Indies sentence example

indies
  • NIAS, the largest island in the chain off the west coast of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies, lying about 1° N., 97° 30' E.
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  • His health had broken down, and he visited the West Indies, where his wife died of yellow fever.
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  • Forsaking the priesthood about 1864, he was employed as a diplomatist by the British government in Egypt, Asia Minor, the West Indies, and Bulgaria, being appointed resident minister in Uruguay in 1884; he died at Montevideo on the 30th of September 1888.
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  • The genus Pyrophorus contains about ninety species, and is entirely confined to America and the West Indies, ranging from the southern United States to Argentina and Chile.
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  • For Portugal, completed in 1886 for the Portuguese possessions in the Indies; in force.
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  • The pulp is much esteemed in the West Indies and is eaten as a salad, usually with the addition of pepper, salt and vinegar.
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  • It is served by the Tampa Northern, the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line railways, and by lines of steamers to the West Indies and to the Gulf and Atlantic ports of the United States.
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  • After the Spanish-American War (1898)(1898) a large trade with the West Indies developed.
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  • The Alligator or Avocado Pear is Persea gratissima, a member of the natural order Lauraceae, and a native of the West Indies and other parts of tropical America.
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  • In 1830 and 1831 he took part in the Dutch campaign in Belgium, and in 1844, after being promoted to the rank of general, was sent on an important mission to the Dutch East Indies to inquire into the state of their military defences.
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  • 1.9 8.8 Dutch Indies o 6 0.5 Siam 2..
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  • 636 Dutch East Indies 1,5091,509 Siam.
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  • " The West Indies " (Oxford, 1890); Colonial Reports Annual; MSSloane, 3295.
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  • It has a wide geographical distribution, being found in Europe (including England), Asia Minor, Burma, Straits Settlements, Java, China, Formosa, Egypt; west, south and Central Africa; Australia, South America, West Indies, United States and Canada, but is generally confined to local centres in those countries.
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  • Howe next served in the West Indies in the "Burford," and was present in her when she was very severely damaged in the unsuccessful attack on La Guayra on the 18th of February 1742.
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  • In 1902 the total area under cotton cultivation in the British West Indies was Soo acres.
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  • 2.5 East Indies „ ' 1 Smyrna or Turkey 5.7 The British Cotton Growing Association works under the sanction of a royal charter and has met with valuable official support.
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  • is only from 3 2.2° to 32.7° F., and the same low temperature continues throughout the Brazil Basin to the equator; but in the North American Basin from the West Indies to the Telegraph Plateau no satisfactory bottom temperature lower than 35.6° F.
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  • His empire extended over the three Indies, including that Farther India, where lay the body of St Thomas, to the sun-rising, and back again down the slope to the ruins of Babylon and the tower of Babel.
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  • Oppert supposes the title "Gur Khan" to have been confounded with Yukhanan or Johannes; and it is probable that even in the Levant the stories of "John the patriarch of the Indies," repeated in the early part of this article, may have already mingled with the rumours from the East.
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  • of Portugal was prosecuting inquiries regarding access to India his first object was to open communication with "Prester John of the Indies," who was understood to be a Christian potentate in Africa.
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  • BUITENZORG, a hill station in the residency of Batavia, island of Java, Dutch East Indies.
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  • Buitenzorg is the usual residence of the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, and is further remarkable on account of its splendid botanical garden and for its popularity as a health !resort.
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  • The principal passenger steamers sailing from the port are those of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company for the West Indies and the Pacific (via Panama) and for Brazil and the River Plate, &c., and the Union-Castle line for the Cape of Good Hope, Natal, East Africa, &c., both of which companies have their headquarters here.
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  • BONI (Bone), a vassal state of the government of Celebes, Dutch East Indies, in the south-west peninsula of Celebes, on the Gulf of Boni.
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  • Codfish was perhaps the truest basis of her commerce, which soon came to include the West Indies, Africa and southern Europe.
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  • Of fundamental importance was the trade with the French West Indies, licit and illicit, particularly after the Peace of Utrecht (1713).
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  • Provisions taken to Newfoundland, poor fish to the West Indies, molasses to New England, rum to Africa and good cod to France and Spain, were the commonest ventures of foreign trade.
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  • Scholars, guessing from isolated passages in classic writers, or arguing on general principles, had held that the "Indies" could be reached by sailing due west.
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  • Hence he spoke of the "Indies," and "las Indies" continued to be the official name given to their American possessions by the Spaniards for many generations.
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  • had given the Portuguese the exclusive right of exploration and conquest on the road to the Indies.
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  • After the return of Columbus and his supposed demonstration that the Indies could be reached by sailing west, disputes might obviously arise between the two powers as to their respective "spheres of influence."
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  • Between September 1493 and the time of his last voyage (May 1502 to November 1504), Columbus explored the West Indies, reached the mainland of South America at the mouth of the Orinoco and sailed along the coast of Central America from Cape Honduras to Nombre de Dios (near Colon).
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  • In 150o the Portuguese Pedro Alvarez Cabral, while on his way to the East Indies, sighted the coast of Brazil at Monte Pascoal in the Aimores, and took formal possession.
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  • The first aim of the Spaniards had been trade with the Indies.
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  • In 1509 the council of the Indies was established, but it did not take its final form till 1524.
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  • The captains-general corresponded directly with the council of the Indies, and were independent of the viceroys except in war time.
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  • They acted as councils to the governors, and had civil and criminal jurisdiction with an appeal to the council of the Indies at Seville.
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  • The Indies were expected to supply precious metals and raw materials, and to take all manufactures from the mother country.
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  • Meanwhile French corsairs from St Malo and Dieppe had been active in infesting the West Indies and the trade route followed by the Spanish convoys.
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  • They invaded the West Indies, seized one island after another, and formed the freebooting communities known as the Brethren of the Coast and the Buccaneers.
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  • They surrendered Louisiana to Spain, which had suffered much in an attempt to help them, and their possessions in America were reduced to their islands in the West Indies and French Guiana.
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  • "If France has Spain," cried Canning in parliament, "at least it shall be Spain without the Indies.
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  • MENTAWI, a chain of islands in the Dutch East Indies, off the west coast of Sumatra, between r° and 3° 30' S.
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  • RIOUW, RHIOUw or Bintang, an archipelago of the Dutch East Indies, E.
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  • BARTOLOME DE LAS CASAS (1474-1566), for some time bishop of Chiapa in Mexico, and known to posterity as "The Apostle of the Indies," was a native of Seville.
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  • In 1498 he accompanied his father in an expedition under Columbus to the West Indies, and in 1502 he went with Nicolas de Ovando, the governor, to Hayti, where in 1510 he was admitted to holy orders, being the first priest ordained in the American colonies.
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  • He began his medical career as apprentice to John Paisley, a Glasgow surgeon, and after completing his apprenticeship he became surgeon to a merchant vessel trading between London and the West Indies.
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  • In the West Indies from Venezuela to the Bahamas and in the Caribbean Sea many islands yield supplies of leached guanos; the following are important in this respect: Sombrero, Navassa, A y es, Aruba, Curacoa.
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  • During the interval between the citation and the appearance of the accused, the professorial members of the synod was instructed to prepare themselves to be able to confute the Arminian errors, and the synod occupied itself with deliberations as to a new translation of the Bible, for which a commission was named, made arrangements for teaching the Heidelberg catechism, and granted permission to the missionaries of the East Indies to baptize such children of heathen parents as were admitted into their families.
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  • Trinidad, West Indies >>
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  • Kingston, West Indies >>
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  • In the West Indies Palaemon jamaicensis, and in the East Indies Pal.
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  • He entered the army in 1789, and served in Flanders, the West Indies and the Peninsula.
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  • TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS, a group in the British West Indies.
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  • Soon afterwards he was transferred to the navy and cruised in the West Indies, until, when blockaded by a British cruiser, he left his ship and travelled through the United States.
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  • In November Jerome sailed in a squadron commanded by Admiral Willaumez, which was to ravage the West Indies; but it was scattered by a storm.
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  • Hallet, A Thousand Miles on an Elephant (London, 1890); Captain Hamilton, A New Account of the East Indies (1688-1723); Prince Henri d'Orleans, Around Tonquin and Siam (London, 1894); Professor A.
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  • MARIE GALANTE, an island in the French West Indies.
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  • MALAY ARCHIPELAGO' (variously called Malaysia, the Indian Archipelago, the East Indies, Indonesia, Insulinde), the largest group of islands in the world, lying south-east of Asia and north and north-west of Australia.
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  • The governor-general not only has supreme executive authority, but can of his own accord pass laws and regulations, except in so far as these, from their nature, belong of right to the home government, and as he is bound by the constitutional principles on which, according to the Regulations for the Government of Netherlands India, passed by the king and StatesGeneral in 1854, the Dutch East Indies must be governed.
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  • Cust, Sketch of the Modern Languages of the East Indies (London, 1878); and for bibliography, Boele van Neusbroek, De Beoefening der oostersche talen..
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  • In addition to the Transactions of these societies - many of which contain valuable contributions to their respective departments in their relation to the East Indies - a considerable number of publications are issued in Batavia.
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  • He entered the army of Henry IV., and served in Brittany under Jean d'Aumont, Francois de St Luc and Charles de Brissac. When the army of the League was disbanded he accompanied his uncle, who had charge of the ships in which the Spanish allies were conveyed home, and on reaching Cadiz secured (1599) the command of one of the vessels about to make an expedition to the West Indies.
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  • Two great objects eclipsed all others, - to find a route to the Indies, and to bring the heathen tribes into the embraces of the Church, since, while he cared little for their bodies, his solicitude for their souls knew no bounds" (Parkman).
