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indifference

indifference

indifference Sentence Examples

  • Under that facade of indifference beats a heart primed for breaking.

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  • The indifference of the Jews to the desolate conditions of their sanctuary opens up a problem of some difficulty.

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  • The abstruse nature of his studies, the mystical character of his writings, and the general indifference of the Romans to such subjects, caused his works to be soon forgotten.

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  • This attitude of indifference to real knowledge passed in the younger and less reputable generation into a corroding moral scepticism which recognized no good but pleasure and no right but might.

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  • After the fall of Struensee (the warrant for whose arrest he signed with indifference), for the last six-and-twenty years of his reign, he was only nominally king.

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  • One man says, in his despair or indifference to life, take up a handful of the earth at your feet, and paint your house that color.

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  • That science must be left free to determine the aims of her investigation, to select and apply her own methods, and to publish the results of her researches without restraint, is a postulate which Ultramontanism either cannot understand or treats with indifference, for it regards as strange and incredible the fundamental law governing all scientific research - that there is for it no higher aim than the discovery of the truth.

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  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?"

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  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.

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  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.

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  • Whether this type is more conveniently designated by the word Iberian, or by some other name (" Eur-african," " Mediterranean," &c.) is a matter of comparative indifference, provided that there is no misunderstanding as to the steps by which the term Iberian attained its meaning in modern anthropology.

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  • But her relations with Henry passed gradually through indifference to hatred.

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  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?

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  • It is true that even by the most thorough-going allegorists the literal sense of Scripture was not openly and entirely disregarded; but the very fact that the study of Hebrew was never more than exceptional, and so early ceased to be cultivated at all, is eloquent of indifference to the original literal sense, and the very principle of the many meanings inherent in the sacred writings was hostile to sound interpretation; greater importance was attached to the " deeper " or " hidden " senses, i.e.

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  • Thus the Nestorian Church in India, voluntarily and with perfect indifference to theological dogmas, passed under Jacobite rule, and when early in the 18th century, Mar Gabriel, a Nestorian bishop, came to Malabar, he had a cool reception, and could only detach a small following of Syrians whom he brought back to the old Nestorianism.

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  • These attempts meet with little success, owing in part to racial prejudice and in part to the indifference of the Arabs to education.

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  • Thus the Nestorian Church in India, voluntarily and with perfect indifference to theological dogmas, passed under Jacobite rule, and when early in the 18th century, Mar Gabriel, a Nestorian bishop, came to Malabar, he had a cool reception, and could only detach a small following of Syrians whom he brought back to the old Nestorianism.

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  • With the dualistic philosophy is further connected an attitude of absolute indifference towards this lower and material world, and the practice of asceticism.

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  • They style themselves " truly spiritual Christians," and in their rejection of the sacraments, their indifference to outward forms, and their insistence on the spiritual interpretation of the Bible (" the letter killeth "), they are closely akin to the Quakers, whom they resemble also in their inoffensive mode of life and the practice of mutual help.

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  • Cuba is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic in religion, but under the new Republic there is a complete separation of church and state, and liberalism and indifference are increasing.

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  • Besides being a busy natural philosopher, Boyle devoted much time to theology, showing a very decided leaning to the practical side and an indifference to controversial polemics.

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  • She struck those who saw her by her fullness of life and beauty, combined with her indifference to everything about her.

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  • Baron Cuvier in his Eloge historique of Fourcroy repels the charge, but he can scarcely be acquitted of time-serving indifference, if indeed active, though secret, participation be not proved against him.

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  • The conflagration, at which he had looked with so much indifference the evening before, had greatly increased during the night.

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  • Tiberius appears to have received the news with indifference, if not with satisfaction; he absented himself from the funeral, and refused to allow her apotheosis; her will was suppressed for a long time and only carried out, and the legacies paid, by Caligula.

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  • Tiberius appears to have received the news with indifference, if not with satisfaction; he absented himself from the funeral, and refused to allow her apotheosis; her will was suppressed for a long time and only carried out, and the legacies paid, by Caligula.

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  • He looked up at the opening door and his expression of sleepy indifference suddenly changed to one of delighted amazement.

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  • The most curious example of this inconsistency, or rather of this indifference to general principle, occurs in his Essay on Projects.

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  • He joined Lean and Allin as they dined, listening with forced indifference as they told him that Rissa had left alone with her guard at dusk.

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  • The well-known sentence of Carlyle, that it is "as far as possible from meriting its high reputation," is in strictness justified, for all Thiers's historical work is marked by extreme inaccuracy, by prejudice which passes the limits of accidental unfairness, and by an almost complete indifference to the merits as compared with the successes of his heroes.

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  • The well-known sentence of Carlyle, that it is "as far as possible from meriting its high reputation," is in strictness justified, for all Thiers's historical work is marked by extreme inaccuracy, by prejudice which passes the limits of accidental unfairness, and by an almost complete indifference to the merits as compared with the successes of his heroes.

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  • "But that is a matter of perfect indifference to me," he thought.

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  • Cicero, by his professed antagonism to the doctrines of Epicurus, by his inadequate appreciation of Lucretius himself and by the indifference which he shows to other contemporary poets, seems to have been neither fitted for the task of correcting the unfinished work of a writer whose genius was so distinct from his own, nor likely to have cordially undertaken such a task.

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  • At the most important crisis of his life in 1783, he almost made an ostentation of disorder and of indifference not only to appearances, but even to decency.

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  • These various movements proved in the first place that the masses were by no means ripe for revolution, and that the idea of unity, although now advocated by a few revolutionary leaders, was far from being generally accepted even by the Liberals; and, secondly, that, in spite of the indifference of the masses, the despotic governments were unable to hold their own without the assistance of foreign bayonets.

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  • Youths and maidens maintain towards each other a demeanour of reserve and even indifference, from which it has been confidently affirmed that love does not exist in Japan.

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  • He showed a lofty indifference to criticism such as that of Eadmer in the Historia novorum, which was published early in the reign.

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  • The investigations of Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay had shown that indifference to chemical reagents did not sufficiently characterize an unknown gas as nitrogen, and it became necessary to reinvestigate other cases of the occurrence of "nitrogen" in nature.

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  • The men are said to be in appearance very like eunuchs, and both sexes have a tendency to sexual indifference amounting in the men to impotence.

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  • With all his efforts, Schelling does not succeed in bringing his conceptions of nature and spirit into any vital connexion with the primal identity, the absolute indifference of reason.

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  • Eighteenth-century Italy looked on religion with apathetic indifference, and Liguori convinced himself that only the gentlest and most lenient treatment could win back the alienated laity; hence he was always willing to excuse errors on the side of laxity as due to an excess of zeal in winning over penitents.

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  • The men are said to be in appearance very like eunuchs, and both sexes have a tendency to sexual indifference amounting in the men to impotence.

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  • Born in Edinburgh on the 28th of January 1784, he lost his father in 1791 and his mother in 1795; and as his grandfather regarded him with indifference, he went to reside with Henry Dundas, afterwards Viscount Melville.

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  • The completion of the second Temple (516 B.C.) has been followed by disillusionment as to the anticipated prosperity, by indifference to worship, scepticism as to providence, and moral laxity.'

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  • Apt to minimize difficulties, to search for the common ground of unity in opponents, he turned aside, with a disdain which superficial critics often mistook for indifference, from the base, the violent and the common.

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  • We know, for example, that the choice of a contemplative life was not the result of indifference to the fate of the world, or of any natural coldness or even calmness of temperament.

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  • Chretien left his poem unfinished, and we do not know how he intended to complete the adventures of his hero; but those writers who undertook the task, Wauchier de Denain, Gerbert de Montreuil and Manessier, carried it out with such variety of detail, and such a bewildering indifference to Chretien's version, that it seems practically certain that there must have been, previous to Chretien's work, more than one poem dealing with the same theme.

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  • Whether this view is to be traced to William or not, it is certain that the theory of " indifference " or " non-difference " (indifferentia) was a favourite solution in the Realistic schools soon after his time.

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  • Whether this view is to be traced to William or not, it is certain that the theory of " indifference " or " non-difference " (indifferentia) was a favourite solution in the Realistic schools soon after his time.

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  • Zeno was a pupil of Crates, from whom he learned the moral worth of self-control and indifference to sensual indulgence.

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  • He greatly admired, or professed to admire, the genius of the early Roman poets, while he shows indifference to the poetical genius of his younger contemporaries.

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  • " In England," he says, " it was received with cold indifference, little read, and speedily forgotten.

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  • The slaying of Patroclus by the Trojan hero Hector roused Achilles from his indifference; eager to avenge his beloved comrade, he sallied forth, equipped with new armour fashioned by Hephaestus, slew Hector, and, after dragging his body round the walls of Troy, restored it to the aged King Priam at his earnest entreaty.

