiar inflorescence of Dorstenia, or to that of the fig (fig.

  • This inflorescence has been called a hypanthodium.

  • Again, there may be a raceme of capitula, that is, a group of capitula disposed in a racemose manner, as in Petasites, a raceme of umbels, as in ivy, and so on, all the forms of inflorescence being indefinite in disposition.

  • The simplest form of the definite type of the inflorescence is seen in Anemone nemorosa and in gentianella (Gentiana acaulis), where the axis terminates in a single flower, no other flowers being produced upon the plant.

  • This is a solitary terminal inflorescence.

  • The general name of cyme is applied to the arrangement of a group of flowers in a definite inflorescence.

  • A cymose inflorescence is an inflorescence where the primary floral axis before terminating in a flower gives off one or more lateral unifloral axes which repeat the process - the development being only limited by the vigour of the plant.

  • In the natural order Carophyllaceae (pink family) the dichasial form of inflorescence is very general.

  • carthusianorum, &c., in which the peduncles are short, and the flowers closely approximated, with a centrifugal expansion, the inflorescence has the form of a contracted dichasium, and receives the name of fascicle.

  • When the axes become very much shortened, the arrangement is more complicated in appearance, and the nature of the inflorescence can only be recognized by the order of opening of the flowers.

  • The inflorescence is therefore a contracted dichasium, the flowers being sessile, or nearly so, and the clusters are called verticillasters (fig.

  • Sometimes, especially towards the summit of a dichasium, owing to the exhaustion of the growing power of the plant, only one of the bracts gives origin to a new axis, the other remaining empty; thus the inflorescence becomes unilateral, and further development is arrested.

  • - Cymose inflorescence (dichasium) of Cerastium collinum; t-t", successive axes.

  • The basal portion of the consecutive axes may become much thickened and arranged more or less in a straight line, ns and thus collectively form an apparent or false axis or sympodium, and the inflorescence thus simulates a raceme.

  • 19), the bracts when developed forming a second double row on the opposite side; the whole inflorescence usually curves on itself like a scorpion's tail, hence its name.

  • The false axis, a b c d, is formed by successive generations of unifloral axes, the flowers being arranged along one side alternately and in a double row; had the bracts been developed they would have formed a similar double row on the opposite side of the false axis; the whole inflorescence is represented as curved on itself.

  • The inflorescence in the family Boraginaceae are usually regarded as true scorpioid cymes.

  • Forms of inflorescence occur, in which both the definite and indefinite types are represented - mixed inflorescences.

  • So also in Labiatae, such as dead-nettle (Lamium), the different whorls of inflorescence are developed centripetally, while the florets of the verticillaster are centrifugal.

  • This mixed character presents difficulties in such cases as Labiatae, where the leaves, in place of retaining their ordinary form, become bracts, and thus might lead to the supposition of the whole series of flowers being one inflorescence.

  • In the privet (Ligustrum vulgare) there are numerous racemes of dichasia arranged in a racemose manner along an axis; the whole inflorescence thus has an appearance not unlike a bunch of grapes, and has been called a thyrsus.

  • Indefinite Centripetal Inflorescence.

  • Compound Indefinite Inflorescence.

  • Definite Centrifugal Inflorescence.

  • Compound Definite Inflorescence.

  • C. Mixed Inflorescence.

  • The inflorescence is usually a spike bearing lateral cones or catkins, arranged sometimes distichously, sometimes in a spiral order.

  • The morphology of the female inflorescence of Cordaiteae has not yet been cleared up, but Taxus and Ginkgo among recent plants appear to offer the nearest analogies.

  • Umbel-panicle inflorescence present at the terminal of branches.

  • Steeple Bellflower (Campanula Pyramidalis) - A vigorous plant, with thick and fleshy flower-stems, rising to a height of 4 to 6 feet; the flowers, close to the stem, giving the inflorescence a steeple-like form.

  • It differs from the preceding in being smooth, deep green, and dwarfer, and in having as a rule several empty bracts below the inflorescence.

  • Venetian Sumach (Rhus Cotinus) - A beautiful and distinct shrub, long cultivated though not always well placed, the simple leaves taking a fine color in autumn and the curious inflorescence giving a very pretty effect.

  • Through June the strong Yucca-like growths bear bold spikes of orange-scarlet and primrose-yellow flowers, the upper portion of the inflorescence being red, the lower primrose.

  • It blossoms in spring, the inflorescence having a bottle-brush appearance owing to the length of the white stamens, which, petals being absent, form the only conspicuous part of the flowers.

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