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  • 1794), the widow of a British army officer who had died in the West Indies during the War of Independence.
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  • Instead, the pope sent out Joao Nunez Barreto as patriarch of the East Indies, with Andre de Oviedo as bishop; and from Goa envoys went to Abyssinia, followed by Oviedo himself, to secure the king's adherence to Rome.
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  • The belief in the short and direct westward passage from Europe to the East Indies was thus shaken, but it was still held that some passage was to be found, and in1519-1521Fernao de Magalhaes (Magellan) made the famous voyage in which he discovered the strait which bears his name.
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  • In1615-1617two Dutchmen, Jacob Lemaire and Willem Cornelis Schouten, having in view both the discovery of the southern continent and the possibility of establishing relations with the East Indies from the east, took a course which brought them to the north part of the Paumotu Archipelago, thence to part of the Tonga chain, and ultimately to New Pomerania, after which they reached the East Indies.
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  • He studied at Franeker, entered the military service in the West Indies about 1625, and was director of the West India Company's colony of Curacao from 1634 to 1644.
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  • On the 28th of April 1789 a mutiny broke out on board the "Bounty," then employed by the British government in conveying young bread-fruit trees from Tahiti to the West Indies.
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  • The smallest lizards of this family belong to the genus Anolis, extremely numerous as regards species (more than ioo) and individuals on bushes and trees of tropical America, and especially of the West Indies.
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  • Tupinambis teguixin, the "tej u" of South America and the West Indies, is the largest member of the family; it reaches a length of a yard, most of which, however, belongs to the strong, whip-like tail.
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  • An isolated attack on Charleston, South Carolina, had been made by Sir Henry Clinton and Sir Peter Parker as early as June 1776, but this was foiled by the spirited resistance of General William Moultrie; after 1778 the southern attempts, stimulated in part by the activity of the French in the West Indies, were vigorously sustained.
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  • (2) During the second period the successive interventions of France, Spain and Holland extended the naval war till it ranged from the West Indies to the Bay of Bengal.
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  • The French government, which by the fault of the British administration was allowed to take the offensive, had three objects in view - to help the Americans, to expel the British from the West Indies and to occupy the main strength of the naval forces of Great Britain in the Channel.
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  • The operations of naval forces in the New World were largely dictated by the facts that from June to October are the hurricane months in the West Indies, while from October to June includes the stormy winter of the northern coast.
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  • On the 4th of November d'Estaing sailed for the West Indies, on the very day that Commodore William Hotham was despatched from New York to reinforce the British fleet in those waters.
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  • On the 6th of January 1779 Admiral Byron reached the West Indies.
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  • During the early part of this year the naval forces in the West Indies were mainly employed in watching one another.
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  • The war now died down in the West Indies.
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  • So far the British navy had stood on the defensive, without material loss except in the West Indies, but without triumph.
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  • The only real success achieved by this numerically imposing force was the capture on the 8th and 9th of August of a large British convoy of ships bound for the East and West Indies carrying troops.
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  • But on the American coast and in the West Indies more vigour was displayed.
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  • On the French side the count de Guichen was sent with reinforcements to the West Indies to take command of the ships left in the previous year by d'Estaing.
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  • The West Indies was again the scene of the most important operations of the year.
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  • Rodney was to go on to the West Indies with part of the fleet.
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  • He sailed on the 29th of December 1779 with the trade for the West Indies under his protection, captured a Spanish convoy on his way off Finisterre on the 8th of January, defeated a smaller Spanish force near Cape St Vincent on the 16th, relieved Gibraltar on the 19th, and left for the West Indies on the 13th of February.
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  • But a vigorous policy was carried out by France in the West Indies and America, while she began a most resolute attack on the British position in the East Indies.
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  • In the West Indies Rodney, having received news of the breach with Holland early in the year, took the island of St Eustatius, which had been a great depot of contraband of war, on the 3rd of February.
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  • Admiral Thomas Graves, Arbuthnot's successor, who had been joined by Hood from the West Indies, endeavoured to drive off the French fleet.
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  • The French admiral, having rendered this vital service to his ally, now returned to the West Indies, whither he was followed by Hood, and resumed the attacks on the British islands.
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  • (See Saints, Battle Of.) No further operations of note occurred in the West Indies.
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  • The war in the East Indies formed a separate series of episodes.
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  • In Europe the corn spirit sometimes immanent in the crop, sometimes a presiding deity whose life does not depend on that of the growing corn, is conceived in some districts in the form of an ox, hare or cock, in others as an old man or woman; in the East Indies and America the rice or maize mother is a corresponding figure; in classical Europe and the East we have in Ceres and Demeter, Adonis and Dionysus, and other deities, vegetation gods whose origin we can readily trace back to the rustic corn spirit.
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  • Forest trees, no less than cereals, have their indwelling spirits; the fauns and satyrs of classical Literature were goat-footed and the tree spirit of the Russian peasantry takes the form of a goat; in Bengal and the East Indies wood-cutters endeavour to propitiate the spirit of the tree which they cut down; and in many parts of the world trees are regarded as the abode of the spirits of the dead.
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  • Djokjakarta), a residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded N.
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  • Guatemala is surpassed only by Brazil and the East Indies in the quantity of coffee it exports.
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  • In 1631 he led a Dutch fleet from the Indies to Holland, and in 1636 he was raised to the governor-generalship. He came into conflict with the Portuguese, and took their possessions in Ceylon and Malacca from them.
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  • Commerce, Foreign and Domestic.The English colonies that became the United States carried on during the colonial period a commerce with the mother country, and also, both so far as the legislative trammels of the British colonial system permitted it and illicitly, a fairly active commerce with the West Indies.
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  • Although relatively unsuccessful in securing access to the British islands, the importance of the United States as a supplier of the other West Indies continually grew, and when the communication of the French and Spanish islands with their metropolises was practically cut off by the British during the Napoleonic wars, the dependence of these colonies upon the American carrying trade became absolute.
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  • As general carriers American ships gained no importance until the Napoleonic wars; and this interest was greater in the West Indies than in Europe.
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  • In 1664 a new " Company of the West Indies " (Compagnie des Indes Occidentales) was organized to control French trade and colonization not only in Canada but also in West Africa, South America and the West Indies.
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  • EAST INDIES, a name formerly applied vaguely, in its widest sense, to the whole area of India, Further India and the Malay Archipelago, in distinction from the West Indies, which, at the time of their discovery, were taken to be the extreme parts of the Indian region.
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  • The term "East Indies" is still sometimes applied to the Malay Archipelago alone, and the phrase "Dutch East Indies" is commonly used to denote the Dutch possessions which constitute the greater part of that archipelago.
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  • He was next sent to the West Indies in charge of a squadron destined for the conquest of Barbadoes and the other islands still under royalist control.
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  • She was on her way to the East Indies, carrying the newly appointed lieutenant-governor of Bombay.
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  • NEVIS, an island in the British West Indies, forming with St Kitts one of the five presidencies in the colony of the Leeward Islands.
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  • During the period of the slave trade it was a leading mart for slaves in the West Indies.
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  • As a fact, the commanders-in-chief on the East Indies and Cape of Good Hope stations were instructed that in consequence of the great practical difficulty of proving - at ports so remote from the scene of war operations as Aden and Perim - the real destination of contraband of war carried by vessels visiting those parts, directions were to be given to the officers concerned to cease to search such vessels, and to merely report to the commander-in-chief at the Cape the names of ships suspected of carrying contraband, and the date of clearance.
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  • From 1882 till 1887 his prime minister was Walter Murray Gibson (1823-1888), a singular and romantic genius, a visionary adventurer and a shrewd politician, who had been imprisoned by the Dutch government in Batavia in 1852 on a charge of inciting insurrection in Sumatra, and had arrived at Honolulu in 1861 with the intention of leading a Mormon colony to the East Indies.
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  • At the time of his death (1713) he was governorgeneral in the West Indies.
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  • I have nothing but argument to offer touching this matter, having never met with any person in Persia or the Indies to inform me when the compass was first known among them, though I made inquiry of the most learned men in both countries.
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  • I have sailed from the Indies to Persia in Indian ships, when no European has been aboard but myself.
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  • Again, it appears that compasses of a primitive description, which can hardly be supposed to have been brought from Europe, were employed in the East Indies certainly as early as several years previous to the close of the 16th century.
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  • Its work in the West Indies was firmly established in Wesley's lifetime.
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  • His first engagement was the battle off Ushant in 1778, and, soon afterwards transferred to the West Indies, he was present, under the command of his cousin Sir Samuel Hood, at all the actions which culminated in Rodney's victory of April 12th, 1782.
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  • Island after island fell to him, and soon, outside Martinique, the French had scarcely a foothold in the West Indies.
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  • In his last command, that of the East Indies station, he carried out many salutary reforms, especially in matters of discipline and victualling.
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  • Under Howe and Rodney he distinguished himself in the West Indies, and at the victory of April 12th, 1782, he was in command of one of Rodney's frigates.
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  • MACASSAR (MAKASSAR, MANGKASAR), the capital of a district of the same name in the island of Celebes, Dutch East Indies, and the chief town of the Dutch government of Celebes.
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  • VIRGIN ISLANDS, a group of small islands in the West Indies, about loo in number, for the most part uninhabited.
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  • In the West Indies "the only horned cattle fit for work are those which have a good deal of black in them; the white are terribly tormented by the insects and they are weak and sluggish in proportion to the black."
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  • Towards the end of the 18th century, Guinea pepper was supplanted in Europe by peppers from the East Indies.
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  • The glossy ibis, Plegadis falcinellus, found throughout the West Indies, Central and the south-eastern part of North America, as well as in many parts of Europe (whence it not unfrequently strays to the British Islands), Africa, Asia and Australia.