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  • After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made.

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  • The long Modern wars of religion in Germany, as in France and England, and were followed by a certain indifference as to disputed secular points of theology.

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  • But the latter, while feigning indifference, was thenceforth his rancorous and determined foe.

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  • But the latter, while feigning indifference, was thenceforth his rancorous and determined foe.

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  • In this supreme crisis, then, it is not surprising that the masses listened with sullen indifference to the fiery eloquence of the Coalition leaders.

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  • In two peasants' cottages in the Campagna, protected with wire netting by Professor Celli, all the inmates-10 in number - escaped, while the neighbours suffered severely; and three out of four persons living in a third hut, from which protection was removed owing to the indifference of the inmates, contracted malaria.

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  • This conception of him is largely true, as is pointed out above, but it does not harmonize the contradictions of the book, the discrepancies between the piety of some passages and the emotional indifference toward God shown in others.

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  • The doctrine of indifference as it appears in later writers certainly tends, as Prantl points out, towards Nominalism, inasmuch as it gives up the substantiality of the universals.

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  • The most striking feature of the Oriental fatalism is its complete indifference to material circumstances: men accept prosperity and misfortune with calmness as the decree of fate.

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  • The most striking feature of the Oriental fatalism is its complete indifference to material circumstances: men accept prosperity and misfortune with calmness as the decree of fate.

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  • The scientific study of practical problems and difficulties is (generally speaking, and with honourable exceptions) far more advanced in almost every civilized country than it is in England, where the limited scale upon which such work is carried on, the indifference of statesmen, officials and business men, and the incapacity of the public to understand the close relation between scientific study and practical success, contrast very unfavourably with the state of affairs in Germany or the United States.

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  • The scientific study of practical problems and difficulties is (generally speaking, and with honourable exceptions) far more advanced in almost every civilized country than it is in England, where the limited scale upon which such work is carried on, the indifference of statesmen, officials and business men, and the incapacity of the public to understand the close relation between scientific study and practical success, contrast very unfavourably with the state of affairs in Germany or the United States.

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  • A similar change between the earlier odes of Horace, in which he declares his epicurean indifference to affairs of state, and the great national odes of the third book is to be ascribed to the same guidance.

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  • And, if Kant was overridden by a love of symmetry, Reid's indifference to form and system is an even more dangerous defect.

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  • By this time the members of the Habsburg family were thoroughly alarmed at the indifference or incompetence of the emperor; and their anxieties were not diminished by the knowledge that he was in feeble health, was unmarried, and had refused to take any steps towards securing the election of a successor.

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  • Pitt's debts were the result of a wasteful indifference to his private affairs.

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  • Celebratory cigars and wine came out and all other business suffered from total indifference.

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  • In general, the learned consensus dubbed the whole business with indifference.

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  • "How's my darling?" he asked with his usual indifference.

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  • Not surprisingly, Lori alternated between tears and indifference.

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  • To the Gnostic the things of the world are worthless; they are to him matters of indifference.

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  • From this position it easily followed that actions, being merely external, were morally indifferent, and that the true Gnostic should abandon himself to every lust with perfect indifference.

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  • As a dramatist he worked more in the spirit of Plautus than of Ennius, Pacuvius, Accius or Terence; but the great Umbrian humorist is separated from his older contemporary, not only by his breadth of comic power, but by his general attitude of moral and political indifference.

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  • Whether the necessary forces are due to aerial pressures acting on the rear, or to forces directly impressed from without, is a matter of indifference.

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  • Military historians point out that he sometimes sacrificed great advantages to impetuosity; naval experts that he sometimes threw away great opportunities by indifference.

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  • Erasmus is accused of indifference.

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  • The happiness or satisfaction of the individual was the end which dominated this scepticism as well as the contemporary systems of Stoicism and Epicureanism, and all three philosophies place it in tranquillity or self-centred indifference.

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  • For this common basis, however, he did not succeed at first in finding any other than the merely negative expression of indifference.

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  • This indifference to goods of body and estate is quite Platonic, but is.

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  • He inherited great difficulties - the feud with France, the dissensions of the continental provinces, the growing indifference of England to foreign conquests, the discontent of all his subjects with a strict executive and severe taxation.

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  • There is no sign of any intimate knowledge of ancient or scholastic thought; to the doctrines of Spinoza, Leibnitz, Malebranche, Norris, the attitude is one of indifference or lack of appreciation, but the influence of Descartes and specially of Locke is evident throughout.

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  • The fearful slaughter which took place before the British were masters of the defences caused Wellington to be charged with indifference to loss, but a postponement of the attack would merely have resulted in more battles against Soult.

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  • The young poet wooed the girl with poems, romances, dramas and mute worship, but received nothing except chilling indifference and lively ridicule.

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  • Administrative indifference to the eminently useful officials forming the service has led, in many cases, to diminishing instead of increasing their number and their salaries, but it is obvious that the extension of their duties and a corresponding raising of their status would be much more in accordance with the national interest.

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  • As yet no means are known which call so much into action as a great war, that rough energy born of the camp, that deep impersonality born of hatred, that conscience born of murder and cold-bloodedness, that fervour born of effort in the annihilation of the enemy, that proud indifference to loss, to one's own existence, to that of one's fellows, to that earthquake-like soul-shaking which a people needs when it is losing its vitality."

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  • In the Utopia, which, though written earlier, More had allowed to be printed as late as 1516, he had spoken against the vices of power, and declared for indifference of religious creed with a breadth of philosophical view of which there is no other example in any Englishman of that age.

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  • His nepotism, again, casts a dark shadow over his memory: but most regrettable of all was his indifference towards the ending of the schism.

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  • Sixtus was far from blind to the Turkish peril, but here also he was hampered by the indifference of the secular powers.

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  • He found their religious life too formal, external and worldly; and they could not sanction his comparative indifference to doctrinal correctness and his incurable tendency to separatism in church life.

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  • e.), apart from what such cities in Mesopotamia as held by its last kings suffered through the invasion, first perhaps of Nabopolassar, who in 609 B.C. claims to be lord of Shubaru, and then of the Medes, would be a matter of comparative indifference; tribute paid to Babylon was just as hard to find as if it were going to Nineveh.

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  • The true interpretation of Grotius's mind appears to be an indifference to dogmatic propositions, produced by a profound sentiment of piety.

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  • Man in a primitive state has for his dead an almost animal indifference.

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  • This indifference is not dictated by any realization that death means annihilation of the personality.

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  • And in their indifference to the distinctions of race and nationality they merely accommodated themselves to the spirit which had become characteristic of chivalry itself, already recognized, like the church, as a universal institution which knit together the whole warrior caste of Christendom into one great fraternity irrespective alike of feudal subordination and territorial boundaries.

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  • During the first century of the existence of the Gentile Christian Church, "the hope of the approaching end of the world and the glorious kingdom of Christ" was dominant, although warnings had to be given against doubt and indifference.

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  • Little is known of the personal part played by Philip in the events associated with his name, and later historians have been divided between the view which regards him as a handsome, lethargic nonentity and that which paints him as a master of statecraft who, under a veil of phlegmatic indifference and pious sentiment, masked an inflexible purpose, of which his ministers were but the spokesmen and executors.

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  • 11-20), or the assertion of God's indifference towards men's actions (xxxv.

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  • The indifference complained of in Mal.

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  • In other respects the writer displays the most complete indifference, and even ignorance, with regard to the state of affairs in the West.

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  • Charles attempted to buy off these redoubtable invaders, a policy which aroused the anger of his German subjects, whose resentment was accentuated by the kings indifference to their condition, and found expression in 887 when Arnulf, an illegitimate son of Carloman, the eldest son of Louis the German, led an army of Bavarians against him.

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  • But in spite of these imposing displays of power the princes looked with suspicion upon an emperor who was almost a stranger to their country and who was believed to be a renegade from their faith, and soon after Fredericks return to Italy the gulf between him and his German subjects was widened by his indifference to a great danger which threatened them.

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  • caused much natural concern, combined as it was with that indifference to religion which marks the life of the educated classes in the large towns, and especially in Berlin.

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  • The sympathy of the Slav inhabitants of the empire made it impossible for the government of Vienna to regard with indifference the sufferings of Christians in Turkey.

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  • Their religious teachers detested the native Mahommedan princes for their religious indifference, and gave Yusef a fetwa - or legal opinion - to the effect that he had good moral and religious right to dethrone the heterodox rulers who did not scruple to seek help from the Christians whose bad habits they had adopted.

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  • 5); of great industry and versatility; combining imaginative enthusiasm and a vein of religious mysticism with a sceptical indifference to popular beliefs and a scorn of religious imposture; and tempering the grave seriousness of a Roman with a genial capacity for enjoyment (Hor.

