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indignation

indignation

indignation Sentence Examples

  • Everywhere intense indignation was aroused by the cruel tortures and executions.

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  • She has not even learned that exhibition on which so many pride themselves, of 'righteous indignation.'

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  • On first receiving the news, under the influence of indignation and resentment the Emperor had found a phrase that pleased him, fully expressed his feelings, and has since become famous.

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  • Peter's first serious outburst of indignation was due to the prince's looting in Poland.

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  • In spite of the courage and presence of mind of Cairoli, who received the dagger thrust intended for the king, public and parliamentary indignation found expression in a vote which compelled the ministry to resign.

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  • But their excesses, and in particular the Cabochien ordinance of the 25th of May 1413, aroused public indignation; a reaction took place, and in the month of August the Armagnacs in their turn became masters of the government and of the king.

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  • It was his cool treatment of such sanctified names as Charles, Cranmer and Laud that provoked the indignation of Southey and the Quarterly, who forgot that the same impartial measure was extended to statesmen on the other side.

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  • It was his cool treatment of such sanctified names as Charles, Cranmer and Laud that provoked the indignation of Southey and the Quarterly, who forgot that the same impartial measure was extended to statesmen on the other side.

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  • At last popular indignation against the courtiers, came to a head in the famous Good Parliament of 1376.

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  • In 1875 Bismarck was suspected of a design of again attacking France, and Gorchakov gave him to understand, in a way which was not meant to be offensive, but which roused the German chancellor's indignation, that Russia would oppose any such scheme.

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  • Nearly all the best writers are characterized by a certain naive and earnest piety which is attractive, and not infrequently display a force of moral indignation which arrests attention.

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  • Then Robespierre turned against Desmoulins and took advantage of the popular indignation roused against the Hebertists to send them to death.

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  • Then Robespierre turned against Desmoulins and took advantage of the popular indignation roused against the Hebertists to send them to death.

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  • Boleslaus in his fury slew the saintly bishop, but so general was the popular indignation that he had to fly his kingdom.

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  • Upon his head was concentrated the whole of the popular indignation against the foreign favourites; and he seems to have deserved this unenviable distinction.

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  • Public indignation was aroused by what were known as the "Bulgarian atrocities," and Gladstone flung himself into the agitation against Turkey with characteristic zeal.

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  • The indignation of the Christians increased, a state of insecurity prevailed, and the Moslem peasants refused to return to their homes.

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  • He rejected with indignation the miraculous stories told to confirm the doctrine of transubstantiation.

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  • The circumstances of General Gordon's untimely death awoke an outburst of indignation against those who were, or seemed to be, responsible for it.

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  • In August there were strikes among the dock laborers of Genoa and the iron workers of Florence; the latter agitation developed into a general strike in that city, which aroused widespread indignation among the orderly part of the population and ended without any definite result.

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  • When it was found that there was to be no direct compensation for Italy a storm of indignation was aroused against Austria, and also against Signor Tittoni.

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  • They began to be alarmed by the severity with which the edicts against heresy were being carried out, and by the rising indignation among the populace.

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  • He was also aware that the exactions of the French had produced deep indignation throughout Germany and especially in Prussia.

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  • The indignation with which the queen repelled the idea may have made him think of the duke of Orleans as a possible constitutional king, because his title would of necessity be parliamentary.

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  • Her conduct excited popular indignation; and the consequent disorders, amounting almost to civil war, gave an opportunity to the ambition of Andronicus.

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  • The prevalent famine and distress are due to Yahweh's indignation at such remissness.

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  • His actions at this time have been ascribed to righteous indignation against Metternich's double-dealing.

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  • The action of the British cabinet caused both astonishment and indignation throughout South Africa and in the other selfgoverning states of the empire.

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  • The birth of an heir to the throne (Prince Henry) in 1594 strengthened her position and influence; but the young prince, much to her indignation, was immediately withdrawn from her care and entrusted to the keeping of the earl and countess of Mar at Stirling Castle; in 1595 James gave a written command, forbidding them in case of his death to give up the prince to the queen till he reached the age of eighteen.

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  • The popular indignation at such scandalous miscarriages of justice rendered a change in the composition of the courts imperative.

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  • The popular indignation at such scandalous miscarriages of justice rendered a change in the composition of the courts imperative.

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  • This partisan action aroused such indignation that at the next election he was again chosen governor, by a large majority, and served from 1825 until his death.

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  • The agitation had no immediate effect, but the indignation which he aroused against Russian policy had much to do with the strong anti-Russian feeling which made the Crimean War possible.

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  • When the terms of the Austro-Piedmontese armistice were announced in the Chamber at Turin they aroused great indignation, but the king succeeded in convincing the deputies Piedmont that they were inevitable.

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  • There was nothing of stoical austerity or of rhetorical indignation in the tone in which he treated the vices and follies of his time.

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  • "I didn't lie," he said with indignation.

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  • But his indignation and persistent refusal to comply with the request that he should voluntarily leave France had to be met at last with force: he was apprehended, imprisoned for a week at Vincennes, and on the 17th of December conducted to the French border.

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  • His temper was hot, kept under rigid control; his disposition tender, gentle and loving, with flashing scorn and indignation against all that was ignoble and impure; he was a good husband, father and friend.

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  • Mr Hofmeyr, on meeting the executive, freely expressed indignation at these proceedings.

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  • Considering the part he played in this transaction, Walsingham was fortunate to escape the fate which the queen with calculated indignation inflicted upon Davison.

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  • Meanwhile the reactionaries of Vienna were goading the Magyar Liberals into revolt, and Arany found a safety-valve for his growing indignation by composing a satirical poem in hexameters, entitled "The Lost Constitution."

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  • Carmen said with mock indignation.

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  • He plied her lips gently, testing and encouraging, and she felt herself respond despite her indignation.

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  • His arrest had caused great indignation.

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  • The conclusion of the treaty of Bardo on the 12th of May, however, compelled Cairoli to sacrifice himself to popular indignation.

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  • The contrast between the obscurity of such a man and the fame enjoyed by the fluent young doctors roused Bacon's indignation.

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  • He passed six quiet years in the convent, but his poems written during that period are expressive of burning indignation against the corruptions of the church and profoundest sorrow for the calamities of his country.

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  • But there are no reasons for thinking the performance ironical or insincere, and it cannot be doubted that Defoe would have been honestly unable even to understand Lamb's indignation.

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  • The assent of Lord Elgin to the bill provoked in Montreal a riot which ended in the burning of the houses of parliament, and so great was the indignation of the hitherto ultra-loyal Conservative party that many of its most prominent members signed a document favouring annexation to the United States; Macdonald on the other hand took steps, in conjunction with others, to form a British-American league, having for its object the confederation of all the provinces, the strengthening of the connexion with the mother country, and the adoption of a national commercial policy.

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  • Some months later he signed the bail bond of Jefferson Davis, and this provoked a torrent of public indignation.

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  • This incident provoked the wildest indignation, and Russia was for some days on the verge of war with England.

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  • This attack on the religion and property of the Saxons aroused intense indignation, and provoked the rising of 782 which marks the beginning of the second period of the war.

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  • The supposition least favourable to Rousseau is that it was due to one of his numerous fits of half-insane petulance and indignation at the obligations which he was nevertheless always ready to incur.

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  • Even the Hebrew historian ascribes to this act the effect of rousing divine indignation against the invading host of Israel; it would not, therefore, be surprising if under the miseries brought on Palestine by the westward march of the Assyrian power, the idea of the sacrifice of one's own son, as the most powerful of atoning rites, should have taken hold of those kings of Judah (Ahaz and Manasseh, 2 Kings xvi.

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  • The failure of these negotiations, for which he was only in part responsible, led to the universal movement of indignation and impatience, which ended, in France, in the declaration of neutrality (1408), and at Pisa, in the decree of deposition against the two pontiffs (1409).

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  • Popular indignation was unbounded, and Sackville was dismissed from his offices.

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  • Skilfully taking advantage of the jealousies of Poland and Lithuania, as they were accentuated by the personal antagonism of Jagiello and Witowt (q.v.), with the latter of whom the Knights more than once contracted profitable alliances, they even contrived (Treaty of Salin, 1378) to extend their territory by getting possession of the province of Samogitia, the original seat of the Lithuanians, where paganism still persisted, and where their inhuman cruelties finally excited the horror and indignation of Christian Europe.

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  • Had not Lady Jane still been alive to take off the edge of Mary's indignation and suspicion Elizabeth might have paid forfeit for Wyat's rebellion with her life instead of imprisonment.

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  • His gloomy experiences of student life are reflected in a series of sketches named after two districts of Upsala, Fran Fjerdingen och Svartbacken (1877), which aroused great indignation at the time.

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  • But the publicity given to a document scarcely known till then raised the utmost indignation against the Society.

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  • Considering the part he played in this transaction, Walsingham was fortunate to escape the fate which the queen with calculated indignation inflicted upon Davison.

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  • Meanwhile the reactionaries of Vienna were goading the Magyar Liberals into revolt, and Arany found a safety-valve for his growing indignation by composing a satirical poem in hexameters, entitled "The Lost Constitution."

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  • His sympathetic nature was influenced by indignation against the brutal methods adopted towards prisoners, especially political prisoners, and by the stern measures which the government of the tsar felt compelled to adopt in order to repress the revolutionary movement.

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  • His indignation carried him into accord for a time with those who advocated the terrorist policy.

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  • This announcement raised a storm of indignation among the European community in India, and the government were obliged virtually, though not avowedly, to abandon their measure.

