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infirmary

infirmary

infirmary Sentence Examples

  • It was then devoted to the accommodation of the students of the Royal Naval College, the Infirmary being granted to the Seamen's Hospital Society.

  • When nineteen he became the pupil of a doctor in Shrewsbury, also acting as dresser in the infirmary there.

  • In 1881 he became master of University College, and threw himself with vigour into university and City life, becoming treasurer of the Radcliffe infirmary, and founder of the first technical school in Oxford, for which he presented a site.

  • The old infirmary building is now occupied by St Joseph's College, a commercial academy of the Marist Brotherhood, in connexion with which there is a novitiate for the training of members of the order for missionary service at home or abroad.

  • The city's charitable institutions include the Memorial (1903), Virginia Sheltering Arms (1889) and St Luke's hospitals, the Retreat for the Sick (1877), the Eye, Nose, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1880), the Confederate Soldiers' Home (1884), supported jointly by the state and the city, a Home for Needy Confederate Women (1900), the City Almshouse and Hospital, and several orphanages and homes for the aged.

  • Among charitable institutions the principal is the handsome royal infirmary, a Renaissance building.

  • The other officials are the sheriff, treasurer and coroner, elected for two years; the auditor, recorder, clerk of courts, prosecuting attorney, surveyor and infirmary directors, elected for two years; and the board of school examiners (three) and the board of county visitors (six, of whom three are women), appointed usually by the probate judge for three years.

  • Each state institution in addition has its own board of trustees appointed by the governor, and each county infirmary is under the charge of three infirmary directors chosen by popular vote.

  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

  • Charitable institutions include a deaf and dumb asylum (1875-1886), the Metropolitan infirmary for children (1841), and the royal sea-bathing infirmary, established in 1791 and enlarged through the munificence of Sir Erasmus Wilson in 1882.

  • Among institutions there are a specially fine public library, museums of geology and natural history and antiquities, mining and science schools, the West Cornwall Infirmary and a meteorological station.

  • On the "farm" the city maintains an "infirmary village," a tuberculosis sanatorium, a detention hospital, a convalescent hospital and houses of correction.

  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

  • The principal buildings are the old town-hall, the market house, the guildhall, the Royal Dorset Yacht Clubhouse, the theatre, the Royal Victoria Jubilee Hall, the Weymouth and Dorset eye infirmary, the Weymouth royal hospital and dispensary and the barracks.

  • Closely associated with the medical school, and separated from it by the Middle Meadow Walk, is the Royal Infirmary, designed by David Bryce, R.S.A.

  • (1803-1876), removed hither from Infirmary Street.

  • Besides the Royal Infirmary there are a considerable number of more or less specialized institutions, two of the most important being situated at Craiglockhart.

  • The infirmary convalescents are sent to the convalescent house in Corstorphine.

  • The central public baths in Infirmary Street, with branch establishments in other parts of the town, including Portobello, are largely resorted to, and the proximity of the Firth of Forth induces the keener swimmers to visit Granton every morning.

  • Altenburg is the seat of the higher courts of the Saxon duchies, and possesses a cathedral and several churches, schools, a library, a gallery of pictures and a school of art, an infirmary and various learned societies.

  • The Royal South Hampshire Infirmary is the principal of numerous benevolent and charitable institutions.

  • Other institutions receiving state aid, each governed by trustees appointed by the governor, are the Massachusetts general hospital at Boston, the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary at Boston, the Massachusetts homoeopathic hospital at Boston, the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts school for the blind at South Boston and the soldiers' home in Massachusetts at Boston.

  • From 1757 he delivered lectures on clinical medicine in the Royal Infirmary.

  • The principal public buildings in the old town of Stoke are the town hall, with assembly rooms, law library and art gallery, the market hall, the Minton memorial building, containing a school of art and science; the free library and museum, and the North Staffordshire infirmary, founded in 1815 at Etruria, and removed to its present site in 1868.

  • The qualifications for a Queen's nurse are as follows: (r) training at an approved general hospital or infirmary for two years; (2) approved training in district nursing for not less than six months, including the nursing of mothers and infants after child-birth; (3) nurses in country districts must in addition have had at least three months' approved training in midwifery.

  • Among the charitable institutions are the City Hospital, Saint Michael's Hospital, Saint Barnabas Hospital, Saint James Hospital, the German Hospital, a Babies' Hospital, an Eye and Ear Infirmary, a City Dispensary, the Newark Orphan Asylum, a Home for Crippled Children, a Home for Aged Women and three day nurseries.