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  • When on the last day of the year 1600 Queen Elizabeth granted a charter to George, earl of Cumberland, and other "adventurers," to be a body-corporate by the name of " The Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading with the East Indies," the expressed recognition of higher duties than those of commerce may by some be deemed a mere matter of form, and, to use the words of Bacon, " what was first in God's providence was but second in man's appetite and intention."
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  • Driven by persecution from Moravia, hunted into mountain-caves and forests, they had scarcely secured a place of refuge in Saxony before, " though a mere handful in numbers, yet with the spirit of men banded for daring and righteous deeds, they formed the heroic design, and vowed the execution of it before God, of bearing the gospel to the savage and perishing tribes of Greenland and the West Indies, of whose condition report had brought a mournful rumour to their ears.
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  • " And so, literally with " neither bread nor scrip," they went forth on their pilgrimage, and, incredible as it sounds, within ten years they had established missions in the islands of the West Indies, in South America, Surinam, Greenland, among the North American tribes, in Lapland, Tartary, Algiers, Guinea, the Cape of Good Hope and Ceylon.
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  • Christian Faith Society for the West Indies.
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  • South-East Asia and the East Indies.
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  • The total number of Christians in British Malaysia and the Dutch East Indies is about 600,000 (including 57,000 Roman Catholics).
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  • In the 18th century, and early in the 19th, Norwich had a lucrative trade with the Atlantic ports and the West Indies, but later manufacturing became the most important industry; the manufactures including textiles, cutlery, firearms, paper, electrical supplies, printing presses, &c. In 1905 the factory products were valued at $6,022,391.
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  • The town of Palembang is a large place on the river Musi, with 50,000 inhabitants (2500 Chinese), extensive barracks, hospitals, &c., a mosque (1740), considered the finest in the Dutch Indies, and a traditional tomb of Alexander the Great.
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  • Among the national mail steamship services are the lines to the East and West Indies, Africa and the United States.
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  • Among societies of general utility are the Society for Public Welfare (Maatschappij tot nut van't algemeen, 1785), whose efforts have been mainly in the direction of educational reform; the Geographical Society at Amsterdam (1873); Teyler's Stichting or foundation at Haarlem (1778), and the societies for the promotion of industry (1777), and of sciences (1752) in the same town; the Institute of Languages, Geography and Ethnology of the Dutch Indies (1851), and the Indian Society at the Hague, the Royal Institute of Engineers at Delft (1848), the Association for the Encouragement of Music at Amsterdam, &c.
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  • For the education of medical practitioners, civil and military, the more important institutions are the National Obstetrical College at Amsterdam, the National Veterinary School at Utrecht, the National College for Military Physicians at Amsterdam and the establishment at Utrecht for the training of military apothecaries for the East and West Indies.
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  • A national institution at Leiden for the study of languages, geography and ethnology of the Dutch Indies has given place to communal institutions of the same nature as Delft and at Leiden, founded in 1864 and 1877.
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  • Their ships had penetrated to the East and West Indies, and were to be found in every sea.
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  • The question of freedom of trade with the Indies had become no less vital to the Dutch people than freedom of religious worship. To both these concessions Spanish policy was irreconcilably opposed.
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  • The Spaniards on their side were obdurate on the subjects of freedom of trade in the Indies and of freedom of religious worship. At last, after the negotiations had been repeatedly on the point of breaking off, a compromise was effected by the mediation of the envoys of France and England.
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  • Neither the granting of freedom of worship to Roman Catholics nor the word " Indies " was mentioned, but in a secret treaty King Philip undertook to place no hindrance in the way of Dutch trade, wherever carried on.
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  • But it was in the Portuguese g g colonies that the conquests of the Dutch East and with West India Companies had been made, and the France question of the Indies as between Netherlander and Spaniard assumed henceforth quite a different complexion.
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  • The United Provinces were recognized as free and independent, and Spain dropped all her claims; the uti possidetis basis was adopted in respect to all conquests; the Scheldt was declared entirely closed - a clause which meant the ruin of Antwerp for the profit of Amsterdam; the right to trade in the East and West Indies was granted, and all the conquests made by the Dutch from the Portuguese were ceded to them; the two contracting parties agreed to respect and keep clear of each other's trading grounds; each was to pay in the ports of the other only such tolls as natives paid.
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  • Disputes had been constantly recurring between Dutch and English traders in the East Indies and elsewhere, and the seeds were already sown of that stern rivalry which was to issue in a series of fiercely contested wars.
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  • Friction and disputes had frequently arisen between the Dutch and the English English traders in different parts of the world, and especially in the East Indies, culminating in the so-called Massacre of Amboyna "; and the strained relations between the two nations would, but for the civil discords in England, have probably led to active hostilities during the reign of Charles I.
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  • The Dutch conceded the 5 P 54 striking of the flag and compensation for English claims against the Dutch in the East Indies and elsewhere.
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  • Tigers are found throughout India, Turkestan, China, Mongolia and the East Indies.
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  • He restored the finances of the state, and extended its commercial supremacy in the East Indies.
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  • ST Kitts, or ST Christopher, an island in the British West Indies, forming, with Nevis and Anguilla, one of the presidencies in the colony of the Leeward Islands.
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  • The principal towns are Batavia, which is the capital of the residency, as well as the seat of government of the whole Dutch East Indies, Meester Cornelis, Tangerang, Bekasi and Buitenzorg.
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  • Batavia, Dutch East Indies >>
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  • CURACAO, or Curacoa, an island in the Dutch West Indies.
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  • Curacao gives name to the government of the Dutch West Indies, which consists of Aruba, an island lying W.
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  • The island of Curacao has a population of 30,119; and altogether the Dutch West Indies have a population of 51,693.
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  • With the exception of occasional changes of residence in England, generally for the sake of his wife's health, one or two short holiday trips abroad, a tour in the West Indies, and another in America to visit his eldest son settled there as an engineer, his life was spent in the peaceful, if active, occupations of a clergyman who did his duty earnestly, and of a vigorous and prolific writer.
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  • In the East Indies rape oil and its equivalents, known under various names, are the most important of oils for native use.
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  • The West Indies >>
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  • Attempts at tea growing have been made in the West Indies, Brazil, Australia, Nyassaland, Mauritius, the Straits Settlements, Johore, Fiji and at San Miguel in the Azores without marked success.
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  • Dutch Indies.
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  • Francis Cabot Lowell's son, John Lowell (1799-1836), was born in Boston, travelled in India and the East Indies on business in 1816 and 1817, in 1832 set out on a trip around the world, and on the 4th of March 1836 died in Bombay.
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  • Its splendid bay, and easy communication with the capital of Santo Domingo, then the seat of government of the Indies, determined its original importance.
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  • At a town meeting on the 11th of July 1774 it was resolved that "a firm and inviolable union of our colonies is absolutely necessary for the defence of our civil rights," and that "the most effectual measures to defeat the machinations of the enemies of His Majesty's government and the liberties of America is to break off all commercial intercourse with Great Britain and the West Indies until these oppressive acts for raising a revenue in America are repealed."
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  • The struggle for emancipation in the West Indies was then at the point of culmination; the leaders of the cause, from all parts of the kingdom, were assembled in London, and Garrison was at once admitted to their councils and treated with distinguished consideration.
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  • Lastly there are two species of true crocodiles in America, C. intermedius of the Orinoco, allied to the former, and C. americanus or acutus of the West Indies, Mexico, Central America to Venezuela and Ecuador; its characteristic feature is a median ridge or swelling on the snout, which is rather slender.
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  • The revenue and expenditure of the Faeroes are included in the budget for Denmark proper, but Iceland and the West Indies have their separate budgets.
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  • Various attempts were also made to improve trade and industry by abolishing the still remaining privileges of the Hanseatic towns, by promoting a wholesale immigration of skilful and well-to-do Dutch traders and handicraftsmen into Denmark under most favourable conditions, by opening up the rich fisheries of the Arctic seas, and by establishing joint-stock chartered companies both in the East and the West Indies.
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  • Various reforms were carried, but the proposal to sell the Danish islands in the West Indies to the United States fell through.
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  • HALMAHERA [" great land"; also Jilolo or Gilolo], an island of the Dutch East Indies, belonging to the residency of Ternate, lying under the equator and about 128° E.
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  • In 1817 Ceylon was added to his charge; in 182 3 all British subjects in the East Indies and the islands of the Indian Ocean; and in 1824 "New South Wales and its dependencies"!
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  • The church of the West Indies was disestablished and disendowed in 1868.
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  • (7) The Church of the West Indies, i province of 8 dioceses, of which Barbados and the Windward Islands are at present united.
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  • archbishop of the West Indies, bishop of Pennsylvania, Wyoming, &c. (see Bishop).
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  • Wade drove his military roads through the highlands, and, poor as the country still was, the city of Glasgow throve on the tobacco and sugar trade with America and the West Indies.
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  • LOMBOK (called by the natives Sasak), one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, in the Dutch East Indies, E.
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  • The Virginian red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) grows in the United States, Canada and the West Indies.
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  • Mahogany (Swietenia mahogan y) is a native of the West Indies and Central America, the best-known varieties being Cuban or Spanish and Honduras.
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  • Greenheart (Nectandra rodiaei) is a very heavy, hard and durable wood from the East Indies.
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  • came Nearchus, the admiral of Alexander, on his way from the Indies to the Tigris delta; from Basra sailed Sindbad in the 9th century in one of the many Arab craft which traded thence to India, Ceylon and Zanzibar.