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  • was crowned at Reims. Charles's intimate counsellors, La Tremoille and Regnault de Chartres, archbishop of Reims, saw their profits menaced by the triumphs of Joan of Arc, and accordingly the court put every difficulty in the way of her military career, and received the news of her capture before Compiegne (1430) with indifference.

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  • Melanchthon, on being referred to, declared that, though the Interim was inadmissible, yet so far as matters of indifference (adiaphora) were concerned it might be received.

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  • Hence arose that "adiaphoristic" controversy in connexion with which he has been misrepresented as holding among matters of indifference such cardinal doctrines as justification by faith, the number of the sacraments, as well as the dominion of the pope, feast-days, and so on.

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  • He recognized from the first two important disqualifications - his indifference to music and his slight knowledge of architecture.

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  • This, then, in brief summary, is what we have seen: the natural development of an historical situation, a march of events leading rapidly to a climax; an unexampled strength and an unexampled sympathy issuing inevitably in an unexampled liberty; and then the forces of orthodox religion combining with the forces of worldly indifference in order to suppress a dangerous innovator.

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  • At Halle Hinrichs maintained the standard of Hegelianism amid the opposition or indifference of his colleagues.

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  • Nor was it, as in Schelling's earlier system, to be a collateral progeny with mind from the same womb of indifference and identity.

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  • As a poet, his fame has undergone many vicissitudes since his death, ranging from the indifference of the "Young German" school to the enthusiastic admiration of the closing decades of the 19th century - an enthusiasm to which we owe the Weimar Goethe-Gesellschaft (founded in 1885) and a vast literature dealing with the poet's life and work; but the fact of his being Germany's greatest poet and the master of her classical literature has never been seriously put in question.

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  • With these considerable merits, normal sophistry had one defect, its indifference to truth.

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  • While he emphasizes in the later sophists the consequences of the fundamental error of sophistry - its indifference to truth - he does honour to the genius and the originality of the leaders of the movement.

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  • Starting from the obvious antithesis of thought and that of which it is the thought, it is possible to view the ultimate relation of its term as that of mutual indifference or, secondly, as that of a correspondence such that while they retain their distinct character modification of the one implies modification of the other, or thirdly and lastly, as that of a mergence of one in the other of such a nature that the merged term, whichever it be, is fully accounted for in a complete theory of that in which it is merged.

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  • In his philosophy of identity Schelling (q.v.) had already defined the Absolute as pure indifference, or the identity of subject and object, but without advancing further into theogony.

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  • He now proceeded to distinguish three moments in God, the first of which is the pure indifference which, in a sense, precedes all existence - the primal basis or abyss, as he calls it, in agreement with Boehme.

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  • It showed the ease of seizing the country, the indifference of the natives, and the resolution of the United States government.

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  • Then, after the indifference of humanists and Protestant polemic, came the disgust of men of science at the scholastic philosophy - an attitude best exhibited in Bacon's Advancement of Learning.

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  • The Renaissance ran its course in Italy with strange indifference to consequences.

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  • Moreover, the temper of these more enlightened men was itself opposed to Italian indifference and immorality; it was pugnacious and polemical, eager to beat down the arrogance of monks and theologians rather than to pursue an ideal of aesthetical self-culture.

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  • Its acts, owing to the indifference of the settlers, had slight importance.

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  • An example of this theory is the doctrine of the liberum arbitrium indifferentiae ("liberty of indifference"), according to which the choice of two or more alternative possibilities is affected neither by contemporaneous data of an ethical or prudential kind nor by crystallized habit (character).

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  • Nothing but his curious indifference to the publication of his work prevented him from securing earlier recognition for it.

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  • He even attacked Augustus (and perhaps Caesar), who treated the matter with indifference.

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  • Preoccupied with his own ideas, he chafed under the indifference of thinkers who had grown blasé in speculation and fancied himself persecuted by a conspiracy of professors of philosophy.

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  • He was either the founder or the formulator of the doctrine of indifference, according to which genus and species retain their identity in the individual apart altogether from particular idiosyncrasies.

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  • From the first, it aims at propaganda; and the nationality of the convert is a matter of indifference.

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  • The person of the individual ruler is, on the other hand, a matter of indifference.

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  • Therefore the duty of the believer is to combat and destroy the unbeliever and the heretic. In short, the tolerance of the Achaemenids and the indifference of the Arsacids are now replaced by intolerance and religious persecution.

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  • At first the encroachments on Bechuana territory by Boers from the Transvaal were looked upon with comparative indifference.

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  • This feeling explains his detestation of foreign manners and superstitions, his loathing not only of inhuman crimes and cruelties but even of the lesser derelictions from selfrespect, his scorn of luxury and of art as ministering to luxury, his mockery of the poetry and of the stale and dilettante culture of his time, and perhaps, too, his indifference to the schools of philosophy and his readiness to identify all the professors of stoicism with the reserved and close-cropped puritans, who concealed the worst vices under an outward appearance of austerity.

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  • Even his references to the great poets of the past indicate rather a blase sense of indifference and weariness than a fresh enjoyment of them.

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  • Seneca gives the true Stoic answer in his treatise On Providence: the wise man cannot really meet with misfortune; all outward calamity is a divine instrument of training, designed to exercise his powers and teach the world the indifference of external conditions.

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  • Withdrawal from the active duty of the world must lead to passive endurance, and, ere long, complete indifference.

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  • The heavy losses sustained by the Indians during that outbreak, and their dislike and distrust of the colonial Spaniard, account for the comparative indifference with which they viewed the rise and progress of the 1814 colonial revolt against Spain, which gave the South American states their independence.

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  • For Example, The Bore Of The Tube Is No Longer A Matter Of Indifference, Even Though The Attachment Of The Drop Occurs Entirely At The Outer Edge.

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  • These dates are given in the following memorial distich with a frank indifference to quantity and metre "Vult Crux, Lucia, Cinis, Charismata dia Quod det vota pia quarta sequens feria."

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  • This is the most satisfactory, as it is the most obvious, explanation of his utter indifference in presence of one of the most momentous problems that ever pressed for solution on an English statesman.

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  • Indifference, perhaps founded on religious scepticism, characterized the king during the many ecclesiastical disputes that played so large a part in his reign.

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  • The new sovereign, however, showed with regard to the unceasing religious controversy the same apathy and indifference with which he also met matters of state.

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  • But it suited also the practical bent of the Roman mind, with its comparative indifference to abstract speculation or purely scientific research.

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  • The consequence of this indifference to original research and patient verification might have been less serious had the written tradition on which Livy preferred to rely been more trustworthy.

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  • At this time, as Cardinal-Archbishop of Bologna, he delivered a remarkable address on the attitude and duty of the Church during the war, and strongly emphasized the paramount importance of the Holy See observing strict neutrality, not of indifference, but of impartiality, while leaving nothing undone to restore peace and good-will and to mitigate suffering.

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  • This atmosphere of indifference imperceptibly influenced the attitude of the contending schools to one another, and we find various movements towards unity in the views of Boethus the Stoic, Panaetius and Antiochus of Ascalon, founder of the so-called "Fifth Academy."

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  • Were worldliness, tongue religion, moral indifference, the distinctive marks of the Jewish element?

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  • He reduces the opposite doctrine to three assumptions, all of which he shows to be untenable: (1) " a self-determining power in the will "; (2) " indifference, ...

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  • His choice of subject in this instance was certainly not made from any love of warfare or indifference to its horrors.

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  • The dedication to King William was to have procured Swift an English prebend, but this miscarried owing to the negligence or indifference of Henry Sidney, earl of Romney.

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  • As in Chile, the indifference of the ruling class to the welfare of the common people is a primary cause of their ignorance and poverty, to which must be added the apathy, if not opposition, of the Church.

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  • Although Tiberius is said to have received the news of his death with indifference, there is no reason to suppose that he had any hand in it; indeed, he seems to have entertained a genuine affection for his son.

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  • On the other hand, the still half-heathen world outside broke every moral law with indifference; and in the effort to restrain men's vices church discipline became mechanical instead of sympathetic, penal rather than paternal.

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  • The ease with which he had subdued the realm misled him; he fancied that the slack resistance, which was mainly due to the incapacity and unpopularity of Baliol, implied the indifference of the Scots to the idea ol annexation.

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  • But the country, being in enjoyment of considerable prosperity, paid only a languid attention to the scheme; its indifference was reflected in the House; the Conservatives were encouraged in their opposition by the lack of interest which the new bill excited, and the almost unconcealed dislike of the prime minister to its provisions.

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  • At home, a terrible murrain had fallen on the cattle, inflicting ruin on the agricultural interest; a grave commercial crisis was creating alarm in the city of London, and, in its consequences, injuring the interests of labor; while the working classes, at last roused from their long indifference, and angry at the rejection of Lord Russells bill, were assembling in their tens of thousands to demand reform.

