Induction sentence examples

induction
  • The ordination and induction of ministers is always the act of a presbytery.

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  • Magnetic force has not merely the property of acting upon magnetic poles, it has the additional property of producing a phenomenon known as magnetic induction, or magnetic flux, a physical condition which is of the nature of a flow continuously circulating through the magnet and the space outside it.

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  • Telephonic speech between these two circuits was found possible and good, the communication between the circuits taking place partly by induction, and no doubt partly by conduction.

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  • Weber, which was found capable of explaining all the phenomena investigated by Ampere as well as the induction currents of Faraday.

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  • 7, the microphone, a battery and the primary of an induction coil in a local circuit, and putting the line in circuit with the secondary of the induction coil, which acted as the transmitter.

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  • By this method of transmission the battery is always to the line for the same interval of time, and alternately with opposite poles, so that the effect of electrostatic induction is reduced to a minimum.

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  • On the question of how far the effects are due to conduction between the earth plates, and how far to true electromagnetic induction, authorities differ, some being of opinion that the two effects are in operation together.

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  • It may also be prepared by heating ammonium oxalate; by passing induction sparks between carbon points in an atmosphere of nitrogen.

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  • Thus, for instance, when using an induction coil or transformer to charge a condenser, it is not generally convenient to make more than 50 discharges per second, but each of these may create a train of oscillations consisting of, say, 20 to 50 waves.

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  • By repeated fractionations he was able to divide yttrium into distinct portions which gave different spectra when exposed in a high vacuum to the spark from an induction coil.

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  • The ordination and induction of elders in some branches of the Church is the act of the kirk-session; in others it is the act of the presbytery.

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  • The method of induction between insulated primary and secondary circuits laid out flat on the surface of the earth proves to be of limited application, and in his later experiments Preece returned to a method which unites both conduction and induction as the means of affecting one circuit by a current in another.

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  • In circuit with this battery was placed the secondary circuit of an induction coil, the primary circuit of which contained a telephone transmitter or microphone interrupter.

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  • is impressed upon the circuit through the medium of the induction coil.

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  • Induction is an effect of the field of force associated with a magnet.

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  • These trains are produced by pressing the key in the primary circuit of the induction coil for a longer or shorter time' and generating a long or short series of oscillatory electric sparks between the spark balls with a corresponding creation of trains of electric waves.

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  • Up to 1895 or 1896 the suggestions for wireless telegraphy which had been publicly announced or tried can thus be classified under three or four divisions, based respectively upon electrical conduction through the soil or sea, magnetic induction through space, combinations of the two foregoing, and lastly, electrostatic induction.

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  • The ink is electrified by a small induction electrical machine E placed on the top of the instrument; this causes it to fall in very minute drops from the open end of the siphon tube upon the brass table or the paper slip passing over it.

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  • The oscillations are controlled either by a key inserted in the primary circuit of the exciting induction coil or transformer, or by a key cutting in and out of the primary condensers or throwing inductance in and out of the closed oscillation circuit.

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  • One of these was to be connected to the earth through a telephone receiver, and the other through the secondary circuit of an induction coil in the primary circuit of which was a key.

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  • Even a permanent magnet is susceptible of induction, its polarity becoming thereby strengthened, weakened, or possibly reversed.

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  • When the magnetic induction flows through a piece of iron or other magnetizable substance placed near the magnet, a south pole is developed where the flux enters and a north pole where it leaves the substance.

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  • On one or more of the carriages of the trains were placed also insulated metallic sheets, which were in connexion through a telephone and the secondary circuit of an induction coil with the earth or rails.

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  • At a later date, 1891, Trowbridge discussed another method of effecting communication at a distance, viz., by means of magnetic induction between two separate and completely insulated circuits.

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  • In the primary circuit of the induction coil was an arrangement for rapidly intermitting the current and a key for short-circuiting this primary circuit.

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  • The antenna wire, connected to one spark ball of the induction coil, must be considered to form with the earth, connected to the other spark ball, a condenser.

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  • In this case a closed condenser circuit is formed with a battery of Leyden jars, an inductance coil and a spark gap, and oscillations are excited in it by discharges created across the spark gap by an induction coil or transformer.

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  • The single-wire earthed circuits used in the early days of telephony were subject to serious disturbances from the induction caused by currents in neighbouring telegraph and electric light wires, and from the varying potential of the earth due to natural or artificial causes.

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  • The direction of magnetic induction may be indicated by lines of induction; a line of induction is always a closed curve, though it may possibly extend to and return from infinity.

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  • Hence, when the coil at one fixed station was in action it generated high frequency alternating currents, which were propagated across the air gap between the ordinary telegraph wires and the metallic surfaces attached to one secondary terminal of the induction coil, and conveyed along the ordinary telegraph wires between station and moving train.

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  • Magnetic Induction or Magnetic Flux.

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  • He found, as others have dune, that if a battery, dynamo or induction coil has its terminals connected to the earth at two distant places, a system of electric currents flows between these points through the crust of the earth.

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  • The line of circuit passed through the secondary of the induction coil I to the line, from that to the telephone T at the receiving station, 'See Journal of the Telegraph, New York, April 1877; Philadelphia Times, 9th July 1877; and Scientific American, August 181 This term was used by Wheatstone in 1827 for an acoustic apparatus intended to convert very feeble into audible sounds; see his Scientific Papers, p. 32.

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  • The crosssection of a tube of induction may vary in different parts, but the total induction across any section is everywhere the same.

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  • The magnetic flux per square centimetre at any point (B, B, or 0) is briefly called the induction, or, especially by electrical engineers, the flux-density.

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  • In 1885 Preece and Heaviside proved by experiments made at Newcastle that if two completely insulated circuits of square form, each side being 440 yds., were placed a quarter of a mile apart, telephonic speech was conveyed from one to the other by induction, and signals could be perceived even when they were separated by 1000 yds.

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  • He also made important contributions to the mathematical theory of electrodynamics, and in papers published in 1845 and 1847 established mathematically the laws of the induction of electric currents.

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  • Outside the magnet the direction of the magnetic induction is generally the same as that of the magnetic force.

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  • Hence if the induction per square centimetre at any point is denoted by B, then in empty space B is numerically equal to H; moreover in isotropic media both have the same direction, and for these reasons it is often said that in empty space (and practically in air and other nonmagnetic substances) B and H are identical.

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  • The wire will in fact become temporarily magnetized by induction, that end of it which is nearest to the pole of the magnet acquiring opposite polarity, and behaving as if it were the pole of a permanent magnet.

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  • Magnetic induction, like other fluxes such as electrical, thermal or fluid currents, is defined with reference to an area; it satisfies the same conditions of continuity as the electric current does, and in isotropic media it depends on the magnetic force just as the electric current depends on the electromotive force.

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  • In a uniform magnetic field of unit intensity formed in empty space the induction or magnetic flux across an area of I square centimetre normal to the direction of the field is arbitrarily taken as the unit of induction.

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  • - As induction is the process from particulars to universals, it might have been thought that it would always have been opposed to syllogism, in which one of the rules is against using particular premises to draw universal conclusions.

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  • Yet such is the passion for one type that from Aristotle's time till now constant attempts have been made to reduce induction to syllogism.

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  • Since Mill's time, however, the logic of induction tends to revert towards syllogisms more like that of Aristotle.

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  • Jevons supposed induction to be inverse deduction, distinguished from direct deduction as analysis from synthesis, e.g.

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  • On this view induction becomes a reduction in the form: all M is P (hypothesis), S is M (given),.

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  • But induction cannot start from a known law.

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  • A contemporary of Canton and co-discoverer with him of the facts of electrostatic induction was the Swede, Johann Karl Wilcke (1732-1796), then resident in Germany, who in 1762 published an account of experiments in which a metal plate held above the upper surface of a glass table was subjected to the action of a charge on an electrified metal plate held below the glass (Kon.

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  • Herschel, Peter Barlow and others, but did not receive a final explanation until after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by Faraday in 1831.

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  • In 1831 Faraday began the investigations on electromagnetic induction which proved more fertile in far-reaching practical consequences than any of those which even his genius gave to the world.

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  • Between Euclides and Antisthenes the Socratic induction and universal definition were alike discredited from the point of view of the Eleatic logic. It is with the other point of doctrine that Plato comes to grips, that which allows of a certainty or knowledge consisting in an analysis of a compound into simple elements themselves not known.