  • It was then surrounded by strong fortifications, and contained a number of important buildings, such as the town-house (built in 1652 and restored in 1706), the exchange, the infirmary and orphan asylum, and the European churches.

  • There are four distinct quarters in the monastery, each under a superior, subject to the archimandrite: the Laura proper or New Monastery, that of the Infirmary, and those of the Nearer and the Further Caves.

  • In addition to the menagerie, there is an infirmary and operating room, an anatomical and pathological laboratory, and the Society holds scientific meetings and publishes stately volumes containing the results of zoological research.

  • Among the institutions are the City infirmary (at Hartwell, a suburb), which, besides supporting pauper inmates, affords relief to outdoor poor; the Cincinnati hospital, which is supported by taxation and treats without charge all who are unable to pay; twenty other hospitals, some of which are charitable institutions; a United States marine hospital; the Longview hospital for the insane, at Carthage, Io m.

  • The general infirmary is the principal of numerous charitable institutions.

  • Wyatt; the Guildhall; the barracks, which are the headquarters of two battalions of the South Wales Borderers; the county infirmary founded in 1832; and the prison (in Llanfaes) for the counties of Brecon and Radnor.

  • The infirmary for sick monks, with the physician's house and physic garden, lies to the east.

  • In the same group with the infirmary is the school for the novices.

  • One of these diminutive convents is appropriated to the "oblati" or novices (Q), the other to the sick monks as an "infirmary" (R).

  • The "residence of the physicians" (S) stands contiguous to the infirmary, and the physic garden (T) at the north-east corner of the monastery.

  • A passage under the dormitory leads eastwards to the smaller or infirmary cloister, appropriated to the sick and infirm monks.

  • Eastward of this cloister extend the hall and chapel of the infirmary, resembling in form and arrangement the nave and chancel of an aisled church.

  • square, surmounted by a lofty pyramidal roof, and the kitchen court; to the west, the butteries, pantries, &c. The infirmary had a small kitchen of its own.

  • The small cloister lies to the south-east of the larger cloister, and still farther to the east we have the remains of the infirmary with the table hall, the refectory of those who were able to leave their chambers.

  • The infirmary has perished completely.

  • To the south was the great cloister (A), surrounded by the chief monastic buildings, and farther to the east the smaller cloister, opening out of which were the infirmary, novices' lodgings and quarters for the aged monks.

  • Infirmary.

  • From this cloister opened the infirmary (K), with its hall, chapel, cells, blood-letting house and other dependencies.

  • The requirements of sickness and old age are carefully provided for in the infirmary cloister and that for the aged and infirm members of the establishment.

  • At R we see a portion of the infirmary.

  • These have been identified either with the hospitium or with the abbot's house, but they occupy the position in which the infirmary is more usually found.

  • Infirmary (?).

  • As peculiarities of arrangement may be noticed the position of the kitchen (Q), between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary (W) (unless there is some error in its designation) above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses (XX).

  • Among the principal buildings are the Federal building, the county court-house, the Soldiers and Sailors' Monumental Building, containing a large auditorium, the Masonic and Oddfellows' temples, the Market building, containing city offices, a National Guard armoury, the John McIntire public library, the John McIntire Children's Home (1880), the Helen Purcell home for women, the county infirmary, the Bethesda Hospital (1890), and the Good Samaritan hospital (1902; under the Franciscan Sisters).

  • The infirmary was founded in 1782.

  • Among the charitable institutions are the City Hospital (1886), the Santa Rosa Infirmary (1869), maintained by Sisters of Charity, a House of Refuge (1897), a Rescue Home (1895), a home for destitute children and aged persons (1897), the St Francis Home for the Aged (1893), St John's Orphan Asylum (1878), St Joseph's Orphan Asylum (1871) and the Protestant Home for Destitute Children (1887).

  • The charitable institutions comprise the royal infirmary,, in the Italian style, considerably enlarged since its foundation in 1836; the Murray royal lunatic asylum in Bridgend; the Hillside House in Kinnoull and the small-pox hospital.

  • distant there is a county Children's Home and Infirmary.

  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

  • It has an Evangelical and a Roman Catholic church, and an old castle formerly the seat of the prince-bishops of Ermeland, but now used as an infirmary.