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  • Pitt's debts were the result of a wasteful indifference to his private affairs.

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  • In that treatise (c. 15) he approves indeed of the church practice of not fasting on Saturdays and Sundays (as elsewhere, De corona, c. 3, he had expressed his concurrence in the other practice of observing the entire period between Easter and Pentecost as a season of joy); but otherwise he evinces great dissatisfaction with the indifference of the church as to the number, duration and severity of her fasts.'

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  • His indifference to works of art and ignorance of their value is shown by his well-known remark to those who contracted for the shipment of the treasures of Corinth to Rome, that "if they lost or damaged them, they would have to replace them."

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  • She felt so keenly the social disabilities it brought upon her, and her husband's indifference to them, that "she never pardoned him his name."

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  • But Giraldus threw up his post, indignant at the indifference of the bishop to the welfare of his see.

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  • The letters allude to toleration in the state and comprehension in the church, while they show an indifference to theological dogma hardly consistent with an exclusive connexion with any sect.

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  • Hasty judgment, bias, absence of an a priori " indifference " to what the evidence may in the end require us to conclude, undue regard for authority, excessive love for custom and antiquity, indolence and sceptical despair are among the states of mind marked by him as most apt to interfere with the formation of beliefs in harmony with the Universal Reason that is active in the universe.

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  • The elections to the Convention were by almost universal suffrage, but indifference or intimidation reduced the voters to a The small number.

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  • Similarly, in the view taken by the Stoics of the duties of social decorum, and in their attitude to the popular religion, we find a fluctuating compromise between the disposition to repudiate what is conventional, and the disposition to revere what is 1 The Stoics seem to have varied in their view of " good repute," eu50 ia; at first, when the school was more under the influence of Cynicism, they professed an outward as well as an inward indifference to it; ultimately they conceded the point to common sense, and included it among rrponyp. va.

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  • Hence we find that later thinkers of the Cyrenaic school felt themselves compelled to change their fundamental notion; thus Theodorus defined the good as" gladness " (Xapa) depending on wisdom, as distinct from mere pleasure, while Hegesias proclaimed that happiness was unattainable, and that the chief function of wisdom was to render life painless by producing indifference to all things that give pleasure.

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  • The sense of the gap between theory and fact gives to the religious element of Stoicism a new force; the soul, conscious of its weakness, leans on the thought of God, and in the philosopher's attitude towards external events, pious resignation preponderates over self-poised indifference; the old self-reliance of the reason, looking down on man's natural life as a mere field for its exercise, makes room for a positive aversion to the flesh as an alien element imprisoning the spirit; the body has come to be a " corpse which the soul sustains," 1 and life a " sojourn in a strange land "; 2 in short, the ethical idealism of Zeno has begun to borrow from the metaphysical idealism of Plato.

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  • The statement of them is variously given, - Pride, Avarice, Anger, Gluttony, Unchastity, are found in all the lists; the remaining two (or three) are variously selected from among Envy, Vainglory, and the rather singular sins Gloominess (tristitia) and Languid Indifference (acidic or acedia, from Gr.

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  • It follows that the only wise course is to be content with an attitude of indifference, neither to affirm nor to deny.

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  • It must have been at least after his Commentary on Seneca's De Clementia that his heart was "so subdued and reduced to docility that in comparison with his zeal for true piety he regarded all other studies with indifference, though not entirely forsaking them.

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  • These Calvin regarded as matters of indifference, provided the magistrates did not make them of importance, by seeking to enforce them; and he was the more willing to concede them, because he hoped thereby to meet the wishes of the Bernese brethren whose ritual was less simple than that established by Farel at Geneva.

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  • That he was not the originator of the theory known as "liberty of indifference" (liberum arbitrium indifferentiae) is shown in G.

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  • The older source, however, presupposes that Judah and the two Joseph tribes have acquired their territory; the remaining seven are blamed for their indifference (xviii.

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  • Before this there had been complete harmony between Church and State; but afterwards came indifference and then disagreement between political and religious institutions, between the City of God and that of Caesar.

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  • Indifference and satiety spread speedily; the bourgeoisie forsook the reformers directly they had recourse to violence (February 1358), and the Parisians became hostile when Etienne Marcel complicated his revolutionary work by intrigues with Navarre, releasing from prison the grandson of Louis X., the Headstrong, an ambitious, fine-spoken courter of popularity, covetous of the royal crown.

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  • An ardent patriot and republican, her relations with Danton resembled those of Marie Antoinette with Mirabeau, in each case a woman spoilt by flattery, enraged at indifference.

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  • To Ghazali (q.v.) it seemed that the study of secular philosophy had resulted in a general indifference to religion, and that the Ghazal, scepticism scepticism which concealed itself under a pretence of piety was destroying the life and purity of the nation.

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  • The princes had cause to dread him; for Yusuf, the leader of a religious movement still in its first zeal, was known to have no friendly feeling for their religious indifference and elegant, dissipated habits.

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  • The representatives of the third estate were confined by the indifference of the Castilians to eighteen towns, whose procurators were named by the councils either from among themselves in rotation, or from particular families.

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  • His indifference to their good, or his utter inability to see where it lay, was conspicuously shown when, on his abdication in 1556, he left his hereditary Flemish possessions to his son Philip, and not to his brother Ferdinand.

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  • His jests, which were used by his enemies as a charge against him, seem to have originated in religious indifference, or perhaps in a spirit of inquiry which anticipated the ideas of a later age.

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  • This indifference to the welfare of the Protestants added to the estrangement between the elector and his eldest son, which was further accentuated when John George, ignoring the Dispositio Achillea, bequeathed the new mark to one of his younger sons.

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  • and the indifference, or weakness, of the emperor Leopold I., the elector was forced to restore western Pomerania to Sweden, in return for the payment of 300,000 crowns by France.

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  • Under that facade of indifference beats a heart primed for breaking.

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  • Behind that facade of indifference, there's a very nice person.

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  • Celebratory cigars and wine came out and all other business suffered from total indifference.

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  • Julie responded like everyone else; with the usual dazed look of acute indifference.

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  • In general, the learned consensus dubbed the whole business with indifference.

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  • "How's my darling?" he asked with his usual indifference.

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  • Not surprisingly, Lori alternated between tears and indifference.

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  • He joined Lean and Allin as they dined, listening with forced indifference as they told him that Rissa had left alone with her guard at dusk.

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  • He had callous indifference for helpless weakness.

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  • affectation of indifference I began to chop idly at the ground in front of me with my hatchet.

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  • appreciation of beauty is of greater value than indifference to it.

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  • belle indifference ' - Patients did not seem to be concerned about their condition.

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  • careless indifference.

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  • contrive a situation in which Elizabeth declines Darcy's first proposal, thereby demonstrating her indifference to wealth.

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  • Feigning indifference, she plays the coquette 's cheapest trick.

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  • Summary The shape of indifference curves depends upon the preferences of the individual.

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  • If you are not very demonstrative, you will give the appearance of emotional indifference.

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  • feigning indifference, she plays the coquette's cheapest trick.

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  • illocutionary function, agency and subjecthood are matters of indifference.

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  • feigning indifference, she plays the coquette's cheapest trick.

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  • But the great majority of the people present showed entire indifference to the youth and his sorrows.

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  • As a result I felt a profound indifference to what followed.

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  • Being unable to empathize with injured or upset children, and displaying indifference to the needs of others.

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  • He does not mean indifference for he was deeply compassionate, he cared greatly.

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  • Yes, but it is not the silence of callous indifference or helpless weakness.

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  • That sums up the conventional view and explains the seeming indifference of many central banks to this issue.

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  • What happens to the Russians, what happens to the Czechs, is a matter of utter indifference to me.

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  • I cannot suffocate their plea for air with my careless indifference.

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  • To the general public, outside the Church, in Britain there is supreme indifference to what world wide Anglicanism does with itself.

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  • Do we continue to turn out for cup matches every season despite the manager's apparent indifference to them?

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  • indifference curves depends upon the preferences of the individual.

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  • indifference map.

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  • However, following the war, the unit seemed to be losing its impetus through government indifference.

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  • Often accompanied by what Charcot called ' la belle indifference ' - Patients did not seem to be concerned about their condition.

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  • This report illustrates why so many business leaders are increasingly alarmed by the worsening situation and why the government's indifference is so frustrating.

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  • indifference of nature is stressed in the death of Bazarov.

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  • indifference of the outside world.

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  • Summary An indifference curve is a locus of points about which the individual feels indifferent.

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  • We are not speaking of the insolence of open and avowed infidelity, but of the heartless indifference of respectable orthodoxy.

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  • There appears to be complete official indifference to the usual mantras of secrecy and " national security " .

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  • The pitfalls are that of creating a mishmash and that of promoting indifference.