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  • The conditions permit of the circulation of the alternating currents of low periodicity, which are used for operating the bells, but in respect of the battery the circuit is open until the subscriber lifts the receiver, when the hook switch, thus released, joins the transmitter with one winding of an induction coil in series across the circuit.

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  • Thus, in the case of one station and one moving railway carriage, there is a circuit consisting partly of the earth, partly of the ordinary telegraph wires at the side of the track, and partly of the circuits of the telephone receiver at one place and the secondary of the induction coil at the other, two air gaps existing in this circuit.

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  • 38 6), the insulated wires or plates being upheld by masts, its operation is as follows: - When the key in the primary circuit of the induction coil is pressed the transmitting antenna wire is alternately charged to a high potential and discharged with the production of high frequency oscillations in it.

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  • These spark balls are connected either to the secondary circuit of an induction coil I, or to that of an alternating current transformer having a secondary voltage of 20,000 to 100,000 volts.

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  • field created round one circuit to induce, when varied, a secondary current in another circuit, there have been certain attempts to utilize what may best be described as electrostatic induction.

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  • These distance effects were not understood at the time, or else were referred simply to ordinary induction.

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  • In conjunction with the above receiver he employed a transmitter, which consisted of a large induction or spark coil S having its spark balls placed a few millimetres apart; one of these balls was connected to an earth FIG.

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  • It may be noticed that (iv) is the familar principle of mathematical induction.

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  • It remained for Francis Bacon to develop these beginnings into a new logic of induction.

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  • Following Aristotle in this order - sense, memory, intellect - he resolved the whole process of induction into three ministrations: r.

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  • The last supposed syllogism, namely, that having two affirmative premises and entailing an undistributed middle in the second figure, is accepted by Wundt under the title "Inference by Comparison" (Vergleichungsschluss), and is supposed by him to be useful for abstraction and subsidiary to induction, and by Bosanquet to be useful for analogy.

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  • (Verbindungsschluss), to be useful for induction.

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  • What they really are in the inferences proposed by Wundt is not premises for syllogism, but data for induction parading as syllogism.

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  • This is not only of importance in the history of the terminology of logic, but supplies a philosophy of induction.

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  • In any case, however, definition, syllogism, induction all invited further determination, especially if they were to take their place in a doctrine of truth or knowledge.

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  • 10 This is the explanation of the formal definition of induction, Prior Analytics, ii.

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  • We need then to develop the alternative, and to pass from the external aspect of all-ness to the intrinsic ground of it in the universal Kau' auTO Kai n ai)TO, which, whatsoever the assistance it receives from induction in some sense of the word, in the course of its development for the individual mind, is secured against dependence on instances by the decisive fiat or guarantee of vas, insight into the systematic nexus of things.

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  • Yet they must have something to develop from, and thereupon Aristotle gives an account of a process in the psychological mechanism which he illustrates by comparative psychology, wherein a Xo yos or meaning emerges, a "first" universal recognized by induction.

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  • On the side of induction we find that experience is said to give the specific principles, 10 "the phenomena being apprehended in sufficiency."

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  • is not bridged by the function of vas in relation to " induction."

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  • It is in induction, which claims to start from particulars and end in universals, 2 that we must, if anywhere within the confines of logical inquiry, expect to find the required bridge.

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  • The Aristotelian conception of induction, however, is somewhat ambiguous.

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  • 5 This is clearly an unreflective, prelogical process, not altogether lighted up by our retrojection upon it of our view of dialectical induction based thereon.

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  • Yet it was the fundamental form of induction as it was conceived throughout the scholastic period.

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  • It appears safer, notwithstanding, to take the less subtle interpretation 11 that dialectical induction struggling with instances is formally justified only at the limit, and that this, where we have exhausted and know that we have exhausted the cases, is in regard to individual subjects rarely and accidentally reached, so that we perforce illustrate rather from the definite class-concepts falling under a higher notion.

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  • It is only then in the rather mystical relation of vous to the first type of induction as the process of the psychological mechanism that an indication of the direction in which the bridge from individual being to universal knowledge is to be found can be held to lie.

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  • But it is not mere induction, with its " unanalysed concretes taken as ultimate " that is set up as the substitute for deduction.

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  • He echoes the cry for recourse to nature, for induction, for experiment.

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  • Yet the induction of the.

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  • Aristotelians, the dialectical induction of the Topics, content with imperfect enumeration and with showing the burden of disproof upon the critic, is puerile, and at the mercy of a single instance to the contrary.

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  • The first is an induction, i.e.

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  • With Descartes intuition does not connote givenness, but its objects are evident at a glance when induction has brought them to light.

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  • It is because of the failure of this endeavour to bring the technique of induction within the setting of his Humian psychology of belief that the separation of his contribution to the applied logic of science from his sensationism became necessary, as it happily 1 Mill, Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy, cap. 17.

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  • " I grappled at once with the problem of Induction, postponing that of Reasoning."

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  • p. 182 (when he is preoccupied with syllogism), " I could make nothing satisfactory of Induction at this time."

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  • It rested these in turn upon a general induction enumerative in character of enormous and practically infinite range and always uncontradicted.

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  • Though obviously not exhaustive, the unique extent of this induction was held to render it competent to give practical certainty or psychological necessity.

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  • With this coheres his dictum, with its far-reaching consequences for the philosophy of induction, that " the logical justification of the inductive process rests upon the fact that it is an inevitable postulate of our effort after knowledge.that the given is necessary, and can be known as proceeding from its grounds according to universal laws."

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  • The transmutation of Mill's induction of inductions into a postulate is an advance of which the psychological school of logicians have not been slow to make use.

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  • When the two metal surfaces are connected for a short time with the terminals of some source of electromotive force, such as an electric machine, an induction coil or a voltaic battery, electric energy is stored up in the condenser in the form of electric strain in the glass, and can be recovered again in the form of an electric discharge.

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  • The distinction is analogous to that between analysis and synthesis, deduction and induction (but there may be a synthesis of a priori judgments, cf.

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  • 1 In this case the visible indication consisted in the attraction exerted between the electrified body and the light pivoted needle which was acted upon A, ' j+ C and electrified by induction.

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  • To detect electrification it is best to charge the electroscope by induction.

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  • He saw, for example, that it was not enough to find a meaning for the archaic words (the yXwvaae, as they were called), but that common words (such as lrovos, go(30s) had their Homeric uses, which were to be gathered by due induction.

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  • The second dates from Volta's discovery to the discovery by Faraday in 1831 of the induction of electric currents and the creation of currents by the motion of conductors in magnetic fields, which initiated the era of modern electrotechnics.

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  • His most important discovery, however, was that of electrostatic induction, the fact that one electrified body can produce charges of electricity upon another insulated body, and that when this last is touched it is left electrified with a charge of opposite sign to that of the inducing charge (Phil.

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  • These advances all centre round his supreme discovery of the induction of electric currents.

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  • He not only collected the facts concerning electromagnetic induction so industriously that nothing of importance remained for future discovery, and embraced them all in one law of exquisite simplicity, but he introduced his famous conception of lines of force which changed entirely the mode of regarding electrical phenomena.

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  • He proved by systematic experiments that the electromotive forces set up in conductors by their motions in magnetic fields or by the induction of other currents in the field were due to the secondary conductor cutting lines of magnetic force.

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  • The 1st and 2nd concern the discovery of magneto-electric induction already mentioned.

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  • The 11th series (1837) deals with electrostatic induction and the statement of the important fact of the specific inductive capacity of insulators or dielectrics.

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  • Neumann in 1845 did for electromagnetic induction what Ampere did for electrodynamics, basing his researches upon the experimental laws of Lenz.

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  • He discovered a function, which has been called the potential of one circuit on another, from which he deduced a theory of induction, completely in accordance with experiment.

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  • Weber at the same time deduced the mathematical laws of induction from his elementary law of electrical action, and with his improved instruments arrived at accurate verifications of the law of induction which by this time had been developed mathematically by Neumann and himself.

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  • Kirchhoff determined experimentally in a certain case the absolute value of the current induced by one circuit in another, and in the same year Erik Edland (1819-1888) made a series of careful experiments on the induction of electric currents which further established received theories.

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  • The discovery of electric-current induction also led to the production of the induction coil, improved and brought to its present perfection by W.

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  • This view followed from the discovery of the facts of electric induction of J.

