Indo-european sentence example

indo-european
  • It is now not only the headquarters of the English naval squadron in the Persian Gulf, and the land terminus of the Indo-European telegraph, but it also forms the chief station in the Gulf of the British India Steam Navigation Company, which runs its vessels weekly between Bombay and Basra.
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  • Taking the term Italy to comprise the whole peninsula with the northern region as far as the Alps, we must first distinguish the tribe or tribes which spoke Indo-European languages from those who did not.
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  • The groundwork, so far as it can be ascertained, and the grammar are Indo-European, but a large number of words have been borrowed from the Latin or Italian and Greek, and it is not always easy to decide whether the mutilated and curtailed forms now in use represent adopted words or belong to the original vocabulary.
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  • One has hitherto supposed that he was related to the Mediterraneans, the race to which the Bronze Age Greeks and Italians belonged; but this supposed connexion may well break down in the matter of skull form, as the Hittite skull, like that of the modern Anatolian, probably inclined to be brachycephalic. whereas that of the Mediterranean inclined in the other direction, And now the Bohemian Assyriologist Prof. Hrozny has brought forward evidence s that the cuneiform script adopted by the Hittites from the Mesopotamians expressed an Indo-European tongue, nearly akin to Latin!
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  • Still less foundation exists for the belief, once widely spread, that Bactria was the cradle of the Indo-European race; it was based on the supposition that the nations of Europe had immigrated from Asia, and that the Aryan languages (Indian and Iranian) stood nearest to the original language of the Indo-Europeans.
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  • Indo-European languages and the big sister of Greek and Latin.
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  • The article, though necessarily unsigned (in accordance with the rule of the Quarterly as it then stood), was Maine's reply to the M`Lennan brothers' attack on the historical reconstruction of the Indo-European family system put forward in Ancient Law and supplemented in Early Law and Custom.
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  • There are two conjugations; the passive formation, now wanting inmost Indo-European languages, has been retained, as in Greek; thus kerko-iy, " I seek," forms kerko-n -em, " I am sought."
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  • The name Varuna may be Indo-European, identifiable, some believe, with the Greek ofpavos (Uranus), and ultimately referable to a root var, " to cover," Varuna thus meaning "the Encompasser."
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  • It has no connexion with Indo-European, as has erroneously been supposed.
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  • (2) Too little is known of the Sicel language to make clear more than its Indo-European character.
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  • Their possible place in the earlier stratum of, Indo-European population is discussed under SABINI.
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  • In their country was a wooden city inhabited by a distinct race, the Geloni, who seem to have spoken an Indo-European tongue.
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  • The language, so far as it has been deciphered, is "Asianic" and not Indo-European.
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  • It only remains to be added that there is some ground for supposing that the language spoken in Crete before the later Doric was non-Hellenic, but Indo-European.
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  • Farn; the Indo-European root, seen in the Sanskrit parna, a feather, shows the primary meaning; cf.
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  • Whether the national hieroglyphic system of the Hittites expressed the same Indo-European language as, according to Hrozny, their cuneiform does, we do not know, as further attempts to elucidate it made by Campbell Thompson 11 and Cowley," while in themselves very interesting experiments, do not seem to take us further than previous attempts by Sayce and others.
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  • But of the Scythic words preserved by Herodotus some are Iranian, others, especially the names of deities, have found no satisfactory explanation in any Indo-European language.
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  • Winckler has adduced evidence from names of local gods to show that there was an Indo-European racial element in Mitanni; but none for a similar element in the Hatti, whose chief god was Teshub.
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  • The attempts to connect the name Yahweh with that of an Indo-European deity (Jehovah-Jove, &c.), or to derive it from Egyptian or Chinese, may be passed over.
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  • M`Lennan's theory of primitive society with owing its plausible appearance of universal validity to general neglect of the Indo-European evidence and misapprehension of such portions of it as M`Lennan did attempt to handle.
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  • meoluc; from a common Indo-European root, cf.
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  • The old hand-mill was known as a " quern," a word which appears in this sense in many Indo-European languages; the ultimate root is gar-, to grind.
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  • (1st ed., 1860; 2nd, 1871) was concerned with the origin and racial affinities of the Hindus, exhibiting all the then available evidences of their connexion, their linguistic, social and political kinship, with the other branches of the Indo-European stock.
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  • The Pelasgians probably spoke an Indo-European language adopted by their conquerors with slight modifications.
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  • Singularly few language groups have this peculiarity; and our own great Indo-European group, which possesses it, is distinguished from those above mentioned by having the neuter gender in addition.
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  • It undoubtedly belongs to the Indo-European family, but its earlier forms cannot, unfortunately, be ascertained owing to the absence of literary monuments.
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  • The attempts to connect the language with the Indo-European family have been unsuccessful; it belongs to a separate family of speech which we may term "Asianic."
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  • There exist in Scotland a few inscriptions on stones, in Ogam, which yield no sense in any known Indo-European language.