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  • Tom watches this with an indifference that belongs not to enlightenment rationality, but to the callousness traditionally attributed to the fairy world.

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  • For some, indifference may seem less risky than engagement.

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  • seeming indifference of many central banks to this issue.

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  • sorry tale of indifference, neglect and contempt.

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  • stolid indifference put the lawyer out of countenance.

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  • One especially striking clause calls on us to " move away from the freedom of indifference toward the freedom of involvement.

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  • throne of mercy, O Lord, the sin of indifference and ambivalence.

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  • 4 Thus the highest liberty, as distinguished from mere indifference, proceeds from clear and distinct knowledge, and such knowledge can only be attained by firmness and resolution, i.e.

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  • The investigations of Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay had shown that indifference to chemical reagents did not sufficiently characterize an unknown gas as nitrogen, and it became necessary to reinvestigate other cases of the occurrence of "nitrogen" in nature.

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  • The indifference of the Jews to the desolate conditions of their sanctuary opens up a problem of some difficulty.

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  • The traditional theory of the Mosaic origin of the elaborate Levitical legislation cannot be maintained save by the most arbitrary and inconsequential treatment of the evidence and by an entire indifference to the historical spirit; and, although numerous points of detail still remain very obscure, the three leading stages in the Levitical institutions are now recognized by nearly all independent scholars.

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  • 1, 170-176) Horace accuses him of clumsiness in the construction of his plays and the drawing of his characters, and indifference to everything excepting immediate success: gestit enim nummum in loculos demittere, post hoc securus cadat an recto stet fabula talo.

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  • To the Gnostic the things of the world are worthless; they are to him matters of indifference.

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  • From this position it easily followed that actions, being merely external, were morally indifferent, and that the true Gnostic should abandon himself to every lust with perfect indifference.

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  • These various movements proved in the first place that the masses were by no means ripe for revolution, and that the idea of unity, although now advocated by a few revolutionary leaders, was far from being generally accepted even by the Liberals; and, secondly, that, in spite of the indifference of the masses, the despotic governments were unable to hold their own without the assistance of foreign bayonets.

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  • The abstruse nature of his studies, the mystical character of his writings, and the general indifference of the Romans to such subjects, caused his works to be soon forgotten.

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  • Zeno was a pupil of Crates, from whom he learned the moral worth of self-control and indifference to sensual indulgence (see Stoics).

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  • They style themselves " truly spiritual Christians," and in their rejection of the sacraments, their indifference to outward forms, and their insistence on the spiritual interpretation of the Bible (" the letter killeth "), they are closely akin to the Quakers, whom they resemble also in their inoffensive mode of life and the practice of mutual help.

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  • It broke out in the following year, and after the battles of Austerlitz (December 1805) and Friedland (June 1807), in which the Russians were completely defeated, the two sovereigns had their famous interviews at Tilsit, at which they not only made peace but agreed to divide the world between them, with a sublime indifference to the interests of other states.

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  • " In England," he says, " it was received with cold indifference, little read, and speedily forgotten.

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  • In two peasants' cottages in the Campagna, protected with wire netting by Professor Celli, all the inmates-10 in number - escaped, while the neighbours suffered severely; and three out of four persons living in a third hut, from which protection was removed owing to the indifference of the inmates, contracted malaria.

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  • And, if Kant was overridden by a love of symmetry, Reid's indifference to form and system is an even more dangerous defect.

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  • Born in Edinburgh on the 28th of January 1784, he lost his father in 1791 and his mother in 1795; and as his grandfather regarded him with indifference, he went to reside with Henry Dundas, afterwards Viscount Melville.

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  • But her relations with Henry passed gradually through indifference to hatred.

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  • Napoleon showed his indifference to the opinion of the tsar by ordering the seizure of the British envoy at Hamburg, Sir George Rumbold (24th of October); but set him free on the remonstrance of the king of Prussia, with whom he then desired to remain on friendly terms. Nevertheless, the general trend of his policy was such as powerfully to help on the formation of the Third Coalition against France - a compact which Pitt (who returned to power in May 1804) had found it very difficult to arrange.

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  • After the fall of Struensee (the warrant for whose arrest he signed with indifference), for the last six-and-twenty years of his reign, he was only nominally king.

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  • Apt to minimize difficulties, to search for the common ground of unity in opponents, he turned aside, with a disdain which superficial critics often mistook for indifference, from the base, the violent and the common.

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  • A similar change between the earlier odes of Horace, in which he declares his epicurean indifference to affairs of state, and the great national odes of the third book is to be ascribed to the same guidance.

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  • The news of the destruction of Fort Caroline, and the execution of Ribaut and his followers, was received with indifference at the French court; but Dominique de Gourgues (c. 1530-1593), a friend of Ribaut but probably a Catholic, organized an expedition of vengeance, not informing his men of his destination until his three ships were near the Florida coast.

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  • This conception of him is largely true, as is pointed out above, but it does not harmonize the contradictions of the book, the discrepancies between the piety of some passages and the emotional indifference toward God shown in others.

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  • Cuba is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic in religion, but under the new Republic there is a complete separation of church and state, and liberalism and indifference are increasing.

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  • As a dramatist he worked more in the spirit of Plautus than of Ennius, Pacuvius, Accius or Terence; but the great Umbrian humorist is separated from his older contemporary, not only by his breadth of comic power, but by his general attitude of moral and political indifference.

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  • Before this he had been sent by Archbishop Affre to Rome, and had been appointed Roman prelate and protonotary apostolic. For thirty years he remained a notable figure in France, doing his utmost to arouse his countrymen from religious indifference.

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  • He showed a lofty indifference to criticism such as that of Eadmer in the Historia novorum, which was published early in the reign.

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  • The doctrine of indifference as it appears in later writers certainly tends, as Prantl points out, towards Nominalism, inasmuch as it gives up the substantiality of the universals.

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  • Prantl distinguishes from the system of indifference the " status " doctrine attributed by John of Salisbury to Walter of Mortagne (d.

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  • In this supreme crisis, then, it is not surprising that the masses listened with sullen indifference to the fiery eloquence of the Coalition leaders.

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  • Whether the necessary forces are due to aerial pressures acting on the rear, or to forces directly impressed from without, is a matter of indifference.

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  • It would be necessary for the court to engage in endless inquiries as to the true inwardness of a man's mind, whether his state of ignorance existed at the time of the commission of the offence, whether such a condition of mind was inevitable or brought about merely by indifference on his part.

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  • Cicero, by his professed antagonism to the doctrines of Epicurus, by his inadequate appreciation of Lucretius himself and by the indifference which he shows to other contemporary poets, seems to have been neither fitted for the task of correcting the unfinished work of a writer whose genius was so distinct from his own, nor likely to have cordially undertaken such a task.

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  • We know, for example, that the choice of a contemplative life was not the result of indifference to the fate of the world, or of any natural coldness or even calmness of temperament.

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  • He greatly admired, or professed to admire, the genius of the early Roman poets, while he shows indifference to the poetical genius of his younger contemporaries.

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  • Whether this type is more conveniently designated by the word Iberian, or by some other name (" Eur-african," " Mediterranean," &c.) is a matter of comparative indifference, provided that there is no misunderstanding as to the steps by which the term Iberian attained its meaning in modern anthropology.

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  • This determination to be a working playwright, pushed on in the face of critical hostility and popular indifference, is a very curious trait in the character of Tennyson.

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  • Chretien left his poem unfinished, and we do not know how he intended to complete the adventures of his hero; but those writers who undertook the task, Wauchier de Denain, Gerbert de Montreuil and Manessier, carried it out with such variety of detail, and such a bewildering indifference to Chretien's version, that it seems practically certain that there must have been, previous to Chretien's work, more than one poem dealing with the same theme.

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  • Youths and maidens maintain towards each other a demeanour of reserve and even indifference, from which it has been confidently affirmed that love does not exist in Japan.

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  • At the most important crisis of his life in 1783, he almost made an ostentation of disorder and of indifference not only to appearances, but even to decency.

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  • The most curious example of this inconsistency, or rather of this indifference to general principle, occurs in his Essay on Projects.

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  • Military historians point out that he sometimes sacrificed great advantages to impetuosity; naval experts that he sometimes threw away great opportunities by indifference.

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  • The completion of the second Temple (516 B.C.) has been followed by disillusionment as to the anticipated prosperity, by indifference to worship, scepticism as to providence, and moral laxity.'

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  • These ideas became known to his Spanish rulers, and to assuage them he wrote a philippic called the Mars gallicus (1635), a violent attack on French ambitions generally, and on Richelieu's indifference to international Catholic interests in particular.

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  • The class of humanists which had grown up in Italy during the 5th century, and whose influence had been spreading into Germany, France and England during the generation immediately preceding the opening of the Protestant revolt, represented every phase of religious feeling from mystic piety to cynical indifference, but there were very few anti-clericals among them.