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  • After he had educated himself by the study of the phenomena of lines of magnetic force in his discoveries on electromagnetic induction, he applied the same conception to electrostatic phenomena, and thus created the notion of lines of electrostatic force and of the important function of the dielectric or non-conductor in sustaining them.

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  • Geissler (1815-1879) containing air, carbonic acid, hydrogen, &c., under a pressure of one or two millimetres, exhibit beautiful appearances when traversed by the high tension current produced by the secondary circuit of an induction coil.

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  • This discussion, though strictly speaking extraneous to the scheme, has always been looked upon as a most important part of his philosophy, and his name is perhaps as much associated with the doctrine of Idols (Idola) as with the theory of induction or the classification of the sciences.

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  • This thread, the filum labyrinthi, is the new method of induction.

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  • Lastly, the very form of induction that has been used by logicians in the collection of their instances is a weak and useless thing.

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  • 8 Finally the very form of induction itself must be new.

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  • " The induction which is to be available for the discovery and demonstration of sciences and arts must analyse nature by proper rejections and exclusions; and then, after a sufficient number of negatives, come to a conclusion on the affirmative instances, which has not yet been done, or even attempted, save only by Plato.

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  • And this induction must be used not only to discover axioms, but also in the formation of notions."

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  • Thirdly, the induction is amiss which infers the principles of sciences by simple enumeration, and does not, as it ought, employ exclusions and solutions (or separations) of nature.

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  • 9 This extract gives an answer to the objection sometimes raised that Bacon is not original in his theory of induction.

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  • Bacon did not understand by induction the argument from particulars to a general proposition; he looked upon the exclusion and rejection, or upon elimination, as the essence of induction.

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  • It is evident that the Socratic search for the essence by an analysis of instances - an induction ending in a definition - has a strong resemblance to the Baconian inductive method.

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  • But induction is neither the whole of the new method, nor is it applicable to forms only.

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  • 21: - Prerogative Instances, Supports of Induction, Rectification of Induction, Varying the Investigation according to the Nature of the Subject, Prerogative Natures, Limits of Investigation, Application to Practice, Preparations for Investigation, the Ascending and Descending Scale of Axioms. The remainder of the Organum is devoted to a consideration of the twenty-seven classes of Prerogative Instances, and though it contains much that is both luminous and helpful, it adds little to our knowledge of what constitutes the Baconian method.

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  • With regard to the first, it has been already pointed out that Bacon's induction or inductive method is distinctly his own, though it cannot and need not be maintained that the general spirit of his philosophy was entirely new.6 The value of the method is the separate and more difficult question.

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  • He brings against Bacon, of all men, the accusations of making induction start from the undetermined perceptions of the senses, of using imagination, and of putting a quite arbitrary interpretation on phenomena.

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  • There is required in the process not merely a preliminary critical induction, but a subsequent experimental comparison, verification or proof, the canons of which can be laid down with precision.

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  • To formulate and show grounds for these laws is to construct a philosophy of induction, and it must not be forgotten that the first step towards the accomplishment of the task was made by Bacon when he introduced and gave prominence to the powerful logical instrument of exclusion or elimination.

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  • 106), " In establishing axioms by this kind of induction, we must also examine and try whether the axiom so established be framed to the measure of these particulars, from which it is derived, or whether it be larger or wider.

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  • It is the flux of matter and the inconstanc y of the physical body which requires induction, that thereby it may be fixed as it were, and allow the formation of notions well defined.

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  • In physics you wisely note, and therein I agree with you, that after the notions of the first class and the axioms concerning them have been by induction well made out and defined, syllogism may be applied safely; only it must be restrained from leaping at once to the most general notions, and progress must be made through a fit succession of steps."

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  • In this connexion, however, it is important to notice that Hobbes, who had been Bacon's secretary, makes no mention of Baconian induction, nor does he in any of his works make any critical reference to Bacon himself.

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  • (3) Induction.

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  • He studied the phenomena of electrical oscillations from 1869 to 1871, and in the latter year he announced that the velocity of the propagation of electromagnetic induction was about 314,000 metres per second.

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  • Besides the description of the method of magnetization which still bears his name, this work contains a variety of accurate magnetic observations, and is distinguished by a lucid exposition of the nature of magnetic induction.

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  • 12 a and developed the view that induction is simply an inverse employment of deduction; he treated in a luminous manner the general theory of probability, and the relation between probability and induction; and his knowledge of the various natural sciences enabled him throughout to relieve the abstract character of logical doctrine by concrete scientific illustrations, often worked out in great detail.

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  • Jevons's general theory of induction was a revival of the theory laid down by Whewell and criticized by Mill; but it was put in a new form, and was free from -some of the non-essential adjuncts which rendered Whewell's exposition open to attack.

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  • Inasmuch as he finally followed in philosophy the mainly poetical or theosophic movement of Schelling, which satisfied neither the logical needs appealed to by Hegel nor the new demand for naturalistic induction, Coleridge, after arousing a great amount of philosophic interest in his own country in the second quarter of the century, has ceased to "make a school."

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  • After Cary's election he left the university and would have accepted the great church of Colchester, but the bishop of London refused to grant institution and induction.

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  • In laying the foundations of a science of ancient chronology he relied sometimes upon groundless, sometimes even upon absurd hypotheses, frequently upon an imperfect induction of facts.

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  • In April the sheriffs of four batches of counties were each ordered to send forty masons to Wykeham at Windsor, This secular activity was rewarded by presentation to the deanery of St Martin-leGrand, with an order for induction on the 21st of May, on which day he was commissioned to inquire by a jury of men of Kent into the defects of the walls and tower of Dover (Pat.

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  • The spark may be obtained from the secondary of an induction coil, whose terminals are in connexion with the coatings of a Leyden jar.

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  • A still greater improvement may be effected by using an electrically maintained fork, which performs the double office of controlling the resolution of the jet and of interrupting the primary current of the induction coil.

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  • Early in 1832 he discovered the induction of a current on itself, in a long helical wire, giving greatly increased intensity of discharge (Sill.

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  • In 1838 he made important investigations in regard to the conditions and range of induction from electrical currents - showing that induced currents, although merely momentary, produce still other or tertiary currents, and thus on through successive orders of induction, with alternating signs, and with reversed initial and terminal signs.

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  • He also discovered similar successive orders of induction in the case of the passage of frictional electricity (Trans.

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  • He traced the influence of induction to surprising distances, magnetizing needles in the lower story of a house through several intervening floors by means of electrical discharges in the upper story, and also by the secondary current in a wire 220 ft.

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  • He studied the reflection and polarization of radiant heat, the magnetism of rocks, electrostatic induction, daguerrotypy, &c.

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  • Since it has been taken up by specialists, psychology is being established on a broader basis of induction, and with the advantage, in some departments, of the employment of experimental methods of measurement.

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  • It does not dissociate on heating as do the pentachloride and pentabromide, thus indicating the existence of pentavalent phosphorus in a gaseous compound; dissociation, however, into the trifluoride and free fluorine may be brought about by induction sparks of 150 to 200 mm.

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  • the payment into the papal treasury by every abbot and bishop, on his induction, of one year's revenue of his new benefice.

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  • This, in an elementary treatment of the subject, must be regarded as axiomatic; but it is really a simple case of mathematical induction.

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  • which he adopts, and the necessity of which he so strongly proclaims, is the ordinary one of observation, analysis and induction.

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  • By his method of observation and induction as thus explained, his philosophy will be found to be marked off very clearly, on the one hand from the deductive construction of notions of an absolute system, as represented either by Schelling or Hegel, which Cousin regards as based simply on hypothesis and abstraction, illegitimately obtained; and on the other, from that of Kant, and in a sense, of Sir W.

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  • Her main ideas on the subject are contained in a posthumous volume of her essays (Induction and Deduction, 1890), edited by Dr Lewins.

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  • This contains a reprint of the First Notions, an elaborate development of his doctrine of the syllogism, and of the numerical definite syllogism, together with chapters of great interest on probability, induction, old logical terms and fallacies.

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  • But no art of discovery, such as Bacon anticipated, follows, for "invention, sagacity, genius" are needed at each step. He analyses induction into three steps: - (I) the selection of the (fundamental) idea, such as space, number, cause or likeness; (2) the formation of the conception, or more special modification of those ideas, as a circle, a uniform force, &c.; and (3) the determination of magnitudes.