  • As the county town Armagh has a court-house, a prison, a lunatic asylum and a county infirmary.

  • Among the chief modern structures may be mentioned the magnificent post office, erected in 1895, the provincial law courts, the municipal infirmary and the large railway station.

  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).

  • Besides numerous churches and chapels the public buildings comprise a large town hall (1856), market house, exchange, county court, municipal offices, chamber of commerce, free library, and, outside the town, an infirmary.

  • Among the numerous charitable institutions the most important hospital is the Casa de Beneficencia y Maternidad (Charity and Maternity Asylum), opened in 1794, and containing an orphan asylum, a maternity ward, a home for vagrants, a lunatic asylum and an infirmary.

  • The principal buildings are four Roman Catholic and three Evangelical churches, several schools and an infirmary.

  • The principal public buildings are the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary and Dispensary, the public hall, the borough courts and offices, the arcade, the market hall, the free public library and the county courts and offices (1888).

  • high), observatory, academy, corporation art gallery, institute (containing a free library and a museum), Kay schools, School of Science and Art, Athenaeum, theatre, infirmary, Agricultural Hall, and Philosophical Institution.

  • The county gaol, court house and infirmary are here, but the town is practically a suburb of Strabane, across the river, in Co.

  • The public buildings include, the Clark hospital, the Victoria infirmary convalescent home and the Stevenson institute and mechanics' library.

  • The charitable institutions include the infirmary; the cholera hospital; the eye infirmary; the fever reception house; Sir Gabriel Wood's mariners' asylum, an Elizabethan building erected in 1851 for the accommodation of aged merchant seamen; and the Smithson poorhouse and lunatic asylum, built beyond the southern boundary in 1879.

  • Besides burial grounds near the infirmary and attached to a few of the older churches, a beautiful cemetery, 90 acres in extent, has been laid out in the southwestern district.

  • Besides the strictly state institutions, there are a number of private charitable institutions which are assisted by state funds; among these are the eye and ear infirmary at Portland, the Maine state sanatorium at Hebron for the treatment of tuberculosis, and various hospitals, orphanages, &c. The national government has a branch of the national home for disabled volunteer soldiers at Togus, and a marine hospital at Portland.

  • The Yorkshire Ladies' Council of Education has as its object the promotion of female education, and the instruction of girls and women of the artisan class in domestic economy, &c. The general infirmary in Great George Street is a Gothic building of brick with stone dressings with a highly ornamental exterior by Sir Gilbert Scott, of whose work this is by no means the only good example in Leeds.

  • Women were formerly lodged in the old infirmary, close to the main gate, which is now a hotel.

  • Near it are slight ruins of the monastic infirmary chapel of St Catherine.

  • The principal buildings are All Saints church, erected in 1870 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, and other churches, the market house and town hall, the Royal Victoria Yacht club-house, the theatre and the Royal Isle of Wight Infirmary.

  • In 1675 he initiated the works for draining the foul tidal swamps; and, failing the consent of the Company to the erection of a regular hospital, he turned the law court into an infirmary.

  • Of the numerous charitable institutions, the Infirmary, erected in 1831, is housed in a building of the Doric order.

  • There are a number of hospitals and similar benevolthnt institutions, including the leper house founded in the reign of King John, now used practically as an infirmary.

  • The principal buildings comprise the court house, the county hall (with portraits by Raeburn, Romney, Opie and others), the town hall, the Meffan Institute (including the free library), the infirmary, poorhouse and the Reid hall, founded by Peter Reid, a merchant in the burgh who also gave the public park.

  • and demolished at the Reformation; the Smith Institute, founded in 1873 by Thomas Stewart Smith, an artist, containing a picture-gallery, museum and readingroom; the public halls; the Royal Infirmary and various charitable institutions.

  • The benevolent institutions include a general hospital, the eye infirmary, orphan asylum, nursing institution and institute of the society.

  • The principal public buildings are the town-hall, a somewhat ornate market house, the gildhall, the public hall, the infirmary, the antiquarian museum (including some valuable fossil remains) and the public and mechanics' libraries.

  • South-west of these buildings, on the other side of the Johannisthal Park, are clustered the medical institutes and hospitals of the university - the infirmary, clinical and other hospitals, the physico-chemical institute, pathological institute, physiological institute, ophthalmic hospital, pharmacological institute, the schools of anatomy, the chemical laboratory, the zoological institute, the physicomineralogical institute, the botanical garden and also the veterinary schools, deaf and dumb asylum, agricultural college and astronomical observatory.

