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infinitive

infinitive

infinitive Sentence Examples

  • B is replaced by the surd pat the end of a word (trobar in the infinitive, but trop in the present tense); so also in the interiOr of a word when it precedes a consonant (supvensr, s u b v e n i re, sopte, s u b t 0).

    15
    6
  • It seems that all the above classes may be divided into two main groups, according to the form of the infinitive :with masculine infinitive the strong triliteral type, and with feminine infinitive the type of the III.

    9
    7
  • The Latin future has been replaced, as everywhere, by tile perirphasis (c a n t a r e ha b en), but it is worth noticing that in certain old texts of the 13th century, and in the popular songs of a comparatively ancient date which have been preserved in Asturias, the auxiliary can still precede the infinitive (ha ben cant a r e), as with the Latin writers of the decadence:

    7
    4
  • The second form of the present infinitive (arare, credere, dormire) is used as a noun.

    7
    7
  • The second form of the present infinitive (arare, credere, dormire) is used as a noun.

    7
    7
  • and consequently becomes liable to be confounded with the infinitive (amar, render, partir).

    6
    4
  • from Corinth, an ancient inscription written 1 30vvrpoc 66v has recently been discovered, which shows that though Cleonae for B wrote E {, like the Corinthian ?j, and, as at Corinth, wrote for a vowel sound, the vowel thus represented was not short and long e and n) as at Corinth, but Il only, as in Xp g A, (X p i i a 1 Here 'a represents and the spurious diphthong is represented by a, as in (dycv, Doric infinitive -= a form which shows that c has at Cleonae the more modern form I as distinguished from the Corinthian Regarding three other questions controversy still rages.

    6
    5
  • The infinitive is not found; as in Greek, Rumanian and Bulgarian, it is replaced by the subjunctive with a particle.

    5
    6
  • But the simple perfect is no longer employed in the spoken language, which has substituted for it a periphrastic perfect, composed of the infinitive o~ the verb and the present of the auxiliary anar: va-ig pendre, for example, does not mean I am going to take, but I have taken.

    3
    4
  • The past participle of verbs in er was formerly isdo (u t u s) in most cases; at present ido serves for all verbs in er and Cr, except some ten or twelve in which the participle has retained the Latin form accented on the radical: dicho, hecho, visto, &c. It ought to be added that the past participle in normal Castilian derives its theme not from the perfect, but from the infinitive: habido, sabido, from haber, saber, not from hubo, supo.

    3
    4
  • The past participle of verbs in er was formerly isdo (u t u s) in most cases; at present ido serves for all verbs in er and Cr, except some ten or twelve in which the participle has retained the Latin form accented on the radical: dicho, hecho, visto, &c. It ought to be added that the past participle in normal Castilian derives its theme not from the perfect, but from the infinitive: habido, sabido, from haber, saber, not from hubo, supo.

    3
    4
  • antghi, aghi), has likewise served fur the forination not only of the past participle but also of the infinitive (agher, habere, can only be explained by ach, 3rd person of the perfect); the infinitives with r paragogic (viurer, seurer, plonrer) are not used (viure, seure, ploure ilistead); in the conjugation of the present of the verb essar or esser, the 2iid pers.

    1
    2
  • 2, 3 the construction of St50vae followed by Kai instead of infinitive or Iva is unique in this book.

    1
    3
  • There are three regular conjugations, distinguished (as in Latin) according to the termination of the present infinitive in a, e or i; e.g.

    1
    3
  • It is never preserved except when protected by the non-etymological I already spoken of (lie girt or llegt, but never liegsn); the r reappears, nevertheless, whenever the infinitive is followed by a pronoun (donarme, d-irho).

    1
    3
  • As in Provenal, the past participle of a large ntimber of verbs of the 2nd and 3rd conjugations is formed, not from the infinitive, but from the perfect (pogut, volgut, tingut suggest the perfects poch, volch, tinch, and not the infinitives poder, voler, tenir).

    1
    3
  • There are three regular conjugations, distinguished (as in Latin) according to the termination of the present infinitive in a, e or i; e.g.

    1
    3
  • As in Provenal, the past participle of a large ntimber of verbs of the 2nd and 3rd conjugations is formed, not from the infinitive, but from the perfect (pogut, volgut, tingut suggest the perfects poch, volch, tinch, and not the infinitives poder, voler, tenir).

    1
    3
  • The form in des has persisted only in those verbs where it was protected by the consonants n or r preceding it: pondes, tendes, vindes, amardes, and also no doubt in some forms of the present of the imperative, where the theme has been reduced to an extraordinary degree by the disappearance of a consonant and the contraction of vowels: ides, credes, ledes, &c. Portuguese is the only Romance language which possesses a personal or conjugated infinitive: amar, amer-es, amar, a,nar-mos, amer-des, amar-em; e.g.

    1
    4
  • (2) As regards conjugation only two points need be noted here: (a) it employs the form known as the inchoative, that is to say, the lengthening of the radical of the present in verbs of the third conjugation by means of the syllable ex or ix, a proceeding common to Italian, Walachian, Provenal and French, but altogether unknown in Hispanic Romance; (b) the formation of a great number of past participles in which the termination is added; as in Provenal, not to the radical of the verb, but to that of the perfect: tingut from tinch, pogut from poch, conegut from conech, while in Castilian tenido (formerly also tenudo), podido, conocido, are participles formed from the infinitive.