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  • Upon these follow special methods of induction applicable to quantity, viz., the method of curves, the method of means, the method of least squares and the method of residues, and special methods depending on resemblance (to which the transition is made through the law of continuity), viz.

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  • It may be replied that experience makes it reasonably certain that the infliction of certain penalties will produce acts of a certain character and that the influence of certain incentives upon conduct may be established as reasonably probable by induction.

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  • Thus, by the aid of his famous " dialectic," Socrates arrived first at the negative result that the professed teachers of the people were as ignorant as he himself claimed to be, and in a measure justified the eulogy of Aristotle that he rendered to philosophy the service of " introducing induction and definitions."

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  • p p p Although the Socratic induction forms a striking feature of Plato's dialogues, his ideal method of ethics is purely deductive; he admits common sense only as supplying provisional steps and starting-points from which the mind is to ascend to knowledge of absolute good, through which knowledge alone, as he conceives, the lower notions of particular goods are to be truly conceived.

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  • Aristotle, discarding the transcendentalism of Plato, naturally retained from Plato's teaching the original Socratic method of induction from and verification by common opinion.

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  • He first leads us by an induction to the fundamental notion of ultimate end or good for man.

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  • Ethical truth, in his view, is to be attained by careful comparison of particular moral opinions, just as physical truth is to be obtained by induction from particular physical observations.

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  • It is easy, by induction, to arrive at the general results: A determinant of the order n is the sum of the 1.2.3...n products which can be formed with n elements out of n 2 elements arranged in the form of a square, no two of the n elements being in the same line or in the same column, and each such product having the coefficient = unity.

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  • holy orders, presentation, institution and induction.

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  • If the plate receives a mixed charge, as, for example, from an induction coil, a "mixed" figure results, consisting of a large red central nucleus, corresponding to the negative charge, surrounded by yellow rays, corresponding to the positive charge.

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  • Nevertheless, he at the same time admits that the senses yield knowledge - not of things - but of qualities only, and holds that we arrive at the idea of thing or substance by induction.

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  • He holds that the true method of research is the analytic, rising from lower to higher notions; yet he sees clearly, and admits, that inductive reasoning, as conceived by Bacon, rests on a general proposition not itself proved by induction.

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  • The subjects covered include induction, home/school liaison, combating racism, and the psychological adaption of refugee young people.

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  • Stimuli that activate the immune system and lead to the induction of strong immune responses are called adjuvants.

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  • This ' venous admixture ' increases from 1% to around 10% following induction of anesthesia.

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  • As part of the induction he was baptized with wine and took some solemn oaths pledging allegiance to the Clan Chief.

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  • Application domains include digital circuit design, image filter design, and finite state automata induction.

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  • bid for the funding of induction mentors to support a cluster of primary schools.

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  • On induction there is a marked rise in heart rate and blood pressure caused by central nervous stimulation and an increase in circulating catecholamines.

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  • certainty of mathematics on that of direct observation and induction.

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  • induction checklist for New Member of Staff Welcome to the Oxford University Library Services.

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  • Primary objective Does the addition of induction chemotherapy to CHART improve overall survival over CHART alone?

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  • All new starters follow a rigorous induction program and are partnered with experienced colleagues, to focus on training and development.

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  • Induction elements require that you use only iron cookware (not aluminum ).

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  • However, when the 100 kW turbine is second, both 30 kW induction couplers are used, starting in sequence.

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  • crankcase reed valve induction.

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  • The cell intrinsic co-ordination of neural crest induction:: Neural crest induction:: Neural crest cells (NCC) are a specialized group of neural stem cells.

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  • The use of a rapid sequence induction technique needs be balanced against the risks of difficult intubation in chronically ill patients with poor dentition.

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  • One research group had provided some in vitro data to suggest that induction of CYP2E1 resulted in 2,3-DCP mediated hepatotoxicity and glutathione depletion.

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  • Laparoscopic ovarian diathermy is a safe and effective alternative to ovulation induction with gonadotropins.

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  • Hearing impairment: There is an induction loop in the Mong Building and flashing doorbells could be provided.

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  • A musical mood induction task was used to induce temporary mild dysphoria, and the effect of mood induction on self schemas was assessed.

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  • induction The edict for the Induction of the Rev. Randolph Scott to the Church and Parish of Coatbridge: Calder was returned duly served.

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  • Topics include: basic electrostatics, electrostatic induction, Coulomb's Law, electric field strength, and electric potential.

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  • Trait emotional intelligence: Behavioral validation in two studies of emotion recognition and reactivity to mood induction.

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  • faraday flashlight This dual power induction flashlight has all the others beat.

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  • Ovulation induction with urinary follicle stimulating hormone versus human menopausal gonadotropin for clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome (Cochrane Review ).

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  • gym induction, please contact the Center for an appointment.

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  • The gears were all hobbed from the solid, shaved, induction hardened and honed to produce the correct tooth form.

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  • induction hardening: this involves selective heating of the surface region of the gear using induction coils.

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  • In which 4 new premises types is a loop induction, or infra-red system, required for the benefit of people with impaired hearing?

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  • You can also opt for regular ultrasound scans and fetal heart monitoring if you do not want an induction.

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  • The most modern form of hob today is the induction or halogen hob.

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  • homologues of genes that control flower induction in Arabidopsis.

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  • Ms Collins has cloned eucalyptus homologues of genes that control flower induction in Arabidopsis.

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  • induction of anesthesia to empty the stomach.

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  • induction of ovulation in obese infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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  • induction of aneuploidy (8 ).

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  • induction hardened and honed to produce the correct tooth form.

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  • Place a tape recorder approximately where a patient would sit and run through a hypnotic induction and suggestions.

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  • The theory part covers the basics of electromagnetic induction.

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  • An inhalational induction of anesthesia is usually very easy to perform with halothane which is not irritating to the airway.

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  • The principles of electro-magnetic induction are used in the generator to produce electricity at about 22,000 volt.

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  • Many children express a preference for intravenous anesthetic induction.

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  • Golden Rule No 3 - Carry out a thorough induction Allows the employer to'set out their stall ' to new employees.

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  • induction loop at left window of the box office.

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  • induction coil.

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  • induction chemotherapy is related to the development of this rather rare complication of APL.

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  • induction motors without measuring speed is not easy.

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  • induction training program is provided for all new trustees.

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  • Women with invasive ovarian tumors were no more likely to have been exposed to any ovulation induction agents.

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  • One baby died as a result of uterine rupture after misoprostol induction, but otherwise outcomes for the babies were similar.

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  • Preliminary results indicated a high remission induction rate with the human CD52 antibody, CAMPATH-1H.

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  • The gym is for 16yrs and over, and a gym induction is required for the Bodyzone Gym.

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    0
  • There appear to be two different pathways of ECM remodeling and apoptosis induction in POAG.

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  • The pendulum's motion can be detected using an induction coil.

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  • Hence, the attempt to rescue inductive inferences by grafting deductive inferences onto them disguises rather than solves the problem of induction.

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  • introspection aids or supplements external observation and induction in disclosing to a man the fundamental purposefulness of human action.

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  • If aspiration occurs at induction then intubate the patient and clear the airways with suction.

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  • Twenty patients (50 %) had leukocytosis (10,000 WBC/microL) during induction therapy.

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  • Covering induction, home/school liaison, combating racism, and the psychological adaptation of refugee young people.

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    0
  • Misoprostol is cheaper than Prostaglandin E2, and apparently the induction to delivery interval is reduced, but uterine hyperstimulation appears more likely.

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  • linear (induction) motortes an innovative three-phase linear servo motor with a precision guide assembly and a displacement encoder.

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  • lithium neurotoxicity is needed in a variety of standard stress induction paradigms.

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  • Although it can be used with tuned induction loop antennas, it is usually operated with earthed electrodes separated by 25m to 100m.

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  • Description: The curved lines (generated by a computer program written by me) represent the magnetic field from an induction loop antenna.

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  • A negative or reverse magnetic force applied for reducing magnetic induction to zero.

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  • Also bought a ' Boy Racer ' (TM) induction manifold pipe - need to get some bits tig'd onto it.

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  • We have also bid for the funding of induction mentors to support a cluster of primary schools.

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  • mesoderm induction.

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  • micronucleus 2002) 1,3-Dichloropropan-2-ol (1,3-DCP ): Induction of micronuclei in the bone marrow of treated rats.