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  • The slaying of Patroclus by the Trojan hero Hector roused Achilles from his indifference; eager to avenge his beloved comrade, he sallied forth, equipped with new armour fashioned by Hephaestus, slew Hector, and, after dragging his body round the walls of Troy, restored it to the aged King Priam at his earnest entreaty.

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  • That science must be left free to determine the aims of her investigation, to select and apply her own methods, and to publish the results of her researches without restraint, is a postulate which Ultramontanism either cannot understand or treats with indifference, for it regards as strange and incredible the fundamental law governing all scientific research - that there is for it no higher aim than the discovery of the truth.

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  • Erasmus is accused of indifference.

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  • This attitude of indifference to real knowledge passed in the younger and less reputable generation into a corroding moral scepticism which recognized no good but pleasure and no right but might.

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  • The happiness or satisfaction of the individual was the end which dominated this scepticism as well as the contemporary systems of Stoicism and Epicureanism, and all three philosophies place it in tranquillity or self-centred indifference.

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  • By this time the members of the Habsburg family were thoroughly alarmed at the indifference or incompetence of the emperor; and their anxieties were not diminished by the knowledge that he was in feeble health, was unmarried, and had refused to take any steps towards securing the election of a successor.

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  • interested commercially, the whole enterprise was regarded with such indifference that the king, in the very crisis of the struggle, could only with the utmost difficulty obtain contributions for war expenses from the half-dozen local diets of Poland, which extorted from the helplessness of their distracted and impecunious sovereign fresh privileges for every subsidy they grudgingly granted.

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  • Besides being a busy natural philosopher, Boyle devoted much time to theology, showing a very decided leaning to the practical side and an indifference to controversial polemics.

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  • The long Modern wars of religion in Germany, as in France and England, and were followed by a certain indifference as to disputed secular points of theology.

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  • These attempts meet with little success, owing in part to racial prejudice and in part to the indifference of the Arabs to education.

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  • It is true that even by the most thorough-going allegorists the literal sense of Scripture was not openly and entirely disregarded; but the very fact that the study of Hebrew was never more than exceptional, and so early ceased to be cultivated at all, is eloquent of indifference to the original literal sense, and the very principle of the many meanings inherent in the sacred writings was hostile to sound interpretation; greater importance was attached to the " deeper " or " hidden " senses, i.e.

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  • Thus it is to Luther a matter of indifference whether or not Moses wrote the Pentateuch; the books of Chronicles he definitely pronounces less credible than those of Kings, and he considers that the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah and Hosea probably owe their present form to later hands.

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  • With the dualistic philosophy is further connected an attitude of absolute indifference towards this lower and material world, and the practice of asceticism.

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  • For this common basis, however, he did not succeed at first in finding any other than the merely negative expression of indifference.

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  • With all his efforts, Schelling does not succeed in bringing his conceptions of nature and spirit into any vital connexion with the primal identity, the absolute indifference of reason.

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  • Baron Cuvier in his Eloge historique of Fourcroy repels the charge, but he can scarcely be acquitted of time-serving indifference, if indeed active, though secret, participation be not proved against him.

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  • The negative side of Epicurean hedonism was developed to such an extent by some members of the school (see Hegesias) that the ideal life is held to be rather indifference to pain than positive enjoyment.

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  • Eighteenth-century Italy looked on religion with apathetic indifference, and Liguori convinced himself that only the gentlest and most lenient treatment could win back the alienated laity; hence he was always willing to excuse errors on the side of laxity as due to an excess of zeal in winning over penitents.

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  • This indifference to goods of body and estate is quite Platonic, but is.

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  • He inherited great difficulties - the feud with France, the dissensions of the continental provinces, the growing indifference of England to foreign conquests, the discontent of all his subjects with a strict executive and severe taxation.

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  • Astute in small matters, he had no breadth of view or foresight; his policy was continually warped by his passions or caprices; he flaunted vices of the most sordid kind with a cynical indifference to public opinion, and shocked an age which was far from tenderhearted by his ferocity to vanquished enemies.

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  • There is no sign of any intimate knowledge of ancient or scholastic thought; to the doctrines of Spinoza, Leibnitz, Malebranche, Norris, the attitude is one of indifference or lack of appreciation, but the influence of Descartes and specially of Locke is evident throughout.

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  • The fearful slaughter which took place before the British were masters of the defences caused Wellington to be charged with indifference to loss, but a postponement of the attack would merely have resulted in more battles against Soult.

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  • The young poet wooed the girl with poems, romances, dramas and mute worship, but received nothing except chilling indifference and lively ridicule.

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  • Administrative indifference to the eminently useful officials forming the service has led, in many cases, to diminishing instead of increasing their number and their salaries, but it is obvious that the extension of their duties and a corresponding raising of their status would be much more in accordance with the national interest.

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  • As yet no means are known which call so much into action as a great war, that rough energy born of the camp, that deep impersonality born of hatred, that conscience born of murder and cold-bloodedness, that fervour born of effort in the annihilation of the enemy, that proud indifference to loss, to one's own existence, to that of one's fellows, to that earthquake-like soul-shaking which a people needs when it is losing its vitality."

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  • In the Utopia, which, though written earlier, More had allowed to be printed as late as 1516, he had spoken against the vices of power, and declared for indifference of religious creed with a breadth of philosophical view of which there is no other example in any Englishman of that age.

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  • In the Utopia, published in Latin in 1516 (1st English translation, 1551), he not only denounced the ordinary vices of power, but evinced an enlightenment of sentiment which went far beyond the most statesmanlike ideas to be found among his contemporaries, pronouncing not merely for toleration, but rising even to the philosophical conception of the indifference of religious creed.

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  • His nepotism, again, casts a dark shadow over his memory: but most regrettable of all was his indifference towards the ending of the schism.

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  • Sixtus was far from blind to the Turkish peril, but here also he was hampered by the indifference of the secular powers.

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  • He found their religious life too formal, external and worldly; and they could not sanction his comparative indifference to doctrinal correctness and his incurable tendency to separatism in church life.

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  • For some time a memorandum of the total of daily sales reported was posted on 'Change, but the indifference of traders, together with the distrust that makes any innovation difficult, caused the scheme to be abandoned.

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  • e.), apart from what such cities in Mesopotamia as held by its last kings suffered through the invasion, first perhaps of Nabopolassar, who in 609 B.C. claims to be lord of Shubaru, and then of the Medes, would be a matter of comparative indifference; tribute paid to Babylon was just as hard to find as if it were going to Nineveh.

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  • The true interpretation of Grotius's mind appears to be an indifference to dogmatic propositions, produced by a profound sentiment of piety.

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  • Man in a primitive state has for his dead an almost animal indifference.

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  • This indifference is not dictated by any realization that death means annihilation of the personality.

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  • And in their indifference to the distinctions of race and nationality they merely accommodated themselves to the spirit which had become characteristic of chivalry itself, already recognized, like the church, as a universal institution which knit together the whole warrior caste of Christendom into one great fraternity irrespective alike of feudal subordination and territorial boundaries.

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  • During the first century of the existence of the Gentile Christian Church, "the hope of the approaching end of the world and the glorious kingdom of Christ" was dominant, although warnings had to be given against doubt and indifference.

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  • On the rzth of June Knollys wrote to Cecil at once the best description and the noblest panegyric extant of the queen of Scots - enlarging, with a brave man's sympathy, on her indifference to form and ceremony, her daring grace and openness of manner, her frank display of a great desire to be avenged of her enemies, her readiness to expose herself to all perils in hope of victory, her delight to hear of hardihood and courage, commending by name all her enemies of approved valour, sparing no cowardice in her friends, but above all things athirst for victory by any means at any price, so that for its sake pain and peril seemed pleasant to her, and wealth and all things, if compared with it, contemptible and vile.

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  • Little is known of the personal part played by Philip in the events associated with his name, and later historians have been divided between the view which regards him as a handsome, lethargic nonentity and that which paints him as a master of statecraft who, under a veil of phlegmatic indifference and pious sentiment, masked an inflexible purpose, of which his ministers were but the spokesmen and executors.

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  • 11-20), or the assertion of God's indifference towards men's actions (xxxv.

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  • The indifference complained of in Mal.

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  • In other respects the writer displays the most complete indifference, and even ignorance, with regard to the state of affairs in the West.

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  • Charles attempted to buy off these redoubtable invaders, a policy which aroused the anger of his German subjects, whose resentment was accentuated by the kings indifference to their condition, and found expression in 887 when Arnulf, an illegitimate son of Carloman, the eldest son of Louis the German, led an army of Bavarians against him.