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  • The tree is grown at Tellicherry, in Java, the West Indies, Brazil and Egypt, but the produce of none of these places approaches in quality that grown in Ceylon.
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  • Nutmeg and mace are almost exclusively obtained from the Banda Islands, although the cultivation has been attempted with varying success in Singapore, Penang, Bengal, Reunion, Brazil, French Guiana and the West Indies.
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  • The entire fruit preserved in syrup is used as a sweetmeat in the Dutch East Indies.
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  • Habana or, more fully, San Cristobal de la Habana), the capital of Cuba, the largest city of the West Indies, and one of the principal seats of commerce in the New World, situated on the northern coast of the island in 23° 9' N.
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  • Rice is a principal food of the people; it was formerly taken from the East Indies, but is now mostly raised in the island.
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  • Telegraphs radiate to all parts of the island; a submarine cable to Key West forms part of the line of communication between Colon and New York, and by other cables the island has connexion with various parts of the West Indies and with South America.
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  • Its commanding position gained it in 1634, by royal decree, the title of "Llave del Nuevo Mundo y Antemural de las Indias Occidentales" (Key of the New World and Bulwark of the West Indies), in reference to which it bears on its coat of arms a symbolic key and representations of the Morro, Punta and Fuerza.
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  • The " East Indies," as opposed to the " West Indies," is an old-fashioned and inaccurate phrase, dating from the dawn of maritime discovery, and still lingering in certain parliamentary papers.
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  • If the West Indies belonged to Spain by priority of discovery, Portugal might claim the East Indies by the same right.
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  • In 1618 they laid the foundation of the city of Batavia in Java, to be the seat of the supreme government of the Dutch possessions in the East Indies.
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  • At length Story settled down as a shopkeeper at Goa, Leedes entered the service of the Great Mogul, Newbery died on his way home overland, and Fitch, after a lengthened peregrination in Bengal, Pegu, Siam and other parts of the East Indies, returned to England.
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  • The " Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies " was founded by Queen Elizabeth Rivalry the British and the Portuguese.
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  • Between 1600 and 1612 there were twelve separate voyages, but in the latter year a joint-stock system began involving continual communication with the Indies.
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  • One clause, the operation of which was limited to two years from the close of the existing war, provided that American vessels not exceeding 70 tons burden might trade with the West Indies, but should carry only American products there and take away to American ports only West Indian products; moreover, the United States was to export in American vessels no molasses, sugar, coffee, cocoa or cotton to any part of the world.
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  • Jay consented to this prohibition under the impression that the articles named were peculiarly the products of the West Indies, not being aware that cotton was rapidly becoming an important export from the southern states.
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  • By them the United States was granted limited privileges of trade with the British East Indies; some provisions were made for reciprocal freedom of trade between the United States and the British dominions in Europe; some articles were specified under the head of "contraband of war"; it was agreed that whenever provisions were seized as contraband they should be paid for, and that in cases of the capture of a vessel carrying contraband goods such goods only and not the whole cargo should be seized; it was also agreed that no vessel should be seized merely because it was bound for a blockaded port, unless it attempted to enter the port after receiving notice of the blockade.
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  • The treaty was laid before the Senate on the 8th of June 1795, and, with the exception of the clause relating to trade with the West Indies, was ratified on the 24th by a vote of 20 to 10.
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  • One result of the introduction of free labour has been to reduce the descendants of the slave population to a small and unimportant class - Mauritius in this respect offering a striking contrast to the British colonies in the West Indies.
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  • trans., A New Voyage to the East Indies;.
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  • In 1905 the value of factory products was $4,254,024 (an increase of 37.7% over the value in 1900); the exports in 1907 were valued at $852,457; the imports were valued at $994,47 2, the excess over the exports being due to the fact that the food supply of the city is derived from other Florida ports and from the West Indies.
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  • Compared with the results of English or Dutch colonization the conversion and civilization of the Filipinos is a most remarkable achievement s Notwithstanding the undeniable vices, follies and absurd illiberalities of the Spanish colonial regime, the Philippines were the only group in the East Indies that improved in civilization in the three centuries following their discovery.
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  • CHERIBON, a residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded S.
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  • The name " California " was taken from Ordonez de Montalvo's romance of chivalry Las Sergas de Esplandian (Madrid, 15 ro), in which is told of black Amazons ruling an island of this name " to the right of the Indies, very near the quarter of the terrestrial paradise."
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  • BURU (Buro, Dutch Boeroe or Boeloe), an island of the Dutch East Indies, one of the Molucca Islands belonging to the residency of Amboyna, between 3° 4' and 3° 50' S.
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  • They have still extensive colonies in the East Indian Archipelago, as well as possessions in the West Indies.
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  • The treaty transferring the Danish West Indies to the United States (1917) contained a clause recognizing Denmark's right to extend her economic and pojitical sphere over the whole of Greenland.
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  • The lesser patriarchates are those of Babylon (Chaldaic), Cilicia (Armenian), the East Indies (Latin), Lisbon (Latin), Venice (Latin) and the West Indies (Latin).
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  • JUDAH PHILIP BENJAMIN (1811-1884), Anglo-American lawyer, of Jewish descent, was born a British subject at St Thomas in the West Indies on the 11th of August 1811, and was successively an American lawyer, a leading Confederate politician and a distinguished English barrister.
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  • In 1751 he accompanied his half-brother Lawrence, who was stricken with consumption, to the West Indies, where he had an attack of small-pox which left him marked for life.
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  • He entered the army as a colonel of infantry, and in 1 757 he accompanied count de Lally to the East Indies, with the rank of brigadier-general.
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  • He then sailed for the West Indies on the 4th of November.
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  • SULA ISLANDS (Sulla, Xulla; Dutch Soela), a chain of islands forming a prolongation of the eastern peninsula of Celebes and the Banggai Islands, Dutch East Indies.
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  • The society's operations are now carried on, not only in the East, but in the West Indies, China, Africa (chiefly on the Congo river), and Europe.
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  • He adduced the example of vines taken to the West Indies from Madeira, which have been found to succeed better than those taken directly from France.
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  • Conversely, French wheat taken to the West Indies produced only barren spikes, while native wheat by its side yielded an enormous harvest.
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  • The gourami (Osphromenus olfax) of the East Indies has been established in Mauritius and Cayenne, being a valuable foodfish.
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  • BANJERMASIN (Dutch Bandjermasin), the chief town in the Dutch portion of the island of Borneo, East Indies, on the river Martapura, near its junction with the Barito, 24 m.
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  • americana is the source of Pita fibre, and is used as a fibre plant in Mexico, the West Indies and southern Europe.
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  • He took and destroyed Jacatra, and founded on its ruins the capital of the Dutch East Indies, to which he gave the name of Batavia.
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  • Cromwell sent powerful English fleets to watch the coast of Spain and to prevent communications with the West Indies and America; on the 8th of September 1656 a fleet of treasure ships was destroyed off Cadiz by Stayner, and on the 10th of April 1657 Blake performed his last exploit in the destruction of the whole Spanish fleet of sixteen treasure ships in the harbour of Santa Cruz in Teneriffe.
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  • On the ist of February 1898 a new cable was laid between Bermuda and Jamaica (via Turks Islands), giving an all-British line to the West Indies, with reduced charges.
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  • It was spurred into renewed activity by the audacity of Sir John Hawkins in the West Indies, and by the appearance of Drake, Cavendish and Richard Hawkins in the Pacific.
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  • His master, Captain William Bligh, was sent in the " Bounty" to convey breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies.
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  • NIAS, the largest island in the chain off the west coast of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies, lying about 1° N., 97° 30' E.
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  • Pickering, Pioneering in Formosa (London, 1898); George Candidius, A Short Account of the Island of Formosa in the Indies ., vol.
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  • KEI ISLANDS [Ke, Key, Kii, &c.; native, Ewab], a group in the Dutch East Indies, in the residency of Amboyna, between 5° and 6° 5' S.
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  • Vultures are represented by only one species, the turkey buzzard, which is the universal scavenger of the fields, and until recent years even of the cities, and has always been protected by custom and the Laws of the Indies.
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  • But as the colony had no voice in the Cortes, while the " special laws " were never passed (Cuba expected special fundamental laws, reforming her government, and the government regarded the old Laws of the Indies as satisfying the obligation of the constitution) the arbitrary rule of the captains-general remained quite supreme, under the will of the crown, and colonial discontent became stronger and stronger.
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  • The success of the Dutch East India Company led to the establishment of a similar one for the West Indies, to which a monopoly of the trade to America and Africa was granted.
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  • Its occupation contributed to the improvement of agriculture in Brazil; it had been the policy of Portugal up to this time to separate the productions of its colonies, to reserve sugar for Brazil, and spices to the East Indies, and to prohibit the cultivation of these in the African possessions.
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  • ARU ISLANDS (Dutch Aroe), a group in the residency of Amboyna, Dutch East Indies; between 5° 18' and 7° 5' S., and 13 4 ° and 135° E.; the member nearest to the south-west coast of New Guinea lying about 70 m.
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  • Australia, South Africa, Canada, and the West Indies, since 1893, when it was assumed by the metropolitans of Canada and Rupert's Land (see Anglican Communion).
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  • BACHIAN (Dutch Batjan), one of the Molucca Islands, in the residency of Ternate, Dutch East Indies, in the Molucca Sea, in 0°13/-0°55' S.
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  • is only from 3 2.2° to 32.7° F., and the same low temperature continues throughout the Brazil Basin to the equator; but in the North American Basin from the West Indies to the Telegraph Plateau no satisfactory bottom temperature lower than 35.6° F.
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  • MENTAWI, a chain of islands in the Dutch East Indies, off the west coast of Sumatra, between r° and 3° 30' S.