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  • Strong, full moonlight is on the borderline of being enough light to cease floral induction entirely.

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  • New Year 7s cause chaos A BRAND NEW GANG OF YEAR 7s burst into Grange Hill, all slightly nervous on their induction day.

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  • purchased off-the-shelf, this induction system can be customized to reflect the unique HR training requirements.

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  • We had an 8 day Induction Session for the 8 new ordinands.

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  • ovulation induction agents.

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  • Induction of Labor with Syntocin (synthetic oxytocin ).

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  • oxytocin induction or acceleration, and prostaglandin E2 gel induction.

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  • palladium metal is preformed, a much smaller induction period is evident.

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  • The new animal studies did not allow any conclusions to be made regarding the mechanisms of tumor induction by diesel particulates in humans.

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  • When satisfied, the presbytery proceeds with the ordination and induction.

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    1
  • Grassot has devised a galvanometer, or " fluxmeter," which greatly alleviates the tedious operation of taking ballistic readings.2 The instrument is of the d'Arsonval type; its coil turns in a strong uniform field, and is suspended in such a manner that torsion is practically negligible, the swings of the coil being limited by damping influences, chiefly electromagnetic. The index therefore remains almost stationary at the limit of its deflection, and the deflection is approximately the same whether the change of induction occurs suddenly or gradually.

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  • The downward course of the curve is, owing to hysteresis, strikingly different from its upward course, and when the magnetizing force has been reduced to zero, there is still remaining an induction of 7500 units.

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    1
  • The sample under test is prepared in the form of a ring A, upon which are wound the induction and the magnetizing coils; the latter should be wound evenly over the whole ring, though for the sake of clearness only part of the winding is indicated in the diagram.

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  • Induction.

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  • There is a superficial resemblance between induction and this hypothetical deduction.

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  • But in induction the given particulars are the evidence by which we discover the universal,, e.g.

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    1
  • Or rather, there are two uses of induction: inductive discovery before deduction, and inductive verification after deduction.

    1
    1
  • But neither use of induction is the same as the deduction itself: the former precedes, the latter follows it.

    1
    1
  • This method of communication by magnetic induction through space establishes, therefore, a second method of wireless telegraphy which is quite independent of and different from that due to conduction through earth or water.

    1
    4
  • - When magnetic force acts on any medium, whether magnetic, diamagnetic or neutral, it produces within it a phenomenon of the nature of a flux or flow called magnetic induction (Maxwell, loc. cit., § 428).

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    4
  • Among other subjects at which he subsequently worked were the absorption of gases in blood (1837-1845), the expansion of gases by heat (1841-1844), the vapour pressures of water and various solutions (1844-1854), thermo-electricity (1851), electrolysis (1856), induction of currents (1858-1861), conduction of heat in gases (1860), and polarization of heat (1866-1868).

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  • Gray's and then either to earth or back to the induction coil by a return line of wire.

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    6
  • Preece, who took up the subject about the same time as Prof. Trowbridge, obtained improved practical results by combining together methods of induction and conduction.

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    9
  • An Act of Assembly of 1753 declares pactions simoniacal whereby a minister or probationer before presentation and as a means of obtaining it bargains not to raise a process of augmentation of stipend or demand reparation or enlargement of his manse or glebe after induction.

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  • A special meaning has been assigned to the term " lines of induction."

    0
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  • Suppose the whole space in which induction exists to be divided up into unit tubes, such that the surface integral of the induction over any cross-section of a tube is equal to unity, and along the axis of each tube let a line of induction be drawn.

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  • These axial lines constitute the system of lines of induction which are so often referred to in the specification of a field.

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  • Where the induction is high the lines will be crowded together; where it is weak they will be widely separated, the number per square centimetre crossing a normal surface at any point being always equal to the numerical value of B.

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  • The induction may therefore be specified as B lines per square centimetre.

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  • The direction of the induction is also of course indicated by the direction of the lines, which thus serve to map out space in a convenient manner.

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  • Lines of induction are frequently but inaccurately spoken of as lines of force.

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    0
  • When induction or magnetic flux takes place in a ferromagnetic metal, the metal becomes magnetized, but the magnetization at any point is proportional not to B, but to B - H.

    0
    0
  • (25) Unless the path of the induction is entirely inside the metal, free magnetic poles are developed at those parts of the metal where induction enters and leaves, the polarity being south at the entry and north at the exit of the flux.

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  • In certain cases, as, for instance, in an iron ring wrapped uniformly round with a coil of wire through which a current is passing, the induction is entirely within the metal; there are, consequently, no free poles, and the ring, though magnetized, constitutes a poleless magnet.

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  • - The ratio B/H is called the permeability of the medium in which the induction is taking place, and is denoted byµ.

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  • The circulation of magnetic induction or flux through magnetic and non-magnetic substances, such as iron and air, is in many respects analogous to that of an electric current through good and bad conductors.

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  • The total magnetic induction or flux corresponds to the current of electricity (practically measured in amperes); the induction or flux density B to the density of the current (number of amperes to the square centimetre of section); the magnetic permeability to the specific electric conductivity; and the line integral of the magnetic force, sometimes called the magnetomotive force, to the electro-motive force in the circuit.

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  • The principal points of difference are that (I) the magnetic permeability, unlike the electric conductivity, which is independent of the strength of the current, is not in general constant; (2) there is no perfect insulator for magnetic induction, which will pass more or less freely through all known substances.

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  • Nevertheless, many important problems relating to the distribution of magnetic induction may be solved by methods similar to those employed for the solution of analogous problems in electricity.

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  • The coercive force, or coercivity, of a material is that reversed magnetic force which, while it is acting, just suffices to reduce the residual induction to nothing after the material has been temporarily submitted to any great magnetizing force.

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  • Equations (33) and (34) show that when, as is generally the case with ferromagnetic substances, the value of is considerable, the resultant magnetic force is only a small fraction of the external force, while the numerical value of the induction is approximately three times that of the external force, and nearly independent of the permeability.

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  • The small magnet may be a sphere rigidly magnetized in the direction of Ho; if this is replaced by an isotropic sphere inductively magnetized by the field, then, for a displacement so small that the magnetization of the sphere may be regarded as unchanged, we shall have dW = - vIdHo = v I+-, whence W = - 2 I + H2 ° (37) The mechanical force acting on the sphere in the direction of displacement x is 1 Hopkinson specified the retentiveness by the numerical value of the " residual induction " (=47rI).

    0
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  • When either the magnetization I or the induction B corresponding to a given magnetizing force H is known, the other may be found by means of the formula B = 41rI + H.

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  • This last method of arrangement is called by Ewing the " one-pole method, because the magnetometer deflection is mainly caused by the upper pole of the rod (Magnetic Induction, p. 40).

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  • Since the induction B is equal to H 47rI, it is easy from the results of experiments such as that just described to deduce the relation between B and H; a curve indicating such relation is called a curve of induction.

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  • The general character of curves of magnetization and of induction will be discussed later.

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  • The magnetometric method, except when employed in connexion with ellipsoids, for which the demagnetizing factors are [[[Magnetic Measurements]] accurately known, is generally less satisfactory for the exact determination of induction or magnetization than the ballistic method.

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  • - The so-called " ballistic " method of measuring induction is based upon the fact that a change of the induction through a closed linear conductor sets up in the conductor an electromotive force which is proportional to the rate of change.

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  • If the conductor consists of a coil of wire the ends of which are connected with a suitable galvanometer, the integral electromotive force due to a sudden increase or decrease of the induction through the coil displaces in the circuit a quantity of electricity Q=SBns R, where SB is the increment or decrement of induction per square centimetre, s is the area of the coil, n the number of turns of wire, and R the resistance of the circuit.

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  • In practice it is usual to standardize or " calibrate " the galvanometer by causing a known change of induction to take place within a standard coil connected with it, and noting the corresponding deflection on the galvanometer scale.

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  • Then if a known change of induction SB a inside the standard coil is found to cause a throw of d scale-divisions, any change of induction SB through the experimental coil will be numerically equal to the corresponding throw D multiplied by snRBa/SNrd.

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  • Rowland and others have used an earth coil for calibrating the galvanometer, a known change of induction through the coil being produced by turning it over in the earth's magnetic field, but for several reasons it is preferable to employ an electric current as the source of a known induction.

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  • A primary coil of length 1, having n turns, is wound upon a cylinder made of non-conducting and non-magnetic material, and upon the middle of the primary a secondary or induction coil is closely fitted.