  • In 1400 Richard was in the infirmary of the abbey, where he died in the following year.

  • Avila also possesses an old Moorish castle (alcazar) used as barracks, a foundling hospital, infirmary, military academy, and training schools for teachers of both sexes.

  • He was admitted to Leeds general infirmary where he underwent surgery to remove a cerebral abscess.

  • He carries her to the infirmary to await an ambulance to take her for an X-ray.

  • I fear the time will shortly arrive when we shall need at least half a dozen new bedspreads in the Infirmary.

  • cafeteria run by the Royal Infirmary Volunteers is located opposite the " Shopping Precinct " at the foot of the west drive.

  • He was transferred to Stoke Royal Infirmary and underwent a front temporal craniotomy to evacuate the haematoma.

  • dreadnought library: newly restored listed 18 th Century former infirmary by James " Athenian " Stuart.

  • While in the infirmary, patients wore workhouse garb and their own clothing was stored away after being fumigated if necessary.

  • gestation at birth, who were all recruited from the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle.

  • houseman posts at the Law Hospital in Carluke and the Glasgow Western Infirmary.

  • immunology departments of the University at the Western Infirmary.

  • infirmary from the southwest, 2001. © Peter Higginbotham.

  • infirmary from the southeast, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

  • infirmary from the northeast, 2005. © Peter Higginbotham.

  • infirmary from the west, 2001. © Peter Higginbotham.

  • infirmary from the south, 2001 © Peter Higginbotham.

  • Neath Union infirmary The Neath Union erected a separate infirmary on a site to the south of Neath.

  • In 1905 the guardians agreed to build a new infirmary which contained 4 wards on 2 floors with room for 66 patients.

  • The Epilepsy Unit is situated in the grounds of the western infirmary in the west end of Glasgow.

  • In a further question concerning cancer waiting time targets and proposed ward changes, at Aberdeen royal infirmary.

  • A separate infirmary stood at the north of the site.

  • A separate block, probably the original infirmary, stood at the rear.

  • A new infirmary was opened on Mayday Road in 1885.

  • infirmary block stood at the north side of the main building.

  • infirmary ward.

  • infirmary building had been added to the site by 1850.

  • infirmary door.

  • infirmary complex at the south of the workhouse was built in several phases.

  • The original workhouse infirmary lay directly to the south of the main building.

  • Written in the prison infirmary, February, 1850.

  • In 1824, with Dr. George Monteath, he established an eye infirmary, initially very small.

  • iodine prophylaxis during cataract surgery, in collaboration with Dr. Ben Browne at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

  • In 1879 she was appointed matron of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

  • General inpatient nephrology 25 inpatient beds provide the inpatient area for general nephrology on ward 206 at the Royal Infirmary.

  • The driver, the sole occupant of the car, was taken to Glasgow Royal Infirmary, where he later died.

  • He was intern in surgery at the University of Bristol prior to completing a PhD on canine osteoarthritis at Bristol Royal Infirmary.

  • outpatient's appointment at the Radcliffe Infirmary we arrived very late.

  • Attached to it is an Infirmary for about 40 sick paupers, erected in 1823, at the cost of £ 1000.

  • The majority of pathological specimens from the museum were transferred to the Clinical Sciences Department of Leicester Royal Infirmary in 1985.

  • Several months later he got an urgent summons to an infirmary, where a woman, dying of cancer, wanted to see him.

  • Middlesbrough's historic North Riding Infirmary is currently under threat after proposals to build a supermarket on the site were unveiled.

  • waggon of these men, after little delay, were removed in the ambulance wagon to the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow.

  • Little survives of the south and west ranges, but the small chapel of the infirmary is amazingly well-preserved.

  • workhouse infirmary lay directly to the south of the main building.

  • Besides recitation and residence halls, it has the Lawrence Hall Library (1846), containing (1910) 68,000 volumes, the Thompson Memorial Chapel (1904), the Lasell Gymnasium (1886), an infirmary (1895), the Hopkins Observatory (1837) and the Field Memorial Observatory (1882), the Thompson Chemical Laboratory (1892), the Thompson Biological Laboratory (1893) and the Thompson Physical Laboratory (1893).