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  • His Life of Caesar (1879), a glorification of imperialism, betrays an imperfect acquaintance with Roman politics and the life of Cicero; and of his two pleasant books of travel, The English in the West Indies (1888) shows that he made little effort to master his subject, and Oceana (1886), the record of a tour in Australia and New Zealand, among a multitude of other blunders, notes the prosperity of the working-classes in Adelaide at the date of his visit, when, in fact, owing to a failure in the wheatcrop, hundreds were then living on charity.
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  • who devoted great attention to the silk question as it affects the East Indies, that at least six species of Bombyx, differing from B.
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  • BATAVIA, a residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded E., S.
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  • HALMAHERA [" great land"; also Jilolo or Gilolo], an island of the Dutch East Indies, belonging to the residency of Ternate, lying under the equator and about 128° E.
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  • Habana or, more fully, San Cristobal de la Habana), the capital of Cuba, the largest city of the West Indies, and one of the principal seats of commerce in the New World, situated on the northern coast of the island in 23° 9' N.
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  • BURU (Buro, Dutch Boeroe or Boeloe), an island of the Dutch East Indies, one of the Molucca Islands belonging to the residency of Amboyna, between 3° 4' and 3° 50' S.
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  • The extent of the woollen and worsted manufactures of the United Kingdom is indicated by the following table showing the imports and exports of wool and the quantity retained for use in various years (1890-19ò5):--- During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of wool (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom was as follows: Australia (1904), 220,483,961; (1895), 417,163,078; New Zealand (1890), 95, 6 3 2, 59 8; (1909), 1 7 6, 457, 1 5 0; British possessions in South Africa (1900), 32,219,369; (1909), 115,896,598; South America (1890), 11,173,692; (1908), 78,938,157; British possessions in the East Indies (1901), 24,069,571; (1909), 56,238,633; France (1890), 10, 8 73,7 88; (1902), 27,770,790; Turkish Empire (1908), 5,705,671; (1897), 25,727,462.
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  • CERAM (Sirang), an island of the Dutch East Indies, in the Molucca group, lying about 3° S., and between 127° 45' and 131° E.
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  • SALEYER (Dutch, Saleijer), a group of islands belonging to the government of Celebes and its dependencies in the Dutch East Indies, numbering altogether 73, the principal being Saleyer, Tambalongang, Pulasi and Bahuluwang; between 5° 36' and 7° 25' S.
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  • ALEXANDER JAMES DALLAS (1759-1817), American statesman and financier, was born on the island of Jamaica, West Indies, on the 21st of June 1759, the son of Dr Robert C. Dallas (d.
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  • 1460-1540) was nominated first viceroy of Portuguese India in 1504, but was unable to serve owing to temporary blindness; in 5506 he was placed in command of a fleet which operated on the east coast of Africa and in the Indies, Alphonso d'Albuquerque having charge of a squadron under da Cunha.
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  • Lyon (25) got Recs off to a good start against the bowling of former West Indies Test fast bowler Reon King.
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  • CONTENT Scope and content/abstract: A vellum bound volume describing fourteen voyages to India, Malaya and the East Indies in several ships.
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  • Tuberose (Polianthes) - P. tuberosa is a native of the East Indies, but strong imported bulbs of this deliciously fragrant plant, if inserted in warm soil, will flower well in the open air during August.
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  • His mother died a few days after giving him birth; his father, Pynaston Hastings, drifted away to perish obscurely in the West Indies.
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  • Negotiations for the marriage began during the reign of Charles I., were renewed immediately after the Restoration, and on the 23rd of June, in spite of Spanish opposition, the marriage contract was signed, England securing Tangier and Bombay, with trading privileges in Brazil and the East Indies, religious and commercial freedom in Portugal and two million Portuguese crowns (about 300,000); while Portugal obtained military and naval support against Spain and liberty of worship for Catherine.
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  • In 1642 Abel Janszoon Tasman sailed on a voyage of discovery from Batavia, the headquarters of the governor and council of the Dutch East Indies, under whose auspices the expedition was undertaken.
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  • In 1684 a vessel had sailed from Holland for the Dutch possessions in the East Indies, and after rounding the Cape of Good Hope, she was never again heard of.
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  • At length one of the midshipmen suggested the device of " fothering," which he had seen practised in the West Indies.
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  • PREANGER, a residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded S.
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  • He also negotiated treaties for the purchase of the Danish West Indies, the Bay of Samana, and for American control of the isthmus of Panama; but these were not ratified by the Senate.
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  • In December 1654 Penn and Venables sailed for the West Indies with orders to attack the Spanish colonies and the French shipping; and for the first time since the Plantagenets an English fleet appeared in the Mediterranean, where Blake upheld the supremacy of the English flag, made a treaty with the dey of Algiers, destroyed the castles and ships of the dey of Tunis at Porto Farina on the 4th of April 1655, and liberated the English prisoners captured by the pirates.
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  • In December 16 J4 Cromwell despatched Penn and Venables with a fleet of thirty-eight ships and 2500 soldiers to the West Indies, their numbers being raised by recruits at the islands to 7000 men.
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  • Newfoundland, the West Indies, and the Falklands, and the chief oceanic islands are the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, the Cape Verde Islands, Ascension, St Helena, Tristan da Cunha and Bouvet Island.
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  • The second branch proceeds north-westwards towards the West Indies, where it mingles with the waters of the northern equatorial; and the two drifts, blocked by the
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  • The loss of trade consequent upon the closing of Egypt and the Levant, together with the discovery of America and ~e~ilne the sea-route to the Indies, had dried up her thief of Vonl~e source of wealth.
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  • 35 is described under another Hebrew word, and refers to ladanum, a fragrant resin produced in Cyprus, and the use of this drug, as well as that of cinnamon and cassia, indicates even at that early period a knowledge of the products of Somaliland, Arabia and the East Indies and the existence of trade between the farther East and Egypt.
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  • Amongst broadleaved trees Juglans has a similar Holarctic range, descending to the West Indies; so has Aesculus, were it not lacking in Europe; it becomes tropical in South America and Malaya.
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  • The highlands of Central America and the West Indies have preserved a number of Chino-Japanese typesBocconia, Deutzia, A belie, &c.not met with elsewhere in the New Woild.
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  • The voyages of Columbus (1492-1498) resulted in the discovery of the West Indies and North America which barred the way to the Far East.
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  • engaged on similar work as regards Africa and the East Indies.
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  • In April 1520 Vasco da Gama, as viceroy of the Indies, took a fleet into the Red sea, and landed an embassy consisting of Dom Rodriguez de Lima and Father Francisco Alvarez, a priest whose detailed narrative is the earliest and not the least interesting account we possess of Abyssinia.
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  • One important object of English maritime adventurers of those days was to discover a route to Cathay by the north-west, a second was to settle Virginia, and a third was to raid the Spanish settlements in the West Indies.
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  • Many English voyages were also made to Guinea and the West Indies, and twice English vessels followed in the track of Magellan, and circumnavigated the globe.
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  • In 1577 Francis Drake, who had previously served with Hawkins in the West Indies, undertook his celebrated voyage round the world.
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  • The exploring enterprise of the Spanish nation did not wane after the conquest of Peru and Mexico, and the acquisition of the vast empire of the Indies.
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  • James Lancaster made a voyage to the Indian Ocean from 1591 to 1594; and in 1599 the merchants and adventurers of London resolved to form a company, with the object of establishing a trade with the East Indies.
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  • The French directed their enterprise more in the direction of North America than of the Indies.
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  • West Indies from 1599 to 1602, established his historic connexion with Canada, to the geographical knowledge of which he made a very large addition.
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  • For a long period the city was noted for its commerce with the West Indies, which began to decline about 1876, but the coast trade and commerce with Great Britain are still considerable, especially in the winter, when Portland is the outlet of much of the trade from the Great Lakes that in the other seasons passes through Montreal.
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  • Enterprises: (1) Foreign missions in Labrador, Alaska, Canada, California, West Indies, Nicaragua, Demerara, Surinam, Cape Colony, Kaffraria, German East Africa, North Queensland, West Himalaya.
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  • BALI, an island of the East Indies, E.
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  • In 1903 he became chairman of the commission on food supply in time of war, and in 1909 of that on trade relations with Canada and the West Indies, receiving in 1911 the G.C.M.G.
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  • 33 Asia Minor, Syria, Arabia and Cyprus 2,930 Portuguese East Indies 51 Total.
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  • 2.3 1.6 Persia 0.005 0.04 Asia Minor, Syria, Arabia, Cyprus 0.5 1.5 Portuguese Indies.
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  • FRANCISCO DE XAVIER (1506-1552), Jesuit missionary and saint, commonly known in English as St Francis Xavier and also called the "Apostle of the Indies."
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  • Xavier complied, merely waiting long enough to obtain the pope's benediction, and set out for Lisbon, where he was presented to the king, and soon won his entire confidence, attested notably by procuring for him from the pope four briefs, one of them appointing him papal nuncio in the Indies.
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  • He was made acting-lieutenant in the West Indies in the same year, and the rank was confirmed in 1744 During the Jacobite rising of 1745 he commanded the "Baltimore" sloop in the North Sea, and was dangerously wounded in the head while co-operating with a frigate in an engagement with two strong French privateers.
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  • In 1746 he became post-captain, and commanded the "Triton" (24) in the West Indies.
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  • Tampa is the principal gateway for trade and travel between the United States and the West Indies.
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  • Sugar-canes suffer from the sugar cane borer (Diatioca sacchari) in the West Indies; tobacco from the larvae of hawk moths (Sphingidae) in America; corn and grass from various Lepidopterous pests all over the world.