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  • When a current of strength i is suddenly interrupted in the primary, the increment of induction through the secondary is sensibly equal to 47rin/l units.

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  • The ballistic method is largely employed for determining the relation of induction to magnetizing force in samples of the iron and steel used in the manufacture of electrical machinery, and especially for the observation of hysteresis effects.

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  • The sample may have the form of a closed ring, upon which are wound the induction coil and another coil for taking the magnetizing current; or it may consist of a long straight rod or wire which can be slipped into a magnetizing coil such as is used in magnetometric experiments, the induction coil being wound upon the middle of the wire.

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  • The induction coil wound upon the ring is connected to the ballistic galvanometer G2 in series with a large permanent resistance R3.

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  • In the same circuit is also included the induction coil E, which is used for standardizing the galvanometer; this secondary coil is represented in the diagram by three turns of wire wound over a much longer primary coil.

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  • For a simple proof, see Ewing, Magnetic Induction (1900), p. 99.

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    0
  • Hopkinson pointed out that the greatest dissipation of energy which can be caused by a to-and-fro reversal is approximately represented by Coercive force X maximum induction fir.

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  • When it is desired to obtain a simple curve of induction, such as that in fig.

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  • When a hysteresis curve is to be obtained, the procedure is as follows: The current is first adjusted by means of R to such a strength as will fit it to produce the greatest + and - values of the magnetizing force which it is intended to apply in the course of the cycle; then it is reversed several times, and when the range of the galvanometer throws has become constant, half the extent of an excursion indicates the induction corresponding to the extreme value of H, and gives the point a in the curve fig.

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  • The galvanometer throw which results from the change of current measures the amount by which the induction is reduced, and thus a second point on the curve is found.

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  • The distinguishing feature of the first is the steepness of its outlines; this indicates that the induction increases rapidly in relation to the magnetic force, and hence the metal is well suited for the construction of dynamo magnets.

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  • Bedford 3 have Magnetic Induction, 1900, 378.

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  • Induction and Hysteresis Curves.

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  • - Some typical induction curves, copied from a paper by Ewing (Proc. Inst.

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  • Denoting by W the work in ergs done upon a cubic centimetre of the metal (=_fHdB or f HdI), he finds W =nips approximately, where n 47r is a number, called the hysteretic constant, depending upon the metal, and B is the maximum induction.

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  • Working with two different specimens, he found that the hysteresis loss in ergs per cubic centimetre (W) was fairly represented by o 00125B 1 6 and o o0101B 1 ' 6 respectively, the maximum induction ranging from about 300 to 3000.

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  • 17, contains examples of ascending induction curves characteristic of wrought iron, cast iron, cobalt and nickel.

    0
    0
  • Curves of magnetization (which express the relation of I to H) have a close resemblance to those of induction; and, indeed, since B = H+47r1, and 47rI (except in extreme fields) greatly exceeds H in numerical value, we may generally, without serious error, put I = B /47r, and transform curves of induction into curves of magnetization by merely altering the scale to which the ordinates are referred.

    0
    0
  • During the first stage, when the magnetizing force is small, the magnetization (or the induction) increases rather slowly with increasing force; this is well shown by the nickel curve in the diagram, but the effect would be no less conspicuous in the iron curve if the abscissae were plotted to a larger scale.

    0
    0
  • The induction, however, continues to increase indefinitely, though very slowly.

    0
    0
  • The permeability of a soft iron wire, which was tapped while subjected to a very small magnetizing force, rose to the enormous value of about 80,000 (Magnetic Induction, § 85).

    0
    0
  • per cycle at an induction of 8000, being 1 6 times the loss shown by Ewing's specimen at the same induction.

    0
    0
  • The standard induction in reference to determinations of hysteresis is generally taken as 2500, while the loss is expressed in watts per lb at a frequency of ioo double reversals, or cycles, per second.

    0
    0
  • The loss for any induction B within the range for which Steinmetz's law holds may be converted into that for the standard induction 2500 by dividing it by B 6 /2500'.

    0
    0
  • The actual experiment to which it relates was carried only as the point marked X, corresponding to a magnetizing force of 65, and an induction of nearly 17,000.

    0
    0
  • Rowland, believing that the curve would continue to fall in a straight line meeting the horizontal axis, inferred that the induction corresponding to the point B-about 17,500-was the highest I Phil.

    0
    0
  • but though the force was thus increased ninefold, the induction only reached 19,800, and the ultimate value of the permeability was still as much as 33'9.

    0
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  • Trans., 1885, 176, 455) introduced a modification of the usual ballistic arrangement which presents the following advantages: (I) very considerable magnetizing forces can be applied with ordinary means; (2) the samples to be tested, having the form of cylindrical bars, are more easily prepared than rings or wires; (3) the actual induction at any time can be measured, and not only changes of induction.

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  • Between the magnetizing coils is a small induction coil D, which is connected with a ballistic galvanometer.

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    0
  • The induction coil is carried upon the end of one portion of the test bar, and when this portion is suddenly drawn back the coil slips off and is pulled out of the field by an india-rubber spring.

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    0
  • This causes a ballistic throw proportional to the induction through the bar at the moment when the two portions were separated.

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  • Ewing (Magnetic Induction, § 194) has devised an arrangement in which two similar test bars are placed side by side; each bar is surrounded by a magnetizing coil, the two coils being connected to give opposite directions of magnetization, and each pair of ends is connected by a short massive block of soft iron having holes bored through it to fit the bars, which are clamped in position by set-screws.

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  • Induction coils are wound on the middle parts of both bars, and are connected in series.

    0
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  • If H l and H2 be the values of 47rinll and 47ri' - 'Z/ l for the 2 2 same induction B, it can be shown that the true magnetizing force is H = H l - (H 2 - H 1).

    0
    0
  • The induction of the magnetization may be measured by observing the force required to draw apart the two portions of a divided rod or ring when held together by their mutual attraction.

    0
    0
  • Below is given a selection from Bidwell's tables, showing corresponding values of magnetizing force, weight supported, magnetization, induction, susceptibility and permeability: - A few months later R.

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  • Mag., 1886, 22, 535) experimented on the relation of tractive force to magnetic induction.

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  • The joint was surrounded by an induction coil connected with a ballistic galvanometer, an arrangement which enabled him to make an independent measurement of the induction at the moment when the two portions of the bar were separated.

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    0
  • The greatest weight supported in the experiments was 14,600 grammes per square cm., and the corresponding induction 18, Soo units.

    0
    0
  • Several instruments in which the traction method is applied have been devised for the rapid measurement of induction or of magnetization in commercial samples of iron and steel.

    0
    0
  • Ewing has described an arrangement in which the test bar has a soft-iron pole piece clamped to each of its ends; the pole pieces are joined by a long well-fitting block of iron, which is placed upon them (like the " keeper " of a magnet), and the induction is measured by the force required to detach the block.

    0
    0
  • 1898, 27, 526), the value of the magnetic induction corresponding to a single stated magnetizing force is directly read off on a divided scale.

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    0
  • The position of the weight at the moment when contact is broken indicates the induction in the rod.

    0
    0
  • above them (thus A compass needle placed in the gap serves to detect any flow of induction that may exist between the bent bars.

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    0
  • Suppose the switches to be adjusted so that the effective number of turns in the variable coil is loo; the magnetizing forces in the two coils will then be equal, and if the test rod is of the same quality as the standard, the flow of induction will be confined entirely to the iron circuit, the two yokes will be at the same magnetic potential, and the compass needle will not be affected.

    0
    0
  • If, however, the permeability of the test rod differs from that of the standard, the number of lines of induction flowing in opposite directions through the two rods will differ, and the excess will flow from one yoke to the other, partly through the air, and partly along the path provided by the bent bars, deflecting the compass needle.

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  • But a balance may still be obtained by altering the effective number of turns in the test coil, and thus increasing or decreasing the magnetizing force acting on the test rod, till the induction in the two rods is the same, a condition which is fulfilled when reversal of the current has no effect on the compass needle.

    0
    0
  • Let m be the number of turns in use, and H 1 and H2 the magnetizing forces which produce the same induction B in the test and the standard rods respectively; then H1=H2Xm/Ioo.

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  • - Since in air B = H, the ballistic method of measuring induction described above is also available for determining the strength of a magnetic field, and is more often employed than any other.