  • It was then devoted to the accommodation of the students of the Royal Naval College, the Infirmary being granted to the Seamen's Hospital Society.

  • When nineteen he became the pupil of a doctor in Shrewsbury, also acting as dresser in the infirmary there.

  • In 1881 he became master of University College, and threw himself with vigour into university and City life, becoming treasurer of the Radcliffe infirmary, and founder of the first technical school in Oxford, for which he presented a site.

  • The old infirmary building is now occupied by St Joseph's College, a commercial academy of the Marist Brotherhood, in connexion with which there is a novitiate for the training of members of the order for missionary service at home or abroad.

  • The charitable institutions include Moorhead's hospital (1753) for reduced householders; the Dumfriesshire and Galloway royal infirmary, dating from 1778, but now housed in a fine edifice in the northern Italian style; the Crichton royal institution for the insane, founded by Dr James Crichton of Friars Carse, and supplemented in 1848 by the Southern Counties asylum; the new infirmary, a handsome building; the contagious diseases hospital, the industrial home for orphan and destitute girls and a nurses' home.

  • The city's charitable institutions include the Memorial (1903), Virginia Sheltering Arms (1889) and St Luke's hospitals, the Retreat for the Sick (1877), the Eye, Nose, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1880), the Confederate Soldiers' Home (1884), supported jointly by the state and the city, a Home for Needy Confederate Women (1900), the City Almshouse and Hospital, and several orphanages and homes for the aged.

  • Among charitable institutions the principal is the handsome royal infirmary, a Renaissance building.

  • The other officials are the sheriff, treasurer and coroner, elected for two years; the auditor, recorder, clerk of courts, prosecuting attorney, surveyor and infirmary directors, elected for two years; and the board of school examiners (three) and the board of county visitors (six, of whom three are women), appointed usually by the probate judge for three years.

  • Each state institution in addition has its own board of trustees appointed by the governor, and each county infirmary is under the charge of three infirmary directors chosen by popular vote.

  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

  • Charitable institutions include a deaf and dumb asylum (1875-1886), the Metropolitan infirmary for children (1841), and the royal sea-bathing infirmary, established in 1791 and enlarged through the munificence of Sir Erasmus Wilson in 1882.

  • Among institutions there are a specially fine public library, museums of geology and natural history and antiquities, mining and science schools, the West Cornwall Infirmary and a meteorological station.

  • Grady; the Presbyterian hospital; the Baptist Tabernacle Infirmary; the Wesley Memorial hospital; St Joseph's infirmary; the Municipal hospital for contagious diseases; the Florence Crittenden home.

  • The charitable institutions include two charity hospitals - at New Orleans (1832) and Shreveport; an Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, a Hotel Dieu, the Touro Infirmary and a Home for Incurables, all at New Orleans; an Institute for the Deaf and Dumb (for whites - there is no state provision for negro deaf and dumb) and an Institute for the Blind, both at Baton Rouge; an Insane Hospital at Jackson and another at Pineville; and the Louisiana Retreat for the Insane at New Orleans.

  • On the "farm" the city maintains an "infirmary village," a tuberculosis sanatorium, a detention hospital, a convalescent hospital and houses of correction.

  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

  • Street, is a fine example of modern Gothic. Among the principal buildings and institutions are the town-hall, museum of the natural history society, theatre and opera-house (1880), market, schools of art and science, the Torbay infirmary and dispensary, the Western hospital for consumption, Crypt House institution for invalid ladies and the Mildmay home for incurable consumptives.

  • The principal buildings are the old town-hall, the market house, the guildhall, the Royal Dorset Yacht Clubhouse, the theatre, the Royal Victoria Jubilee Hall, the Weymouth and Dorset eye infirmary, the Weymouth royal hospital and dispensary and the barracks.

  • Closely associated with the medical school, and separated from it by the Middle Meadow Walk, is the Royal Infirmary, designed by David Bryce, R.S.A.

  • (1803-1876), removed hither from Infirmary Street.

  • Besides the Royal Infirmary there are a considerable number of more or less specialized institutions, two of the most important being situated at Craiglockhart.

  • The infirmary convalescents are sent to the convalescent house in Corstorphine.

  • The central public baths in Infirmary Street, with branch establishments in other parts of the town, including Portobello, are largely resorted to, and the proximity of the Firth of Forth induces the keener swimmers to visit Granton every morning.