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  • The growing violence of his latest works is to be accounted for, not only by his burning indignation against the ever-advancing secularization of the Catholic church, but also by the incompatibility between the authorities which he recognized and yet was not able to reconcile.

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  • Weyler attempted to do this by a policy of inexorable repression, which raised a storm of indignation, and led to a demand from America for his recall.

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  • steamer "Malacca" on July 13th in the Red Sea by the Russian volunteer cruiser "Peterburg" led to a storm of indignation, and the sinking of the "Knight Commander" (July 24th) by the Vladivostok squadron intensified the feeling.

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  • A Frenchman before everything, he abased the papal power to such an extent as to excite the indignation of his contemporaries, often slavishly subordinating it to the exigencies of the domestic and foreign policy of the Angevins at Naples and the reigning house at Paris.

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  • The indignation of the pope and his advisers was not deep enough to prevent the ratification in 1803 of a somewhat similar concordat for the Italian Republic. In 1804 Pius consented to anoint Napoleon emperor, thus casting over a conquered crown the halo of legitimacy.

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  • He regarded the monstrous system of misrule for which they were primarily responsible with indignation, made no secret of his sentiments, and soon gathered round him a band of young officers of strong royalist proclivities, whom he formed into a club, the so-called Svenska Botten (Sweden's groundwork).

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  • Pathos and indignation, subtlety and simplicity, personal appeal and political reasoning, were the alternate weapons with which she fought against all odds of evidence or inference, and disputed step by step every inch of debatahle ground.

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  • Paulet, with loyal and regretful indignation, declined the disgrace proposed to him in a suggestion "to shed blood without law or warrant"; and on the 7th of February the earls of Shrewsbury and Kent arrived at Fotheringay with the commission of the council for execution of the sentence given against his prisoner.

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  • Great indignation was therefore felt at the idea of giving them up, when Holland (14th of March 1838) signified eT its readiness to accept the conditions of the treaty.

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  • The indignation against him on account of his first-named work was so great that he would probably have been compelled to leave Italy had not Alphonso V.

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  • In the outburst of indignation, followed by increasing disaffection in Ireland, which this event produced, Grattan acted with conspicuous moderation and loyalty, which won for him warm acknowledgments from a member of the English cabinet.2 That cabinet, however, doubtless influenced by the wishes of the king, was now determined firmly to resist the Catholic demands, with the result that the country rapidly drifted towards rebellion.

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  • Neither those whom his masterpiece soon roused to enthusiasm, nor those whom it moved to indignation, were likely to be indifferent to anything he should now write, whether it lay near to or far from the region of practice.

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  • In view of popular indignation he resigned in order to avoid making inopportune declarations to the chamber.

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  • The news of the convention of Gastein, which seemed to re-cement the union of Germany, had been received in France with clamorous indignation; and on the France.

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  • On the 14th of March 1867 Thiers in the French Chamber gave voice to the indignation of France at the bungling policy that had suffered the aggrandizement of Prussia.

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  • (This law, which still exists, is popularly known as the Kanzlei or Pulpit-paragraph.) It was of course opposed by the Centre, who declared that the Reichstag had no right to interfere in what was after all a religious question, and the Bavarian Opposition expressed much indignation that their government should turn for help to the Protestants of the North in order to force upon -the Catholics of Bavaria a law which they could not have carried in that state.

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  • The action of the government, however, caused great indignation, and in a debate on the address an amendment was carried petitioning the king to dismiss his ministry.

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  • It is only fair to say that no real proof was brought that the Socialists had anything to do with either of these crimes, or that either of the men was really a member of the Socialist party; nevertheless, a storm of indignation rose against them.

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  • The persecution of the Poles in Prussia naturally iroused indignation in Austria, where the Poles had for long been among the strongest elements on which the government depended; and it was not always easy to prevent the agitation on behalf of the Germans in Bohemia from assuming a dangerous aspect.

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  • These Clerical amendments aroused a strong feeling of indignation.

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  • This arrangement, which made the Prussian police the active allies of the Third Section in the persecution of The political suspects, created vast indignation among all K~inigs- shades Of Liberal opinion in Germany, an indignation berg which culminated with the famous Konigsberg trial.

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  • In 1902 the Clerical majority in the Bavarian diet had refused to vote inter20,000 asked by the government for art purposes, vention whereupon the emperor had telegraphed expressing ~i~:rur his indignation and offering to give the money himself, an offer that was politely declined.

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  • The German Left opposed it; they were compelled to do so by the popular indignation in the German districts; and when the vote was carried against them (12th June 1895) they made it a question of confidence, and formally withdrew their support from the government, which therefore at once resigned.

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  • Shortly after a rescript arrived from Constantinople confirming Mug~afa Pasha in the governors4fip. Similarly in 1631 the army took upon themselves to depose the governor Mflsa Pasha, in indignation at his execution of KIts Bey, an officer who was to have commanded an Egyptian force required for service in Persia.

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  • The presentation of the memorial provoked an outburst of indignation.

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  • A still more striking contrast is the passionate outburst of sympathy and indignation with which, in the same diary, he comments on the supposed kidnapping of Luther by foul play on his return from the diet of Worms. Without being one of those who in his city took an avowed part against the old ecclesiastical system, and probably without seeing clearly whither the religious ferment of the time was tending - without, that is, being properly speaking a Reformer - Diirer in his art and his thoughts was the incarnation of those qualities of the German character and conscience which resulted in the Reformation; and, personally, with the fathers of the Reformation he lived in the warmest sympathy.

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  • He cast out the spirit of negation, and henceforth the temper of his misery was changed to one, not of " whining," but of " indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance."

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  • In 1621, they were carried in parliament by a fair majority; to the horror and bitter indignation of all men and women of the old leaven.

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  • When the part played by President Cordero in this transaction became known, an outburst of popular indignation occurred.

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  • He certainly had not approved of Henry's general treatment of the church, especially during the ascendancy of Cromwell, and he was frequently visited with storms of royal indignation, which he schooled himself to bear with patience.

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  • These seizures created much indignation and anxiety among firms in England whose interests were involved.

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  • A climax of indignation is reached when a blind man is healed at the pool of Siloam on the sabbath day.

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  • It then became necessary to examine the papal claims. He set himself to study the Decretals, and to his amazement and indignation he found that they were full of frauds.

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  • At Worms the indignation of the populace was intense.

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  • The sufferings of the Christians and the desecrations of their sacred buildings during these troubled times created wide-spread indignation through the west: and this indignation was inflamed into fury by Peter the Hermit, a native of Picardy, who in early life had been a soldier.

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  • A widespread feeling of indignation spread not only among High Churchmen, but among many who cared little or nothing for the ritual practices involved; and it seemed impossible to foretell what the outcome would be.

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  • The measure aroused a storm of indignation amongst the European community which finally resulted in the bill being shorn of its most objectionable features.

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  • To satisfy the anti-colonial party he ceded Kassala to Great Britain, provoking thereby much indignation in Italy.

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  • Indignation at the results of his policy led to his overthrow in June 1898.

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  • They speedily relapsed into crime; their numbers, as the years passed, became so great and their depredations so serious, especially in garrotte robberies, that a cry of indignation was raised against the system, which led to its arraignment before a select committee of the House of Commons in 1863.

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  • Hisham, however, would not again punish his old servant; on the contrary, he seems to have regarded his indignation as a proof of innocence.

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  • Meanwhile, indignation at Antony's un-Roman excesses, and alarm at Cleopatra's rumoured schemes of founding a GrecoOriental empire, were rapidly increasing.

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  • Before his arrest he had completed the first part of the Age of Reason, the publication of which made an instant change in his position on both sides of the Atlantic, the indignation in the United States being as strong as in England.

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  • Abigail, however, soon ventured to talk "business," and in the summer of 1707 the duchess discovered to her indignation that her protegee had already undermined her influence with the queen and had become the medium of Harley's intrigue.

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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.

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  • The papal letter when translated referred to the imperial crown as a benefice conferred by the pope, and its reading aroused great indignation.

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  • These pretensions roused a special burst of indignation in France.

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  • The indignation excited by Leo X.'s sale of indulgences, the moral rage stirred in Northern hearts by papal abominations in Rome, were external causes which precipitated the schism between Teutonic and Latin Christianity.

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  • The country was still torn by civil and religious dissensions; and Cameron excited the indignation of the more strenuous adherents of his own party.

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  • His great popularity, and the general ignorance of the reasons for his imprisonment, stirred up a strong feeling against the queen, who was reported to be influenced by Bacon, and such indignation was raised against the latter that his friends feared his life would be in danger.

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  • His reasons for disapproval he explained to the king and Buckingham, but found to his surprise that their indignation was strongly roused against him.

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  • Bacon, who seems to have acted from a simple desire to do the best for Buckingham's own interests, at once changed his course, advanced the match by every means in his power, and by a humble apology appeased the indignation that had been excited against him.

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  • ments as hereditary fiefs, their consequent worldliness and (it must be added) their vices, aroused the indignation of two very remarkable men in the latter half of the 11th century.

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  • The exasperation of the majority of the country at his policy, and the indignation aroused by his treatment of the Dalmatians in Rome, as well as his failure to secure a settlement of the Adriatic problem, led to his fall in June 1920, thus leaving the way open for the return of Giolitti.

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  • But proportionate to his exultation in this first recognition of his merit was the depth of his mortification and the height of his indignation at the result of the second competition.

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  • John De Witt had been Spinoza's friend, and had bestowed a small pension upon him; he had Spinoza's full sympathy in his political aims. On receiving the news of the brutal murder of the two brothers, Spinoza burst into tears, and his indignation was so roused that he was bent upon publicly denouncing the crime upon the spot where it had been committed.