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  • Upon the central neck was wound a coil consisting of one or two layers of very fine wire, which was connected with a ballistic galvanometer for measuring the induction in the iron; outside this coil, and separated from it by a small and accurately determined distance, a second coil was wound, serving to measure the induction in the iron, together with that in a small space surrounding it.

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  • Two groups of observations were recorded, one giving the induction in the inner coil and the other that in the outer coil.

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  • The value of the residual induction which persisted when the bobbin was drawn out was added to that of the induction measured, and thus the total induction in the iron was determined.

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  • The highest induction reached in these experiments was 45,350 units, more than twice the value of any previously recorded.

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  • There appears to be no definite limit to the value to which the induction B may be raised, but the magnetization I attains a true saturation value under magnetizing forces which are in most cases comparatively moderate.

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  • Thus the magnetization which the sample of Swedish iron received in a field of 1490 was not increased (beyond the limits of experimental error) when the intensity of the field was multiplied more than thirteen-fold, though the induction was nearly doubled.

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  • When the saturation value of I has been reached, the relation of magnetic induction to magnetic force may be expressed by B = H +constant.

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  • Trans., 1885, 176, 580; 1888, 1 79, 333; Magnetic Induction, 1900, ch.

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  • The effects of longitudinal pressure are opposite to those of traction; when the cyclic condition has been reached, pressure reduces the magnetization of iron in weak fields and increases it in strong fields (Ewing, Magnetic Induction, 1900, 223).

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  • 4 Magnetic Induction, 1900, 222.

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  • The primary coil carried the magnetizing current; the secondary, which was wound inside the other, could be connected either with a ballistic galvanometer for determining the induction, or with a Wheatstone's bridge for measuring the resistance, whence the temperature was calculated.

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  • Specimens of curves showing the relation of induction to magnetic field at various temperatures, and of permeability to temperature with fields of different intensities, are given in figs.

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  • Induction curves of an annealed soft-iron ring were taken first at a temperature of 15° C., and afterwards when the ring was immersed in liquid air, the magnetizing force ranging from about o'8 to 22.

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  • 8 The hysteresis of the soft annealed iron turned out to be sensibly the same for equal values of the induction at - 186° as at 15°, the loss in ergs per c. cm.

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  • The permeability of the alloys containing from 1 to 4.7% of nickel, though less than that of good soft iron for magnetizing forces up to about 20 or 30, was greater for higher forces, the induction reached in a field of 240 being nearly 21,700.

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  • The induction for considerable forces was found to be greater in a steel containing 73% of nickel than in one with only 33%, though the permeability of pure nickel is much less than that of iron.

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  • In the case of iron containing 7.5% of tungsten (W), the residual induction had a remarkably high value; the coercive force, however, was not very great.

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  • 6 A small percentage of aluminium produced still higher permeability (µ=6000 for H=2), the induction in fields up to 60 being greater than in any other known substance, and the hysteresis-loss for moderate limits of B far less than in the purest commercial iron.

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  • Thus in an alloy containing 26.5% of manganese and 14.6% of aluminium, the rest being copper, the induction for H= 20 was 4500, and for H=150, 5550.

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  • to the magnetized cobalt was proportional to the square of the magnetic induction or of the magnetization.

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  • In the first experiments it was calculated from observations of the mutual induction of two conducting circuits in air and in the liquid; the results for oxygen at-182° C. were I 00287, 228 X IO-6.

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  • With small magnetizing forces the hysteresis was indeed somewhat larger than that obtained in an alternating field, probably on account of the molecular changes being forced to take place in one direction only; but at an induction of about 16,00o units in soft iron and 15,000 in hard steel the hysteresis reached a maximum and afterwards rapidly diminished.

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  • In one case the hysteresis loss per cubic centimetre per cycle was 16,100 ergs for B =1 5,900, and only 1200 ergs for B = 20,200, the highest induction obtained in the experiment; possibly it would have vanished before B had reached 21,000.2 These experiments prove that actual friction must be almost entirely absent, and, as Baily remarks, the agreement of the results with the previously suggested deduction affords a strong verification of Ewing's form of the molecular theory.

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  • 910-915) by the Roman poet, Lucretius (96-5555 B.C.), in which it is stated that the stone can support a chain of little rings, each adhering to the one above it, indicates that in his time the phenomenon of magnetization by induction had also been observed.

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  • Among the most splendid of his achievements was the discovery of the phenomena and laws of magneto-electric induction, the subject of two papers communicated to the Royal Society in 1831 and 1832.

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  • Throughout his researches Faraday paid special regard to the medium as the true seat of magnetic action, being to a large extent guided by his pregnant conception of " lines of force," or of induction, which he considered to be " closed curves passing in one part of the course through, the magnet to which they belong, and in the other part through space," always tending to shorten themselves, and repelling one another when they were side by side (Exp. Res.

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  • The practice of measuring magnetic induction and permeability with scientific accuracy was introduced in 1873 by H.

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  • Trans., 1885, 176, 523; Magnetic Induction, 1900.

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  • Induction in Iron and other Metals (3rd ed., London, 2900); Thomson, Recent Researches in Electricity and Magnetism (Oxford, 2893); Elements of Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism 3rd ed., Cambridge, 1904); H.

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  • of the second volume is especially interesting to English thinkers as containing a profound examination of the Induction theories of Bacon, J.

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  • ratiocinari, to use the reasoning faculty) is classified from Aristotle downwards as deductive (from generals to particulars) and inductive (from particulars to generals); see Logic, Induction, Syllogism.

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  • Moreover, there is no denying that the new Nominalism not only represents the love of reality and the spirit of induction, but also contains in itself the germs of that empiricism and:sensualism so frequentlyassociated with the former tendencies.

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  • We then obtain a set of equations, and by means of these equations we establish the required result by a process known as mathematical induction.

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  • The following are some further examples of mathematical induction.

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  • This is the remainder-theorem; it may be proved by induction.

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  • This can be verified by induction.

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  • This may be proved either by induction or by the method of � 52 (vi.).

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  • Induction >>

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  • The production of ozone in small quantities during electrolysis, and by the so-called silent discharge, has long been known, and the Siemens induction tube has been developed for use industrially.

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  • The electrified ebonite is said to act by " electrostatic induction " on the tray, and creates on it two induced charges, one of positive and the other of negative electricity.

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  • This experiment proves that when a charged body acts by induction on an insulated conductor it causes an electrical separation to take place; electricity of opposite sign is drawn to the side nearest the inducing body, and that of like sign is repelled to the remote side, and these quantities are equal in amount.

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  • The explanation is as follows: the charge (-}- Q) of positive electricity on the ball creates by induction an equal charge (- Q) on the inside of the canister when placed in it, and repels to the exterior surface of the canister an equal charge (+ Q).

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  • The electric force due to a point-charge q at a distance r is defined to be q/r 2, and the total flux or induction through the sphere of radius r is therefore 41rq.

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  • CRYSTAL - GAZING, or Scrying, the term commonly applied to the induction of visual hallucinations by concentrating the gaze on any clear deep, such as a crystal or a ball of polished rock crystal.

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  • This form of induction is required to give the clerk a legal title to his beneficium, although his admission to the office by institution is sufficient to vacate any other benefice which he may already possess.

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  • all units of thought) are (1) analysable only by abstraction, and (2) are compound of deduction and induction, i.e.

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  • Most of the practical meters in use at the present time may be classified under the following five heads: electrolytic meters, motor meters, clock meters, intermittent registering meters and induction meters.

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  • Induction Meters are applicable only in the case of alternating current supply.

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  • Now the electric force (P,Q,R) is the force acting on the electrons of the medium moving with velocity v; consequently by Faraday's electrodynamic law (P,Q,R) = (P',Q' - vc, R'+vb) where (P',Q',R') is the force that would act on electrons at rest, and (a,b,c) is the magnetic induction.

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  • where (u,v,w) = and where, when magnetic quality is inoperative, the magnetic induction (a,b,c) is identical with the magnetic force (a,0,y).

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  • Strange as this point is, it is still stranger that not one of these internal evidences is brought into relation with induction and deduction.

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  • Example (7rapabayma) is not called rhetorical induction, and consideration (EVBuµnya) is not called rhetorical syllogism, as they are in the Rhetoric, and in the Analytics.

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  • Induction (E7rayo.y17) and syllogism (ovXXcytcr oc), the general forms of inference, do not occur in the Rhetoric to Alexander.