  • Altenburg is the seat of the higher courts of the Saxon duchies, and possesses a cathedral and several churches, schools, a library, a gallery of pictures and a school of art, an infirmary and various learned societies.

  • The last include the large municipal infirmary and the Senckenberg'sches Stift, a hospital and almshouses founded by a doctor, Johann C. Senckenberg (d.

  • Still Infirmary (incorporated 1895), named in honour of its founder, Andrew Taylor Still (b.

  • The Royal South Hampshire Infirmary is the principal of numerous benevolent and charitable institutions.

  • Other institutions receiving state aid, each governed by trustees appointed by the governor, are the Massachusetts general hospital at Boston, the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary at Boston, the Massachusetts homoeopathic hospital at Boston, the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts school for the blind at South Boston and the soldiers' home in Massachusetts at Boston.

  • From 1757 he delivered lectures on clinical medicine in the Royal Infirmary.

  • The principal public buildings in the old town of Stoke are the town hall, with assembly rooms, law library and art gallery, the market hall, the Minton memorial building, containing a school of art and science; the free library and museum, and the North Staffordshire infirmary, founded in 1815 at Etruria, and removed to its present site in 1868.

  • The qualifications for a Queen's nurse are as follows: (r) training at an approved general hospital or infirmary for two years; (2) approved training in district nursing for not less than six months, including the nursing of mothers and infants after child-birth; (3) nurses in country districts must in addition have had at least three months' approved training in midwifery.

  • Among the charitable institutions are the City Hospital, Saint Michael's Hospital, Saint Barnabas Hospital, Saint James Hospital, the German Hospital, a Babies' Hospital, an Eye and Ear Infirmary, a City Dispensary, the Newark Orphan Asylum, a Home for Crippled Children, a Home for Aged Women and three day nurseries.

  • It was then surrounded by strong fortifications, and contained a number of important buildings, such as the town-house (built in 1652 and restored in 1706), the exchange, the infirmary and orphan asylum, and the European churches.

  • There are four distinct quarters in the monastery, each under a superior, subject to the archimandrite: the Laura proper or New Monastery, that of the Infirmary, and those of the Nearer and the Further Caves.

  • In addition to the menagerie, there is an infirmary and operating room, an anatomical and pathological laboratory, and the Society holds scientific meetings and publishes stately volumes containing the results of zoological research.

  • Among the institutions are the City infirmary (at Hartwell, a suburb), which, besides supporting pauper inmates, affords relief to outdoor poor; the Cincinnati hospital, which is supported by taxation and treats without charge all who are unable to pay; twenty other hospitals, some of which are charitable institutions; a United States marine hospital; the Longview hospital for the insane, at Carthage, Io m.

  • The state penal and charitable institutions include a penitentiary at Baltimore; a house of correction at Jessups, two houses of refuge at Baltimore; a house of reformation in Prince George's county; St Mary's industrial school for boys at Baltimore; an industrial home for negro girls at Melvale; an asylum and training school for the feeble-minded at Owings Mills; an infirmary at Cumberland; the Maryland hospital for the insane at Cantonsville; the Springfield state hospital for the insane; the Maryland school for the deaf and dumb at Frederick city; and the Maryland school for the blind at Baltimore.

  • The general infirmary is the principal of numerous charitable institutions.

  • Wyatt; the Guildhall; the barracks, which are the headquarters of two battalions of the South Wales Borderers; the county infirmary founded in 1832; and the prison (in Llanfaes) for the counties of Brecon and Radnor.

  • The infirmary for sick monks, with the physician's house and physic garden, lies to the east.

  • In the same group with the infirmary is the school for the novices.

  • One of these diminutive convents is appropriated to the "oblati" or novices (Q), the other to the sick monks as an "infirmary" (R).

  • The "residence of the physicians" (S) stands contiguous to the infirmary, and the physic garden (T) at the north-east corner of the monastery.

  • A passage under the dormitory leads eastwards to the smaller or infirmary cloister, appropriated to the sick and infirm monks.

  • Eastward of this cloister extend the hall and chapel of the infirmary, resembling in form and arrangement the nave and chancel of an aisled church.

  • square, surmounted by a lofty pyramidal roof, and the kitchen court; to the west, the butteries, pantries, &c. The infirmary had a small kitchen of its own.