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  • But the affair caused such general indignation that Gustavus felt obliged, in May, to offer some justification of his conduct.

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  • When the Riksdag met in 1760, the indignation against the Hat leaders was so violent that an impeachment seemed inevitable; but once more the superiority of their parliamentary tactics prevailed, and when, after a session of twenty months, the Riksdag was brought to a close by the mutual consent of both the exhausted factions, the Hat government was bolstered up for another four years.

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  • Nadirs anger and indignation had been great at this weak proceeding; indeed, he had made it the ostensible cause of the shahs deposition.

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  • Beardless and shrivelled, writes Sir John Malcolm, it resembled that of an aged and wrinkled woman, and the expression of his countenance, at no time pleasant, was horrible when clouded, as it very often was, with indignation.

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  • A massacre of Persians at Kerbela might have seriously complicated the dispute, but, after a first burst of indignation and call for vengeance, an expression of the regret of the Ottoman government was accepted as a sufficient apology for the occurrence.

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  • The British immigrants of 1820 were still struggling against heavy odds; the Dutch colonists were in a state of great indignation.

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  • The deepest indignation was aroused by this incident, and was still further increased by the trivial way in which the case was dealt with by the court.

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  • The writer's indignation at finding it treated with silent contempt by the great scholar, who thought it was the work of a personal enemyAleander - caused him to write a second oration, more violent, more abusive, with more self-glorification, but with less real merit than the first.

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  • It is, indeed, impossible to say what motives of personal chagrin, of love of detraction, of the mere literary passion for effective writing, may have contributed to the indignation which inspired his verse.

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  • DeIphobus was preferred, and Helenus withdrew in indignation to Mount Ida, where he was captured by the Greeks, whom he advised to build the wooden horse and carry off the Palladium.

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  • The inherent weakness of the government, the vigour and eloquence of his opposition, and a series of military disasters abroad combined to rouse a public feeling of indignation which could not be withstood, and in December 1756 Pitt, who now sat for Okehampton, became secretary of state, and leader of the Commons under the premiership of the duke of Devonshire.

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  • Side by side with his indignation at the idea of cheating his Saracen enemies may be mentioned his answer to those who after Taillebourg complained that he had let off Henry III.

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  • By the outside world the affair was greeted with mingled ridicule and indignation, and the new Messiah had to be protected by the police from the violence of an angry mob.

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  • The queen and the prince consort (see Victoria, Queen) did not conceal their indignation at the position in which he had placed them with all the other courts of Europe.

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  • Some of the insurgents actually proposed that he should put himself at their head and secure the empire for himself, but their offer was rejected with indignation.

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  • The indignation of the people at the death of Germanicus, and the suspicion that Piso had poisoned him, forced Tiberius to order an investigation.

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  • But Eugene rejected these offers with indignation, and proceeded to operate against the Turks commanded by Kara Mustapha.

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  • With bitter indignation Swift denounced the simony and threw up his chaplaincy, but he was ultimately reconciled to Berkeley by the presentation to the rectory of Agher in Meath with the united vicarages of Laracor and Rathbeggan, to which was added the prebend of Dunlavin in St Patrick's - the total value being about 230 a year.

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  • For Henry looked to the learning and abilities of Reginald Pole to vindicate before Europe the justice of his divorce from Catherine of Aragon; and, when Pole was conscientiously compelled to declare the very opposite, the king's indignation knew no bounds.

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  • This harsh treatment created intense indignation abroad, especially in France and Great Britain; and the emperor Napoleon wrote personally to Prince Charles, protesting against the persecution.

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  • Bitter indignation prevailed against everything German, and culminated in an attack on the German colony in Bucharest on the 22nd of March 1871.

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  • But the proposed exchange of territory aroused the most bitter indignation at Bucharest.

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  • The account of this scene which he sent home roused indignation in England to such a degree as to lead to determined and to a considerable extent successful efforts to get the sultan of Zanzibar to suppress the trade.

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  • Mr Schreiner, in reply, used expressions which called down upon him the severest censure and indignation, both in the colony and in Great Britain.

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  • He believed, he subsequently told a Unionist audience, that the Opposition could have turned out the Government at this time owing to the indignation about the shortage of munitions; but that would have meant an election and renewal of party feeling, and so have prevented the concentration of effort on the war.

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  • By the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, the Russians rewarded their Rumanian allies with this land of mountains, fens and barren steppes, peopled by Turks, Bulgarians, Tatars, Jews and other aliens; while, to add to the indignation of Rumania, they annexed instead the fertile country of Bessarabia, largely inhabited by Rumans.

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  • The crime provoked universal indignation, but since there was no other prince of the house of Alfred available, the magnates were forced to place ~thelred on the throne:

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  • The kings astonishment was even greater than his indignation when he saw the late chancellor setting himself to oppose him in all things.

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  • This act provoked a certain amount of indignation in England, and in the spring of 1213 the king was able to collect a large army on Barham Down to resist the threatened French invasion.

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  • In great anger and indignation he marched off towards the north, with his hired soldiery, swear- * ing to pm~nish the barons who had taken the leitd in the strike which had defeated his purpose.

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    0
  • He not only obtained it, but to the great indignation of the English baronage married the kings sister Eleanor in 1238.

    0
    0
  • Much indignation was provoked by tha sight of the king kept continually in ward by his privy councilors and treated with systematic neglect; but the treatment of his son was even more resented.

    0
    0
  • King John declared himself unable to restrain the indignation.

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    0
  • The nation, however much it might murmur, would never have been willing to rebel against a sovereign whose only fault was that he occasionally pressed his prerogative too far, Edwards rule was seldom or never oppressive, the seizure of the merchants wool in 1297 was the only one of his acts which caused really fierce and widespread indignation.

    0
    0
  • But peace did not suffice to end Edwards troubles; he dropped back into his usual apathy, and the Despensers showed themselves so harsh and greedy that the general indignation only required a new leader in order to take once more the form of open insurrection.

    0
    0
  • In indignation at the first refusal that he had met, the earl conspired with Glendower to raise rebellion in the name of the rightful heirs of ~ King Richard, the house of March.

    0
    0
  • Even before this final disaster the indignation felt against Suffolk and Somerset had raised violent disturbances at home.

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  • When the queen was dead, and some rumours of the kings intentions got abroad, the public indignation was so great that Henry of Richards councillors had to warn him to disavow the Richmond projected marriage, if he wished to retain a single lands at adherenf.

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    0
  • Englishmen of both parties were stung to indignation by the insult.

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    0
  • The terrible condition of the army, vividly described in the letters which the war correspondents of the newspapers sent home, aroused strong feelings of indignation in Great Britain.

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    0
  • This horrible outrage naturally created indignation in France, and it unfortunately became plain that the conspiracy had been hatched in England, and that the bombs had been manufactured in Birmingham.

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    0
  • The hostility of the Irish members was perhaps increased by some natural indignation at the charges brought against Parnell.

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  • The story of Claude Gueux, published five years later (1834), another fervent protest against the infliction of capital punishment, was followed by many other eloquent and passionate appeals to the same effect, written or spoken on various occasions which excited the pity or the indignation of the orator or the poet.

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  • In the deathless volume of Chatiments, which appeared in 1853, his indignation, his genius, and his faith found such utterance and such expression as must recall to the student alternately the lyric inspiration of Coleridge and Shelley, the prophetic inspiration of Dante and Isaiah, the satiric inspiration of Juvenal and Dryden.

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  • All the poet and all the man spoke out and stood evident in the perfervid patriotism, the filial devotion, the fatherly tenderness, the indignation and the pity, which here find alternate expression in passionate and familiar and majestic song.

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  • Lord Rockingham repeated these tales to Burke, who of course denied them with indignation.

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  • But neither Sheridan nor Fox was capable of that sustained and overflowing indignation at outraged justice and oppressed humanity, that consuming moral fire, which burst forth again and again from the chief manager of the impeachment, with such scorching might as drove even the cool and intrepid Hastings beyond all self-control, and made him cry out with protests and exclamations like a criminal writhing under the scourge.

    0
    0
  • The spectacle of men so rash, and so incapable of controlling the forces which they seemed to have presumptuously summoned, excited in Burke both indignation and contempt.

    0
    0
  • And the leaders of the Constituent who came first on the stage, and hoped to make a revolution with rose-water, and hardly realized any more than Burke did how rotten was the structure which they had undertaken to build up, almost deserved his contempt, even if, as is certainly true, they did not deserve his indignation.

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  • To this " humanism " the Reformation seemed at first more' hostile than the Roman hierarchy; indeed, the extent to which this latter had allowed itself to become paganized by the Renaissance was one of the points that especially roused the Reformers' indignation.

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  • It had besides long been thought desirable to possess a station on the route between Australia and Panama; it was also felt that the Polynesian labour traffic, the abuses in which had caused much indignation, could only be effectually regulated from a point contiguous to the recruiting field, and the locality where that labour was extensively employed.

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    0
  • Anxious as Henry was to avoid being involved in foreign wars, it was not many years before he was committed to a war with France, partly by his desire of an alliance with Spain, and partly by the indignation of his own subjects at the way in which the French were undermining the independence of Brittany.

    0
    0
  • Once more the French monarchy was pulled up short by the indignation of all Italy (1518).

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    0
  • This was the age of plebeians, to the great indignation of the duke and peer Saint Simon.