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  • But in spite of these imposing displays of power the princes looked with suspicion upon an emperor who was almost a stranger to their country and who was believed to be a renegade from their faith, and soon after Fredericks return to Italy the gulf between him and his German subjects was widened by his indifference to a great danger which threatened them.

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  • caused much natural concern, combined as it was with that indifference to religion which marks the life of the educated classes in the large towns, and especially in Berlin.

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  • The sympathy of the Slav inhabitants of the empire made it impossible for the government of Vienna to regard with indifference the sufferings of Christians in Turkey.

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  • Their religious teachers detested the native Mahommedan princes for their religious indifference, and gave Yusef a fetwa - or legal opinion - to the effect that he had good moral and religious right to dethrone the heterodox rulers who did not scruple to seek help from the Christians whose bad habits they had adopted.

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  • 5); of great industry and versatility; combining imaginative enthusiasm and a vein of religious mysticism with a sceptical indifference to popular beliefs and a scorn of religious imposture; and tempering the grave seriousness of a Roman with a genial capacity for enjoyment (Hor.

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  • was crowned at Reims. Charles's intimate counsellors, La Tremoille and Regnault de Chartres, archbishop of Reims, saw their profits menaced by the triumphs of Joan of Arc, and accordingly the court put every difficulty in the way of her military career, and received the news of her capture before Compiegne (1430) with indifference.

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  • Melanchthon, on being referred to, declared that, though the Interim was inadmissible, yet so far as matters of indifference (adiaphora) were concerned it might be received.

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  • Hence arose that "adiaphoristic" controversy in connexion with which he has been misrepresented as holding among matters of indifference such cardinal doctrines as justification by faith, the number of the sacraments, as well as the dominion of the pope, feast-days, and so on.

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  • He recognized from the first two important disqualifications - his indifference to music and his slight knowledge of architecture.

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  • This, then, in brief summary, is what we have seen: the natural development of an historical situation, a march of events leading rapidly to a climax; an unexampled strength and an unexampled sympathy issuing inevitably in an unexampled liberty; and then the forces of orthodox religion combining with the forces of worldly indifference in order to suppress a dangerous innovator.

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  • At Halle Hinrichs maintained the standard of Hegelianism amid the opposition or indifference of his colleagues.

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  • Nor was it, as in Schelling's earlier system, to be a collateral progeny with mind from the same womb of indifference and identity.

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  • This collection of distichs, written in collaboration with Schiller, was prompted by the indifference and animosity of contemporary criticism, and its disregard for what the two poets regarded as the higher interests of German poetry.

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  • As a poet, his fame has undergone many vicissitudes since his death, ranging from the indifference of the "Young German" school to the enthusiastic admiration of the closing decades of the 19th century - an enthusiasm to which we owe the Weimar Goethe-Gesellschaft (founded in 1885) and a vast literature dealing with the poet's life and work; but the fact of his being Germany's greatest poet and the master of her classical literature has never been seriously put in question.

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  • With these considerable merits, normal sophistry had one defect, its indifference to truth.

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  • While he emphasizes in the later sophists the consequences of the fundamental error of sophistry - its indifference to truth - he does honour to the genius and the originality of the leaders of the movement.

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  • Starting from the obvious antithesis of thought and that of which it is the thought, it is possible to view the ultimate relation of its term as that of mutual indifference or, secondly, as that of a correspondence such that while they retain their distinct character modification of the one implies modification of the other, or thirdly and lastly, as that of a mergence of one in the other of such a nature that the merged term, whichever it be, is fully accounted for in a complete theory of that in which it is merged.

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  • In his philosophy of identity Schelling (q.v.) had already defined the Absolute as pure indifference, or the identity of subject and object, but without advancing further into theogony.

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  • He now proceeded to distinguish three moments in God, the first of which is the pure indifference which, in a sense, precedes all existence - the primal basis or abyss, as he calls it, in agreement with Boehme.

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  • It showed the ease of seizing the country, the indifference of the natives, and the resolution of the United States government.

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  • Then, after the indifference of humanists and Protestant polemic, came the disgust of men of science at the scholastic philosophy - an attitude best exhibited in Bacon's Advancement of Learning.

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  • The Renaissance ran its course in Italy with strange indifference to consequences.

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  • Moreover, the temper of these more enlightened men was itself opposed to Italian indifference and immorality; it was pugnacious and polemical, eager to beat down the arrogance of monks and theologians rather than to pursue an ideal of aesthetical self-culture.

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  • Its acts, owing to the indifference of the settlers, had slight importance.

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  • An example of this theory is the doctrine of the liberum arbitrium indifferentiae ("liberty of indifference"), according to which the choice of two or more alternative possibilities is affected neither by contemporaneous data of an ethical or prudential kind nor by crystallized habit (character).

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  • Nothing but his curious indifference to the publication of his work prevented him from securing earlier recognition for it.

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  • In spite, however, of the marked improvement in the conditions and behaviour of the Welsh people, owing to this strictly orthodox revival within the pale of the Church, Griffith Jones and his system of education were regarded with indifference by the English prelates in Wales, who offered no preferment and gave little encouragement to the founder of the circulating schools.

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  • He even attacked Augustus (and perhaps Caesar), who treated the matter with indifference.

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  • Preoccupied with his own ideas, he chafed under the indifference of thinkers who had grown blasé in speculation and fancied himself persecuted by a conspiracy of professors of philosophy.

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  • He was either the founder or the formulator of the doctrine of indifference, according to which genus and species retain their identity in the individual apart altogether from particular idiosyncrasies.

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  • From the first, it aims at propaganda; and the nationality of the convert is a matter of indifference.

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  • The person of the individual ruler is, on the other hand, a matter of indifference.

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  • Therefore the duty of the believer is to combat and destroy the unbeliever and the heretic. In short, the tolerance of the Achaemenids and the indifference of the Arsacids are now replaced by intolerance and religious persecution.

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  • At first the encroachments on Bechuana territory by Boers from the Transvaal were looked upon with comparative indifference.

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  • This feeling explains his detestation of foreign manners and superstitions, his loathing not only of inhuman crimes and cruelties but even of the lesser derelictions from selfrespect, his scorn of luxury and of art as ministering to luxury, his mockery of the poetry and of the stale and dilettante culture of his time, and perhaps, too, his indifference to the schools of philosophy and his readiness to identify all the professors of stoicism with the reserved and close-cropped puritans, who concealed the worst vices under an outward appearance of austerity.

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  • Even his references to the great poets of the past indicate rather a blase sense of indifference and weariness than a fresh enjoyment of them.

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  • Seneca gives the true Stoic answer in his treatise On Providence: the wise man cannot really meet with misfortune; all outward calamity is a divine instrument of training, designed to exercise his powers and teach the world the indifference of external conditions.

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  • Withdrawal from the active duty of the world must lead to passive endurance, and, ere long, complete indifference.

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  • The heavy losses sustained by the Indians during that outbreak, and their dislike and distrust of the colonial Spaniard, account for the comparative indifference with which they viewed the rise and progress of the 1814 colonial revolt against Spain, which gave the South American states their independence.

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  • For Example, The Bore Of The Tube Is No Longer A Matter Of Indifference, Even Though The Attachment Of The Drop Occurs Entirely At The Outer Edge.

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  • These dates are given in the following memorial distich with a frank indifference to quantity and metre "Vult Crux, Lucia, Cinis, Charismata dia Quod det vota pia quarta sequens feria."

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  • This is the most satisfactory, as it is the most obvious, explanation of his utter indifference in presence of one of the most momentous problems that ever pressed for solution on an English statesman.

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  • Indifference, perhaps founded on religious scepticism, characterized the king during the many ecclesiastical disputes that played so large a part in his reign.

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  • The new sovereign, however, showed with regard to the unceasing religious controversy the same apathy and indifference with which he also met matters of state.

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  • But it suited also the practical bent of the Roman mind, with its comparative indifference to abstract speculation or purely scientific research.

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  • The consequence of this indifference to original research and patient verification might have been less serious had the written tradition on which Livy preferred to rely been more trustworthy.

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  • At this time, as Cardinal-Archbishop of Bologna, he delivered a remarkable address on the attitude and duty of the Church during the war, and strongly emphasized the paramount importance of the Holy See observing strict neutrality, not of indifference, but of impartiality, while leaving nothing undone to restore peace and good-will and to mitigate suffering.

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  • This atmosphere of indifference imperceptibly influenced the attitude of the contending schools to one another, and we find various movements towards unity in the views of Boethus the Stoic, Panaetius and Antiochus of Ascalon, founder of the so-called "Fifth Academy."

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  • Were worldliness, tongue religion, moral indifference, the distinctive marks of the Jewish element?

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  • He reduces the opposite doctrine to three assumptions, all of which he shows to be untenable: (1) " a self-determining power in the will "; (2) " indifference, ...

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  • His choice of subject in this instance was certainly not made from any love of warfare or indifference to its horrors.

