Indiscriminately sentence example

indiscriminately
  • Many words are used indiscriminately as nouns, adjectives or verbs, without any change of form.
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  • He's capable of great violence, but he doesn't act indiscriminately.
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  • On both sides was civil war, urged as fiercely as that against the common enemy, in which the parties sought allies indiscriminately among Christians and Mahommedans.
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  • There can be little doubt that the earlier of these expeditions were from Denmark, though the term Northmen was originally applied indiscriminately to all these terrible visitants from the unknown north.
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  • He also read largely, though somewhat indiscriminately, in French literature, and appears to have been particularly struck with Pascal's Provincial Letters, which he tells us he reperused almost every year of his subsequent life with new pleasure, and which he particularly mentions as having been, along with Bleterie's Life of Julian and Giannone's History of Naples, a book which probably contributed in a special sense to form the historian of the Roman empire.
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  • In Asia Minor the Kurdish troops under Ibrahim Pasha revolted, and, although they were defeated with the loss of their commander, the Kurds continued to attack indiscriminately the Turks, Nestorians and Armenians; disturbances also broke out among the other reactionary Moslems of this region, culminating in a massacre of the Armenians at Adana.
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  • The acting-president had in his absence been granted leave by the volksraad to carry out various measures opposed to the public welfare; native lands had been indiscriminately allotted to adventurers, and a war with Sikukuni (Secocoeni), a native chief on the eastern borders of the country, was imminent.
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  • Not, however, all diseases of the nervous system conduct themselves on these definite paths, for some of them pay no attention to the geography of structure, but, as one may say, blunder indiscriminately among the several parts; others, again, pick out particular parts definitely enough, but not parts immediately continuous, or even contiguous.
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  • An enormous accumulation of lunatics of all sorts and degrees seems to have paralysed public authorities, who, at vast expense in buildings, mass them more or less indiscriminately in barracks, and expect that their sundry and difficult disorders can be properly studied and treated by a medical superintendent charged with the whole domestic establishment, with a few young assistants under him.
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  • The natives, whom the French call Kanakas (Canaques, a word meaning "man," applied indiscriminately to many Pacific peoples), live on reservations.
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  • The cachet of the Fukagawa atelier was indiscriminately applied to all such pieces, and has probably proved a source of confusion to collectors.
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  • The name Protestant seems to have been first applied to the protesting princes by their opponents, and it soon came to be used indiscriminately of all the adherents of the reformed religion.
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  • The rank and file of the Tatar soldiery were known as Kazaki, or Cossacks, a word meaning "freebooters," and this term came to be applied indiscriminately to all the free dwellers in the Ukraine, or border-lands.
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  • The word is used loosely, especially by Hindu authors, to designate all the tribes which from time to time invaded India from the north, much as all the tribes who invaded China are indiscriminately termed Tatars.
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  • One lesson only, instead of many, has to be learnt; and once learnt at the expense of a few individuals of one or two species it will thereafter be applied indiscriminately to all.
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  • This warning applies notably to those - usually women - who are accustomed indiscriminately to use belladonna or atropine in order to give greater brilliancy to their eyes.
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  • Still the tendency to treat merchet as a distinctive feature of serfdom has to be noted, and we find that the custom spread for this very reason in consequence of the encroachments of powerful lords: in the Hundred Rolls it is applied indiscriminately to the whole rustic population of certain hundreds in a way which can hardly be explained unless by artificial extension.
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  • They are all called " Digger Indians " indiscriminately, although divided by a multiplicity of tongues.
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  • Birds of either phase of plumage pair indiscriminately, and the young show by their earliest feathers whether they will prove whole or parti-coloured; but in their immature plumage the upper surface is barred with pale reddish brown.
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  • Now, whatever speculation may say as to God's purpose being necessarily universal benevolence, experience plainly shows us that our present happiness and misery depend upon our conduct, and are not distributed indiscriminately.
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  • It is necessary, therefore, that assent should not be given indiscriminately; we must determine a criterion of truth, a special formal test whereby reason may recognize the merely plausible and hold fast the true.
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  • Thus Mommsen (History of Rome) indiscriminately describes the supremacy of Rome over Armenia as " suzerainty " or " protectorate."
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  • In recent times the term tarantula has been applied indiscriminately to many different kinds of large spiders in no way related to Lycosa tarantula; and to at least one Arachnid belonging to a distinct order.