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    0
  • The passage of this KansasNebraska Bill, one of the most momentous in its consequences ever passed by the Federal Congress, was largely a personal triumph for Douglas, who showed marvellous energy, adroitness and resourcefulness, and a genius for leadership. There was great indignation throughout the free states; and even in Chicago Douglas was unable to win for himself a hearing before a public meeting.

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    0
  • As was to be expected,, an oath taken under compulsion by such a man was little binding; and the French troops were compelled to witness, with helpless indignation, the orgy of cruel reaction which immediately began under the protection of their bayonets.

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    0
  • Prince Bismarck looked upon the rights of Spain over the Caroline Islands in the Pacific as so shadowy that he sent some German war-ships to take possession of a port in the largest island of the group. The action of Germany caused great indignation in Spain, which led, in Madrid, to imposing demonstrations.

    0
    0
  • This tragedy, which rightly or wrongly aroused the most widespread indignation throughout Europe, produced a ministerial crisis in Spain.

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    0
  • Mr Chamberlain had relied on his personal influence, which from 1895 to 1902 had been supreme; but his own resignation, and the course of events, had since 1903 made his personality less authoritative, and new interests - such as the opposition to the Education Act, to the heavy taxation, and to Chinese labour in the Transvaal, and indignation over the revelations concerned with the war - were monopolizing attention, to the weakening of his hold on the public. The revival in trade, and the production of new statistics which appeared to stultify Mr Chamberlain's prophecies of progressive decline, enabled the free-trade champions to reassure their audiences as to the very foundation of his case, and to represent the whole tariff reform movement as no less unnecessary than risky.

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    0
  • The indignation which his appointment caused was intense; he was known only by the reputation which in his early years he had won as a violent ultra-Conservative, and the apprehensions were increased by his first speech, in which he said that the German question could not be settled by speeches and parliamentary decrees, but only by blood and iron.

    0
    0
  • A massacre of a most brutal character, in which Turkish soldiers took part, followed; and aroused deep indignation in Europe.

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    0
  • Statues of Christ, especially of him hanging on the cross, inspired the greatest horror and indignation; and this is why none of the graven images of Christ, common before the outbreak of the movement, survive.

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    0
  • This theory, though not altogether new, aroused much indignation in Oxford, and A.

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    0
  • When the tribune P. Servilius Rullus introduced his agrarian law (63), these lands, which had been originally assigned to the Roman people by Scipio Africanus, were expressly exempted from sale, which roused the indignation of Cicero (De lege agraria, i.

    0
    0
  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

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    0
  • Carmen said with mock indignation.

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    0
  • "I didn't lie," he said with indignation.

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    0
  • He plied her lips gently, testing and encouraging, and she felt herself respond despite her indignation.

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    0
  • "Well, that's not very friendly," Josh said with a note of indignation in his voice.

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    0
  • aroused great indignation among the supporters of the other candidates.

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    0
  • The Frogman felt he had been insulted, so he gave a loud croak of indignation and turned away.

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    0
  • fearful judgment of fiery indignation which would devour God's adversaries.

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    0
  • indignation against the sin had to be (to use the technical term) propitiated.

    0
    0
  • The attack by the fascists had aroused the greatest indignation among the workers.

    0
    0
  • Under Augustus, a father used his legal right to execute a delinquent son, and provoked the indignation of Rome.

    0
    0
  • Also, some people expressed moral indignation at the fact there was a section of the hall reserved for ' women only ' .

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    0
  • indignation caused by the above practice.

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    0
  • You will also feel constant indignation at the dire shortage of confectionery.

    0
    0
  • And they have awful immoral indignation if you hate them back, yet they still hate you if you don't.

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    0
  • indignation at the way in which things were going.

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    0
  • indignation at injustice, as well as such qualities as being lively, energetic and full of life.

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    0
  • They are able to hide behind righteous indignation caused by the above practice.

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  • Much of Phil's self-righteous indignation seems to be directed at any such enterprise.

    0
    0
  • The writer of Hebrews warned then of a fearful judgment of fiery indignation which would devour God's adversaries.

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    0
  • There is the moral indignation against General Pinochet, where passions are running high.

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    0
  • Billions of people in the world have seen with deep indignation the televised images of the terrible events in Palestine.

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    0
  • He can little know the force of popular indignation, or such an attempt would never have been made.

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    0
  • lather of indignation about the use of the death penalty in Trinidad & Tobago.

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    0
  • The allusion to the hilarity of the students and the general levity of the occasions aroused Coleridge's indignation.

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    0
  • Every new chapter in the story of Turkish misrule raises a fresh storm of indignation throughout Europe.

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    0
  • Parnell publicly condemned the murders and rode out the storm of public indignation to push for a policy of Home Rule for Ireland.

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    0
  • outburst of outraged indignation from the community and an immediate response from the police.

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    0
  • The Chinese Government and people hereby express their utmost indignation and stern condemnation and lodge the strongest protest against this barbaric atrocity.

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  • righteous indignation caused by the above practice.

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    0
  • self-righteous indignation seems to be directed at any such enterprise.

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    0
  • His arrest had caused great indignation.

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    0
  • The agitation had no immediate effect, but the indignation which he aroused against Russian policy had much to do with the strong anti-Russian feeling which made the Crimean War possible.

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    0
  • Indignation at the cession of Nice to France and at the neglect of his followers by the Italian government induced him to return to political life.

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    0
  • A storm of popular indignation arose and the decemvirs were forced to resign.

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    0
  • The prevalent famine and distress are due to Yahweh's indignation at such remissness.

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    0
  • An attempt was made by this official to put a stop to the English missions by violence; but the report of his conduct led to so much indignation in Australia and in England that the emperor Napoleon, on receipt of a protest from Lord Shaftesbury and others, caused a commission of inquiry to be appointed and free liberty of worship to be secured to the Protestant missions.

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    0
  • They began to be alarmed by the severity with which the edicts against heresy were being carried out, and by the rising indignation among the populace.

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    0
  • Everywhere intense indignation was aroused by the cruel tortures and executions.

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    0
  • Moved only to scorn and indignation by the rhetoric of these presumptuous enthusiasts, Frederick marched into the Leonine city, and took the imperial crown from the hands of Adrian IV.

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    0
  • Seizing the agitation in Romagna as a pretext, he had the town of Ferrara occupied by Austrian troops, which provoked the indignation not only of the Liberals but also of the pope, for according to the treaties Austria had the right of occupying the citadel alone.

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    0
  • At the same time Leopold ceded Lunigiana to Parma and Modena in equal parts, tn arrangement which provoked the indignation of the in~iabitants of the district (especially of those destined to be ruled ~y Francis V.

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    0
  • When the terms of the Austro-Piedmontese armistice were announced in the Chamber at Turin they aroused great indignation, but the king succeeded in convincing the deputies Piedmont that they were inevitable.

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    0
  • In spite of the courage and presence of mind of Cairoli, who received the dagger thrust intended for the king, public and parliamentary indignation found expression in a vote which compelled the ministry to resign.

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    0
  • Italian indignation at the French coup de main was the deeper on account of the apparent duplicity of the go~iernment of the Republic. On the 11th of May the French foreign minister, Barthlmy Saint Hilaire, had officially assured the Italian ambassador in Paris that France had no thought of occupying Tunisia or any part of Tunisian territory, beyond some points of the Kroumir country.

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    0
  • The conclusion of the treaty of Bardo on the 12th of May, however, compelled Cairoli to sacrifice himself to popular indignation.

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    0
  • On the 5th of March the Crispi cabinet resigned before an outburst of indignation which the Opposition had assiduously fomented, and five days later a new cabinet was formed by General Ricotti-Magnani, who, however, made over the premiership to the marquis di Rudini.

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  • of a Public Safety Bill, but fell for the fourth and last time on the 18th of June 1898, on account of public indignation at the results of Rudinis home policy as exemplified in the May riots.

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    0
  • The death of the unfortunate monarch, against whom an attempt had previously been made by the anarchist Accianito (2 2nd April Death 1897), caused an outburst of profound sorrow and indignation.

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    0
  • In August there were strikes among the dock laborers of Genoa and the iron workers of Florence; the latter agitation developed into a general strike in that city, which aroused widespread indignation among the orderly part of the population and ended without any definite result.

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    0
  • When it was found that there was to be no direct compensation for Italy a storm of indignation was aroused against Austria, and also against Signor Tittoni.

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    0
  • Even Jeremy Bentham, restive under appeals to vague and intangible standards, breaks out in despairing indignation against the word " ought " as " the talisman of arrogance, indolence point of the particular theist who speaks to the ques tion.

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    0
  • Boleslaus in his fury slew the saintly bishop, but so general was the popular indignation that he had to fly his kingdom.

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    0
  • In 1875 Bismarck was suspected of a design of again attacking France, and Gorchakov gave him to understand, in a way which was not meant to be offensive, but which roused the German chancellor's indignation, that Russia would oppose any such scheme.

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  • Though there had been no open insurrection, he caused many boyars and humbler persons to be executed, and when some of the great nobles, fearing a similar fate, fled across the frontier and tendered their allegiance to the prince of Lithuania, his suspicion and indignation increased and he determined to adopt still more drastic measures.

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    0
  • Abandoning the ancient Muscovite capital, where many influential personages were fanatically hostile to his innovations and not a few of the superstitious inhabitants regarded him with horror as Antichrist, he built at the mouth of the Neva a new capital which was to serve as " a window through which his people might look into Europe "; and laying aside the national St title of tsar he proclaimed himself (1711) emperor Peters- (Imperator) of all Russia - much to the surprise and indignation of foreign diplomatic chancelleries, which resented the audacity of a semi-barbarous potentate in claiming to be equal in rank with the head of the Holy Roman Empire.