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  • He gradually became a logician out of his previous studies: out of metaphysics, for with him being is always the basis of thinking, and common principles, such as that of contradiction, are axioms of things before axioms of thought, while categories are primarily things signified by names; out of the mathematics of the Pythagoreans and the Platonists, which taught him the nature of demonstration; out of the physics, of which he imbibed the first draughts from his father, which taught him induction from sense and the modification of strict demonstration to suit facts; out of the dialectic between man and man which provided him with beautiful examples of inference in the Socratic dialogues of Xenophon and Plato; out of the rhetoric addressed to large audiences, which with dialectic called his attention to probable inferences; out of the grammar taught with rhetoric and poetics which led him to the logic of the proposition.

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  • He means that the logical analysis of demonstration in the Analytics would teach them beforehand that there cannot be demonstration, though there must be induction, of an axiom, or any other principle; whereas, if they are not logically prepared for metaphysics, they will expect a demonstration of the axiom, as Heraclitus, the Heraclitean Cratylus and the Sophist Protagoras actually did, - and in vain.

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  • He got so far as gradually to write short discourses and long treatises, which we, not he, now arrange in the order of the Categories or names; the De Interpretatione on propositions; the Analytics, Prior on syllogism, Posterior on scientific syllogism; the Topics on dialectical syllogism; the Sophistici Elenchi on eristical or sophistical syllogism; and, except that he had hardly a logic of induction, he covered the ground.

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  • Logically regarded, the origin of all teaching and learning of an intellectual kind is a process of induction (Enraywyi) from particulars to universal, and of syllogism (ovXXoyco-p5s) from universal to further particulars; induction, whenever it starts from sense, becomes the origin of scientific knowledge (bruiriran); while there is also a third process of example (1rapaSeiyµa) from particular to particular, which produces only persuasion.

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  • In acquiring scientific knowledge, syllogism cannot start from universals without induction, nor induction acquire universals without sense.

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  • Hence, as science and dialectic are different, so scientific induction and syllogism must be distinguished from dialectical induction and syllogism.

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  • But it is by a different process of sense, memory, experience, induction, intelligence, syllogism, that science becomes knowledge of real causes, of real effects, and especially of real essences from which follow real consequences, not beyond, but belonging to real substances.

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  • The Moslem Calendar May Evidently Be Carried On Indefinitely By Successive Addition, Observing Only To Allow For The Additional Day That Occurs In The Bissextile And Intercalary Years; But For Any Remote Date The Computation According To The Preceding Rules Will Be Most Efficient, And Such Computation May Be Usefully Employed As A Check On The Accuracy Of Any Considerable Extension Of The Calendar By Induction Alone.

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  • By the rules of induction from concomitant variations, we are logically bound to infer the realistic conclusion that outer physical stimuli cause inner sensations of sensible effects.

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  • He thought that in the soul there is a productive intellect and a passive intellect, and that, when we rise from sense by induction, the productive causes the passive intellect to receive the universal form or essence, e.g.

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  • In the deflexion experiment, in addition to the induction correction, and that for the effect of temperature on the magnetic moment, a correction has to be applied for the effect of temperature on the length of the bar which supports the deflexion magnet.

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  • The hull of an iron or steel ship is a magnet, and the distribution of its magnetism depends upon the direction of the ship's head when building, this result being produced by induction from the earth's magnetism, developed and impressed by the hammering of the plates and frames during the process of building.

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  • Soft iron is iron which becomes instantly magnetized by induction when exposed to any magnetic force, but has no power of retaining its magnetism.

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  • B has reference to horizontal forces acting in a longitudinal direction in the ship, and caused partly by the permanent magnetism of hard iron, partly by vertical induction in vertical soft iron either before or abaft the compass.

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  • D is due to transient induction in horizontal soft iron, the direction of which passes continuously under or over the compass.

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  • E is due to transient induction in horizontal soft iron unsymmetrically placed with regard to the compass.

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  • The deviation observed when the ship inclines to either side is due - (i) to hard iron acting vertically upwards or downwards; (2) to vertical soft iron immediately below the compass; (3) to vertical induction in horizontal soft iron when inclined.

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  • We must now go on to the crowning discovery of the induction of electric currents.

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  • During his first period of discovery, besides the induction of electric currents, Faraday established the identity of the electrification produced in different ways; the law of the definite electrolytic action of the current; and the fact, upon which he laid great stress, that every unit of positive electrification is related in a definite manner to a unit of negative electrification, so that it is impossible to produce what Faraday called "an absolute charge of electricity" of one kind not related to an equal charge of the opposite kind.

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  • He also discovered the difference of the capacities of different substances for taking part in electric induction.

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  • The theorem, then, seems to have been arrived at by induction, and may have been suggested by the contemplation of floors or walls covered with tiles of the form of equilateral triangles, or squares, or hexagons.

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  • These operate by electrostatic induction and convert mechanical work into electrostatic energy by the aid of a small initial charge which is continually being replenished or reinforced.

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  • Let A and C be two fixed disks, and B a disk which can be brought at will within a very short distance of either A or C. Let us suppose all the plates to be equal, and let the capacities of A and C in presence of B be each equal to p, and the coefficient of induction between A and B, or C and B, be q.

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  • The action of the machine is as follows: Suppose one paper armature to be charged positively, it acts by induction on the right hand comb, causing negative electricity to issue from the comb points upon the glass revolving disk; at the same time the positive electricity passes through the closed discharge circuit to the left comb and issues from its teeth upon the part of the glass disk at the opposite end of the diameter.

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  • Large Wimshurst multiple plate influence machines are often used instead of induction coils for exciting Rntgen ray tubes in medical work.

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  • Bouchotte have 1 See Lord Kelvin, Reprint of Papers on Electrostatics and Magnetism (1872);" Electrophoric Apparatus and Illustrations of Voltaic Theory,"p. 319;" On Electric Machines Founded on Induction and Convection,"p. 330;" The Reciprocal Electrophorus,"P. 337.

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  • those heated by electric arcs, or " induction " ones, i.e.

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  • The Heroult furnace, the best known in the arc class, and the Kjellin and Roechling-Rodenhauser fur- lc naces, the best known of the induction class, will serve as examples.

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  • In the Roechling-Rodenhauser induction furnace (fig.

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  • - Plan of Roechling-Rodenhauser Induction Electric Furnace.

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  • The normal use of the Kjellin induction furnace is to do the work usually done in the crucible process, i.e.

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  • - Kjellin Induction Electric Steel Melting Furnace.

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  • Possession of the benefice is completed by induction, which makes the church full against any one, including the crown.

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  • The word " Induction," which occurs in only three or four passages throughout all his works (and these again minor ones), is never used by him with the faintest reminiscence of the import assigned to it by Bacon; and, as will be seen, he had nothing but scorn for experimental work in physics.

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  • by an induction shock.

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  • Vernon have adduced experimental evidence as to the induction of variation by such causes as difference in the ages of the parents, in the maturity or freshness of the conjugating germ cells, and in the condition of nutrition for the embryos.

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  • It is plain that whilst the existence of variation can be demon strated and the occurrence of evolution established by induction and deduction, the part played by selection must remain largely theoretical.

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  • Or again, the process of scientific induction is a threefold chain; the original hypothesis (the first unification of the fact) seems to melt away when confronted with opposite facts, and yet no scientific progress is possible unless the stimulus of the original unification is strong enough to clasp the discordant facts and establish a reunification.

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  • Meyer, on the basis of a larger induction, has pointed out the relation of this Judah to a large group of Edomite or Edomite-Ishmaelite tribes.

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  • Induction and deduction differ still more, and are in fact opposed, as one makes a particular premise the evidence of a universal conclusion, the other makes a universal premise evidence of a particular conclusion.

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  • Hence we may redivide inference into particular inference by analogy and universal inference by induction and deduction.

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  • Universal inference is what we call reasoning; and its two species are very closely connected, because universal conclusions of induction become universal premises of deduction.

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  • Analogical inference requires that one particular is similar to another, induction that a whole number or class is similar to its particular instances, deduction that each particular is similar to the whole number or class.

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  • Analogy hardly requires as much evidence as induction.

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  • Induction has to consider more instances, and the similarity of a whole number or class.

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  • Deduction or syllogism is superior to analogy and induction in combining premises so as to involve or contain the conclusion.