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  • As president of the elder society he had already in 1892 foreshadowed the ideals of the League in a lecture entitled " The necessity for de-anglicizing the Irish nation," not, he explained " as a protest against imitating what is best in the English people, for that would be absurd, but rather to show the folly of neglecting what is Irish, and hastening to adopt, pell-mell and indiscriminately, everything that is English, simply because it is English."
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  • All later collections availed themselves indiscriminately of the contents of this vast collection, whether authentic or forged, without the least suspicion.
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  • Many words are used indiscriminately, as nouns, adjectives or verbs, without change; but sometimes a noun is indicated by its termination.
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  • In some species the male deposits small oval spermatophores indiscriminately on any part of the body of the female.
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  • It is obviously on the. face of it an atrocious practice because it indiscriminately punishes men who are completely guiltless of any war crime.
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  • Secrecy concerning practical formulae of ceremonial magic is also advisable, for if they are used indiscriminately, the virtue goes out of them.
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  • Mimetic posture-dances (Shosagoto) were always introduced as interludes; past and present indiscriminately contributed to the playwrights subjects; realism was carried to extremes; a revolving stage and all mechanical accessories were supplied; female parts were invariably taken by males, who attained almost incredible skill in these simulations; a chorusrelic of the Nochanted expositions of profound sentiments or thrilling incidents; and histrionic talent of the very highest order was often displayed.
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  • It is pointed out that the word missa long continued to be applied to any church service, and more particularly to the lections (see Du Cange for numerous examples), and it is held that such services received their name of missal from the solemn form of dismissal with which it was customary to conclude them; thus, in the 4th century Pilgrimage of Etheria (Silvia) the word missa is used indiscriminately of the Eucharist, other services, and the ceremony of dismissal.
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  • Pour it out indiscriminately; drown everyone around you in the vapid production of versified prose !
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  • The woodcut images that frequently adorn printed broadsides were often recycled, wandering somewhat indiscriminately from one ballad to another.
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  • Looking to turn the greatest profit, these businesses tend to breed indiscriminately for mass production.
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  • Because they are bred indiscriminately for mass production and profit, the puppies from puppy mills often have severe congenital defects and serious health problems.
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  • Dogs are bred constantly and indiscriminately.
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  • Dahlia - Distinct groups of Dahlias present a fine effect, if the colors are well chosen, and many good effects are spoilt by mixing up tall and dwarf bushy kinds indiscriminately.
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  • At first, babies will indiscriminately try to grasp things that cannot be grasped, such as pictures in a book, as well as those that can, such as a rattle or ball.
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  • His older brother, Damon, is far more hedonistic and feeds indiscriminately.
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  • Many people feel sugar alcohols are "free" foods they can eat indiscriminately.
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  • The English form "eremite," which was used, according to the New English Dictionary, quite indiscriminately with "hermit" till the middle of the 17th century, is now chiefly used in poetry or rhetorically, except with reference to the early hermits of the Libyan desert, or sometimes to such particular orders as the eremites of St Augustine (see Augustinian Hermits).
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  • Nevertheless, though the conceptions originally denoted by " evolution " and " development " were shown to be untenable, the words retained their application to the process by which the embryos of living beings gradually make their appearance; and the terms" development," " Entwickelung,"and " evolutio " are now indiscriminately used for the series of genetic changes exhibited by living beings, by writers who would emphatically deny that " development " or " Entwickelung " or " evolutio," in the sense in which these words were usually employed by Bonnet or Haller, ever occurs.
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  • Of such probably are the toxins and antitoxins of certain infections, which, anchoring themselves not by any means indiscriminately, but to particular and concerted molecules, by such anchorage antagonize them or turn them to favourable or unfavourable issues.
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  • Moreover, zinc and bismuth were confused, and the word spiauter (the modern spelter) was indiscriminately given to both these metals.
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  • Thus, one of them is named indiscriminately Nan-shan, Richthofen Range and Momoshan.
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  • But the terms passport and sea-letter are often used indiscriminately.
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  • The ultimate origin of this word is the Sanskrit root man-, meaning to "think," seen in "man," "mind," &c. The term "mandarin" is not, in its western usage, applied indiscriminately to all civil and military officials, but only to those who are entitled to wear a "button," which is.
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  • In 427 Cleon gained an evil notoriety by his proposal to put to death indiscriminately all the inhabitants of Mytilene, which had put itself at the head of a revolt.
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  • The average age a first depressive episode occurs is in the mid-20s, although the disorder strikes all age groups indiscriminately, from children to the elderly.
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