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    0
  • The queen-regent now openly appointed him prime minister, gave him official quarters in the palace, and conferred a grandeeship on him, to the profound indignation of the other grandees.

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    0
  • 1920 provoked the indignation not onl y of the manufacturers but of all the middle-class.

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  • Elisha's indignation can be illustrated by the denunciation passed upon an anonymous king by the prophetic party on a similar occasion (I Kings xx.

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    0
  • The indignation of the Christians increased, a state of insecurity prevailed, and the Moslem peasants refused to return to their homes.

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    0
  • The indignation with which the queen repelled the idea may have made him think of the duke of Orleans as a possible constitutional king, because his title would of necessity be parliamentary.

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    0
  • When, after the introduction of cattle plague or rinderpest in 1865, the proposal was made to resort to the extreme remedy of slaughter in order to check the ravages of a disease which was pursuing its course with ruinous results, the idea was received with public indignation and denounced as barbarous.

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    0
  • The action of the Convention in perpetuating its influence by the imposition of two-thirds of its members on the next popularly elected councils, aroused a storm of indignation in Paris, where the "moderate" and royalist reaction was already making headway.

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    0
  • The war of the Second Coalition having brought about the expulsion of the French from Italy, the Directors were exposed to a storm of indignation in France, not unmixed with contempt; and this state of public opinion enabled the young conqueror within a month of his landing at Frejus (9th of October 1799) easily to prevail over the Directory and the elective councils of the nation.

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    0
  • The re-occupation of Switzerland by French troops in October 1802 wrought English opinion to a state of indignation against the autocrat who was making conquests more quickly in time of peace than he had done by his sword; and the irritation increased when, on the 29th of January 5803, he publicly stated: "It is recognized by Europe that Italy and Holland, as well as Switzerland, are at the disposal of France."

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    0
  • His actions at this time have been ascribed to righteous indignation against Metternich's double-dealing; and in a long interview at the Marcolini palace at Dresden on the 26th of June he asked the chancellor point blank how much money England had given him for his present conduct.

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    0
  • As appears from his letters to his father, he watched with exultation the procession of deputies at Versailles, and with violent indignation the events of the latter part of June which followed the closing of the Salle des Menus to the deputies who had named themselves the National Assembly.

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    0
  • This conspiracy was championed by Bajamonte Tiepolo, and seems to have been an expression of patrician protest against the serrata, just as Bocconio's revolt had represented popular indignation.

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    0
  • The contrast between the obscurity of such a man and the fame enjoyed by the fluent young doctors roused Bacon's indignation.

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  • His indignation was aroused by the barbarities inflicted upon the Hottentots and Kaffirs (by a minority of the colonists), and he set himself to remedy their grievances; but his zeal was greater than his knowledge.

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  • He rejected with indignation the miraculous stories told to confirm the doctrine of transubstantiation.

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    0
  • Her conduct excited popular indignation; and the consequent disorders, amounting almost to civil war, gave an opportunity to the ambition of Andronicus.

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  • Michel Le Tellier having ordered him to refute a thesis of the college of Clermont on the infallibility of the pope, Marca wrote a treatise which was most Gallican in its ideas, but refused to publish it for fear of drawing down "the indignation of Rome."

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    0
  • He was also aware that the exactions of the French had produced deep indignation throughout Germany and especially in Prussia (whose neutrality had been violated, see § 14, below).

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  • The terrible rapacity of its representatives in Bohemia, which increased in proportion as it became more difficult to obtain money from western countries such as England and France, caused general indignation; and this was still further intensified by the gross immorality of the Roman priests.

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  • He had nothing puritanical in his nature, but he shared in the ill-feeling aroused in the Scottish nobility by the political authority given by Charles to the bishops, and by Hamilton's influence with the king, and also in the general indignation at the scheme of imposing upon Scotland a liturgy which had been drawn up at the instigation of the English court and corrected by Archbishop Laud.

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    0
  • The action of the British cabinet caused both astonishment and indignation throughout South Africa and in the other selfgoverning states of the empire.

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    0
  • Every one now looked to the crown to extract the nation from an ex-lex, or extra-constitutional situation, but when the king, passing over the ordinary party-leaders, appointed as premier Count Karoly Khuen-Hedervary, who had made himself impossible as ban of Croatia, there was general amazement and indignation.

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  • 4 The postponement of the question was, indeed, already producing ugly symptoms of popular indignation.

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    0
  • Italy's claims upon Istria and Dalmatia rallied the Yugosla y s to the cause of national unity, and intense indignation was aroused by the action of the Entente in drawing an armistice line against Austria-Hungary almost identical with that prescribed by the secret treaty of London, and in sanctioning Italy's prompt occupation of the disputed territory.

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    0
  • Nearly all the best writers are characterized by a certain naive and earnest piety which is attractive, and not infrequently display a force of moral indignation which arrests attention.

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    0
  • The statesmanlike qualities displayed on this occasion were unavailing to avert the storm of indignation conjured up by Crispi's opponents in connexion with a charge of bigamy not susceptible of legal proof.

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  • "It is almost impossible that a state so disorganized and corrupt as Florence then was should produce men of parts and character, but if by chance any such should arise they would be hated and persecuted, their dispositions would be soured by indignation, or they would be hunted from their country or die of grief" (Benedette Varchi).

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  • But their excesses, and in particular the Cabochien ordinance of the 25th of May 1413, aroused public indignation; a reaction took place, and in the month of August the Armagnacs in their turn became masters of the government and of the king.

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    0
  • Peter's first serious outburst of indignation (March 1711) was due to the prince's looting in Poland.

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    0
  • Upon his head was concentrated the whole of the popular indignation against the foreign favourites; and he seems to have deserved this unenviable distinction.

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    0
  • He displayed his freedom from ecclesiastical prejudices, if also his utter ignorance of ecclesiastical history, by agreeing, on the payment of a large bribe, to grant to the patriarch of Constantinople the title of an ecumenical bishop, but the general indignation which the proposal excited throughout the church compelled him almost immediately to withdraw from his agreement.

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  • He passed six quiet years in the convent, but his poems written during that period are expressive of burning indignation against the corruptions of the church and profoundest sorrow for the calamities of his country.

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    0
  • Public indignation was aroused by what were known as the " Bulgarian atrocities," and Gladstone flung himself into the agitation against Turkey with characteristic zeal.

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    0
  • The circumstances of General Gordon's untimely death awoke an outburst of indignation against those who were, or seemed to be, responsible for it.

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    0
  • But there are no reasons for thinking the performance ironical or insincere, and it cannot be doubted that Defoe would have been honestly unable even to understand Lamb's indignation.

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  • The first production of Addison's Cato was made by the Whigs the occasion of a great demonstration of indignation against the peace, and by Bolingbroke for presenting the actor Booth with a purse of fifty guineas for "defending the cause of liberty against a perpetual dictator" (Marlborough): In the terms granted to England there was perhaps little to criticize.

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  • Valerius Martialis or Martial (c. 41-104) that we have a true image of the average sensual frivolous life of Rome at the end of the 1st century, seen through a medium of wit and humour, but undistorted by the exaggeration which moral indignation and the love of effect add to the representation of Juvenal.

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  • The generous scorn and pathos of the historian acting on extraordinary gifts of imaginative insight and characterization, and the fierce indignation of the satirist finding its vent in exaggerating realism, doubtless to some extent warped their impressions; nevertheless their works are the last voices expressive of the freedom and manly virtue of the ancient world.

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    0
  • At last popular indignation against the courtiers, came to a head in the famous Good Parliament of 1376.

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    0
  • The birth of an heir to the throne (Prince Henry) in 1594 strengthened her position and influence; but the young prince, much to her indignation, was immediately withdrawn from her care and entrusted to the keeping of the earl and countess of Mar at Stirling Castle; in 1595 James gave a written command, forbidding them in case of his death to give up the prince to the queen till he reached the age of eighteen.

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  • It was Madame de Polignac who obtained the appointment of Calonne as controller-general of the finances,' and who succeeded Madame de Guemenee as "governess of the children of France" after the bankruptcy of the prince de Guemenee in 1782.4 Again, in response to Mercy and Joseph II.'s urgent representations, Marie Antoinette exerted herself on behalf of Austria in the affairs of the opening of the Scheldt (1783-1784) and the exchange of Bavaria (1785), in which, though she failed to provoke active interference on the part of France, she succeeded in obtaining the payment of considerable indemnities to Austria, a fact which led to the popular legend of her having sent millions to Austria, and aroused much indignation against her.

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    0
  • There was nothing of stoical austerity or of rhetorical indignation in the tone in which he treated the vices and follies of his time.

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    0
  • This partisan action aroused such indignation that at the next election he was again chosen governor, by a large majority, and served from 1825 until his death.

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    0
  • His proposal to reduce the duty on Spanish wines in connexion with an ItaloSpanish commercial treaty aroused a storm of indignation among the agricultural classes and caused the fall of the Cabinet on Dec. 24 1905; and although Fortis composed a new administration, Tittoni did not enter it.

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  • He seems to have been a kindly, homely, somewhat feckless person like many an excellent parish priest, who did not conceal his indignation at some of Northumberland's deeds.

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    0
  • The assent of Lord Elgin to the bill provoked in Montreal a riot which ended in the burning of the houses of parliament, and so great was the indignation of the hitherto ultra-loyal Conservative party that many of its most prominent members signed a document favouring annexation to the United States; Macdonald on the other hand took steps, in conjunction with others, to form a British-American league, having for its object the confederation of all the provinces, the strengthening of the connexion with the mother country, and the adoption of a national commercial policy.