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  • The whole system is under the control of the Indo-European Telegraph Department, whose directorin-chief is responsible to the Secretary of State for India.
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  • Stall, a common Teutonic word for a place, station, place for standing in; the root is the Indo-European sta -, to stand, seen also in Latin stabulum, Greek QTaOµos, and in stallion, an entire horse, properly one kept in a stall and not worked), a word which means literally a place where one may stand, and so is applied to a separate division in a stable, shed, &c., in which a single horse, cow or other domestic animal may be kept, to a separate booth, bench or table in a market .or other building, or in the street, on which goods are exposed for sale by the person owning or licensed to use the same, and in England to the higher-priced seats on the ground floor of a theatre.
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  • Munda Family (3,179,275) Indo-European Family, Aryan Sub-familyIranian Branch (1,377,023) Indo-Aryan Branch (219,780,650) Semitic Family (42,881)..
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  • Of the Indo-European family, the Iranian branch inhabits Persia, Afghanistan and Baluchistan; while the Indo-Aryan branch is spoken by the great mass of the people of northern India.
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  • Excluding the Indo European telegraph wire, the whole telegraph system of India forms an imperial charge, administered through a director-general.
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  • The administration of the Indo-European department is in London under the direct control of the secretary of state.
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  • (7) Very great interest attaches to the form penkaheh - which Torp very probably identifies with the Oscan stem pompaio - which is a derivative of the Indo-European numeral *penque " 5."
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  • The change of o to a is exceedingly interesting as being a phenomenon associated with the northern branches of Indo-European such as Gothic, Albanian and Lithuanian, and not appearing in any other southern dialect hitherto known.
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  • His Teutonic name is the same as the word for "god" in several ' other Indo-European languages (e.g.
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  • There still remain for discussion the alphabets of the Indo-European peoples of Persia and India from which the other alphabets of the Farther East are descended.
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  • dekken comes "deck"; the Indo-European root is stag, whence Gr.
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  • The mixed type of government described by Homer - consisting of a king guided by a council of elders, and bringing all important resolutions before the assembly of the fighting men - does not seem to have been universal in Indo-European communities, but to have grown up in many different parts of the world under the stress of similar conditions.
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  • The word is common in varying forms to Indo-European languages.
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  • The Welsh language belongs to the Celtic branch of the Aryan or Indo-European family of languages.
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  • Observations for temperature have been taken for many years at the stations of the Indo-European Telegraph and for a few years at the British consulate in Meshed, and the monthly and annual means shown in the following table have been derived from the indications of maximum and minimum thermometers in degrees Fahrenheit.
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  • Statistics of the traffic on the Indo-European line are given in the administration reports of the Indo-European telegraph department, published by government, and from them the figures in the following table have been obtained:
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  • Ancient Ethnograp/iy.In historical times we find the major portion of Iran occupied by peoples of Indo-European origin, terming themselves Aryans (Arya; Zend, Airya) and their language Aryanso in the inscriptions of Dariusthe same name, which is used by the consanguineous tribes of India who were their nearest relations.
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  • Their subjects, on the contrary, speak absolutely different tongues: for the attempts to explain the languages of the Cossaeans, Mitannians, and Arzapians as Indo-European (Iranian) have ended in failure (cf.
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  • These, in part, are rooted in the primeval Indo-European days, though their ultimate form dates only from the Aryan epoch.
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  • The Iranian languages form one of the great branches of the Indo-European stem, first recognized as such by Sir William Jones and Friedrich Schlegel.
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  • Not only amongst Iranian languages, but amongst all the languages of the Indo-European group, Zend takes one of the very highest places in importance for the comparative philologist.
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  • In grammatical forms it is still poorer than Middle New Persian; except English, no Indo-European language Persian.
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  • Some scholarl attribute it to the Iranian family; others prefer to regard it as a separate and independent member of the Indo-European group. Many words that at first sight seem to prove its Iranian origin arc only adopted from the Persian.8 (K.
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  • The ever-restless Baluchi language belongs to the Iranian branch of the Aryan subfamily of the Indo-European family.
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  • The Celts in Italy, in the Balkan, in France and in Britain, overspread the Indo-European peoples, who differed from themselves but slightly in speech.
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  • The Celts represented Indo-European q by p, whilst the Greeks, Illyrians, Thracians, Ligurians, and aborigines of France, Britain and Ireland represented it by k, c or qu.
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  • Galle; the Indo-European root appears in Gr.
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  • Yet more striking is the evidence of the Indo-European (formerly called Aryan) family of languages.
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  • The Indo-European root is seen in Lat.
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  • AIR (from an Indo-European root meaning "breathe," "blow"), the atmosphere that surrounds the earth; Gr.
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  • falten, Dutch vouwen (for vouden), &c., and the ultimate Indo-European root is found in Gr.
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  • By four well-marked characteristics the Aryan group is easily distinguishable from the other Indo-European languages.
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  • The history of the separation of the Aryan from the other Indo-European languages is not yet clear (see INDO-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES).