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  • England made short work of the French squadrons and colonies, particularly in the West Indies, while Napoleon became more than ever the master of central and southern Europe.
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  • Princely abodes in France and annuities (the latter to be paid by Spain) - such was the price at which Napoleon bought the crown of Spain and the Indies.
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  • of Spain; and that monarch appointed Herrera first historiographer of the Indies, and one of the historiographers of Castile.
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  • Here there is only space to name Bontius, Clusius, Hernandez (or Fernandez), Marcgrave, Nieremberg and Piso, 6 whose several works describing the natural products of both the Indies - whether the result of their own observation or compilation - together with those of Olina and Worm, produced a marked effect, since they led up to what may be deemed the foundation of scientific ornithology.'
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  • Of special works relating to the British West Indies, C. Waterton's well-known Wanderings has passed through several editions since its first appearance in 1825, and must be mentioned here, West though, strictly speaking, much of the country he traversed was not British territory.
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  • Exhausting as the Turkish wars were to the Venetian treasury, her trade was still so flourishing that she might have survived the strain had not the discovery of the Cape route to the Indies cut the tap-root of her commercial prosperity by diverting the stream of traffic from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. When Diaz rounded the Cape in 1486 a fatal blow was struck at Venetian commercial supremacy.
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  • It built ships as cheaply as any place in the world, it carried goods for other colonies, it traded-often evading British laws-with Europe, Guinea, Madagascar and above all with the West Indies.
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  • Direct trade with the East Indies began about 1785, with Russia in 1787.
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  • The period of greatest material prosperity of New Haven in the colonial period began about 1750, when a thriving commerce with other American ports and the West Indies developed.
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    1
  • South America, the West Indies, tropical Africa and Southern Asia are the homes of the various members, but the plants have been introduced with success into other lands, as is well indicated by the fact that although no species of Gossypium is native to the United States of America, that country now produces over twothirds of the world's supply of cotton.
    0
    1
  • This plant, known only in cultivation, is usually regarded as native to the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • vitifolium, and considers the modern stock a hybrid, and probably not indigenous to the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • By careful selection (the methods of which are described below) in the United States, the quality of the product was much improved, and on the recent revival of the cotton industry in the West Indies American " Sea Island " seed was introduced back again to the original home of the species.
    0
    1
  • Careful attention is now given to the employment of the seed in new cotton countries, and oil expression is practised in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • It has not yet been reported as a cotton pest in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • It is the most serious pest of cotton in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • The " cotton stainers," various species of Dysdercus, are widely distributed, occurring for example in America, the West Indies, Africa, India, &c. The larvae suck the sap from the young bolls and seeds, causing shrivelling and reduction in quantity of fibre.
    0
    1
  • Mr Webber, in summing up, says, " When Sea Island cotton was first introduced into the United States from the West Indies, it was a perennial plant, unsuited to the duration of the season of the latitude of the Sea Islands of S.
    0
    1
  • Attention has been paid in the West Indies to seed selection, by the officers of the imperial Department of Agriculture, with the object of retaining for West Indian Sea Island cotton its place as the most valuable cotton on the British market.
    0
    1
  • " During the period from 1786 to 1790 the West Indies furnished about 70% of the British supply, the Mediterranean countries 20%, and Brazil 8%; whilst the quantity contributed by the United States and India was less than 1% and Egypt contributed none.
    0
    1
  • A powerful stimulus was thus given to the growth of cotton in all directions; a degree of activity and enterprise never witnessed before was seen in India, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Africa, the West Indies, Queensland, New South Wales, Peru, Brazil, and in short wherever cotton could be produced; and there seemed no room to doubt that in a short time there would be abundant supplies independently of America.
    0
    1
  • British West Indies.-Cotton was cultivated as a minor crop in parts of the West Indies as long ago as the 17th century, and at the opening of the 18th century the islands supplied about 70% of all the cotton used in Great Britain.
    0
    1
  • The department was actively assisted by the Cotton Production in the British West Indies: 1905-1906.1 British Cotton Growing Association, and the results have been very successful, as was shown at an exhibition held in Manchester in 1908.
    0
    1
  • 50 „ At the end of the 18th century the bulk of British cotton was obtained from the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Approximately the supplies were as follows in million lb: British West Indies.
    0
    1
  • In the West Indies results are most favourable, both as regards quantity and quality of the crops.
    0
    1
  • Florida seems to be a link between the vegetation of North America and that of South America and the West Indies, for out of 247 species of S.
    0
    1
  • Florida that have been examined, 187 are common to the West Indies, Mexico and South America.
    0
    1
  • With the increase of trade between the United States and the West Indies following the SpanishAmerican War (1898), the business of the principal ports, notably of Fernandina, Tampa and Pensacola, greatly increased.
    0
    1
  • The Council of the Indies claimed that since 1510 fleets and ships had gone to Florida, and Florida is shown on the Cantino map of 1502.
    0
    1
  • There is more than one meaning of Indies discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
    0
    1
  • The climate is somewhat more healthy than that of the other West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Immediately after this rebellion a second distribution of more than 4000 natives foreshadowed the rapid disappearance of those unfortunates, despite the well-meaning regulations of the Council of the Indies.
    0
    1
  • In 1536 legislation for changing the method of general government and regulating common pasturages and public property caused extreme dissatisfaction, but for many years thereafter the form of control alternated between alcaldes selected by the inhabitants and annual governors appointed by the Council of the Indies.
    0
    1
  • The buccaneers or filibusters, who during the 17th century were drawn to the West Indies by the prospect of plundering the possessions of decadent Spain, often invaded Porto Rico, but that island escaped the conquest which Haiti experienced.
    0
    1
  • Auricula is confined to the East Indies and Peru.
    0
    1
  • The Helicinidae are exotic, ranging from the West Indies to the Philippines.
    0
    1
  • BARBUDA, an island in the British West Indies.
    0
    1
  • KEI ISLANDS [Ke, Key, Kii, &c.; native, Ewab], a group in the Dutch East Indies, in the residency of Amboyna, between 5° and 6° 5' S.
    0
    1
  • A similar map has been in progress for Sumatra since 1883, while the maps for the remaining Dutch Indies are still based, almost exclusively, upon flying surveys.
    0
    1
  • TOBAGO, an island in the British West Indies, 20 m.
    0
    1
  • declared his 'The Spaniards, in the space of fifteen years subsequent to the discovery of the West Indies, had, as Robertson mentions, reduced the natives of Haiti from a million to 60,000.
    0
    1
  • Bryan Edwards estimated the total import into all the British colonies of America and the West Indies from 1680 to 1786 at 2,130,000, being an annual average of 20,095.
    0
    1
  • Exclusive of the slaves who died before they sailed from Africa, 121% were lost during their passage to the West Indies; at Jamaica 42% died whilst in the harbours or before the sale and one-third more in the " seasoning."
    0
    1
  • The question of the legal existence of slavery in Great Britain and Ireland was raised in consequence of an opinion given in 1729 by Yorke and Talbot, attorney-general and solicitor-general at the time, to the effect that a slave by coming into those countries from the West Indies did not become free, and might be compelled by his master to return to the plantations.
    0
    1
  • At length, on the 18th of April of the latter year, a motion was made for the introduction of a bill to prevent the further importation of slaves into the British colonies in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • In 1807 there were in the West Indies 800,000; in 1830 they were reduced to 700,000.
    0
    1
  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.
    0
    1
  • All the old codes of the Peninsula, as well as the laws of the Indies and special royal decrees and schedules, were in force in the colony.
    0
    1
  • It proved as great a drain upon his purse as it had proved to the crown, and he willingly parted with it to the so-called " Western Company," afterwards incorporated with the great Company of the Indies.
    0
    1
  • All the characteristic species of the West Indies, the Central American and Mexican and southern Florida seaboard, and nearly all the large trees of the Mexican tropic belt, are embraced in it.
    0
    1
  • The trade of the United States with the island was as great in 1900-1907 as with Mexico and all the other West Indies combined; as great as its trade with Spain, Portugal and Italy combined; and almost as great as its trade with China and Japan.
    0
    1
  • The audiencias also held important political powers under the Laws of the Indies.
    0
    1
  • Spain paid increasing attention to the island, and in harmony with the policy of the Laws of the Indies many decrees intended to stimulate agriculture and commerce were issued by the crown, first in the form of monopolies, then with increased freedom and with bounties.
    0
    1
  • Hill, Cuba and Porto Rico with the other West Indies (New York, 1898).
    0
    1
  • (New York, for the Spanish legation, 1896); and compilations of Spanish colonial laws listed under article Indies, Laws Of The.
    0
    1
  • BAHAMAS (Lucayos), an archipelago of the British West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Missiessy carried out a successful voyage of commerce-destroying, and returned safely to Rochefort on the 10th of May, from the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • On the 1st of June he was joined by a frigate and two line-of-battle ships sent with orders from Rochefort, and was told to remain in the West Indies till the 5th of July, and if not joined by Ganteaume to steer for Ferrol, pick up the French and Spanish ships in the port, and come on to the Channel.
    0
    1
  • An action in the West Indies would have ruined the emperor's plan of concentration, and Villeneuve decided to sail at once for Ferrol.
    0
    1
  • Nelson, misled by false information, ranged the West Indies as far south as the Gulf of Paria, in search of his opponent whom he supposed to be engaged in attacks on British possessions.
    0
    1
  • SUMBAWA (Dutch Soembawa), one of the Little Sunda islands in the Dutch East Indies, east of Lombok, from which it is separated by the narrow Alas Strait.
    0
    1
  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.
    0
    1
  • The Castilloa tree has been experimentally planted in Ceylon, the West Indies and other countries (Plate II.