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  • Some months later he signed the bail bond of Jefferson Davis, and this provoked a torrent of public indignation.

    0
    0
  • This incident provoked the wildest indignation, and Russia was for some days on the verge of war with England.

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    0
  • This attack on the religion and property of the Saxons aroused intense indignation, and provoked the rising of 782 which marks the beginning of the second period of the war.

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    0
  • Koroschek, the Slovene leader, wrote to the minister in the name of his party that " these hypocritical assurances have called forth nothing but indignation among the Southern Sla y s " (Jan.

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    0
  • The supposition least favourable to Rousseau is that it was due to one of his numerous fits of half-insane petulance and indignation at the obligations which he was nevertheless always ready to incur.

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    0
  • Even the Hebrew historian ascribes to this act the effect of rousing divine indignation against the invading host of Israel; it would not, therefore, be surprising if under the miseries brought on Palestine by the westward march of the Assyrian power, the idea of the sacrifice of one's own son, as the most powerful of atoning rites, should have taken hold of those kings of Judah (Ahaz and Manasseh, 2 Kings xvi.

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    0
  • The failure of these negotiations, for which he was only in part responsible, led to the universal movement of indignation and impatience, which ended, in France, in the declaration of neutrality (1408), and at Pisa, in the decree of deposition against the two pontiffs (1409).

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    0
  • Popular indignation was unbounded, and Sackville was dismissed from his offices.

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    0
  • Skilfully taking advantage of the jealousies of Poland and Lithuania, as they were accentuated by the personal antagonism of Jagiello and Witowt (q.v.), with the latter of whom the Knights more than once contracted profitable alliances, they even contrived (Treaty of Salin, 1378) to extend their territory by getting possession of the province of Samogitia, the original seat of the Lithuanians, where paganism still persisted, and where their inhuman cruelties finally excited the horror and indignation of Christian Europe.

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  • The nature and attributes of God; His gracious purposes towards man; the relation of man to God, with the practical consequences that follow from it; the true nature of religious service; the call to repentance as the condition of God's favour; the ideal of character and action which each man should set before himself; human duty under its various aspects; the responsibilities of office and position; the claims of mercy and philanthropy, justice and integrity; indignation against the oppression of the weak and the unprotected; ideals of a blissful future, when the troubles of the present will be over, and men will bask in the enjoyment of righteousness and felicity, - these, and such as these, are the themes which are ever in the prophets' mouths, and on which they enlarge with unwearying eloquence and power.

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  • Had not Lady Jane still been alive to take off the edge of Mary's indignation and suspicion Elizabeth might have paid forfeit for Wyat's rebellion with her life instead of imprisonment.

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  • His gloomy experiences of student life are reflected in a series of sketches named after two districts of Upsala, Fran Fjerdingen och Svartbacken (1877), which aroused great indignation at the time.

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  • But the publicity given to a document scarcely known till then raised the utmost indignation against the Society.

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  • This atrocity caused great indignation in Mexico and abroad: the reactionists were divided; their financial straits were extreme, as the Juarists held all the chief ports.

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  • This is testified by George Joye in his Apology, who himself brought out a fourth edition of Tyndale's New Testament in August 1534, freed from many of the errors which, through the carelessness of the Flemish printers, had crept into the text, but with such alterations and new renderings as to arouse the indignation of Tyndale.

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  • His sympathetic nature was influenced by indignation against the brutal methods adopted towards prisoners, especially political prisoners, and by the stern measures which the government of the tsar felt compelled to adopt in order to repress the revolutionary movement.

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  • His indignation carried him into accord for a time with those who advocated the terrorist policy.

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  • This announcement raised a storm of indignation among the European community in India, and the government were obliged virtually, though not avowedly, to abandon their measure.

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  • The growing violence of his latest works is to be accounted for, not only by his burning indignation against the ever-advancing secularization of the Catholic church, but also by the incompatibility between the authorities which he recognized and yet was not able to reconcile.

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  • And in the following year he was re-elected professor at Oxford and resumed his lectures; but increasing brain excitement, and indignation at the establishment of a laboratory to which vivisection was admitted, led him to resign his Oxford career, and he retired in 1884 to Brantwood, which he never left.

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  • Weyler attempted to do this by a policy of inexorable repression, which raised a storm of indignation, and led to a demand from America for his recall.

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  • Melville's rudeness (if it is to be called so) was the outburst of just indignation from a man zealous for the purity of religion and regardless of consequences to himself.

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  • steamer "Malacca" on July 13th in the Red Sea by the Russian volunteer cruiser "Peterburg" led to a storm of indignation, and the sinking of the "Knight Commander" (July 24th) by the Vladivostok squadron intensified the feeling.

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  • A Frenchman before everything, he abased the papal power to such an extent as to excite the indignation of his contemporaries, often slavishly subordinating it to the exigencies of the domestic and foreign policy of the Angevins at Naples and the reigning house at Paris.

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  • The indignation of the pope and his advisers was not deep enough to prevent the ratification in 1803 of a somewhat similar concordat for the Italian Republic. In 1804 Pius consented to anoint Napoleon emperor, thus casting over a conquered crown the halo of legitimacy.

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  • He regarded the monstrous system of misrule for which they were primarily responsible with indignation, made no secret of his sentiments, and soon gathered round him a band of young officers of strong royalist proclivities, whom he formed into a club, the so-called Svenska Botten (Sweden's groundwork).

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  • A scheme for her betrothal to Edward, prince of Wales, was defeated by the grasping greed of his father, whose obvious ambition to annex the crown of Scotland at once to that of England aroused instantly the general suspicion and indignation of Scottish patriotism.

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  • Pathos and indignation, subtlety and simplicity, personal appeal and political reasoning, were the alternate weapons with which she fought against all odds of evidence or inference, and disputed step by step every inch of debatahle ground.

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  • Paulet, with loyal and regretful indignation, declined the disgrace proposed to him in a suggestion "to shed blood without law or warrant"; and on the 7th of February the earls of Shrewsbury and Kent arrived at Fotheringay with the commission of the council for execution of the sentence given against his prisoner.

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  • But his indignation and persistent refusal to comply with the request that he should voluntarily leave France had to be met at last with force: he was apprehended, imprisoned for a week at Vincennes, and on the 17th of December conducted to the French border.

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  • Great indignation was therefore felt at the idea of giving them up, when Holland (14th of March 1838) signified eT its readiness to accept the conditions of the treaty.

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  • His temper was hot, kept under rigid control; his disposition tender, gentle and loving, with flashing scorn and indignation against all that was ignoble and impure; he was a good husband, father and friend.

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  • The indignation against him on account of his first-named work was so great that he would probably have been compelled to leave Italy had not Alphonso V.

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  • In the outburst of indignation, followed by increasing disaffection in Ireland, which this event produced, Grattan acted with conspicuous moderation and loyalty, which won for him warm acknowledgments from a member of the English cabinet.2 That cabinet, however, doubtless influenced by the wishes of the king, was now determined firmly to resist the Catholic demands, with the result that the country rapidly drifted towards rebellion.

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  • Neither those whom his masterpiece soon roused to enthusiasm, nor those whom it moved to indignation, were likely to be indifferent to anything he should now write, whether it lay near to or far from the region of practice.

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  • This roused the indignation of those prophets whose aim it was to purify the worship of Yahweh (see Elijah).

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  • In view of popular indignation he resigned in order to avoid making inopportune declarations to the chamber.

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  • The news of the convention of Gastein, which seemed to re-cement the union of Germany, had been received in France with clamorous indignation; and on the France.

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  • On the 14th of March 1867 Thiers in the French Chamber gave voice to the indignation of France at the bungling policy that had suffered the aggrandizement of Prussia.

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  • (This law, which still exists, is popularly known as the Kanzlei or Pulpit-paragraph.) It was of course opposed by the Centre, who declared that the Reichstag had no right to interfere in what was after all a religious question, and the Bavarian Opposition expressed much indignation that their government should turn for help to the Protestants of the North in order to force upon -the Catholics of Bavaria a law which they could not have carried in that state.

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  • The action of the government, however, caused great indignation, and in a debate on the address an amendment was carried petitioning the king to dismiss his ministry.

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  • It is only fair to say that no real proof was brought that the Socialists had anything to do with either of these crimes, or that either of the men was really a member of the Socialist party; nevertheless, a storm of indignation rose against them.

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  • The persecution of the Poles in Prussia naturally iroused indignation in Austria, where the Poles had for long been among the strongest elements on which the government depended; and it was not always easy to prevent the agitation on behalf of the Germans in Bohemia from assuming a dangerous aspect.

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  • These Clerical amendments aroused a strong feeling of indignation.

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  • This arrangement, which made the Prussian police the active allies of the Third Section in the persecution of The political suspects, created vast indignation among all K~inigs- shades Of Liberal opinion in Germany, an indignation berg which culminated with the famous Konigsberg trial.

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  • In 1902 the Clerical majority in the Bavarian diet had refused to vote inter20,000 asked by the government for art purposes, vention whereupon the emperor had telegraphed expressing ~i~:rur his indignation and offering to give the money himself, an offer that was politely declined.

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  • The German Left opposed it; they were compelled to do so by the popular indignation in the German districts; and when the vote was carried against them (12th June 1895) they made it a question of confidence, and formally withdrew their support from the government, which therefore at once resigned.