  • The small cloister lies to the south-east of the larger cloister, and still farther to the east we have the remains of the infirmary with the table hall, the refectory of those who were able to leave their chambers.

  • The infirmary has perished completely.

  • To the south was the great cloister (A), surrounded by the chief monastic buildings, and farther to the east the smaller cloister, opening out of which were the infirmary, novices' lodgings and quarters for the aged monks.

  • From this cloister opened the infirmary (K), with its hall, chapel, cells, blood-letting house and other dependencies.

  • The requirements of sickness and old age are carefully provided for in the infirmary cloister and that for the aged and infirm members of the establishment.

  • At R we see a portion of the infirmary.

  • These have been identified either with the hospitium or with the abbot's house, but they occupy the position in which the infirmary is more usually found.

  • As peculiarities of arrangement may be noticed the position of the kitchen (Q), between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary (W) (unless there is some error in its designation) above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses (XX).

  • Among the principal buildings are the Federal building, the county court-house, the Soldiers and Sailors' Monumental Building, containing a large auditorium, the Masonic and Oddfellows' temples, the Market building, containing city offices, a National Guard armoury, the John McIntire public library, the John McIntire Children's Home (1880), the Helen Purcell home for women, the county infirmary, the Bethesda Hospital (1890), and the Good Samaritan hospital (1902; under the Franciscan Sisters).

  • The infirmary was founded in 1782.

  • Among the charitable institutions are the City Hospital (1886), the Santa Rosa Infirmary (1869), maintained by Sisters of Charity, a House of Refuge (1897), a Rescue Home (1895), a home for destitute children and aged persons (1897), the St Francis Home for the Aged (1893), St John's Orphan Asylum (1878), St Joseph's Orphan Asylum (1871) and the Protestant Home for Destitute Children (1887).

  • The charitable institutions comprise the royal infirmary,, in the Italian style, considerably enlarged since its foundation in 1836; the Murray royal lunatic asylum in Bridgend; the Hillside House in Kinnoull and the small-pox hospital.

  • distant there is a county Children's Home and Infirmary.

  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

  • It has an Evangelical and a Roman Catholic church, and an old castle formerly the seat of the prince-bishops of Ermeland, but now used as an infirmary.

  • As the county town Armagh has a court-house, a prison, a lunatic asylum and a county infirmary.

  • Among the chief modern structures may be mentioned the magnificent post office, erected in 1895, the provincial law courts, the municipal infirmary and the large railway station.

  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).

  • Besides numerous churches and chapels the public buildings comprise a large town hall (1856), market house, exchange, county court, municipal offices, chamber of commerce, free library, and, outside the town, an infirmary.

  • Among the numerous charitable institutions the most important hospital is the Casa de Beneficencia y Maternidad (Charity and Maternity Asylum), opened in 1794, and containing an orphan asylum, a maternity ward, a home for vagrants, a lunatic asylum and an infirmary.

  • The principal buildings are four Roman Catholic and three Evangelical churches, several schools and an infirmary.

  • Among many private institutions are the Washington City Orphan Asylum (1815); Lutheran Eye, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1889); Episcopal Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital (1897); Providence Hospital (1861; Sisters of Charity); George Washington University Hospital (1898); Georgetown University Hospital (1898); Columbia Hospital for Women (1866); Children's Hospital (1871); Washington Hospital for Foundlings (1887); Children's Temporary Home (1899; for negroes); a German Orphan Asylum (1879); Washington Home for Incurables (1889); Home for the Aged (1871); the National Lutheran Home (1890); the Methodist Home (1890) and Baptist Home (1880).

  • The principal public buildings are the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary and Dispensary, the public hall, the borough courts and offices, the arcade, the market hall, the free public library and the county courts and offices (1888).

  • high), observatory, academy, corporation art gallery, institute (containing a free library and a museum), Kay schools, School of Science and Art, Athenaeum, theatre, infirmary, Agricultural Hall, and Philosophical Institution.

  • The county gaol, court house and infirmary are here, but the town is practically a suburb of Strabane, across the river, in Co.

  • The public buildings include, the Clark hospital, the Victoria infirmary convalescent home and the Stevenson institute and mechanics' library.

  • The charitable institutions include the infirmary; the cholera hospital; the eye infirmary; the fever reception house; Sir Gabriel Wood's mariners' asylum, an Elizabethan building erected in 1851 for the accommodation of aged merchant seamen; and the Smithson poorhouse and lunatic asylum, built beyond the southern boundary in 1879.