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  • Up to 1909 only a preliminary account had been given of Tocharish, a hitherto unknown Indo-European language, which is reported to be in some respects more akin to the Western groups than to Aryan.
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  • Max Muller refers the beginning of his system of mythology to the discovery of the connexion of the Indo-European or, as they are called, " Aryan " languages.
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  • The comparison of the various words which, in different forms, are common to all Indo-European languages must inevitably throw much light on the original meaning of these words.
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  • Max Muller's system was a result of the philological theories that indicated the linguistic unity of the Indo-European or " Aryan " peoples, and was founded on an analysis of their language.
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  • In the long history of mankind it is impossible to deny that stories may conceivably have spread from a single centre, and been handed on from races like the Indo-European and the Semitic to races as far removed from them in every way as the Zulus, the Australians, the Eskimo, the natives of the South Sea Islands.
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  • The Ligurians, who exhibited the hard cunning characteristic of the Genoese Riviera, must have been descendants of that Indo-European vanguard who occupied all northern Italy and the centre and south-east of France, who in the 7th century B.C. received the Phocaean immigrants at Marseilles, and who at a much later period were encountered by Hannibal during his Ligiwians.
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  • 744 - which seems to connect it with the locative of aequum " a plain," so that it would mean "dwellers in the plain"; but in the historical period they certainly lived mainly in the hills), we should know whether they were to be grouped with the q or the p dialects, that is to say, with Latin on the one hand, which preserved an original q, or with the dialect of Velitrae, commonly called Volscian (and the Volsci were the constant allies of the Aequi), on the other hand, in which, as in the Iguvine and Samnite dialects, an original q is changed into p. There is no decisive evidence to show whether the q in Latin aequus represents an Indo-European q as in Latin quis, Umbro-Volsc. pis, or an Indo-European k + u as in equus, Umb.
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  • We (as western speakers of Indo-European languages) take as axiomatic that there is one self that is each of us.
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  • skua, shade; connected with an Indo-European root sku, cover, whence "scum," Lat.
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  • If the conclusions suggested under Sabini may be accepted as sound we should expect to find the Volsci speaking a language similar to that of the Ligures, whose fondness for the suffix -sco- we have noticed (see Ligures), and identical with that spoken by the plebeians of Rome, and that this branch of Indo-European was among those which preserved the original Indo-European Velars from the labialization which befell them in the speech of the Samnites.
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  • Of all the other tribes that inhabited Italy down to the classical period, of whose speech there is any record (whether explicit or in the form of names and glosses), it is impossible to maintain that any one does not belong to the Indo-European group. Putting aside the Etruscan, and also the different Greek dialects of the Greek colonies, like Cumae, Neapolis, Tarentum, and proceeding from the south to the north, the different languages or dialects, of whose separate existence at some time between, say, 600 and 200 B.C., we can be, sure, may be enumerated as follows: (I) Sicel, (2) South Oscan.
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  • Although the ritualistic discussions of the Brahmanas are for the most part of a dry and uninteresting nature to an even greater degree than is often the case with exegetic theological treatises, these works are nevertheless of considerable importance both as regards the history of Indian institutions and as "the oldest body of Indo-European prose, of a generally free, vigorous, simple form, affording valuable glimpses backwards at the primitive condition of unfettered Indo-European talk" (Whitney).
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  • Many Indo-European elements appear in their place-names (e.g.
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  • This sound was frequent in the pro-ethnic period of the Indo-European languages and survived into the Indo-Aryan languages.
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  • Quinctilius), indicate clearly certain peculiarities in Sabine phonology: namely, (I) the representation of the Indo-European palatal aspirate gh by f instead of Lat.
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  • Dict., 1898) finds the ultimate origin in the Indo-European base stale-, to be firm or still, and compares Lat.
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  • With these inroads of the Cimmerians and Scythians (see ScYTIIIA), we must doubtless connect the great ethnographical revolution in the north of anterior Asia; the Indo-European Armenians (Haik), displacing the old Alaro..
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  • The Indo-European or Indo-Germanic languages are divided by Brugmann into (1) Aryan, with sub-branches (a) Indian, (b) Iranian; (2) Armenian; (3) Greek; (4) Albanian; (~) Italic; (6) Celtic; (7) Germanic, with sub-branches (a) Gothic, (b) Scandinavian, (c) West Germanic; and (8) Balto-Slavonic. (See INDO-EUROPEAN.) The Aryan family (called by Professor Sievers the Asiatic base-language) is subdivided into (1) Iranian (Eranian, or Erano-Aryan) languages, (2) Pisacha, or non-Sanskritic Indo-Aryan languages, (3) Indo-Aryan, or Sanskritic Indo-Aryan languages (for the last two see INDO-ARYAN) Iranian being also grouped into Persian and non-Persian.
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  • cella, probably from an Indo-European kal - seen in Lat.
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  • Indo-European Languages Tutorials: This online site is another spectacular winner.
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