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  • The dedication to King William was to have procured Swift an English prebend, but this miscarried owing to the negligence or indifference of Henry Sidney, earl of Romney.

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  • As in Chile, the indifference of the ruling class to the welfare of the common people is a primary cause of their ignorance and poverty, to which must be added the apathy, if not opposition, of the Church.

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  • Although Tiberius is said to have received the news of his death with indifference, there is no reason to suppose that he had any hand in it; indeed, he seems to have entertained a genuine affection for his son.

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  • On the other hand, the still half-heathen world outside broke every moral law with indifference; and in the effort to restrain men's vices church discipline became mechanical instead of sympathetic, penal rather than paternal.

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  • The ease with which he had subdued the realm misled him; he fancied that the slack resistance, which was mainly due to the incapacity and unpopularity of Baliol, implied the indifference of the Scots to the idea ol annexation.

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  • But the country, being in enjoyment of considerable prosperity, paid only a languid attention to the scheme; its indifference was reflected in the House; the Conservatives were encouraged in their opposition by the lack of interest which the new bill excited, and the almost unconcealed dislike of the prime minister to its provisions.

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  • At home, a terrible murrain had fallen on the cattle, inflicting ruin on the agricultural interest; a grave commercial crisis was creating alarm in the city of London, and, in its consequences, injuring the interests of labor; while the working classes, at last roused from their long indifference, and angry at the rejection of Lord Russells bill, were assembling in their tens of thousands to demand reform.

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  • In that treatise (c. 15) he approves indeed of the church practice of not fasting on Saturdays and Sundays (as elsewhere, De corona, c. 3, he had expressed his concurrence in the other practice of observing the entire period between Easter and Pentecost as a season of joy); but otherwise he evinces great dissatisfaction with the indifference of the church as to the number, duration and severity of her fasts.'

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  • His indifference to works of art and ignorance of their value is shown by his well-known remark to those who contracted for the shipment of the treasures of Corinth to Rome, that "if they lost or damaged them, they would have to replace them."

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  • She felt so keenly the social disabilities it brought upon her, and her husband's indifference to them, that "she never pardoned him his name."

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  • But Giraldus threw up his post, indignant at the indifference of the bishop to the welfare of his see.

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  • The letters allude to toleration in the state and comprehension in the church, while they show an indifference to theological dogma hardly consistent with an exclusive connexion with any sect.

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  • Hasty judgment, bias, absence of an a priori " indifference " to what the evidence may in the end require us to conclude, undue regard for authority, excessive love for custom and antiquity, indolence and sceptical despair are among the states of mind marked by him as most apt to interfere with the formation of beliefs in harmony with the Universal Reason that is active in the universe.

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  • The elections to the Convention were by almost universal suffrage, but indifference or intimidation reduced the voters to a The small number.

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  • Similarly, in the view taken by the Stoics of the duties of social decorum, and in their attitude to the popular religion, we find a fluctuating compromise between the disposition to repudiate what is conventional, and the disposition to revere what is 1 The Stoics seem to have varied in their view of " good repute," eu50 ia; at first, when the school was more under the influence of Cynicism, they professed an outward as well as an inward indifference to it; ultimately they conceded the point to common sense, and included it among rrponyp. va.

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  • Hence we find that later thinkers of the Cyrenaic school felt themselves compelled to change their fundamental notion; thus Theodorus defined the good as" gladness " (Xapa) depending on wisdom, as distinct from mere pleasure, while Hegesias proclaimed that happiness was unattainable, and that the chief function of wisdom was to render life painless by producing indifference to all things that give pleasure.

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  • The sense of the gap between theory and fact gives to the religious element of Stoicism a new force; the soul, conscious of its weakness, leans on the thought of God, and in the philosopher's attitude towards external events, pious resignation preponderates over self-poised indifference; the old self-reliance of the reason, looking down on man's natural life as a mere field for its exercise, makes room for a positive aversion to the flesh as an alien element imprisoning the spirit; the body has come to be a " corpse which the soul sustains," 1 and life a " sojourn in a strange land "; 2 in short, the ethical idealism of Zeno has begun to borrow from the metaphysical idealism of Plato.

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  • The statement of them is variously given, - Pride, Avarice, Anger, Gluttony, Unchastity, are found in all the lists; the remaining two (or three) are variously selected from among Envy, Vainglory, and the rather singular sins Gloominess (tristitia) and Languid Indifference (acidic or acedia, from Gr.

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  • It follows that the only wise course is to be content with an attitude of indifference, neither to affirm nor to deny.

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  • It must have been at least after his Commentary on Seneca's De Clementia that his heart was "so subdued and reduced to docility that in comparison with his zeal for true piety he regarded all other studies with indifference, though not entirely forsaking them.

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  • These Calvin regarded as matters of indifference, provided the magistrates did not make them of importance, by seeking to enforce them; and he was the more willing to concede them, because he hoped thereby to meet the wishes of the Bernese brethren whose ritual was less simple than that established by Farel at Geneva.

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  • That he was not the originator of the theory known as "liberty of indifference" (liberum arbitrium indifferentiae) is shown in G.

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  • The older source, however, presupposes that Judah and the two Joseph tribes have acquired their territory; the remaining seven are blamed for their indifference (xviii.

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  • Before this there had been complete harmony between Church and State; but afterwards came indifference and then disagreement between political and religious institutions, between the City of God and that of Caesar.

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  • Indifference and satiety spread speedily; the bourgeoisie forsook the reformers directly they had recourse to violence (February 1358), and the Parisians became hostile when Etienne Marcel complicated his revolutionary work by intrigues with Navarre, releasing from prison the grandson of Louis X., the Headstrong, an ambitious, fine-spoken courter of popularity, covetous of the royal crown.

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  • An ardent patriot and republican, her relations with Danton resembled those of Marie Antoinette with Mirabeau, in each case a woman spoilt by flattery, enraged at indifference.

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  • To Ghazali (q.v.) it seemed that the study of secular philosophy had resulted in a general indifference to religion, and that the Ghazal, scepticism scepticism which concealed itself under a pretence of piety was destroying the life and purity of the nation.

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  • But as early as Aegidius Romanus (1247-1316), Averroes had been stamped as the patron of indifference to theological dogmas, and credited with the emancipation which was equally due to wider experience and the lessons of the Crusades.

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  • The princes had cause to dread him; for Yusuf, the leader of a religious movement still in its first zeal, was known to have no friendly feeling for their religious indifference and elegant, dissipated habits.

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  • The representatives of the third estate were confined by the indifference of the Castilians to eighteen towns, whose procurators were named by the councils either from among themselves in rotation, or from particular families.

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  • His indifference to their good, or his utter inability to see where it lay, was conspicuously shown when, on his abdication in 1556, he left his hereditary Flemish possessions to his son Philip, and not to his brother Ferdinand.

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  • His jests, which were used by his enemies as a charge against him, seem to have originated in religious indifference, or perhaps in a spirit of inquiry which anticipated the ideas of a later age.

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  • This indifference to the welfare of the Protestants added to the estrangement between the elector and his eldest son, which was further accentuated when John George, ignoring the Dispositio Achillea, bequeathed the new mark to one of his younger sons.

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  • and the indifference, or weakness, of the emperor Leopold I., the elector was forced to restore western Pomerania to Sweden, in return for the payment of 300,000 crowns by France.

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  • Are you here on leave? he went on in his usual tone of indifference.

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  • Eh, Makeev? queried the doctor, in a tone of indifference.

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  • The others all followed, dispirited and shamefaced, and only much later were they able to regain their former affectation of indifference.

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  • Tom watches this with an indifference that belongs not to Enlightenment rationality, but to the callousness traditionally attributed to the fairy world.

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  • For some, indifference may seem less risky than engagement.

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  • Labor 's stewardship of the countryside has been a sorry tale of indifference, neglect and contempt.

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  • His rival 's stolid indifference put the lawyer out of countenance.

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  • One especially striking clause calls on us to move away from the freedom of indifference toward the freedom of involvement.

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  • Leader We acknowledge before your throne of mercy, O Lord, the sin of indifference and ambivalence.

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  • And while revered for their succulent Pinots, Rochioli's Sauvignon Blanc should not to be dismissed with a cold shoulder or ignored with agnostic indifference.

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  • It's usually some variation of love, hate, or indifference, with the occasional breakthrough trendy hair style that manages to appeal to everyone.

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  • With guidance and love from her grandmother, Nana, Chrissa's challenge begins with coping with the stony silence and indifference of her three classmates.

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  • This would also explain why your boyfriend's attitude toward your calls and your desire to spend time together is met with indifference and sometimes annoyance on his part.

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  • Exact fine amounts are based on the number of overall employees in the company and the degree of malice or careless indifference shown by the employer.

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