  • Besides burial grounds near the infirmary and attached to a few of the older churches, a beautiful cemetery, 90 acres in extent, has been laid out in the southwestern district.

  • Besides the strictly state institutions, there are a number of private charitable institutions which are assisted by state funds; among these are the eye and ear infirmary at Portland, the Maine state sanatorium at Hebron for the treatment of tuberculosis, and various hospitals, orphanages, &c. The national government has a branch of the national home for disabled volunteer soldiers at Togus, and a marine hospital at Portland.

  • The Yorkshire Ladies' Council of Education has as its object the promotion of female education, and the instruction of girls and women of the artisan class in domestic economy, &c. The general infirmary in Great George Street is a Gothic building of brick with stone dressings with a highly ornamental exterior by Sir Gilbert Scott, of whose work this is by no means the only good example in Leeds.

  • Women were formerly lodged in the old infirmary, close to the main gate, which is now a hotel.

  • Near it are slight ruins of the monastic infirmary chapel of St Catherine.

  • The principal buildings are All Saints church, erected in 1870 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, and other churches, the market house and town hall, the Royal Victoria Yacht club-house, the theatre and the Royal Isle of Wight Infirmary.

  • In 1675 he initiated the works for draining the foul tidal swamps; and, failing the consent of the Company to the erection of a regular hospital, he turned the law court into an infirmary.

  • Of the numerous charitable institutions, the Infirmary, erected in 1831, is housed in a building of the Doric order.

  • There are a number of hospitals and similar benevolthnt institutions, including the leper house founded in the reign of King John, now used practically as an infirmary.

  • The principal buildings comprise the court house, the county hall (with portraits by Raeburn, Romney, Opie and others), the town hall, the Meffan Institute (including the free library), the infirmary, poorhouse and the Reid hall, founded by Peter Reid, a merchant in the burgh who also gave the public park.

  • and demolished at the Reformation; the Smith Institute, founded in 1873 by Thomas Stewart Smith, an artist, containing a picture-gallery, museum and readingroom; the public halls; the Royal Infirmary and various charitable institutions.

  • The benevolent institutions include a general hospital, the eye infirmary, orphan asylum, nursing institution and institute of the society.

  • The principal public buildings are the town-hall, a somewhat ornate market house, the gildhall, the public hall, the infirmary, the antiquarian museum (including some valuable fossil remains) and the public and mechanics' libraries.

  • South-west of these buildings, on the other side of the Johannisthal Park, are clustered the medical institutes and hospitals of the university - the infirmary, clinical and other hospitals, the physico-chemical institute, pathological institute, physiological institute, ophthalmic hospital, pharmacological institute, the schools of anatomy, the chemical laboratory, the zoological institute, the physicomineralogical institute, the botanical garden and also the veterinary schools, deaf and dumb asylum, agricultural college and astronomical observatory.

  • In 1400 Richard was in the infirmary of the abbey, where he died in the following year.

  • The court, whose sentimental history has been related by Madame de Ia Fayette, its official splendours by Loret, and its intrigues by the duc de Saint-Simon, now resembled an infirmary of morose invalid~, presided over by Louis XIV.s elderly wife, Madame de Maintenon, under the domination of the Jesuit le Tellier.

  • Avila also possesses an old Moorish castle (alcazar) used as barracks, a foundling hospital, infirmary, military academy, and training schools for teachers of both sexes.

  • In plan the new infirmary was a quadrangle building, four stories high facing west overlooking the River Dee and Welsh hills.

  • The majority of pathological specimens from the museum were transferred to the Clinical Sciences Department of Leicester Royal Infirmary in 1985.

  • Several months later he got an urgent summons to an infirmary, where a woman, dying of cancer, wanted to see him.

  • Middlesbrough 's historic North Riding Infirmary is currently under threat after proposals to build a supermarket on the site were unveiled.

  • Both of these men, after little delay, were removed in the ambulance wagon to the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow.

  • Little survives of the south and west ranges, but the small chapel of the infirmary is amazingly well-preserved.

  • Treat any physical injuries in the ship's infirmary.

  • Kids can participate in a variety of activities, and an on-site infirmary is staffed by nurses and a doctor.

  • In addition, there have been research studies conducted by the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary and Sheffield Hallam University.

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