    0
    0
  • The verb infinitive appears in large print at the right or left corner of the page along with the English translation.

    0
    0
  • The infinitive often functions as a verbal noun, and as such can be the complement of another verb. infix see affix.

    0
    0
  • aorist infinitive clause " Before Abraham was ", properly the perfect clause and tense should follow but does not.

    0
    0
  • infinitive of this verb?

    0
    0
  • Do you need an ax to split an infinitive?

    0
    0
  • All verbs have an infinitive or root, (to come, to sell ), from which all variations spring.

    0
    0
  • It does not follow the same rules as the English infinitive.

    0
    0
  • infinitive verb form, e.g. They must leave.

    0
    0
  • infinitive clause " Before Abraham was ", properly the perfect clause and tense should follow but does not.

    0
    0
  • infinitive construction - liability to do something.

    0
    0
  • infinitive form.

    0
    0
  • infinitive ending, e.g.

    0
    0
  • Now, who can explain the split infinitive to us?

    0
    0
  • The verb infinitive appears in large print at the right or left corner of the page along with the English translation.

    0
    0
  • After the aorist infinitive clause " Before Abraham was ", properly the perfect clause and tense should follow but does not.

    0
    0
  • The infinitive is not found; as in Greek, Rumanian and Bulgarian, it is replaced by the subjunctive with a particle.

    0
    0
  • 1 The singular 1 is properly the infinitive or nomen verbi of 1 '7r1 a verb employed in the technical language of the Temple service for the execution of a jubilant song of praise to the accompaniment of music and the blare of the priestly trumpets (1 Chron.

    0
    0
  • 2, 3 the construction of St50vae followed by Kai instead of infinitive or Iva is unique in this book.

    0
    0
  • It seems that all the above classes may be divided into two main groups, according to the form of the infinitive :with masculine infinitive the strong triliteral type, and with feminine infinitive the type of the III.

    0
    0
  • from Corinth, an ancient inscription written 1 30vvrpoc 66v has recently been discovered, which shows that though Cleonae for B wrote E {, like the Corinthian ?j, and, as at Corinth, wrote for a vowel sound, the vowel thus represented was not short and long e and n) as at Corinth, but Il only, as in Xp g A, (X p i i a 1 Here 'a represents and the spurious diphthong is represented by a, as in (dycv, Doric infinitive -= a form which shows that c has at Cleonae the more modern form I as distinguished from the Corinthian Regarding three other questions controversy still rages.

    0
    0
  • (2) As regards conjugation only two points need be noted here: (a) it employs the form known as the inchoative, that is to say, the lengthening of the radical of the present in verbs of the third conjugation by means of the syllable ex or ix, a proceeding common to Italian, Walachian, Provenal and French, but altogether unknown in Hispanic Romance; (b) the formation of a great number of past participles in which the termination is added; as in Provenal, not to the radical of the verb, but to that of the perfect: tingut from tinch, pogut from poch, conegut from conech, while in Castilian tenido (formerly also tenudo), podido, conocido, are participles formed from the infinitive.

    0
    0
  • B is replaced by the surd pat the end of a word (trobar in the infinitive, but trop in the present tense); so also in the interiOr of a word when it precedes a consonant (supvensr, s u b v e n i re, sopte, s u b t 0).

    0
    0
  • It is never preserved except when protected by the non-etymological I already spoken of (lie girt or llegt, but never liegsn); the r reappears, nevertheless, whenever the infinitive is followed by a pronoun (donarme, d-irho).

    0
    0
  • But the simple perfect is no longer employed in the spoken language, which has substituted for it a periphrastic perfect, composed of the infinitive o~ the verb and the present of the auxiliary anar: va-ig pendre, for example, does not mean I am going to take, but I have taken.

    0
    0
  • antghi, aghi), has likewise served fur the forination not only of the past participle but also of the infinitive (agher, habere, can only be explained by ach, 3rd person of the perfect); the infinitives with r paragogic (viurer, seurer, plonrer) are not used (viure, seure, ploure ilistead); in the conjugation of the present of the verb essar or esser, the 2iid pers.

    0
    0
  • The Latin future has been replaced, as everywhere, by tile perirphasis (c a n t a r e ha b en), but it is worth noticing that in certain old texts of the 13th century, and in the popular songs of a comparatively ancient date which have been preserved in Asturias, the auxiliary can still precede the infinitive (ha ben cant a r e), as with the Latin writers of the decadence:

    0
    0
  • The form in des has persisted only in those verbs where it was protected by the consonants n or r preceding it: pondes, tendes, vindes, amardes, and also no doubt in some forms of the present of the imperative, where the theme has been reduced to an extraordinary degree by the disappearance of a consonant and the contraction of vowels: ides, credes, ledes, &c. Portuguese is the only Romance language which possesses a personal or conjugated infinitive: amar, amer-es, amar, a,nar-mos, amer-des, amar-em; e.g.

    0
    0
  • and consequently becomes liable to be confounded with the infinitive (amar, render, partir).

    0
    0
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