    0
    1
  • Indies, where it has succeeded well, especially in Trinidad and Tobago.
    0
    1
  • Before the general peace of 1815 he had served in North America and the West Indies and gained a wide knowledge of conditions of life on board ship under various commanders.
    0
    1
  • After holding various commands he commissioned the "Larne," 20, for the East Indies and was senior naval officer at Rangoon during the Burmese War from May to September 1824.
    0
    1
  • In March 1848 he unsuccessfully contested the borough of Lancaster, and then made a long tour in the West Indies, Canada and the United States.
    0
    1
  • In January 1859 he suffered a violent haemorrhage of the lungs, and sought relief by retreating first to the West Indies and afterwards to Europe.
    0
    1
  • ETIENNE HENRI SAINTE-CLAIRE DEVILLE (1818-1881), French chemist, was born on the 11th of March 1818 in the island of St Thomas, West Indies, where his father was French consul.
    0
    1
  • ANGUILLA, or Snake, a small island in the British Indies, part of the presidency of St Kitts-Nevis, in the colony of the Leeward Islands.
    0
    1
  • At Vizeu, Para, connexion is made with a French cable to the West Indies and the United States, and at Pernambuco with two cable lines to Europe.
    0
    1
  • Successive civil wars prevented their recovery, and these great plains which ought to be one of the chief sources of meat supply for the world are comparatively destitute of stock, and the only source of revenue from this industry is the small number of animals shipped to the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Many admirals declined to serve under Lord Sandwich, and Rodney, who then commanded in the West Indies, had complained of want of proper support from his subordinates, whom he accused of disaffection.
    0
    1
  • The Admiralty was naturally anxious to secure the services of trustworthy flag officers, and having confidence in Hood promoted him rear-admiral out of the usual course on the 26th of September 1780, and sent him to the West Indies to act as second in command under Rodney, to whom he was personally known.
    0
    1
  • He joined Rodney in January 1781, and remained in the West Indies or on the coast of North America till the close of the War of American Independence.
    0
    1
  • When, however, he returned to the West Indies he was for a time in independent command owing to Rodney's absence !in England for the sake of his health.
    0
    1
  • (August 2, 1571) to the bishops of the West Indies permitting the substitution of balsam of Peru for the balsam of the East in the preparation of the chrism to be used by the Catholic Church in America.
    0
    1
  • He was the first "endenizened" Jew in England, and by his extensive trade with the West Indies rendered considerable services to the Commonwealth.
    0
    1
  • By the adoption of this system in one large plantation in the West Indies, crushing upwards of 1200 tons of canes per day, the labour of sixty-four hands was dispensed with, and was thus made available for employment in the fields.
    0
    1
  • Before beetroot had been brought to its present state of perfection, and while the factories for its manipulation were worked with hydraulic presses for squeezing the juice out of the pulp produced in the raperies, the cane sugar planter in the West Indies could easily hold his own, notwithstanding the artificial competition created and maintained by sugar bounties.
    0
    1
  • The total saving effected is stated to be equivalent to 3 francs per ton of beetroot worked up. This system is also being tried on a small scale with sugar-cane juice in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • In the age of discovery the Portuguese and Spaniards became the great disseminators of the cultivation of sugar; the cane was planted in Madeira in 1420; it was carried to San Domingo in 1494; and it spread over the occupied portions of the West Indies and South America early in the 16th century.
    0
    1
  • Mr Chamberlain concluded by asking whether the treasury would consent to sending a royal commission to the West Indies to inquire into the effect of the foreign sugar bounties on their principal industry.
    0
    1
  • The treasury accepted the proposal, and a royal commission proceeded to the West Indies in December 1896, and reported a few months later in 1897.
    0
    1
  • It is a native of Mexico, and now widely cultivated in southern Germany, Hungary and the East Indies.
    0
    1
  • In the West Indies tobacco is grown on a small scale in many of the British colonies, but only in Jamaica is there a definite industry.
    0
    1
  • Cheroots come principally from Manila, but there are now large quantities imported into the United Kingdom from the East Indies and Burma.
    0
    1
  • Juglandaceae), natives of the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, extending into Mexico, the West Indies and tropical South America.
    0
    1
  • BARBADOS, or Barbadoes, an island in the British West Indies.
    0
    1
  • The island is a place of call for almost all the steamships plying to and from the West Indies, and is a great centre of distribution.
    0
    1
  • The European wars of the 18th century caused much suffering, as the West Indies were the scene of numerous battles between the British and the French.
    0
    1
  • Indies (1827); Schomburgk, History of Barbados (1848); J.
    0
    1
  • Gregory, "Contributions to the Palaeontology and Physical Geology of the West Indies," ibid.
    0
    1
  • In 1793 he published in two volumes his great work, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British Colonies in the West Indies, and in 1797 published his Historical Survey of the French Colony in the Island of St Domingo.
    0
    1
  • In 1801 a new edition of both these works with certain additions was published in three volumes under the title of History of the British Colonies in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Edwards also wrote some poems and some other works relating to the history of the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • He left a short sketch of his life which was prefixed to the edition of the History of the West Indies, published in 1801.
    0
    1
  • ARU ISLANDS (Dutch Aroe), a group in the residency of Amboyna, Dutch East Indies; between 5° 18' and 7° 5' S., and 13 4 ° and 135° E.; the member nearest to the south-west coast of New Guinea lying about 70 m.
    0
    1
  • In the case of filariasis due to Filaria bancrofti, which is common throughout the Tropics, the embryos of the parasite are disseminated by various Culicinae and Anophelinae (Culex pipiens in Queensland; C. fatigans in the West Indies; Myzomyia rossii in India; Pyretophorus costalis in a large portion of tropical Africa; &c.).
    0
    1
  • The largest known species is the drummer of the West Indies (Blabera gigantea), so called from the tapping noise it makes on wood, sufficient, when joined in by several individuals, as usually happens, to break the slumbers of a household.
    0
    1
  • Wingless females of many tropical species present a close superficial resemblance to woodlice; and one interesting apterous form known as Pseudoglomeris, from the East Indies, is able to roll up like a millipede.
    0
    1
  • After the cession of Santo Domingo to France in 1800, the Real Audiencia, the supreme court of the Spanish West Indies, was removed to Puerto Principe.
    0
    1
  • His next service was in the James river flotilla, but after reaching the rank of commodore, on the 16th of July 1862, he was assigned to duty against blockade runners in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • The name Shaddock is asserted to be that of a captain who introduced the tree to the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Yuca (Manihot utilissima), known as cassava in the West Indies and mandioca in Brazil, is also widely cultivated for food and for the manufacture of starch.
    0
    1
  • Cargoes of rum, manufactured from West Indian sugar and molasses, were exported to Africa and exchanged for slaves to be sold in the southern colonies and the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Batavia, Dutch East Indies (Residency) >>
    0
    1
  • On the first night of the debate Lord Howick, afterwards Lord Grey, who had been undersecretary for the Colonies, and who opposed the resolutions as proceeding too gradually towards abolition, cited certain occurrences on Sir John Gladstone's plantation in Demerara to illustrate his contention that the system of slave-labour in the West Indies was attended by great mortality among the slaves.
    0
    1
  • West Indies And British Crown Colonies In Jamaica the Columbian Magazine was founded at Kingston in 1796 and ceased publication in 1800.
    0
    1
  • The Jamaica Magazine (1812-1813), the Jamaica Monthly Magazine (1844-1848), and the Victoria Quarterly (1889-1892), which contained many valuable articles on the West Indies, were other magazines.
    0
    1
  • Its former extensive trade with the West Indies has lately suffered owing to the enormous development of the North Sea ports, but it is still largely engaged in the Greenland whale and the oyster fisheries.
    0
    1
  • In the 18th century Derby was the centre of a thriving commerce with the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Brothers' Club, a society of Tory politicians and men of letters, and the same year witnessed the failure of the two expeditions to the West Indies and to Canada promoted by him.
    0
    1
  • AMBOYNA (Dutch Ambon), the name of a residency, its chief town, and the island on which the town is situated, in the Dutch East Indies.
    0
    1
  • He joined the "Bayonnaise" at Brest in July 1788 and served in the West and East Indies.
    0
    1
  • ST Martin, an island in the West Indies, about 5 m.
    0
    1
  • Among the fish may be mentioned the tunny, dolphin, mackerel, sardine, sea-bream, dentice and pagnell; wrasse, of exquisite rainbow hue and good for food; members of the herring family, sardines, anchovies, flying-fish, sea-pike; a few representatives of the cod family, and some flat fish; soles (very rare); Cernus which grows to large size; several species of grey and red mullet; eleven species of Triglidae, including the beautiful flying gurnard whose colours rival the angel-fish of the West Indies; and eighteen species of mackerel, all migratory.
    0
    1
  • It is ruled by a governor, and, along with Timor (East Indies), constitutes a bishopric, to which belong also the Portuguese Christians in Malacca and Singapore.
    0
    1
  • MELocACTus, the genus of melon-thistle or Turk's-cap cactuses, contains, according to a recent estimate, about 90 species, which inhabit chiefly the West Indies, Mexico and Brazil, a few extending into New Granada.
    0
    1
  • The fruit, which has an agreeably acid flavour, is frequently eaten in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • It comprises about loo species, largely Mexican but scattered through South America and the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Opuntia, the prickly pear, or Indian fig cactus, is a large typical group, comprising some 150 species, found in North America, the West Indies, and warmer parts of South America, extending as far as Chile.
    0
    1
  • Sir George Ayscue, who had lately returned from the West Indies, whither he had been sent to subdue the Royalist party in Barbados, had a sharp encounter with a Dutch convoy while on his way up Channel to the Downs, and had captured several prizes.