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  • Shortly after a rescript arrived from Constantinople confirming Mug~afa Pasha in the governors4fip. Similarly in 1631 the army took upon themselves to depose the governor Mflsa Pasha, in indignation at his execution of KIts Bey, an officer who was to have commanded an Egyptian force required for service in Persia.

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  • The presentation of the memorial provoked an outburst of indignation.

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  • A still more striking contrast is the passionate outburst of sympathy and indignation with which, in the same diary, he comments on the supposed kidnapping of Luther by foul play on his return from the diet of Worms. Without being one of those who in his city took an avowed part against the old ecclesiastical system, and probably without seeing clearly whither the religious ferment of the time was tending - without, that is, being properly speaking a Reformer - Diirer in his art and his thoughts was the incarnation of those qualities of the German character and conscience which resulted in the Reformation; and, personally, with the fathers of the Reformation he lived in the warmest sympathy.

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  • He cast out the spirit of negation, and henceforth the temper of his misery was changed to one, not of " whining," but of " indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance."

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  • In 1621, they were carried in parliament by a fair majority; to the horror and bitter indignation of all men and women of the old leaven.

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  • When the part played by President Cordero in this transaction became known, an outburst of popular indignation occurred.

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  • He certainly had not approved of Henry's general treatment of the church, especially during the ascendancy of Cromwell, and he was frequently visited with storms of royal indignation, which he schooled himself to bear with patience.

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  • These seizures created much indignation and anxiety among firms in England whose interests were involved.

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  • Wiseman travelled slowly to England, round by Vienna; and when he reached London (11th November) the whole country was ablaze with indignation at the " papal aggression," which was misunderstood to imply a new and unjustifiable claim to territorial rule.

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  • A climax of indignation is reached when a blind man is healed at the pool of Siloam on the sabbath day.

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  • It then became necessary to examine the papal claims. He set himself to study the Decretals, and to his amazement and indignation he found that they were full of frauds.

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  • At Worms the indignation of the populace was intense.

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  • The sufferings of the Christians and the desecrations of their sacred buildings during these troubled times created wide-spread indignation through the west: and this indignation was inflamed into fury by Peter the Hermit, a native of Picardy, who in early life had been a soldier.

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  • A widespread feeling of indignation spread not only among High Churchmen, but among many who cared little or nothing for the ritual practices involved; and it seemed impossible to foretell what the outcome would be.

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  • The measure aroused a storm of indignation amongst the European community which finally resulted in the bill being shorn of its most objectionable features.

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  • To satisfy the anti-colonial party he ceded Kassala to Great Britain, provoking thereby much indignation in Italy.

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  • Indignation at the results of his policy led to his overthrow in June 1898.

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  • They speedily relapsed into crime; their numbers, as the years passed, became so great and their depredations so serious, especially in garrotte robberies, that a cry of indignation was raised against the system, which led to its arraignment before a select committee of the House of Commons in 1863.

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  • Hisham, however, would not again punish his old servant; on the contrary, he seems to have regarded his indignation as a proof of innocence.

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  • Meanwhile, indignation at Antony's un-Roman excesses, and alarm at Cleopatra's rumoured schemes of founding a GrecoOriental empire, were rapidly increasing.

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  • Before his arrest he had completed the first part of the Age of Reason, the publication of which made an instant change in his position on both sides of the Atlantic, the indignation in the United States being as strong as in England.

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  • Abigail, however, soon ventured to talk "business," and in the summer of 1707 the duchess discovered to her indignation that her protegee had already undermined her influence with the queen and had become the medium of Harley's intrigue.

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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.

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  • This atrocious deed of Lysimachus aroused great indignation.

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  • The papal letter when translated referred to the imperial crown as a benefice conferred by the pope, and its reading aroused great indignation.

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  • These pretensions roused a special burst of indignation in France.

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  • The indignation excited by Leo X.'s sale of indulgences, the moral rage stirred in Northern hearts by papal abominations in Rome, were external causes which precipitated the schism between Teutonic and Latin Christianity.

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  • The country was still torn by civil and religious dissensions; and Cameron excited the indignation of the more strenuous adherents of his own party.

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  • His great popularity, and the general ignorance of the reasons for his imprisonment, stirred up a strong feeling against the queen, who was reported to be influenced by Bacon, and such indignation was raised against the latter that his friends feared his life would be in danger.

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  • His reasons for disapproval he explained to the king and Buckingham, but found to his surprise that their indignation was strongly roused against him.

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  • Bacon, who seems to have acted from a simple desire to do the best for Buckingham's own interests, at once changed his course, advanced the match by every means in his power, and by a humble apology appeased the indignation that had been excited against him.

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  • ments as hereditary fiefs, their consequent worldliness and (it must be added) their vices, aroused the indignation of two very remarkable men in the latter half of the 11th century.

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  • The exasperation of the majority of the country at his policy, and the indignation aroused by his treatment of the Dalmatians in Rome, as well as his failure to secure a settlement of the Adriatic problem, led to his fall in June 1920, thus leaving the way open for the return of Giolitti.

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  • But proportionate to his exultation in this first recognition of his merit was the depth of his mortification and the height of his indignation at the result of the second competition.

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  • John De Witt had been Spinoza's friend, and had bestowed a small pension upon him; he had Spinoza's full sympathy in his political aims. On receiving the news of the brutal murder of the two brothers, Spinoza burst into tears, and his indignation was so roused that he was bent upon publicly denouncing the crime upon the spot where it had been committed.

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  • But the affair caused such general indignation that Gustavus felt obliged, in May, to offer some justification of his conduct.

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  • When the Riksdag met in 1760, the indignation against the Hat leaders was so violent that an impeachment seemed inevitable; but once more the superiority of their parliamentary tactics prevailed, and when, after a session of twenty months, the Riksdag was brought to a close by the mutual consent of both the exhausted factions, the Hat government was bolstered up for another four years.

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  • Nadirs anger and indignation had been great at this weak proceeding; indeed, he had made it the ostensible cause of the shahs deposition.

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  • Beardless and shrivelled, writes Sir John Malcolm, it resembled that of an aged and wrinkled woman, and the expression of his countenance, at no time pleasant, was horrible when clouded, as it very often was, with indignation.

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  • A massacre of Persians at Kerbela might have seriously complicated the dispute, but, after a first burst of indignation and call for vengeance, an expression of the regret of the Ottoman government was accepted as a sufficient apology for the occurrence.

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  • The British immigrants of 1820 were still struggling against heavy odds; the Dutch colonists were in a state of great indignation.

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  • The deepest indignation was aroused by this incident, and was still further increased by the trivial way in which the case was dealt with by the court.

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  • The writer's indignation at finding it treated with silent contempt by the great scholar, who thought it was the work of a personal enemyAleander - caused him to write a second oration, more violent, more abusive, with more self-glorification, but with less real merit than the first.

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  • In the tenth, the theme of the " vanity of human wishes " is illustrated by great historic instances, rather than by pictures of the men and manners of the age; and, though the declamatory vigour and power of expression in it are occasionally as great as in the earlier satires, and although touches of Juvenal's saturnine humour, and especially of his misogyny, appear in all the satires of this book, yet their general tone shows that the white heat of his indignation is abated; and the lines of the eleventh, already referred to (201 seq.), " Spectent juvenes quos clamor et audax Sponsio, quos cultae decet assedisse puellae: Nostra bibat vernum contracta cuticula solem," leave no doubt that he was well advanced in years when they were written.

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  • It is, indeed, impossible to say what motives of personal chagrin, of love of detraction, of the mere literary passion for effective writing, may have contributed to the indignation which inspired his verse.

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  • DeIphobus was preferred, and Helenus withdrew in indignation to Mount Ida, where he was captured by the Greeks, whom he advised to build the wooden horse and carry off the Palladium.

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  • The inherent weakness of the government, the vigour and eloquence of his opposition, and a series of military disasters abroad combined to rouse a public feeling of indignation which could not be withstood, and in December 1756 Pitt, who now sat for Okehampton, became secretary of state, and leader of the Commons under the premiership of the duke of Devonshire.

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  • Side by side with his indignation at the idea of cheating his Saracen enemies may be mentioned his answer to those who after Taillebourg complained that he had let off Henry III.

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  • By the outside world the affair was greeted with mingled ridicule and indignation, and the new Messiah had to be protected by the police from the violence of an angry mob.

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  • The queen and the prince consort (see Victoria, Queen) did not conceal their indignation at the position in which he had placed them with all the other courts of Europe.

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  • Some of the insurgents actually proposed that he should put himself at their head and secure the empire for himself, but their offer was rejected with indignation.

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  • The indignation of the people at the death of Germanicus, and the suspicion that Piso had poisoned him, forced Tiberius to order an investigation.

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  • But Eugene rejected these offers with indignation, and proceeded to operate against the Turks commanded by Kara Mustapha.

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  • With bitter indignation Swift denounced the simony and threw up his chaplaincy, but he was ultimately reconciled to Berkeley by the presentation to the rectory of Agher in Meath with the united vicarages of Laracor and Rathbeggan, to which was added the prebend of Dunlavin in St Patrick's - the total value being about 230 a year.

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  • To the indignation with which he regarded Oxford's refusal to advance him in the peerage the active St John added an old disgust at the treasurer's pedantic and dilatory formalism, as well as his evident propensity, while leaving his colleague the fatigues, to engross for himself the chief credit of the administration.

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  • For Henry looked to the learning and abilities of Reginald Pole to vindicate before Europe the justice of his divorce from Catherine of Aragon; and, when Pole was conscientiously compelled to declare the very opposite, the king's indignation knew no bounds.