    0
    1
  • During the last months of the war Sir John Harman had fought a successful campaign in the West Indies against the French on whom he inflicted a severe defeat at Martinique on the 24th of June.
    0
    1
  • During the year there was a brisk war in the West Indies, and also in Catalonia, where the French maintained the ground won by Schomberg in the previous campaign.
    0
    1
  • BACHIAN (Dutch Batjan), one of the Molucca Islands, in the residency of Ternate, Dutch East Indies, in the Molucca Sea, in 0°13/-0°55' S.
    0
    1
  • of raw cotton imported, exported and retained for Cot consumption for various years during the period1890-1910were as follows: During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of raw cotton (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom from the principal countries whence it is exported was as follows: United States of America (1893), 1, 0 55, 8 55,3 60; (1898), 1,805,353,424; Egypt (1890), 181,266,176; (1907), 4 2 3, 0 5 2, 44 8; British possessions in the East Indies (1898), 27,349,728; (1890), 2 3 8, 74 6, 7 0 4; (1909), 75,621,168;75,621,168; Brazil (1899), 5,4 6 4,59 2; (1906), 54,362,000; Peru (1891), 6, 1 75,344; (1909), 2 4,4 1 3,§4 8.8.
    0
    1
  • In 1905 there were imported 7,941,920 lb from Chile (only 195,328 in 1909); 6,033,104 lb from Canada (this also fluctuates greatly; 1,801,072 in 1909); 1,241,408 lb from British West Africa (4,985,232 in 1909); 1,126,720 lb from the British West Indies and Guiana (3,022,208 in 1908).
    0
    1
  • The extent of the woollen and worsted manufactures of the United Kingdom is indicated by the following table showing the imports and exports of wool and the quantity retained for use in various years (1890-19ò5):--- During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of wool (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom was as follows: Australia (1904), 220,483,961; (1895), 417,163,078; New Zealand (1890), 95, 6 3 2, 59 8; (1909), 1 7 6, 457, 1 5 0; British possessions in South Africa (1900), 32,219,369; (1909), 115,896,598; South America (1890), 11,173,692; (1908), 78,938,157; British possessions in the East Indies (1901), 24,069,571; (1909), 56,238,633; France (1890), 10, 8 73,7 88; (1902), 27,770,790; Turkish Empire (1908), 5,705,671; (1897), 25,727,462.
    0
    1
  • He entered the navy in 1759, and obtained his commission as lieutenant in June 1770, when he was appointed to the "Princess Royal," the flagship of Admiral Byron, in which he sailed to the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • He next proceeded to the West Indies, where he was stationed for some time at St Domingo.
    0
    1
  • Early in 1799 he was raised to the rank of rear-admiral, and sent to the West Indies to succeed Lord Hugh Seymour.
    0
    1
  • Jakob Wallenberg (1746-1778) described a voyage he took to the East Indies and China under the very odd title of Min son pei galejan (" My Son at the Galleys "), a work full of humour and originality.
    0
    1
  • He interrupted his studies at the university by a voyage to the East Indies, and only returned to Stockholm after many adventures.
    0
    1
  • The tall columnar trunk furnishes the most valued pine timber of the states; close-grained and resinous, it is very durable and polishes well; it is largely employed in American shipyards, and immense quantities are exported, especially to Britain and the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • WINDWARD ISLANDS, a group and colony in the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • Trade, the prevailing wind throughout the West Indies.
    0
    1
  • During the heat of summer voyages to the North Cape are suitable, and during the spring and autumn to the Mediterranean, but in the colder months of the year the West Indies, India, Cape Town, Australia or New Zealand forms the best objective.
    0
    1
  • During the dry season, when the climate is very much like that of the West Indies, there occur terrible tornadoes and long periods of the harmattan - a north-east wind, dry and desiccating, and carrying with it from the Sahara clouds of fine dust, which sailors designate "smokes."
    0
    1
  • of Spain in his Council of the Indies in 1544, by Luis Hernandez de Biedma, who had accompanied De Soto as His Majesty's factor.
    0
    1
  • It was in that century that Portugal rose to prominence as a maritime power; and being anxious to enjoy at first hand some of the commerce which had brought such prosperity to Venice, Portugal determined to seek out an ocean pathway to the Indies.
    0
    1
  • For many years subsequent to this date South Africa represented merely an inconvenient promontory to be rounded on the voyage to the Indies.
    0
    1
  • CERAM (Sirang), an island of the Dutch East Indies, in the Molucca group, lying about 3° S., and between 127° 45' and 131° E.
    0
    1
  • balbisiana, in the West Indies, and by S.
    0
    1
  • After 1492 the discovery of the West Indies by Columbus rendered desirable a delimitation of the Spanish and Portuguese spheres of exploration.
    0
    1
  • After the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century the natives were subjected to much tyranny and oppression, though it must in fairness be said that much of it was carried out in defiance of the efforts and the wishes of the Spanish home government, whose legislative efforts to protect the Indians from serfdom and ill-usage met with scant respect at the hands of the distant settlers and mine-owners, who bid defiance to the humane and protective regulations of the council of the Indies, and treated the unhappy natives little better than beasts of burden.
    0
    1
  • In 1837 he was invested with a government commission in the West Indies, and two years later was made superintendent of the Port Philip district of New South Wales.
    0
    1
  • There are numerous varieties of this plant in cultivation, one of the most remarkable of which is the variety pendula, with long, flexible, hanging, cord-like branches; it was discovered in Japan about 1776 by Carl Peter Thunberg, a pupil of Linnaeus, who made valuable collections at the Cape of Good Hope, in the Dutch East Indies and in Japan.
    0
    1
  • Among the celebrities of Hoorn are William Schouten, who discovered in 1616 the passage round Cape Horn, or Hoorn, as he named it in honour of his birthplace; Abel Janszoon Tasman, whose fame is associated with Tasmania; and Jan Pietersz Coen, governorgeneral of the Dutch East Indies.
    0
    1
  • Hale) being derived from a popular Spanish romance of that time, entitled Sergas de Esplandian, in which an island named California was mentioned and situated "on the right hand of the Indies, very near the terrestrial paradise."
    0
    1
  • BATU, or Rock Islands (Dutch Batoe), a group of three greater and forty-eight lesser islands in the Dutch East Indies, W.
    0
    1
  • BANTAM, the westernmost residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded W.
    0
    1
  • In 1683 the Dutch reduced the sultan to vassalage, built the fort of Speelwijk and monopolized the port, which had previously been free to all comers; and for more than a century afterwards Bantam was one of the most important seats of commerce in the East Indies.
    0
    1
  • There is a society at Mauritius, and correspondents in various parts of South and West Africa, India, Japan, the West Indies and South America.
    0
    1
  • The great repute of Achin as a place of trade is shown by the fact that to this port the first Dutch (1599) and first English (1602) commercial ventures to the Indies were directed.
    0
    1
  • Its commercial prosperity received an enormous impetus from the Treaty of Union (1707), under which trade with America and the West Indies rapidly developed.
    0
    1
  • In 1767 he made a voyage to the East Indies in the Company's service, and put £2000 lent him by an uncle to such good purpose in a private trading venture that he laid the foundation of a handsome fortune.
    0
    1
  • Until about the same time, when the Maine liquor law was passed, the manufacture of rum from molasses, received in exchange for lumber and fish in the West Indies, was also an important industry.
    0
    1
  • The foreign trade, especially that with the West Indies and with Great Britain, decreased after 1875, and yet much trade from the West that goes to Montreal during the warmer months passes through Portland during the winter season.
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  • This succulent berry is in some cases highly perfumed, and affords a delicate fruit for the dessert-table, as in the case of the "granadilla" (P. quadrangularis), P. edulis, P. macrocarpa, and various species of Tacsonia known as "curubas" in Spanish South America; P. laurifolia is the water-lemon, and P. maliformis the sweet calabash of the West Indies.
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  • Banka (Banca, Bangka), an island of the Dutch East Indies, off the east coast of Sumatra, from which it is separated by Banka Strait, which is about 9 m.
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  • 4 1916 he signed a treaty for the purchase by America of the Danish West Indies for $25,000,000.
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  • Opening out of one of the crescent canals which penetrate the city from the Y is the State Entrepot dock (1900), the free harbour of Amsterdam, where the produce from the Dutch East Indies is stored.
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  • No speech of his is perhaps more famous than that in which he claimed the initiative in recognizing the independence of the revolted Spanish colonies in South America in 1823 - "I resolved that, if France had Spain, it should not be Spain with the Indies.
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  • In modern zoology it is the name given to the main genus of a family of worm-shaped lizards, most of which inhabit the tropical parts of America, the West Indies and Africa.
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  • gigantea (the only two surviving species of this generic type are now confined to a few localities in California, but were formerly widely spread in Europe and elsewhere), Pinus Coulteri, P. Lambertiana, &c. Farther south, a few representatives of such genera as Abies, Cupressus, Pinus and juniper are found in the Mexican Highlands, tropical America and the West Indies.
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  • Export duties, it may be observed, are not important in systems of taxation generally, as there are few articles where the charge will not really fall on the wages of labour and profits of capital within the country imposing them; but opium grown in India is a well-known exception, and in the West Indies export duties on principal articles of production, in spite of their incidence, have been found a convenient source of revenue.
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  • BANDA ISLANDS, a group of the Dutch East Indies, consisting of three chief and several lesser islands in the Banda Sea, south of Ceram, belonging to the residency of Amboyna.
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  • Meanwhile the Company had decided to consider Bombay as "an independent settlement, and the seat of the power and trade of the English in the East Indies."
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