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  • This harsh treatment created intense indignation abroad, especially in France and Great Britain; and the emperor Napoleon wrote personally to Prince Charles, protesting against the persecution.

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  • Bitter indignation prevailed against everything German, and culminated in an attack on the German colony in Bucharest on the 22nd of March 1871.

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  • But the proposed exchange of territory aroused the most bitter indignation at Bucharest.

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  • The account of this scene which he sent home roused indignation in England to such a degree as to lead to determined and to a considerable extent successful efforts to get the sultan of Zanzibar to suppress the trade.

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  • Mr Hofmeyr, on meeting the executive, freely expressed indignation at these proceedings.

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  • Mr Schreiner, in reply, used expressions which called down upon him the severest censure and indignation, both in the colony and in Great Britain.

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  • He believed, he subsequently told a Unionist audience, that the Opposition could have turned out the Government at this time owing to the indignation about the shortage of munitions; but that would have meant an election and renewal of party feeling, and so have prevented the concentration of effort on the war.

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  • By the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, the Russians rewarded their Rumanian allies with this land of mountains, fens and barren steppes, peopled by Turks, Bulgarians, Tatars, Jews and other aliens; while, to add to the indignation of Rumania, they annexed instead the fertile country of Bessarabia, largely inhabited by Rumans.

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  • The crime provoked universal indignation, but since there was no other prince of the house of Alfred available, the magnates were forced to place ~thelred on the throne:

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  • The kings astonishment was even greater than his indignation when he saw the late chancellor setting himself to oppose him in all things.

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  • This act provoked a certain amount of indignation in England, and in the spring of 1213 the king was able to collect a large army on Barham Down to resist the threatened French invasion.

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  • In great anger and indignation he marched off towards the north, with his hired soldiery, swear- * ing to pm~nish the barons who had taken the leitd in the strike which had defeated his purpose.

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  • He not only obtained it, but to the great indignation of the English baronage married the kings sister Eleanor in 1238.

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  • Much indignation was provoked by tha sight of the king kept continually in ward by his privy councilors and treated with systematic neglect; but the treatment of his son was even more resented.

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  • King John declared himself unable to restrain the indignation.

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  • The nation, however much it might murmur, would never have been willing to rebel against a sovereign whose only fault was that he occasionally pressed his prerogative too far, Edwards rule was seldom or never oppressive, the seizure of the merchants wool in 1297 was the only one of his acts which caused really fierce and widespread indignation.

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  • But peace did not suffice to end Edwards troubles; he dropped back into his usual apathy, and the Despensers showed themselves so harsh and greedy that the general indignation only required a new leader in order to take once more the form of open insurrection.

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  • In indignation at the first refusal that he had met, the earl conspired with Glendower to raise rebellion in the name of the rightful heirs of ~ King Richard, the house of March.

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  • Even before this final disaster the indignation felt against Suffolk and Somerset had raised violent disturbances at home.

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  • When the queen was dead, and some rumours of the kings intentions got abroad, the public indignation was so great that Henry of Richards councillors had to warn him to disavow the Richmond projected marriage, if he wished to retain a single lands at adherenf.

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  • Englishmen of both parties were stung to indignation by the insult.

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  • The terrible condition of the army, vividly described in the letters which the war correspondents of the newspapers sent home, aroused strong feelings of indignation in Great Britain.

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  • This horrible outrage naturally created indignation in France, and it unfortunately became plain that the conspiracy had been hatched in England, and that the bombs had been manufactured in Birmingham.

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  • The hostility of the Irish members was perhaps increased by some natural indignation at the charges brought against Parnell.

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  • The story of Claude Gueux, published five years later (1834), another fervent protest against the infliction of capital punishment, was followed by many other eloquent and passionate appeals to the same effect, written or spoken on various occasions which excited the pity or the indignation of the orator or the poet.

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  • In the deathless volume of Chatiments, which appeared in 1853, his indignation, his genius, and his faith found such utterance and such expression as must recall to the student alternately the lyric inspiration of Coleridge and Shelley, the prophetic inspiration of Dante and Isaiah, the satiric inspiration of Juvenal and Dryden.

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  • All the poet and all the man spoke out and stood evident in the perfervid patriotism, the filial devotion, the fatherly tenderness, the indignation and the pity, which here find alternate expression in passionate and familiar and majestic song.

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  • Lord Rockingham repeated these tales to Burke, who of course denied them with indignation.

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  • But neither Sheridan nor Fox was capable of that sustained and overflowing indignation at outraged justice and oppressed humanity, that consuming moral fire, which burst forth again and again from the chief manager of the impeachment, with such scorching might as drove even the cool and intrepid Hastings beyond all self-control, and made him cry out with protests and exclamations like a criminal writhing under the scourge.

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  • The spectacle of men so rash, and so incapable of controlling the forces which they seemed to have presumptuously summoned, excited in Burke both indignation and contempt.

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  • And the leaders of the Constituent who came first on the stage, and hoped to make a revolution with rose-water, and hardly realized any more than Burke did how rotten was the structure which they had undertaken to build up, almost deserved his contempt, even if, as is certainly true, they did not deserve his indignation.

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  • To this " humanism " the Reformation seemed at first more' hostile than the Roman hierarchy; indeed, the extent to which this latter had allowed itself to become paganized by the Renaissance was one of the points that especially roused the Reformers' indignation.

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  • This explains the charge of Manichaeism levelled against Priscillian (Jerome, for his talk of the Sordes nuptiarum, had been similarly accused, and to escape popular indignation had retired to Bethlehem),' and to this was added the accusation of magic and licentious orgies.

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  • It had besides long been thought desirable to possess a station on the route between Australia and Panama; it was also felt that the Polynesian labour traffic, the abuses in which had caused much indignation, could only be effectually regulated from a point contiguous to the recruiting field, and the locality where that labour was extensively employed.

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  • These measures of repression aroused great indignation in Europe, and led first to the intervention of the English, French and Russian squadrons (see Navarino, Battle Of), and then to the landing of a French expeditionary force.

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  • Anxious as Henry was to avoid being involved in foreign wars, it was not many years before he was committed to a war with France, partly by his desire of an alliance with Spain, and partly by the indignation of his own subjects at the way in which the French were undermining the independence of Brittany.

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  • Once more the French monarchy was pulled up short by the indignation of all Italy (1518).

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  • This was the age of plebeians, to the great indignation of the duke and peer Saint Simon.

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  • The passage of this KansasNebraska Bill, one of the most momentous in its consequences ever passed by the Federal Congress, was largely a personal triumph for Douglas, who showed marvellous energy, adroitness and resourcefulness, and a genius for leadership. There was great indignation throughout the free states; and even in Chicago Douglas was unable to win for himself a hearing before a public meeting.

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  • As was to be expected,, an oath taken under compulsion by such a man was little binding; and the French troops were compelled to witness, with helpless indignation, the orgy of cruel reaction which immediately began under the protection of their bayonets.

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  • Prince Bismarck looked upon the rights of Spain over the Caroline Islands in the Pacific as so shadowy that he sent some German war-ships to take possession of a port in the largest island of the group. The action of Germany caused great indignation in Spain, which led, in Madrid, to imposing demonstrations.

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  • This tragedy, which rightly or wrongly aroused the most widespread indignation throughout Europe, produced a ministerial crisis in Spain.

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  • Mr Chamberlain had relied on his personal influence, which from 1895 to 1902 had been supreme; but his own resignation, and the course of events, had since 1903 made his personality less authoritative, and new interests - such as the opposition to the Education Act, to the heavy taxation, and to Chinese labour in the Transvaal, and indignation over the revelations concerned with the war - were monopolizing attention, to the weakening of his hold on the public. The revival in trade, and the production of new statistics which appeared to stultify Mr Chamberlain's prophecies of progressive decline, enabled the free-trade champions to reassure their audiences as to the very foundation of his case, and to represent the whole tariff reform movement as no less unnecessary than risky.

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  • The indignation which his appointment caused was intense; he was known only by the reputation which in his early years he had won as a violent ultra-Conservative, and the apprehensions were increased by his first speech, in which he said that the German question could not be settled by speeches and parliamentary decrees, but only by blood and iron.

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  • A massacre of a most brutal character, in which Turkish soldiers took part, followed; and aroused deep indignation in Europe.

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  • Statues of Christ, especially of him hanging on the cross, inspired the greatest horror and indignation; and this is why none of the graven images of Christ, common before the outbreak of the movement, survive.

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  • This theory, though not altogether new, aroused much indignation in Oxford, and A.

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  • When the tribune P. Servilius Rullus introduced his agrarian law (63), these lands, which had been originally assigned to the Roman people by Scipio Africanus, were expressly exempted from sale, which roused the indignation of Cicero (De lege agraria, i.

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  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

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  • While guests who were injured may rightfully feel indignation, frustration, and anger at the amusement park, those emotions do not necessarily indicate the need for an attorney's services.

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  • His indignation was aroused by the barbarities inflicted upon the Hottentots and Kaffirs (by a minority of the colonists), and he set himself to remedy their grievances; but his zeal was greater than his knowledge.

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  • Every one now looked to the crown to extract the nation from an ex-lex, or extra-constitutional situation, but when the king, passing over the ordinary party-leaders, appointed as premier Count Karoly Khuen-Hedervary, who had made himself impossible as ban of Croatia, there was general amazement and indignation.

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  • The statesmanlike qualities displayed on this occasion were unavailing to avert the storm of indignation conjured up by Crispi's opponents in connexion with a charge of bigamy not susceptible of legal proof.

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